de-en  Die Traumbuche Richard von Volkmann-Leander Medium
Printed Edition (Amazon). It's at least one hundred years or more since lightning struck and split it apart from top to bottom, and for just as long, this site has been worked over by the plough; in former times, on the green, grassy hill, a few hundred paces from the first house in the village, there was a mighty beech tree, a tree, the like of which no longer grows because animals, people, plants and trees are becoming increasingly punier and more pathetic. The farmers said it dated back to pagan times and a holy apostle was killed beneath it by these sinful heathens. Thereupon the roots of the tree would have drunk of the apostle's blood, and as it seeped into the trunk and the branches, the tree would have become tall and strong. Who knows whether it's true? The tree however, had its own peculiarity; this was known by everyone in the village, big and small. Whosoever would fall asleep beneath the tree and dream, their dream would be fulfilled irrefutably. Therefore, since time immemorial it had been known as the Dream Beech, and no-one called it otherwise. There was however a special condition: whosoever lay himself down to sleep beneath the Dream Beech should not think about what he may dream. Should he do so, then his dreams would be nothing more than a confused jumble of thoughts and images, which would make no sense to anyone. That was, of course, a very difficult condition because most people are very curious, and so most of those who tried it failed; at the time in which the following story took place, there was probably not a single man or woman in the village who would have succeeded even once. But everything was quite correct with the Dream Beech, that was for sure. One hot summer day, when there was not a breath of wind, it so happened that a poor craftsman came along the road; he had spent many years in foreign parts where it had not fared well for him at all. As he reached the edge of the village, he turned out his pockets once again for good measure, but they were all empty. "What are you going to do now?" he thought to himself. You are exhausted; no innkeeper is going to invite you in for nothing, and begging is an onerous task. Then he saw the magnificent beech with the green hillock before it; and because it was only a few steps off the path, he lay down in the grass beneath the tree to have a rest. But the tree rustled strangely and the gentle movement of its branches let through a ray of sunlight here and a patch of blue sky there: and so his eyelids grew heavy and he fell asleep.

After he had fallen asleep, the beech tree threw down a branch with three leaves; it landed directly on his chest. Then he dreamt he would sit in a cosy home at the table, and the table would be his, and the room too, as well as the house. And before the table stood a young woman, leaning with both hands on the table and looking at him quite amiably, and that she was his wife. A child would be sitting on his lap, whom he would be feeding his porridge, and because it was too hot, he would blow each time onto the spoon. And then the woman said, "What a good nanny you really are, darling!" and laughed about it. But in the parlour another child is jumping around, a fat, chubby boy, and he had tied a string to a large carrot and pulled it behind him, always shouting gee up, gee up as if it were the best fox. And both children would be his own children, too. So he dreamed; and the dream must have pleased him very much, for he was all smiles in his sleep.

When he woke up it had almost become evening, and a shepherd with his sheep stood in front of him and was knitting. Then he jumped up refreshed, stretched and stretched himself and said, "Dear heaven, to whom it would be bestowed! However, it is nice that one knows now at least what it's like." Then the shepherd stepped up to him and asked where he came from and where he wanted to go to and if he had heard about the tree already. After convincing himself that he was as innocent as a newborn babe, he exclaimed: "You are a lucky devil! One could see from your face that you'd had a good dream; I watched you for a long time as you lay there. Thereupon he told him about the peculiar characteristic of the tree: "What you have dreamed will come true; that is as certain as the fact that this here is a ewe and over there is a ram. Just ask the people in the village if I am not right! But now tell me what you dreamt of!" "Gaffer", the travelling journeyman replied with a chuckle, "Stop pumping me. I'll keep my pretty dream to myself; you certainly cannot blame me for that. But it will not work!" And that was not an empty talk, but he was serious; for as he approached the village, he said to himself, "Fiddlesticks, that’s a shepherd's chitchat! I think I'd like to know from where the tree should have the science."

Arriving at the village, he saw a crown hanging from a long pole projecting from the gable of the third house, and the Crown's innkeeper stood at the entrance. At the time he was in very high spirits for he had already had his dinner and was replete, and that was his best hour. Then the journeyman politely lifted his hat and asked if he would not give him, for charity's sake, a bed for the night. The Crown's innkeeper looked the handsome fellow in his dusty, torn clothes up and down from head to foot. Then he gave a friendly nod and said: "Sit yourself down here in the arbour next to the door; no doubt there will be a piece of bread and a jug of wine left over. In the meantime, they can make you a bed of straw." Thereupon he went inside and sent his daughter out with bread and wine. She sat down with him and he told her what it was like in those foreign places. Then she told him everything she knew from the village: how the wheat grew, and that the neighbor's wife had twins, and when the next time would be played in the crown to dance.

Suddenly she got up, bent across the table to the journeyman and said: "What are those three leaves you have on your bib?" Then the craftsman looked and found the branch with the three leaves that had fallen on him during his sleep. It was there in his bib now. "They must be from the great beech tree just outside the village," he replied, "under which I had a short nap".

The girl pricked her ears at that and waited to see what he would say further. When he was silent, she even began to investigate him carefully until she was sure that he had really slept under the dream beech; and then she walked as long as the cat around the bush until she thought she had convinced herself that he knew nothing of the strange power and quality of the dream beech; for he was a rogue and acted as if he knew nothing at all. When she had finished, she fetched another jug of wine, suggesting that he might like to drink some more, and told him about all sorts of dreams that she'd had and how it was such a pity that none of them were ever fulfilled.

During this time the shepherd returned from the fields and drove the sheep along the street through the village. As he was passing by the Crown and saw the girl sitting deep in conversation with the journeyman, he stopped for a moment and said: "Oh yes, to you he will tell his dream, but to me he won't say a word!" And so he drove his sheep further.

Then the girl became even more curious, and as he still didn't say anything about his dream, she couldn't get it out of her mind any more and asked him openly what he had dreamed while sleeping under the beech tree.

Then the craftsman, who was a bad rogue and cheerfully cheered by the beautiful dream, made a clever face, winked his eyes and said: "I had a wonderful dream, that must be true; but I do not dare to say what it was like". But she was pestering him more and more and became annoying for he ought to say it after all. Thereupon he moved quite close to her and said earnestly: "Just imagine, I dreamt that I would marry the daughter of the Crown's innkeeper and later become the innkeeper myself.

At this the girl first turned chalk-white, then went bright red and went back inside. After a while she came back out and asked him whether he had really dreamt that and whether it was really his intention.

"Certainly, certainly," he said, "the girl who appeared in my dream looked exactly like you!" Then the girl went back into the inn and did not come out again. She went into her chamber, thoughts running through her head like water over a wier: constantly new and constantly different ones, and then the same ones over and over again, so that there was no end to them. "He knows nothing about the tree," she said. "He has dreamt it. Whether I want it or not, it will come as it may. Nothing can changed it. Then she went to bed and dreamt of the journeyman the whole night long. When she awoke the next morning, she knew his face by heart, so often had she seen it in her dream, and a handsome fellow he was indeed.

But the journeyman had slept wonderfully on his bed of straw; the Dream Beech, his dream, and what he said to the innkeeper's daughter in the evening were already forgotten. He stood at the door of the inn and wanted to shake the innkeeper's hand in farewell. Then the innkeepers daughter appeared and seeing him standing there, ready to resume his travels, she was overcome with a strange fear, as if she should not let him go. "Father," she said "the wine has not yet been tapped und the young fellow has nothing to do; if he could stay here for a day, then he could earn his keep and a bit of money for his travels on top of that." And the innkeeper had no objection, for he had already prepared his morning drink and had breakfasted and was now so replete that this was his best hour.

But the tapping proceeded very slowly, and again and again the girl had the journeyman brought up from the cellar on some pretext or another. When the barrel was finally empty and all the bottles were filled, she said it would be a good idea if he would help in the field, and when he was finished with that, she found several things that needed doing in the garden, which no one had thought of before. Thus week after week passed, and each and every night she dreamed of him. However in the evenings she sat with him in the arbour at the front of the house, and when he told her about how badly he had fared amongst strangers, a tear always crept into her eye, so that she had to rub her eyes with her apron.

And one year on, the journeyman was still at the inn; everything was scrubbed, white sand was strewn in all the rooms and covered with small, green twigs of fir, and the whole village was celebrating. For the young journeyman was celebrating his marriage to the innkeeper's daughter and all the people rejoiced; and whosoever was not pleased because he was filled with envy, at least pretended to be.

Soon after that the Crown Innkeeper was once again in the best of moods because he was totally replete, and he sat in his armchair with his tin of tobacco on his lap and slept. When he didn't wake up at all again, they wanted to wake him up; there he was dead, stone dead. There the young craftsman was now really crown host, as he said in jest, and otherwise everything else happened the way he dreamed it under the beech tree. For very soon he also had two children, and also he probably took one of them on his lap once and gave it something to eat and blew on the spoon, and at the same time the other boy certainly rode around the room with the carrot, although the boy I know this story about did not tell me and I forgot to ask him about it immediately. But it will have been like that, because what you dreamed under the dream beech always happened exactly the same way.

One day now, it may have been the four years since the wedding passed, the young crown host sat, for that was him now, even once in the inn. Then his wife came in, stood in front of him and said, "Imagine that, yesterday at noon one of our reapers fell asleep under the dream beech and didn't think of it. You know what he has dreamt? He dreamt he was loaded. And who is it? The old Kaspar, who is so stupid that you feel sorry for, and whom we keep only out of pity. I wonder what he'll do with all that money."

Then the man laughed and said, "How can you believe in this stupid stuff and are otherwise such a wise woman? Just consider, is it possible that a tree, even one so beautiful and so old, could know the future"

Then the woman looked wide-eyed at her husband, shook her head and said gravely; "Husband, don't let yourself be tempted by unrighteousness Don't joke about things like those."

"I'm not joking, woman!" replied the man.

Then the woman remained silent for a while, as if she had not understood him properly, and then said, "Just what is all this for? I thought you had every reason to be grateful to the old holy tree. Hasn't everything happened as you dreamed?"

When she said this, the man made the friendliest face of the world and replied, "God knows I am grateful, God and you. Yes, a beautiful dream it was! It seems to me as if it was only yesterday, I remember it so clearly. And everything is a thousand times better than what I dreamed; and you are also a thousand times nicer and prettier than the young woman who appeared to me in my dream back then.

And the woman looked at him with wide eyes again; then he continued: "But as for the tree and the dream, my heart's treasure, I think: whoever likes to dance, he will be easily whistled to; and as one screams into the forest, so it resounds again. If I had been hurt and ill for many years, it was probably no wonder that I dreamed of something endearing."

"That you really dreamed you'd marry me!"

"I never dreamed of that! I only saw a young woman with two children, and she wasn't nearly as pretty as you and neither were the children."

"Fie," the woman replied. "Do you want to repudiate me or the tree? Didn't you tell me on that first day when we met, it was already evening and outside in the arbour, didn't you tell me straightaway that you'd had a dream that you would marry me and become the Crown's landlord?"

Then for the first time the man remembered the joke he had made with his present wife and said: "Nothing can help, dear wife! In fact, I didn't dream about you back then; and when I said it, it was just a joke. You were so curious, that's why I wanted to tease you!"

Then the woman broke into a passion of tears and went out. After a while he followed her. She stood in the yard by the well, still crying. He tried to comfort her, but in vain.

"You stole my love and you stole my heart!" she said. „I will never be happy again!“

Then he asked her if she did not love him with all her heart, more than any other person in the world, and had they not lived together more contentedly and happily, like no one else in the village. She had to admit all that but she remained as sad as before inspite of all attempts of persuasion.

And he thought, " Let her finish her crying! Overnight she will be distracted by other thoughts; tomorrow she will be her old self again. But he was wrong; for although the woman no longer wept, she was grave and sad and avoided her husband. Any attempt of compforting her came to naught just like the night before. Most of the day she sat brooding in a corner and when her husband entered, she winced.

When this lasted for several days without any change, he also felt a great sadness; for he feared that he had lost the love of his wife forever. He moved quietly through the house, contemplating how to make amends, but he couldn't think of anything. And so one day at midday he went out of the village and wandered through the fields. It was a hot day in July; no cloud in the sky. The ripe seed waved like a golden lake, and the birds sang; but his heart was full of sorrow. Then he saw the old Dream Beech in the distance: like the queen of trees she reached up into the sky. It seemed to him as if she waved to him with her green branches, and like an old friend beckoned him to come to her. He went and sat down underneath it and thought about the foregone time. Almost exactly five years had passed since he, a poor devil, had rested underneath it for the first time and had such a nice dream. Oh, so wonderful! And the dream had lasted for five years. And now? It was all over! Was it really all over? For ever? Thereupon the beech began to rustle again as it had five years previously, and moved its immense branches. And as it moved the same branches as before, it let a fine glittering ray of sunshine fall through here, there, and here, and there, a piece of blue sky shine through. Then his heart became calmer, and he fell asleep; for because of his worries he had not slept the previous nights. And it did not take long before he dreamt the same dream as he had done five years ago, and the woman at the table and the children playing had the dear, familiar faces of his wife and of his children. And the woman looked at him so kindly; oh, kindly indeed.

Then he woke up, and when he saw that it was only a dream, he became even sadder. He broke off a green twig from the beech, went home and put it into his hymn-book. When the woman wanted to go to church, it was Sunday at the time, the twig slipped out. Then the man's face, who stood next to her, turned red, bent down and wanted to put it into his pocket. But the woman saw it and asked what kind of leaf it was.

"It's from the Dream Beech; it means better to me than you!" the man answered. "For when I was outside yesterday, and sat under her, I fell asleep. She probably wanted to comfort me then; for I dreamt, you would love me again and had forgotten it all. But it is not true! It has nothing to do with the good old beech. It's a beautiful, wonderful tree, but she has no knowledge about the future.“

Then the woman stared at him, and then there was a beaming smile on her face: "Man, did you really dream that?"

"Yes, I did." he replied firmly, and she realized that it was the truth; for he shrugged his face, because he would not weep.

"And I was really your wife?"

When he affirmed this, the woman fell around his neck and kissed him so often that he could not resist her. "God be praised," she said, "now everything is fine again! I love you so much. I love you so much you don't even know. And a few days ago I was so afraid if I could really love you and if God had not chosen another man for me. For thou hast stolen my heart, thou naughty man, and there was a little deceit still in it. Yes, you stole it from me; but now I know that it did not help you and that it would have happened anyway." Then she remained silent for a while and then continued: "Don't you ever speak badly of the dream beech again?

"No, never; for I believe in it; perhaps a little differently than you, but therefore no less firmly. Take my word for it! And we will put the branch in the front of the hymnbook, so that it will not be lost."
unit 4
Wer weiß, ob's wahr ist?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 5
Eine eigene Bewandtnis aber hatte es mit dem Baum; das wußte jeder, klein und groβ im Dorf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 6
Wer unter ihm einschlief und träumte, des Traum ging unabweislich in Erfüllung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 7
Deshalb hieß er schon seit undenklichen Zeiten die Traumbuche, und niemand nannte ihn anders.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 11
Aber seine Richtigkeit hatte es mit der Traumbuche, das war sicher.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 14
Was fängst du an?
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 15
dachte er bei sich.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 23
Und da sagte die Frau: "Was du doch für eine gute Kindermuhme bist, Schatz!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 24
und lachte darüber.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 26
Und alle beide Kinder wären ebenfalls sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 29
Da sprang er erquickt auf, dehnte und reckte sich und sagte: "Lieber Himmel, wem's so wüchse!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 30
Es ist aber doch hübsch, daß man nun wenigstens weiß, wie's ist."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 35
Fragt nur die Leute im Dorf, ob ich nicht recht habe!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 36
Nun sagt aber auch einmal, was Ihr geträumt habt!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 37
"Alterchen", erwiderte der Handwerksbursche schmunzelnd, "so fragt man die Bauern aus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 38
Meinen schönen Traum behalte ich für mich; das könnt Ihr mir nun schon gar nicht verdenken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 39
Aber daraus werden tut doch nichts!"
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 41
Möchte wohl wissen, wo der Baum die Wissenschaft herhaben sollte."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 44
unit 47
Unterdessen können sie dir eine Streu machen."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 52
Er stak ihm gerade im Latz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 54
Da horchte das Mädchen neugierig auf und wartete, was er wohl weiter sagen würde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 57
Indem kam der Schäfer vom Felde zurück und trieb die Schafe durch die Dorfstraße.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 59
Darauf trieb er seine Schafe weiter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 62
Aber sie drang immer weiter in ihn und quälte, er möchte es doch sagen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 64
Da wurde das Mädchen erst kreideweiß und dann purpurrot und ging ins Haus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 66
"Gewiß, gewiß", sagte er, "gerade wie Ihr sah die aus, die mir im Traum erschienen ist!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 67
Da ging das Mädchen abermals ins Haus und kam nicht wieder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 69
"Er weiß nichts von dem Baume", sagte sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 70
"Er hat's geträumt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 71
Ich mag wollen oder nicht, es wird schon so kommen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 72
Es ist nichts daran zu ändern."
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 73
Darauf legte sie sich zu Bett, und die ganze Nacht träumte sie von dem Handwerksburschen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 82
So verging Woche um Woche, und jedwede Nacht träumte sie von ihm.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks ago
unit 87
Als er gar nicht wieder erwachte, wollten sie ihn wecken; da war er tot – mausetot.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 93
Weißt du, was er geträumt hat?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 94
Er hat geträumt, er wäre steinreich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 95
Und wer ist's?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 96
Der alte Kaspar, der so dumm ist, daß er einen dauert, und den wir nur aus Mitleid behalten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 97
Was der wohl mit dem vielen Gelde anfangen wird?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 101
Über solche Dinge soll man nicht scherzen."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 102
"Ich scherze nicht, Frau!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 103
erwiderte der Mann.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 105
Ich dächte, du hättest alle Ursache, dem alten heiligen Baume dankbar zu sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 106
Ist nicht alles so eingetroffen, wie du es geträumt?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 108
Ja, ein schöner Traum war's!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 109
Ist mir's doch, als wenn es erst gestern gewesen wäre, so genau erinnere ich mich noch daran.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 113
"Daß du aber gerade geträumt hast, du würdest mich heiraten!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 114
"Das hab' ich nie geträumt!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 116
"Pfui", erwiderte die Frau.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 117
"Willst du mich verleugnen oder den Baum?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 120
unit 121
Du warst so neugierig; da wollte ich dich necken!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 122
Da brach die Frau in heftiges Weinen aus und ging hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 123
Nach einer Weile ging er ihr nach.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 124
Sie stand im Hof am Brunnen und weinte immer noch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 125
Er versuchte sie zu trösten, doch vergeblich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 126
"Du hast mir meine Liebe gestohlen und mich um mein Herz betrogen!"
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 127
sagte sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 128
"Ich wede nie wieder froh werden!"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 130
Sie mußte alles zugeben, aber sie blieb traurig wie zuvor, trotz allem Zureden.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 131
Da dachte er: Laß sie ausweinen!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 14 hours ago
unit 132
Über Nacht kommen andere Gedanken; morgen ist sie die alte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 134
Jeder Versuch, sie zu trösten, scheiterte wie am Abend zuvor.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 137
Er ging still im Hause umher und sann auf Abhilfe, doch es wollte ihm nichts einfallen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 138
Da ging er eines Mittags zum Dorfe hinaus und schlenderte durchs Feld.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 139
Es war ein heißer Julitag; keine Wolke am Himmel.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 143
Er ging hin und setzte sich unter sie und dachte an die vergangene Zeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 145
Ach so wunderschön!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 146
Und der Traum hatte fünf Jahre gedauert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 147
– Und nun?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 148
Alles vorbei!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 149
Alles vorbei?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 150
Auf immer?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 151
unit 155
Und die Frau sah ihn so freundlich an – ach, so freundlich.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 14 hours ago
unit 156
Da wachte er auf, und als er sah, daß es nur ein Traum war, ward er noch trauriger.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 157
Er brach sich einen grünen Zweig ab von der Buche, ging nach Haus und legte ihn ins Gesangbuch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 159
Da wurde der Mann, der danebenstand, rot, bückte sich und wollte ihn in die Tasche stecken.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 160
Doch die Frau sah es und fragte, was es für ein Blatt sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 161
"Es ist von der Traumbuche; sie meint es besser mit mir wie du!"
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 2 days ago
unit 162
erwiderte der Mann.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 163
"Denn als ich gestern draußen war und unter ihr saß, schlief ich ein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 164
unit 165
Aber es ist nicht wahr!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 166
Es ist nichts mit der alten guten Buche.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 167
Ein schöner herrlicher Baum ist sie schon, aber von der Zukunft weiß sie nichts."
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 3 hours ago
unit 169
"Ja!"
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 171
"Und ich war wirklich deine Frau?"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 5 days ago
unit 173
"Gelobt sei Gott", sagte sie, "nun ist alles wieder gut!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 174
Ich habe dich ja so lieb –so lieb, wie du es gar nicht weißt!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 176
unit 180
Verlaß dich darauf!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
unit 181
Und den Zweig wollen wir vorn ins Gesangbuch heften, damit er nicht verlorengeht."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 weeks, 3 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 131  5 days, 14 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 59  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 53  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 34  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 122  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 101  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 87  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 77  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 76  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 74  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 73  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 70  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 69  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 68  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 65  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 62  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 56  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 52  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  translated  unit 50  1 week, 1 day ago
DrWho 10122  commented on  unit 152  3 weeks, 2 days ago
DrWho 10122  commented on  unit 179  3 weeks, 2 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 161  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 17  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 15  3 weeks, 3 days ago
DrWho 10122  commented on  unit 178  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 9  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 6  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 5  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 140  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 136  3 weeks, 3 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 151  3 weeks, 3 days ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 104  3 weeks, 3 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 100  3 weeks, 3 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 110  3 weeks, 3 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 110  3 weeks, 4 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 109  3 weeks, 4 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 115  3 weeks, 4 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 99  3 weeks, 4 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 109  3 weeks, 4 days ago
DrWho 10122  commented on  unit 94  3 weeks, 4 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 164  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 171  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 126  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 164  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 165  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  translated  unit 169  3 weeks, 5 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 126  3 weeks, 5 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 83  3 weeks, 5 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 86  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 139  3 weeks, 5 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 133  3 weeks, 5 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 133  3 weeks, 5 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 135  3 weeks, 6 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 137  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 135  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 137  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 138  3 weeks, 6 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 139  3 weeks, 6 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 142  3 weeks, 6 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 154  3 weeks, 6 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 149  3 weeks, 6 days ago
Merlin57 4435  commented on  unit 132  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 146  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 145  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 57  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  translated  unit 148  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  translated  unit 149  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  translated  unit 150  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  translated  unit 147  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 128  3 weeks, 6 days ago
bf2010 5423  translated  unit 127  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 59  3 weeks, 6 days ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 16  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 14  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 46  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 48  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 53  4 weeks, 1 day ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 46  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 46  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 22  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 18  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 14  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 13  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 12  4 weeks, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 2  4 weeks, 1 day ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 22  4 weeks, 1 day ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 44  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 12  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 13  4 weeks, 1 day ago
bf2010 5423  commented on  unit 1  4 weeks, 1 day ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 1  4 weeks, 1 day ago

gedruckte Fassung (Amazon)

Hundert Jahre oder mehr ist's wohl her, daß der Blitz in sie einschlug und sie von oben bis unten auseinanderspellte, und ebensolange schon geht der Pflug über die Stätte; früher aber stand einige hundert Schritte vor dem ersten Hause des Dorfes auf dem grünen Rasenhügel eine alte mächtige Buche; so ein Baum, wie jetzt gar keine mehr wachsen, weil Tiere und Menschen, Pflanzen und Bäume immer kleiner und erbärmlicher werden. Die Bauern sagten, sie stamme noch aus der Heidenzeit und ein heiliger Apostel sei unter ihr von den falschen Heiden erschlagen worden. Da hätten die Wurzeln des Baumes Apostelblut getrunken, und wie es ihm in den Stamm und in die Äste gefahren, sei er davon so groß und kräftig geworden. Wer weiß, ob's wahr ist? Eine eigene Bewandtnis aber hatte es mit dem Baum; das wußte jeder, klein und groβ im Dorf. Wer unter ihm einschlief und träumte, des Traum ging unabweislich in Erfüllung. Deshalb hieß er schon seit undenklichen Zeiten die Traumbuche, und niemand nannte ihn anders. Eine besondere Bedingung war jedoch dabei: wer sich zum Schlaf legte unter die Traumbuche, durfte nicht daran denken, was er wohl träumen würde. Tat er es doch, so träumte er nichts wie Krimskrams und verworrenes Zeug, aus dem kein vernünftiger Mensch klug werden konnte. Das war nun allerdings eine sehr schwere Bedingung, weil die meisten Menschen viel zu neugierig sind, und so mißlang es denn auch den allermeisten, die es versuchten; und zu der Zeit, wo die folgende Geschichte sich zutrug, war im Dorf wohl kein einziger, weder Mann noch Weib, dem's auch nur ein einziges Mal gelungen wäre. Aber seine Richtigkeit hatte es mit der Traumbuche, das war sicher. –

Eines heißen Sommertages also, da kein Lüftchen sich regte, kam auch einmal ein armer Handwerksbursche die Straße daher gewandert, dem war es in der Fremde viele Jahre hindurch weh und übel gegangen. Als er vor dem Dorfe anlangte, drehte er zum Überfluß noch einmal alle seine Taschen um, doch sie waren sämtlich leer. Was fängst du an? dachte er bei sich. Todmüde bist du; umsonst nimmt dich kein Wirt auf, und das Fechten ist ein beschwerliches Handwerk. Da erblickte er die herrliche Buche mit dem grünen Rasenhügel davor; und da sie nur wenige Schritte abseits vom Wege stand, legte er sich unter sie ins Gras, um etwas auszuruhen. Doch der Baum hatte ein seltsames Rauschen, und wie er seine Zweige leise bewegte, ließ er bald hier, bald da einen feinen glitzernden Sonnenstrahl durchfallen und bald hier, bald da ein Stückchen blauen Himmel durchscheinen: da fielen ihm die Augen zu, und er schlief ein.

Als er eingeschlafen war, warf die Buche einen Zweig mit drei Blättern herab, der fiel ihm gerade auf die Brust. Da träumte er, er säße in einer gar heimlichen Stube am Tisch, und der Tisch wäre sein, und die Stube auch, und ebenso das Haus. Und vor dem Tisch stände eine junge Frau, stützte sich mit beiden Händen auf den Tisch und sähe ihn gar freundlich an, und das wäre seine Frau. Und auf seinen Knien säße ein Kind, dem fütterte er seinen Brei, und weil er zu heiß wäre, bliese er immer auf den Löffel. Und da sagte die Frau: "Was du doch für eine gute Kindermuhme bist, Schatz!" und lachte darüber. In der Stube aber spränge noch ein anderes Kind herum, ein dicker, pausbäckiger Junge, und er hätte an eine große Mohrrübe einen Bindfaden gebunden und zöge sie hinter sich her und riefe immer hü und hott, als wär's der beste Fuchs. Und alle beide Kinder wären ebenfalls sein. So träumte er; und der Traum mußte ihm wohl sehr gefallen, denn er lachte im Schlaf übers ganze Gesicht.

Als er aufwachte, war es schon fast Abend geworden, und vor ihm stand der Schäfer mit seinen Schafen und strickte. Da sprang er erquickt auf, dehnte und reckte sich und sagte: "Lieber Himmel, wem's so wüchse! Es ist aber doch hübsch, daß man nun wenigstens weiß, wie's ist." Da trat der Schäfer an ihn heran und fragte ihn, woher er käme und wohin er wollte und ob er schon etwas von dem Baume gehört habe. Nachdem er sich überzeugt, daß er so unschuldig war wie ein neugeborenes Kind, rief er aus: "Ihr seid ein Glückspilz! Denn daß Ihr etwas Gutes geträumt habt, war ja doch auf Euerem Gesicht zu lesen; habe ich Euch doch schon lange betrachtet, wie Ihr so dalagt!" Darauf erzählte er ihm, was es für eine Bewandtnis mit dem Baume habe: "Was Ihr geträumt habt, geht in Erfüllung; das ist so sicher als wie, daß das hier ein Schaf und das dort ein Bock ist. Fragt nur die Leute im Dorf, ob ich nicht recht habe! Nun sagt aber auch einmal, was Ihr geträumt habt!" "Alterchen", erwiderte der Handwerksbursche schmunzelnd, "so fragt man die Bauern aus. Meinen schönen Traum behalte ich für mich; das könnt Ihr mir nun schon gar nicht verdenken. Aber daraus werden tut doch nichts!" Und das sagte er nicht bloß so, sondern es war sein Ernst; denn als er nun auf das Dorf zuging, sprach er vor sich hin: "Papperlapapp, Schäferschnack! Möchte wohl wissen, wo der Baum die Wissenschaft herhaben sollte."

Als er in das Dorf kam, ragte am dritten Haus vom Giebel eine lange Stange heraus, an der hing eine goldene Krone, und unten vor der Haustüre stand der Kronenwirt. Der war gerade sehr guter Laune, denn er hatte schon zur Nacht gegessen und war rundherum satt, und das war sein beste Stunde. Da zog er höflich den Hut und fragte, ob er ihn nicht um einen Gotteslohn zur Nacht behalten wolle. Der Kronenwirt besah sich den schmucken Burschen in seinen staubigen, abgerissenen Kleidern von oben bis unten. Dann nickte er freundlich und sagte: "Setz dich nur gleich hier in die Laube neben die Tür; es wird wohl noch ein Stück Brot und ein Krug Wein übriggeblieben sein. Unterdessen können sie dir eine Streu machen." Darauf ging er hinein und schickte seine Tochter, die brachte Brot und Wein, setzte sich zu ihm und ließ sich erzählen, wie es in der Fremde aussähe. Dann erzählte sie ihm auch wieder alles, was sie wußte, aus dem Dorf: wie der Weizen stände, und daß des Nachbars Frau Zwillinge bekommen hätte, und wann das nächste Mal in der Krone zu Tanz gespielt würde.

Auf einmal aber stand sie auf, bog sich zu dem Handwerksburschen über den Tisch hinüber und sagte: "Was hast du denn da für drei Blätter am Latz?" Da sah der Handwerksbursche hin und fand den Zweig mit den drei Blättern, der während des Schlafes auf ihn herabgefallen war. Er stak ihm gerade im Latz. "Die müssen von der großen Buche dicht vorm Dorfe sein", erwiderte er, "unter der ich einen kleinen Nick gemacht habe."

Da horchte das Mädchen neugierig auf und wartete, was er wohl weiter sagen würde. Als er schwieg, begann sie ihn gar vorsichtig auszukundschaften, bis sie sicher war, daß er wirklich unter der Traumbuche geschlafen; und dann ging sie so lange wie die Katze um den heißen Brei, bis sie sich überzeugt zu haben glaubte, daß er nichts von der sonderbaren Kraft und Eigenschaft der Traumbuche wisse; denn er war ein Schalk und tat so, als wüßte er gar nichts. Als sie auch damit fertig war, holte sie noch einen Krug Wein, sprach ihm freundlich zu, daß er noch trinken möge, und erzählte ihm alles Mögliche, was sie geträumt hätte und wie es doch gar schade wäre, daß nie etwas in Erfüllung ginge.

Indem kam der Schäfer vom Felde zurück und trieb die Schafe durch die Dorfstraße. Als er an der Krone vorbeikam und das Mädchen mit dem Handwerksburschen in eifrigem Gespräch in der Laube sitzen sah, blieb er einen Augenblick stehen und sagte: "Ja, ja, Euch wird er schon den hübschen Traum erzählen; mir will er nichts sagen!" Darauf trieb er seine Schafe weiter.

Da ward das Mädchen noch neugieriger, und wie er immer noch nichts von seinem Traume sagte, konnte sie es nicht mehr verwinden und fragte ihn ganz offen, was er denn, während er unter der Buche geschlafen, geträumt habe.

Da machte der Handwerksbursche, der ein arger Schalk und durch den schönen Traum übermütig fröhlich gestimmte war, ein schlaues Gesicht, zwinkerte mit den Augen und sagte: "Einen herrlichen Traum habe ich gehabt, das muß wahr sein; aber ich getraue mich nicht zu sagen, wie er war." Aber sie drang immer weiter in ihn und quälte, er möchte es doch sagen. Da rückte er ganz nahe an sie heran und sagte ernsthaft: "Denkt nur, mir hat geträumt, ich würde noch einmal des Kronenwirts Töchterlein heiraten und später selbst Kronenwirt werden!"

Da wurde das Mädchen erst kreideweiß und dann purpurrot und ging ins Haus. Nach einer Weile kam sie wieder und fragte, ob er das wirklich geträumt habe und es sein Ernst sei.

"Gewiß, gewiß", sagte er, "gerade wie Ihr sah die aus, die mir im Traum erschienen ist!" Da ging das Mädchen abermals ins Haus und kam nicht wieder. Sie ging in ihre Kammer, und die Gedanken liefen ihr übers Herz wie Wasser übers Wehr: immer neue und immer andere, und immer wieder dieselben, so, daß es gar kein Ende hatte. "Er weiß nichts von dem Baume", sagte sie. "Er hat's geträumt. Ich mag wollen oder nicht, es wird schon so kommen. Es ist nichts daran zu ändern." Darauf legte sie sich zu Bett, und die ganze Nacht träumte sie von dem Handwerksburschen. Als sie am anderen Morgen aufwachte, kannte sie sein Gesicht ganz auswendg, so oft hatte sie es über Nacht im Traum gesehen – und ein schmucker Bursche war's, das ist wahr.

Der Handwerksbursche aber hatte auf seiner Streu wundervoll geschlafen; Traumbuche, Traum und was er am Abend zu der Wirtstochter gesagt, längst vergessen. Er stand in der Wirtsstube an der Tür und wollte eben dem Kronenwirt die Hand reichen zum Abschied. Da trat sie herein, und wie sie ihn reisefertig dastehen sah, überfiel sie eine sonderbare Angst, als dürfe sie ihn nicht fortlassen. "Vater", sagte sie, "der Wein ist immer noch nicht gezapft, und der junge Bursch hat nichts zu tun; könnte er einen Tag hierbleiben, so möchte er sich seine Zeche verdienen und ein Stückchen Reisegeld obendrein." Und der Kronenwirt hatte nichts dagegen, denn er hatte schon seinen Morgentrunk gemacht und gefrühstückt und war so satt, so daß es seine beste Stunde war.

Doch das Zapfen ging sehr langsam, und das Mädchen hatte immer dies oder jenes, weshalb der Handwerksbursche einmal aus dem Keller heraufgeholt werden mußte. Als das Faß endlich leer und die Flaschen gefüllt waren, meinte sie, es wäre doch ganz gut, wenn er erst noch etwas im Feld hülfe; und als er damit auch fertig war, fand sich noch mancherlei im Garten zu tun, woran vorher niemand gedacht hatte. So verging Woche um Woche, und jedwede Nacht träumte sie von ihm. Am Abend aber saß sie mit ihm in der Laube vor dem Haus, und wenn er erzählte, wie es ihm weh und übel unter den fremden Leuten ergangen sei, kam ihr immer eine Schnake ins Auge oder ein Haar, so daß sie sich die Augen mit der Schürze reiben mußte.

Und nach einem Jahr war der Handwerksbursche immer noch im Hause; und alles war gescheuert, weißer Sand in allen Zimmern gestreut und darauf kleine grüne Tannenzweige, und das ganze Dorf hielt Feiertag. Denn der junge Handwerksbursch hielt Hochzeit mit dem Kronenwirtskind, und alle Leute freuten sich; und wer sich nciht freute, weil er ein Neidhammel war, der tat wenigstens so.

Bald darauf hatte der Kronenwirt auch wieder einmal seine beste Stunde, weil er nämlich rundherum satt war, und saß, die Tabaksdose auf dem Schoß, im Lehnstuhl und schlief. Als er gar nicht wieder erwachte, wollten sie ihn wecken; da war er tot – mausetot. Da war nun der junge Handwerksbursch wirklich Kronenwirt, wie er es im Scherze gesagt, und sonst traf alles ein, wie er es unter der Buche geträumt. Denn sehr bald hatte er auch zwei Kinder, und wahrscheinlich nahm er auch einmal das eine von ihnen auf den Schoß und fütterte es und blies dabei auf den Löffel, und sicher fuhr gleichzeitig der andere Knabe mit der Mohrrübe im Zimmer umher, obwohl der, von dem ich diese Geschichte weiß, mir es nicht gesagthat und ich es selbst vergessen habe, ihn expreß danach zu fragen. Aber es wird schon so gewesen sein, weil das, was man unter der Traumbuche träumte, stets aufs Haar eintraf.

Eines Tages nun, es mochten wohl an die vier Jahre seit der Hochzeit verflossen sein, saß der junge Kronenwirt – denn das war er ja jetzt – auch einmal in der Wirtsstube. Da kam sene Frau herein, stellte sich vor ihn hin und sagte: "Denke dir, gestern unter Mittag ist einer von unsern Mähern unter der Traumbuche eingeschlafen und hat nicht daran gedacht. Weißt du, was er geträumt hat? Er hat geträumt, er wäre steinreich. Und wer ist's? Der alte Kaspar, der so dumm ist, daß er einen dauert, und den wir nur aus Mitleid behalten. Was der wohl mit dem vielen Gelde anfangen wird?"

Da lachte der Mann und sagte: "Wie kannst du nur an das dumme Zeug glauben und bist sonst eine so kluge Frau? Überlege dir doch selbst, ob ein Baum, und wenn er noch so schön und alt ist, die Zukunft wissen kann."

Da sah die Frau ihren Mann mit großen Augen an, schüttelte den Kopf und sprach ernsthaft: "Mann, versündige dich nicht! Über solche Dinge soll man nicht scherzen."

"Ich scherze nicht, Frau!" erwiderte der Mann.

Darauf schwieg die Frau wieder eine Weile, als wenn sie ihn nicht recht verstünde, und sagte dann: "Wozu das nur alles ist! Ich dächte, du hättest alle Ursache, dem alten heiligen Baume dankbar zu sein. Ist nicht alles so eingetroffen, wie du es geträumt?"

Als sie dies gesagt, machte der Mann das freundlichste Gesicht der Welt und entgegnete: "Gott weiß es, daß ich dankbar bin, Gott und dir. Ja, ein schöner Traum war's! Ist mir's doch, als wenn es erst gestern gewesen wäre, so genau erinnere ich mich noch daran. Und doch ist alles noch tausendmal schöner geworden, als ich es geträumt; und du bist auch noch tausendmal lieber und hübscher als die junge Frau, die mir damals im Traume erschienen war."

Und die Frau sah ihn wieder mit großen Augen an; darauf fuhr er fort: "Was nun aber den Baum anbelangt und den Traum, Herzensschatz, so denke ich: wer gern tanzt, dem ist leicht gepfiffen; und: wie man in den Wald schreit, so schallt es wieder heraus. War es mir die vielen Jahre weh und übel gegangen, so war's wohl kein Wunder, wenn ich auch einmal von was Liebem träumte."

"Daß du aber gerade geträumt hast, du würdest mich heiraten!"

"Das hab' ich nie geträumt! Bloß eine junge Frau sah ich mit zwei Kindern, und sie war lange nicht so hübsch wie du und die Kinder auch nicht."

"Pfui", erwiderte die Frau. "Willst du mich verleugnen oder den Baum? Hast du mir nicht am ersten Tag, wo wir uns sahen – es war schon Abend und draußen in der Laube –, hast du mir da nicht gleich gesagt, du hättest geträumt, du würdest mich heiraten und Kronenwirt werden?"

Da fiel dem Manne zum ersten Male wieder der Schwerz ein, den er sich damals mit seiner jetzigen Frau erlaubt hatte, und er sagte: "Es kann nichts helfen, liebe Frau! Ich habe wirklich damals nicht von dir geträumt; und wenn ich es gesagt, so war es nur ein Scherz. Du warst so neugierig; da wollte ich dich necken!"

Da brach die Frau in heftiges Weinen aus und ging hinaus. Nach einer Weile ging er ihr nach. Sie stand im Hof am Brunnen und weinte immer noch. Er versuchte sie zu trösten, doch vergeblich.

"Du hast mir meine Liebe gestohlen und mich um mein Herz betrogen!" sagte sie. "Ich wede nie wieder froh werden!"

Da fragte er sie, ob sie ihn denn nicht liebhätte, so lieb wie keinen andern Menschen auf der Welt, und ob sie nicht zufrieden und glücklich miteinander gelebt hätten wie niemand weiter im Dorf. Sie mußte alles zugeben, aber sie blieb traurig wie zuvor, trotz allem Zureden.

Da dachte er: Laß sie ausweinen! Über Nacht kommen andere Gedanken; morgen ist sie die alte. Doch er täuschte sich; denn am andern Morgen weinte die Frau zwar nicht mehr, aber sie war ernst und traurig und ging ihrem Mann aus dem Wege. Jeder Versuch, sie zu trösten, scheiterte wie am Abend zuvor. Den größten Teil des Tages saß sie in einer Ecke und grübelte, und wenn ihr Mann hereintrat, schrak sie zusammen.

Als dies mehrere Tage gedauert, ohne daß eine Änderung eintrat, befiel auch ihn eine große Traurigkeit; denn er fürchtete, er hätte die Liebe seiner Frau auf immer verloren. Er ging still im Hause umher und sann auf Abhilfe, doch es wollte ihm nichts einfallen. Da ging er eines Mittags zum Dorfe hinaus und schlenderte durchs Feld. Es war ein heißer Julitag; keine Wolke am Himmel. Die reife Saat wogte wie ein goldner See, und die Vögel sangen; doch sein Herz war voller Bekümmernis. Da sah er von fern die alte Traumbuche stehen: wie eine Königin der Bäume ragte sie hoch in den Himmel hinein. Es kam ihm vor, als wenn sie ihm mit ihren grünen Zweigen zuwinkte und wie eine alte Freundin zu sich riefe. Er ging hin und setzte sich unter sie und dachte an die vergangene Zeit. Fünf Jahre waren ziemlich genau verflossen, seit er als ein armer Teufel zum ersten Male unter ihr geruht und so schön geträumt hatte. Ach so wunderschön! Und der Traum hatte fünf Jahre gedauert. – Und nun? Alles vorbei! Alles vorbei? Auf immer? –

Da fing die Buche wieder zu rauschen an, wie vor fünf Jahren, und bewegte ihre mächtigen Zweige. Und wie sie dieselben bewegte, ließ sie wie damals bald hier, bald dort einen feinen glitzernden Sonnenstrahl durchfallen und bald hier, bald da ein Stückchen blauen Himmel durchscheinen. Da wurde sein Herz stiller, und er schlief ein; denn er hatte vor Sorge die vorhergehenden Nächte nicht geschlafen. Und nicht lange, so träumte er denselben Traum wie vor fünf Jahren, und die Frau am Tisch und die spielenden Kinder hatten die alten, lieben Gesichter von seiner Frau und von seinen Kindern. Und die Frau sah ihn so freundlich an – ach, so freundlich.

Da wachte er auf, und als er sah, daß es nur ein Traum war, ward er noch trauriger. Er brach sich einen grünen Zweig ab von der Buche, ging nach Haus und legte ihn ins Gesangbuch. Als die Frau am nächsten Tage – es war gerade Sonntag – in die Kirche gehen wollte, fiel der Zweig heraus. Da wurde der Mann, der danebenstand, rot, bückte sich und wollte ihn in die Tasche stecken. Doch die Frau sah es und fragte, was es für ein Blatt sein.

"Es ist von der Traumbuche; sie meint es besser mit mir wie du!" erwiderte der Mann. "Denn als ich gestern draußen war und unter ihr saß, schlief ich ein. Da wollte sie mich wohl trösten; denn mir träumte, du wärest wieder gut und hättest alle vergessen. Aber es ist nicht wahr! Es ist nichts mit der alten guten Buche. Ein schöner herrlicher Baum ist sie schon, aber von der Zukunft weiß sie nichts."

Da starrte ihn die Frau an, und dann ging es wie ein Sonnenschein über ihr Gesicht: "Mann, hast du das wirklich geträumt?"

"Ja!" entgegnete er fest, und sie merkte, daß es die Wahrheit war; denn er zuckte mit dem Gesicht, weil er nicht weinen wollte.

"Und ich war wirklich deine Frau?"

Als er auch dies bejahte, fiel ihm die Frau um den Hals und küßte ihn so oft, daß er sich ihrer gar nicht erwehren konnte. "Gelobt sei Gott", sagte sie, "nun ist alles wieder gut! Ich habe dich ja so lieb –so lieb, wie du es gar nicht weißt! Und ich habe die Tage solche Angst gehabt, ob ich dich denn auch wirklich liebhaben dürfte, und ob mir nicht Gott eigentlich einen anderen Mann bestimmt hatte. Denn mein Herz gestohlen hast du mir doch, du böser Mann, und ein bißchen Betrug war doch dabei! – Ja, gestohlen hast du mir's; aber nun weiß ich doch, daß es dir nichts geholfen hat und daß es auch ohnedem so gekommen wäre." Darauf schwieg sie eine Weile und fuhr dann fort:

"Nicht wahr, du sprichst nie wieder schlecht von der Traumbuche?"

"Nein, niemals; denn ich glaube an sie; vielleicht etwas anders wie du, aber darum doch nicht weniger fest. Verlaß dich darauf! Und den Zweig wollen wir vorn ins Gesangbuch heften, damit er nicht verlorengeht."