fr-en  Joseph Joffo Un sac de billes chapitre VIII Medium
It's six o'clock.
It's very long, a day when one doesn't go out. I have spent the afternoon by reading Michel Strogoff and helping mum kill the weevils that got into the few beans we have left.
The walks came to an end. We will watch the hands of the clock turn until Henri and Albert arrive and every minute that passes is a minute of anguish: the Gestapo took up residence three days ago at the Hotel Excelsior, most hotels have been requisitioned. The Kommandantur is at place Masséna and raids have taken place. There are numerous arrests of Jews by denunciation, but quartier grid lines are coming soon.
Papa paces back and fore.
Our shutters were drawn and outside the sun still shines big in the sky.
Five past six.
"What can they do?"
No one answers my mother who worries.
We have no more news of the V., there is no question of going to see if they are gone or if they are still at home, it is said that when there is an arrest, the Germans leave a mousetrap for several days.
A double step on the stairs, it's them.
We rush about.
"So?"
Henri sits down heavily while Albert goes to the kitchen to pour himself a large glass of water. We hear him drinking loudly.
"So, it's simple", says Henri.
We must leave, and quickly.
Papa puts his hand on his shoulder.
"Explain yourself."
Henri looks up at him with a weary expression. We feel that something worried him today.
"We didn't stop, Albert and I, styling the Germans' hair and they talked among themselves, convinced that no one understood. It was very confusing but basically it appears that they arrest all Jews, that they are locked up at the Excelsior Hotel and every Friday they are taken at night in special convoys to the German camps. These are sealed wagons that have priority. They pass even before the troop trains and the convoys of arms. To stay here is to have a ticket to Germany."
Papa sits, putting his hands flat on the tablecloth.
"My children", he said, "Henri is right, we will have to separate again and in recent days, I have had time to think about all that. So here is what we are going to do. We will first stick faithfully to a method that has always succeeded: we leave two at a time.
First of all Henri and you, Albert, you go tomorrow for Savoie. You have to get to Aix-les-Bains, there I have an address for you, someone will hide you.
Joseph and Maurice, that's what you'll do, listen to me: you will leave tomorrow morning for Golfe-Juan. You will go to a camp called "Moisson Nouvelle". It is theoretically a paramilitary organisation dependent on the government of Vichy, a kind of annexe of the Compagnons de France, in fact, it is about something else, you will quickly understand what it is."
"And you, what are you going to do?"
My father gets up.
"Don't worry about us, it's not from an old monkey that one learns to grimace. And now, at table, you have to go to bed early to be in good shape for tomorrow."
And it was once more a pre-separation meal, a meal where you could not hear much more than the sounds of forks and knives against the porcelain.
The voice of my father or one of the elders sometimes interrupted the silence when it seemed too intense.
When I entered my room, I found my haversack on the bed, it was a long time since I had thought about it but it was always there and it seemed to me that by looking at it that I was already no longer in Nice, but on the road, walking without rest towards a goal of which I had no perception.
" Moisson Nouvelle".
It's a large sign that surmounts the railing. On each side of the sign are two emblems painted as the tricolor.
Behind the railing, there are teenagers in blue shorts, shirts and berets. They are carrying canvas bags full of water and chopped wood, all terribly boy-scout. It is a style that has never really attracted me.
Maurice doesn't seem to be any more excited than me.
"Okay, so, are we going, yes or no?"
We have brought part of our nest egg with us and I am inclined to propose to my brother to continue the route, to go to the north.
We could hide on a farm, work for a while ... but on the other hand, this Petainist camp is probably the last place where Fritz will come to look for two young Jews. So, there is no hesitation, safety before everything.
"Let's go." We pushed against the gate together.
Immediately a great clumsy oaf whose very thin thighs are disappearing into shorts which are too wide comes to meet us, clicks his heels together and makes us a strange sign, a kind of mixture between the Roman, Nazi and military salutes.
Maurice, in turn, greets him back with some additional flourishes.
"You are new? Who sends you?
This fellow is immediately disagreeable to me, Maurice doesn't seem to like him much either.
"We would like to see the camp leader, Mr Subinagui."
"Follow me."
He swivelled round and led us at a hunter's pace toward a hut that loomed over the tents. Almost on the threshold of the hut was a big white flagpole like a ship's mast. The French flag hung in the absence of wind
The oaf knocked, opened the door, clicked his heels, saluted, and said in a nasal voice, "Two new people who want to speak to you, Director."
"Thank you, Gerard. Leave us."
Gérard executed a military half-turn and went at the double to the door, rattling the fragile floor with his boots.
We must have seemed dumbfounded, because the director signalled to us to approach and sit down.
"Do not let yourselves be impressed, he says, Gérard is very nice but his dad was adjutant in the active and he raised in a special atmosphere."
He was a very dark man, with a balding forehead and an indescribable expression in his eyes. I had the impression that this man knew everything about me before I had told him anything. His appearance fascinated me. Even in that tiny dark room, surrounded by metal filing cabinets, old chairs, files and lots of dusty junk, he gave the impression of moving with such ease that he could have been on the stage of the Opera with no scenery.
"Your father has spoken to me about you. I agreed to take you even though you aren't the required age - but you are both pretty big. I believe you will be all right here, and... in safety. "
He didn't say any more about it, but it was quite unnecessary.
"So, you are part of Moisson Nouvelle, and I will explain to you what life in camp is like. There are various possibilities for you. You can stay within the camp and work on inside duties: cooking and cleaning. There would certainly be games for you to play after work.
But you have another possibility, which is to go out to work and to come back to the camp at prescribed times. You will find board and lodging here in exchange for money which will be asked of you, which will be about three-quarters of your pay."
"Excuse me", said Maurice, "but what sort of work is it?"
"I am just getting to that. You can help the nearby market gardeners, or even go up to Vallauris where we have established a pottery workshop. We sell our produce, which allows us to keep the community going. It is for you to choose."
I looked at Maurice.
"I would really like to try pottery", I said.
The director glanced at my brother.
"And you?"
"Me too."
Subinagui started to laugh at Maurice's unconvincing tone.
"It's very good of you to sacrifice yourself. I have the impression that you don't want to be parted too much."
Both of us would have cut off our hand rather than answer a question like that, and he didn't press it.
"Right then, Vallauris it is. You will sleep here tonight and you will go off tomorrow morning. I wish you good luck. "
He shook us by the hand and we went off quite cheered up.
Outside, Gérard was waiting for us.
He clicked his heels, saluted, and indicated that we should follow him.
We went across the camp.
Everything seemed tidy. Already there were plates on the long trestle tables, and the air smelled of sand, pines, and Javel water.
Under the khaki tent, Gérard showed us two beds with two folded blankets at the end, and two joined-together sheets between them, which was called a sleeping bag.
"Supper is at six" said Gérard, "The flag is lowered at seven, washing at eight thirty, in bed at nine, and lights out at a quarter past nine. "
He clicked his heels again, saluted and went out at a mechanical pace.
A voice came from under a bed.
"Don't mind him. He is a bit crazy but he is a solid chap."
A head appeared, a stiff mop of hair, two eyes like coffee beans and a snub nose. I had just met Ange Testi.
While i was making my bed, he told me that at that moment he should have been peeling potatoes in the kitchen, but he had left on the specious pretext of having a stomach ache and he was having a little rest before dinner. He would use the same excuse again tomorrow to take himself to the infirmary, where he hoped to be let off work for several days.
I pulled up the covers and asked "Is it all right here?"
"Yes", said Ange, "It's excellent. There are lots of Jews."
I jumped, but he had said it innocently, sprawled on his mattress. When later I have reviewed my memories, I never see Ange in a vertical position. He had a complete propensity to stretch himself out, whatever time it was, as soon as he could.
"You aren't Jewish?"
"No - and you?"
He laughed a little.
"No danger. Baptised, catechised, communion, confirmation - and a choirboy on top of all that."
"And how did you come to be here?"
He crossed his hands under his head and looked around like a contented buddha.
"Ah well, you see, I was on holiday."
He offered me a cigarette, which I refused.
"I'm not joking, I really am on holiday. But if it doesn't worry you, I will go back under the bed because if the kitchen manager finds me dossing around, he probably won't congratulate me."
Him lying on the floor and me sitting on my bed, I listened to him.
He came from Algiers, born right in the middle of Bab-el-Oued, and he had wanted to spend his holidays in France because his father and his grandfather had boasted to him of its wonders. He was visiting Paris, staying with a cousin of his, exploring the Champs Elysées by degrees, when the Americans had landed in North Africa.
The news had not struck him until after a day or two he realised that while the war continued, it was out of the question that he should see the shores of Algiers the White again.
He was still giggling about it under his bed.
"You get it! If this goes on for ten years, that makes ten years of holiday for me!"
His Parisian cousin having had the ridiculous idea of getting married some weeks after his arrival, Ange had found himself put out without much money. Drawn by the sun like a tropism, he had come back to the South and had stopped at the edge of the sea when he could go no further.
For some days he had begged a bit, and then by chance he had gone past the gate more than three months ago.
He had gone in, explained his story, Subinagui had let him stay, and since then he had peeled potatoes, swept the camp and above all had enjoyed tremendous siestas.
"So basically" he concluded, "In Algiers I was selling shoes all day in my father's shop. I get much less tired here, you see, and the longer the separation goes on, the more happy I shall be to see them again."
Maurice, who had gone to explore, came back and caught us in the middle of chatting.
"How many people are there in the camp?"
"Oh, about a hundred. It doesn't vary much - some go, and others arrive. But you see, basically it's OK."
I started to regret going to Vallauris. I felt I would have made a good friend in Ange.
At six o'clock, a bell told us it was supper time. Thanks to Ange, who knew all the dodges, we immediately found a place on the bench nearest to the feeding station. The saucepans were huge, and a boy of about fifteen who I afterwards found out was Dutch, was dipping into them with a huge ladle whose handle he was holding in both hands.
The noise was deafening. There were two Belgians next to me, also awaiting the end of the war to go home. Opposite me, a blond-haired chap who was called Masso, Jean Masso, whose parents lived in Grasse, and I though he and I could be friends, too.
After the meal, it was parade in ranks, facing the little hill. This struck me as strange. I know I had never stood to attention in my life, except when playing with my friends.
I saw the flag slowly come down the flagpole.
After that, i saw that most people went inside in the central tents which were circular like a nomad's tent, and they played draughts, cards, or petits-chevaux, while others walked around outside, and there were several people playing the harmonica or the guitar, which made me think of the Italians. Where were they now?
I played dominoes with Ange, Jean and my brother, and at nine o'clock i was in bed. The chap in charge of the tent - today we would call him the monitor - was situated at the other end of the row.
He seemed to me kind, but severe enough that no one whispered after lights out.
In the dark, above my head, I heard the rustling of the wind in the leaves of the trees which surrounded the camp. There were also the sounds of insects, but it wasn't that that bothered me most, it was the thousand noises that arose from communal life: the whispering of two chatterers, the creaking of the canvas or the wooden beds, snores, coughs, sighs. I felt around me the muddled presence of stretched-out bodies, the mixed breathing of sleeping people produced a continuous and chaotic sound. I had never lived like this, and it was only really late when I finally got to sleep.
The blast of a whistle pierced my eardrums and i leapt startled out of my bed. Already the boys around me were folding up their blankets and sleeping bags, swapping blows, and running bare-chested to the washplace.
Only Ange Testi didn't seem in a hurry to get out of bed.
"Maurice and Joseph Joffo, to the stores at the double!"
I inherited three shirts with patch pockets and epaulettes, a pair of shorts and three pairs of socks, all the same navy blue.
I put these clothes on, and my morale dropped considerably. I felt I was entirely institutionalised.
"Are you both going to Vallauris?"
"Yes."
"Right, off you go. At the double - go to the entrance."
We went off at the double. Maybe it was the perfect skive for the 'Comrades of France' but it wasn't a sinecure.
About ten people were waiting for us. The chief was with them.
He greeted us with a smile which brought my courage back into my head.
"Twelve," he said. "That's good, you can go. Work well and make us some nice things. Till tonight."
The gardens were full of late roses. In the still-cool air there was a smell of faded petals, and we went forward in a straggle, despite the urgings of our leader who tried to make us march in file and sing the famous 'Marshal, here we are'.
Vallauris is not far from Golfe-Juan, it is the same municipality, a village with a small square and a little to the side of a high building of two floors whose ceiling had collapsed. The Compagnons de France's workshop of pottery is located inside this old building.
Along one of the walls were lined up the most recent models: vases of every shape and size, round, thin, elongated, with a spout, without a spout, with one handle, with two handles, glazed and unglazed. Immediately I found myself in front of a turntable, a block of clay, and off you go..
From the first morning, one thing struck me as blindingly obvious. You could like a job and hate it very quickly if the conditions in which you were working were bad.
I wanted to make my pots; I liked to see and feel the lump of clay between my fingers, I felt that with a tiny pressure of my cupped hands the shape would change, get longer, different. What I wanted above all was to make a form that was my own - in other words to create, improvise a form that would probably be different from all those I had seen lined up along the wall. But the head apprentice, who had taken responsibility and a firm dislike for me since my arrival, was not of that opinion. Perhaps he was right, perhaps it is necessary to be an imitator before you can become a creator, to do your scales before getting stuck in to a symphony. That seemed to be what he thought, but I wasn't persuaded of it.
However it was, each time I tried to bring a personal touch to my work, I was turned off my wheel and with two movements my guide got it back to the right shape, putting back the swelling of the belly which I had been diminishing. I took it back from him, and despite myself I lessened the swelling, which seemed to me a grave aesthetic mistake.
After two hours of this little game, the head apprentice stopped the wheel and looked at me with a baffled air.
"You have no sense of proportion" he murmured. "We are going to have trouble."
I took my chance.
"Could I possibly make something without a model to amuse myself?"
I had committed the gravest crime that one could commit.
I received a shouted lecture, and I shrivelled bit by bit under his arguments; pottery is not a game; before making something without a model you have to learn to copy them; only by smithing does one become a smith; you can't improvise a potter - and so on and so on.
I thought he was stricken by apoplexy.
When he seemed to recover, he flattened out my lump of clay with the flat of his hand, and said to me, "Start again. i shall come back in ten minutes."
I kicked the wheel. He came back, grumbled, stuck me behind one of his students who seemed to have been attached to his wheel for thirty thousand years with the intention of not wasting a single one of his actions in order to reproduce them with precision.
I was bored to death to see a kind of vase gradually arise, which I saw repeated in a great number of copies.
I returned to my place after an hour but it was lunchtime.
Maurice didn't seem any more enthusiastic than I was, to think that the Joffos weren't born to work with clay.
After having eaten, I came back, the master apprentice also and after a couple of hours, head resonating with his barking advice, clay up to the shoulders, sweat dripping down to the kidneys, I told myself that if I didn't want to succumb to the temptation to lob a good kilo of oily earth at the side of his face, it was better that I permanently quit the potter's trade.
Thus vocations are lost, this day being my only experience with this art, this very place where I made my first attempts in this field was to take on the importance of which we are aware.
Let it be known: I was a potter in Vallauris.
In any case, the first thing we did that very same evening as soon as we returned to Golfe-Juan was to go to Subinagui's house and speak frankly about the situation.
"It's over, I said, the pottery and I are incompatible."
"Same for me", adds Maurice, "the trial was inconclusive."
He listened to us with the benevolent calmness that would be unshakeable in any disaster and asked us: "Could you explain to me why you didn't like it?"
"But I like it, I like it a lot!" I exclaimed. But I'm not able to achieve what he wants me to do... His gesture stopped me and when our eyes met, I read clearly that he didn't condemn me, that he didn't share the master apprentice's pedagogical concepts and that he almost approved of my inability to live under his supervision.
I was very comforted and even more so when, after consulting a file, he added, "If you agree, we will try the kitchens, I hope you will like them better, it is a less artistic task but you will probably find more freedom there."
Maurice thanked him, I was happy, I would find Ange, and everyone knows that the kitchen in a community is always the place where various transactions take place, of which a skilful man can find himself the beneficiary.
He walked us back to the door and put his hand on our shoulders.
"It's good that you have come," he says, "if something is wrong, don't be afraid, the office is always open."
There then began three wonderful weeks.
It was a find, this kitchen, Maurice assisted a professional butcher and spent his days cutting steaks and playing la manille coinchée, the second activity occupying him much more than the first. Personally, I remember having to mix pots of mashed potatoes, tossing pans of salad, cutting dumper trucks of tomatoes, always in the company of Masso and Ange who willingly gave up his naps and hiding places to work with me, we formed an inseparable trio.
There was trafficking inside the camp, it was for caster sugar and flour.
Personally, I have sometimes put a few extra bananas in my pockets or biscuits or slabs of chocolate between my skin and my shirt to enjoy with my friends, I was not participating in anything on a large scale. Not that I was suffocated by a boundless honesty, but I couldn't have tolerated Subinagui knowing about it. I knew the difficulties he had in getting food for the camp, he often came to talk to the chef and I felt his tension when the van that brought us the supplies didn't arrive.
There were happy evenings, camp fires with guitar, and I loved the smell of pines and the sea when the night fell, the evening wind rose, sweeping away the heat of the day and, with the exception of Gerard, as always, mechanically enthusiastic, we relaxed and resumed in chorus the melodies that the singer had begun to sing. It felt good, it evoked peace.
But the news was circulating in the camp, it came to us from the suppliers, from those returning from authorisations that the director granted readily and we knew that the war was still going on. It was raging in Italy, the Germans had taken prisoners of entire regiments of their allies the day before and I wondered what had become of my friends from Tite... Marcello was he dead, prisoner or civilian? And the others? At any rate, the Germans were still powerful and they resisted firmly; despite all their efforts, the Anglo-Americans didn't move forward, they were stopped to the south of Naples and it seemed that the city would never fall into their hands.
They were retreating in Russia, but less than they had done before and the doubt was growing in me, Masso ended up believing in the flexible defense myth. They seemed to be preparing for a quantum leap that would overwhelm the world.
We spoke little in the camp, some of the teenagers had been sent by dedicated Petainist families, some were even outright pro-German.
The conversations were fading away as they approached and Maurice had recommended that I not confide in my friends.
There were reasons for this: in addition to the news of the war, other information was reaching us, it was based on a single phrase: intensification of the hunt for Jews. I had caught a few words on the subject between Subinagui and the chef when I was clearing the canteen.
It was clear that the time for niceties had passed. Every Jew, or even anyone suspected of being a Jew, would leave for the German camps.
I was telling my brother about it, but he was even more aware of it than I was.
One morning, around ten o'clock, as I was scrubbing the top of the stove, he came towards me with his large navy blue apron, one of the corners of which was rolled up like the overcoats of the 14-18 soldiers.
"Jo, I 've been thinking, if the Germans raided this place and questioned us, I think they'd know straight away that we were Jews."
I paused, my rag suspended in the air.
"But why? Until now..." He interrupted me and I listened to him, later I was thankful over and over again for having listened to him attentively.
"Listen, Subinagui told me about that. Today, the Gestapo is no longer even trying to conduct investigations. They don't give a damn about paperwork. If we tell them that our name is Joffo, that Dad has a shop on the rue de Clignancourt, in the heart of Paris' Jewish district, they won't look any further."
I must have turned pale because he made an effort to smile.
"I am telling you all this in case they make a raid, you have to invent something completely different, another life. And I think that I have found something. Come here"
I put down my scouring powder and followed him to the other end of the room, wiping my hands on my already dirty shorts.
"That's what we'll do," Maurice said. "Do you know the story of Ange?"
"Of course, he tells it often enough!"
"Okay, well, we're the same."
I was astounded. I had no idea what he was getting at.
"Don't you understand?"
You shouldn't have taken me for a bigger idiot than I was.
"Yep, we came to France for a holiday and stayed because of the landing."
"That's it. The big advantage of that is that they can't contact friends or family because they stayed on there, we must be in control, they have to believe us.
To me, as I endlessly turned the idea around in my head, it hardly seemed possible that I could invent a new past from top to bottom without tripping myself up during a hypothetical interrogation.
"And where did we live?"
"In Algiers"
I looked at Maurice. I was pretty sure that he had planned everything, but we had to be sure and to do that it was necessary to ask the questions that might be asked of us.
"What are your parents occupations?"
"Dad is a hairdresser, Mum doesn't work"
"And where do you live?"
"10 rue Jean-Jaurès."
He didn't hesitate for a second, but that needs an explanation.
"Why rue Jean-Jaurès?"
"Because there is always a rue Jean-Jaurès, and the number 10 because it's easy to remember."
"And if they ask you to describe the shop, the house, the floor, all that, how are we both going to say the same things?"
"You describe the house in the rue de Clignancourt, that way, we will not make a mistake."
I nod my head. That sounds really good to me.
Suddenly, he gets up, grabs me by the shoulder and shakes me, yelling, "Und vhere are you goink to go to school, boy?"
"There, in rue Jean-Jaures, a little further down, I don't know the number anymore."
He delivers a gentle uppercut to my chin.
"Fine," he says, "that's ok, you're a little slow-witted as a guy, but you are instinctive. "Block this punch"
His straight jab hits me in the plexus, I recoil, feel feint and seek to distance myself from him.
He's dancing around me.
Masso pokes his head around the door and looks at us.
"I bet on the biggest and strongest," he said.
That evening, when we were already in bed, I leaned down on my bolster and leaned over the narrow space that separated my bed from my brother's.
"That can't work, your trick."
He then rose up from his bed. I could see his white undershirt loom over the brown blankets.
"Why?"
"Because Subinagui has our papers, he knows where we come from and if the Chleuhs inquire, he will be forced to tell them.
"Don't worry", Maurice said, "I'll talk to him about it, this guy will help us."
Silence fell, some were already sleeping or reading with a torch under the sheets. He added, "You, know, I don't think we're the only ones in this situation here", before rolling over abruptly.
I saw in the gloom the darker frame of the Marshal's photo hanging on the central pillar of the dormitory and I felt a surge of gratitude for the "Compagnons de France" and I thought that for those whom the Germans were tracking, this kind of organisation was far from being unnecessary.
"Hey, you Joffos, are you coming with me?"
The van's engine is running and Ferdinand already has the sole of his shoe on the running board.
The driver looks at us. He is the one who brings the food on Fridays, has a bite to eat and goes down to Nice around 1 pm.
It's Friday, it's one o'clock, so it's time to leave.
I have heard rumours in the kitchens, there are problems with bills from the various firms that supply us and it seems that two of them are putting the squeeze on us and, probably to compensate, delivering lighter and lighter bags.
Ferdinand is twenty-four years old, tuberculosis resulted in him being in a sanatorium for four years and invalided out of the military service. He is the intendant of the centre, Subinagui's right-hand man. He will solve these problems.
Unintentionally, Maurice and I found ourselves in front of the van.
I was on my way to join Ange, and Maurice had in his hand the deck of cards he used to play his endless games of manille whenever the opportunity arose.
Afternoon in Nice! It's a stroke of luck..
"And to return?"
"We'll take the evening bus.
So is it yes or no?
Never hesitate"
"It's yes."
It's too tempting, with the uniform it's not risky and I'm so keen to know what happened to our parents. I have a feeling that when I see the front of the house, the way the shutters are ajar, I will know that they are still there. And then, who knows, if everything is quiet... a hop down the stairs and we'll know what's happening.
The van turns, skidding on the gravel at the entrance and passes through the gate. I cling onto the sides so I don't fall. The tarpaulin is not in place and the wind is making it difficult to breathe. I'll join Maurice on the other side where the protruding gas generator gives a bit of protection..
Ferdinand is next to the driver and turns towards us.
"...is there someone in Nice?"
This engine makes a dreadful noise and the jolting doesn't help. I curve my hands either side of my mouth and yell, "What?"
"Do you know anyone in Nice?"
This time, it 's Maurice who is trying to make his voice heard.
"No! We're going for a walk!"
This guy drives like a maniac. The vehicle jolts from one side of the road to the other, throwing us from one side to the other.
I'm starting to feel sick to my stomach. It feels as if the salt noodles are demanding to get back out into the fresh air.
Suddenly, we stop. The driver swears fit to burst his vocal cords, he has just realised that he has driven more than fifteen kilometers with a flat rear tyre. The spare tyre looks poor, it's as patched up as a sock, but it'll do the job. We're off again. All in all, this break was beneficial to me: the colour came back to my cheeks and my stomach was restored to its normal place.
Nice is very close by.
Here is the unexpected bay that widens on the bend in the road. It's quite something to see this city again. In the clutter of tiny houses which swarm around the quayside, where is Mother Rosso's bar? Where is the house behind the Buffa?
Ferdinand chats with the driver and at the red light, turns towards us.
"We're going down three further streets." "I'm going to see a friend on rue de Russie, I'll be quick, you'll wait for me for a few minutes, then I'll show you where the bus station is so you don't miss the bus and you can get away."
"Okay"
The van stops and our feet touch the Nice pavement.
"Come on, let's get a move on"
I have trouble following him because Ferdinand is as tall as he is skinny, his nose and his Adam's apple are as sharp as each other.
"Here, this is the place. Two minutes, and I'll come back down"
He's already disappeared under the carriage entrance.
I had forgotten how warm these streets were. Several buildings separate us from the sea and it takes just a few obstructions to prevent the bracing air from reaching us. The streets are deserted. There, at the fork in the road, was a flourish of signs. There is a kind of tree stuck in the tarmac, the leaves of which are large yellow arrows marked with long, black words written in a Gothic script. I remember having seen identical ones in Paris before leaving.
"What's he doing?" Maurice murmurs.
I find it hard to know if a lot or a little time has passed if I haven't got a watch.
"It's probably not even two minutes since he left."
Maurice started.
"You're completely crazy, it's been at least ten minutes".
This was the kind of argument that made me angry.
"How do you know it's been exactly ten minutes, where do you see that?"
Maurice takes on that air of superiority which always infuriates me.
"I can't see it anywhere, but you can feel it." "If you can't feel when you wait two minutes or three quarters of an hour, you might as well throw yourself into the sea."
I shrug my shoulders.
"I say we can't know, that we haven't been here for more than maybe two minutes".
"Moron", Maurice murmurs.
I'm not reacting to this insult, it's much too hot to fight. I just sit down on the ground in the shade of the wall.
Maurice stamps his feet, paces two, three times in front of me and suddenly decides, " I'm going to go and see, anyway, we'll be perfectly capable of finding the bus station, we're not going to spend our afternoon kicking our heels."
He pushed the door open and got in.
It is true, he's right, time is running out and we're foolishly losing it in a stifling street. Either that, or I've got used to the outdoors and can't stand the urban heat that appears to me to be radiating from the walls rather than from the sun.
And now Maurice isn't coming back now, that takes the biscuit.
If only I had something to play with, but no, nothing. My pockets are empty and there are no pebbles that could at least replace the jacks.
I walk to the end of the street and I go back counting my steps.
Thirty-five to go, thirty-six to return.
That's funny, my steps are longer when I go somewhere than when I come back. Or it's the road that has expanded because of the heat. Or I was wrong in counting. In any case, I am dreadfully bored.
But what the hell are the bastards doing!
I was so happy to leave a bit earlier and then here, first I almost puke in the car and now I'm moping around in front of this door, while — That's enough, I'll come in.
It's not because I'm the youngest that they'll manipulate me as they want.
The yard is comfortable, there is ivy on one of the walls and an arbor at the bottom of it. Some children's toys are littering around a small pile of sand.
No concierge. Only the stairs there and that's all.
I cross the yard and I put my foot on the first step.
The wall is projected on me, my palms slam on it. I threw them in front of me not to smash my skull.
The pain irradiates in my back, and I turn around.
There he is, he pushed me forward with the barrel of his tommy gun. The ferrous green of his uniform captures all the room light.
Maybe he'll kill me, the black circle of the barrel is a few inches in front of my nose. Where is Maurice?
He bends. He smells of cigarettes.
His hand is squeezing my arm and tears are swelling my eyelids, he is squeezing hard, very hard.
He opens his mouth.
"Kike, he says, kike.
With all his might, he catapults me against a side door which vibrates under the shock.
The soldier hurtles towards me and I raise my elbow to protect my face, but he doesn't hit me, he turns the door latch and as I spin around in the room, he has already secured the door behind me.
Maurice's here, Ferdinand and two women, one of whom is crying. She has a scratch snaking across her forehead.
I sit down, still knocked out I did not understand, all that is a dream, just now I was in the street, it was hot, it was summer and I was free, and then there was this courtyard, a violent push and here I am now.
"What is going on?"
I find it difficult to form words, I'm afraid I've spoken in a shaky voice, a tiny fluted, ridiculous voice.
Ferdinand's eyes are more dilated than usual, they are bathed in a new water. Neither does my brother have exactly the same face as earlier, maybe we shall never recover our previous faces.
"It's my fault", Ferdinand whispers, "we fell into a mousetrap, there used to be a resistance center here, that provided with false documents and a network to sneak into Spain".
Maurice looks at Ferdinand.
"But why did you come here, did you need to leave there?"
Ferdinand nods his head in agreement.
"With the rumours that were going around the camp lately, I panicked, I had this address and I wanted to clear off before the Krauts landed in Golfe-Juan."
I'm looking at him, stupidly.
"But why do you want to clear off ?"
Ferdinand glances at the door and a twitch distorts his lip, "Because I'm Jewish."
He looks at us and I see his Adam's apple going up and down.
"Don't worry, it's no sweat for you, when they know you're not Jews, they'll release you."
"Yeah, sure", Maurice whispers.
He looks at me. "Don't be afraid, brother, I know the lesson, everything is in my head, there'll be no mistake."
"But you, Ferdinand, what are you going to do? Do you know what you are going to tell them?"
A sob is shaking his sharp shoulders.
"I don't know . . . I can't understand, I had planned everything, to have a new identity card, and just as this was the exit from the tunnel . . ." The women in front of us are watching him cry. They are young, perhaps twenty, twenty-five years, they don't seem to know each other, they are motionless in their chairs.
It's a room painted with gloss, there are some chairs and one cabinet, that's all. No window. Electricity is burning; without the bulb hanging from the ceiling, we would see nothing.
Besides, it's strange this room that . . . and suddenly, I understand: there is a window that must have a view on the yard, but the cabinet was pushed in front of it to remove an access and discourage any attempt of escape. We only had to deal with one soldier, maybe there are others.
I get the feeling that the German didn't lock the door behind me when he threw me into the room, but be sure of it, or trying to escape is a bullet in my head, for sure.
"What is going to happen now?"
Maurice has closed his eyes, he seems to be sleeping.
"We're going to be questioned and when they realise the mistake, they'll let us go."
I find him very optimistic.
No need to try to talk with Ferdinand, he is huddled in a chair and swinging back and forth, rocking an unbearable pain. The women stay silent and it's better that way, maybe it's good that they don't talk to us. The heat is intense now. The street, by comparison, appears a mild temperature.
I watch my companions stream with sweat. I have the impression that if I turned off the light it would be better, it appears to me that an entire furnace is coming out of this tiny sun that is the bulb, I combine in my mind thoughts of darkness and coolness.
"Why doesn't someone turn it off?"
Everyone jumps, we could have been here for hours, remaining silent, to stew in our juice.
One of the women, the one with blood on her forehead, smiles at me.
"I think it best not to, they might think we're plotting or trying to escape..." I understand that she is right, it looks as if it won't take much for the guy who let me in to let fly with the butt of his rifle.
"What time is it, please?"
Maurice asked the young woman the question. She has a very slim wrist-watch, almost a chain, the watch is small, rectangular.
"Quarter past five"
"Thank you"
We've been here three hours"
No one has come yet, no one has been caught except us.
Exhaustion overwhelms me by degrees, my bottom is sore from sitting down for over three hours.
Maybe they have forgotten us; besides, they don't care about us; they were probably looking for the leaders of the sector, the bigwigs, men who had been identified, long sought after, but us, what do we represent in their eyes? Absolutely nothing! What a list of conquests, two frightened women, two brats and a tall, skinny beanpole of a fella, it's really a nice catch.
And now that they've got their hands on us, they are certain to win the war, it is no longer a problem.
The visions turn in my mind, and they scroll under my eyelids that the too bright light fills with a painful yellow.
What I can least understand is the violence of this soldier. His machine gun aimed, his poking, his eyes especially, I had the impression that his life's dream would have been to ram me into the wall and I ask myself the question: why?
Am I his enemy?
We've never seen each other before,I've not done anything to him and he wants to kill me. It was only at that moment that I understood Mum a little or people who came to the living room in Paris and when I heard them talking, they said that war was an absurd, stupid thing and that didn't seem right to me. It seemed to me that there was an order in the armed struggle, a reason for being that escaped me but that existed in the minds of important and responsible people. On the news, the regiments were marching in good order, well aligned; the tanks were driving in long lines; people with serious faces, strict ties or their breasts covered in decorations were discussing, signing and speaking with force and conviction. How could we say that all this was absurd? Those who said it did not understand, they decided, in their ignorance, but the war in the eyes of the child that I was did not compare to anything like the chaos, the disorder, the police. Even in my history book, in addition to the beautiful images that made it picturesque and exhilarating, it had been represented to me surrounded by agreements, treaties, reflections, decisions... How could I think that Philippe Auguste, Napoleon, Clemenceau and all the ministers, councillors, all those people full of knowledge, occupying the highest positions, were madmen?
No, the war was not absurd, those who said that understood nothing.
And then, now that this war, deliberate, fought by adults with ever stricter ties and ever more glorious medals, ended up throwing me, a child, with rifle butts, into a closed room, depriving me of the daylight, of freedom, I, who had done nothing, who knew no Germans, that's what Mum meant, she was right after all. And besides, it was possible that... The door opened.
They laugh and there are two of them now, their guns on their bellies.
"Outside, fast, fast."
It's a scramble, I immediately hold Maurice's hand in mine, the most important is that they don't separate us.
There's a truck outside.
"Hurry up, hurry up."
I feel dizzy, I'm running after the two women, one of whom keeps twisting her foot on her wooden heels.
Ferdinand is gasping behind me.
There's a truck at the end of the street and two officers are waiting.
With the same motivation, we all rush to the back. There is no Bench, we have to remain standing.
One of the two soldiers climbs up behind us, the other one refolds the heavy iron plate that closes the rear halfway up, and then, I see him jumping up, climbing over, and landing among us with a sound like the clattering of tin cans His Tommy gun encumbers him and he swears.
We hang on to each other. I see the street turning and disappearing.
We are silent, spreading our feet so as not to fall.
Out of the back I can only see the streets that disappear.
The truck stops abruptly. The soldiers fold down the plate and jump first.
"Come on, quickly."
I'm outside in broad daylight, and I have no trouble recognizing where I am.
In front of me, this is the Excelsior hotel. The head office of the Gestapo from Nice.
unit 1
Il est six heures.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 2
C’est long toute une journée sans sortir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 4
Les vadrouilles sont finies.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 6
La Kommandantur se trouve place Masséna et des rafles ont eu lieu.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 8
Papa marche de long en large.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 9
Nos volets ont été tirés et dehors c’est encore le grand soleil.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 10
Six heures cinq.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 11
— Qu’est-ce qu’ils peuvent faire ?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 12
Personne ne répond à ma mère qui s’inquiète.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 14
Un pas double dans l’escalier, ce sont eux.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 15
Nous nous précipitons.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 16
— Alors ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 17
unit 18
Nous l’entendons boire bruyamment.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 19
— Alors c’est simple, dit Henri.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 20
Il faut partir, et en vitesse.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 21
Papa pose sa main sur son épaule.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 22
— Explique-toi.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 23
Henri lève sur lui un regard fatigué.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 24
On sent qu’il en a pris un coup aujourd’hui.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 27
Ce sont des wagons scellés qui sont prioritaires.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 28
Ils passent même avant les trains de troupes et les convois d’armes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 29
Rester ici, c’est prendre un billet pour l’Allemagne.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 30
Papa s’assoit, pose ses mains à plat sur la nappe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 32
Voici donc ce que nous allons faire.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 34
« Tout d’abord Henri et toi, Albert, vous partez demain pour la Savoie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 35
unit 37
Vous vous rendrez dans un camp qui s’appelle « Moisson Nouvelle ».
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 39
— Et vous, qu’est-ce que vous allez faire ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 40
Mon père se lève.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 46
« Moisson Nouvelle ».
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 47
C’est une grande pancarte plaquée qui surmonte la grille.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
De chaque côté de la pancarte sont attachées deux francisques peintes en tricolore.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 49
Derrière la grille, il y a des adolescents en shorts bleus, chemisettes et bérets.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 50
unit 51
C’est un genre qui ne m’a jamais beaucoup séduit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 52
Maurice n’a pas l’air plus enchanté que moi.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 53
— Bon, alors, on y va, oui ou non ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 56
Il n’y a donc pas à hésiter, sécurité avant tout.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 57
— On y va. Nous poussons la grille ensemble.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 59
Maurice le lui rend en l’enjolivant de quelques fioritures supplémentaires.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 60
— Vous êtes nouveaux ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 61
Qui vous envoie ?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 62
Ce type m’est tout de suite antipathique, Maurice ne semble pas l’apprécier beaucoup non plus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 63
— On voudrait voir le chef du camp, M. Subinagui.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 64
— Suivez-moi.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 65
Il pivote et nous entraîne au pas de chasseur vers une baraque qui surplombait les tentes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 66
Presque sur le seuil de la baraque s’élevait un grand mât blanc comme sur un navire.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 67
Le drapeau français pendait dans l’absence du vent.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 69
— Merci, Gérard, laissez-nous.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 76
Je crois qu’ici, vous serez bien, et… en sûreté.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 77
Il n’en dit pas davantage sur le sujet, mais c’était parfaitement inutile.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 80
Il y a bien sûr à votre disposition des jeux après les heures de service.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 82
— Excusez-moi, dit Maurice, qu’est-ce que c’est comme travail ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 84
Nous vendons nos produits, ce qui nous permet de continuer à faire vivre la communauté.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 85
C’est à vous de choisir.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 86
Je regardai Maurice.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 87
— Moi j’aimerais bien essayer la poterie, dis-je.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 88
Le directeur jeta un œil sur mon frère.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 89
— Et vous ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 90
— Moi aussi.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 91
Subinagui se mit à rire devant le ton peu convaincu de Maurice.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 92
— C’est très bien de vous sacrifier.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 93
J’ai l’impression que vous n’aimez pas trop vous séparer.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 95
— Entendu pour Vallauris, vous coucherez ici ce soir et vous partirez demain matin.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 96
Je vous souhaite bonne chance.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 97
Il nous serra la main et nous sortîmes ragaillardis.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 98
Dehors, Gérard nous attendait.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 99
Il reclaqua des talons, salua et nous intima l’ordre de le suivre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 100
Nous avons traversé le camp.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 104
Il rerereclaqua des talons, salua et sortit d’un pas mécanique.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 105
Une voix sortit de sous un lit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 106
— Vous en faites pas, il est un peu marteau mais il est bien brave.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 110
Je tirai sur les couvertures tout en demandant : — Et c’est bien ici ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 111
— Oui, dit Ange, c’est l’idéal, il y a beaucoup de Juifs.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 112
Je sursautai, mais il avait dit ça innocemment, vautré sur son matelas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 114
— T’es pas juif toi ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 115
— Non, et toi ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 116
Il eut un petit rire.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 118
— Et comment tu es arrivé ici ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 119
unit 120
— Eh bien, tu vois, je suis en vacances.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 121
Il m’offrit une cigarette que je refusai.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 123
Couché sur le plancher, moi assis sur mon lit, je l’écoutai donc.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 127
Il en rigolait encore sous son plancher.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 128
— Tu te rends compte !
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 129
Si ça dure encore dix ans, ça me fera dix ans de vacances !
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 135
Maurice qui était allé faire un tour revint et nous surprit en train de bavarder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 136
— On est combien dans le camp ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 138
Mais vous verrez, on est bien au fond.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 140
A six heures, une cloche nous avertit de l’heure du repas.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 145
Après le repas, ce fut le rassemblement en étoile, face au tertre.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 147
Je vis le drapeau descendre lentement le long du mât.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 149
Où étaient-ils à cette heure ?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 154
Le coup de sifflet vrilla mes tympans et je bondis hors de mon lit effaré.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 156
Seul Ange Testi ne semblait pas pressé de sortir des toiles.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 157
— Joffo, Maurice et Joseph, au magasin en vitesse !
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 159
unit 160
Je me sentis entièrement embrigadé.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 161
— Vous allez à Vallauris tous les deux ?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 162
— Oui.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 163
— Alors en route, pas gymnastique, direction la sortie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 165
Ils sont une dizaine à nous attendre.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 166
Le directeur est avec eux.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 167
Il nous salue d’un sourire qui remonte le courage d’un cran.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 173
Tout de suite je me trouvai devant un tour, un bloc de glaise et roule petit.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 181
— Aucun sens des proportions, murmura-t-il, on va avoir du mal.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 182
Je tentai ma chance.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 183
— Est-ce que je pourrais en faire un sans modèle pour m’amuser ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 184
J’avais commis la plus lourde erreur qui se puisse commettre.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 186
Je le croyais frappé d’apoplexie.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 188
Je pédalai.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 191
Je revins à ma place au bout d’une heure mais c’était l’heure du repas.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 195
Qu’on le sache : je fus potier à Vallauris.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 197
— C’est fini, dis-je, la poterie et moi on est fâchés.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 198
— Pareil pour moi, renchérit Maurice, l’essai n’a pas été concluant.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 200
Je m’exclamai : — Mais moi ça me plaît, ça me plaît beaucoup !
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 204
Il nous raccompagna jusqu’à la porte et posa la main sur nos épaules.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 206
A partir de là commencent trois semaines merveilleuses.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 214
Cela faisait du bien, cela évoquait la paix.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 217
Et les autres ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 220
unit 225
Il en ressortait que le temps des subtilités était passé.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 226
Tout Juif, voire toute personne soupçonnée de l’être partait pour les camps allemands.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 227
J’en parlais à mon frère mais il était encore bien plus au courant que moi.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 230
Je restai mon chiffon en l’air.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 231
— Mais pourquoi ?
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 233
— Écoute, Subinagui m’en a parlé.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 234
Aujourd’hui, la Gestapo ne cherche même plus à faire des enquêtes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 235
Ils se foutent complètement des paperasses.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 237
Je devais être devenu assez pâle car il fit un effort pour sourire.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 239
Et je crois que j’ai trouvé quelque chose.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 240
Viens par ici.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 242
— Voilà ce qu’on va faire, dit Maurice.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 243
Tu connais l’histoire d’Ange ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 244
— Bien sûr, il la raconte assez souvent !
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 245
— Bon, eh bien, nous, c’est pareil.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 246
Il me soufflait.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 247
Je ne voyais pas du tout où il voulait en venir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 248
— Tu ne comprends pas ?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 249
Fallait quand même pas me prendre pour plus idiot que je n’étais.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 250
— Si, on est venus en vacances en France et on est restés à cause du débarquement.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 251
— Voilà.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 254
— Et où c’est qu’on habitait.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 255
— A Alger.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 256
Je regardai Maurice.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 258
— Quel est le métier de vos parents ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 259
— Papa est coiffeur, maman ne travaille pas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 260
— Et où habitez-vous ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 261
— 10 rue Jean-Jaurès.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 262
Il n’a pas hésité une seconde, mais cela nécessite une explication.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 263
— Pourquoi rue Jean-Jaurès ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 266
— Tu décris la maison de la rue de Clignancourt, comme ça on se trompera pas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 267
Je hoche la tête.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 268
Ça me paraît vraiment très au point.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 270
— Rue Jean-Jaurès, dans la même rue, un peu plus bas, je sais plus le numéro.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 271
Il m’envoie un uppercut de satisfaction.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 272
unit 273
Bloque celui-là.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 274
Son direct m’atteint au plexus, je recule, feinte et cherche la distance.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 275
Il tourne autour de moi en dansant.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 276
Masso passe la tête et nous regarde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 277
— Je parie pour le plus gros et le plus fort, dit-il.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 279
Ça peut pas marcher ton truc.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 280
Il se souleva à son tour.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 281
Je voyais son maillot de corps blanc se dessiner sur les couvertures brunes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 282
— Pourquoi ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks ago
unit 284
— Te tracasse pas, dit Maurice, je vais lui en parler, ce type nous aidera.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 285
Le silence tomba, certains dormaient déjà ou lisaient, une lampe de poche sous les draps.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 288
— Eh, les Joffo, vous venez avec moi ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 289
Le moteur de la camionnette tourne et Ferdinand a déjà la semelle sur le marchepied.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 290
Le chauffeur nous regarde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 292
Nous sommes vendredi, il est treize heures, c’est donc le départ.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 294
unit 295
Il est l’intendant du centre, le bras droit de Subinagui.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 296
Il va régler ces problèmes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 297
C’est sans le vouloir que Maurice et moi nous sommes trouvés devant la camionnette.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 299
L’après-midi à Nice !
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 300
L’aubaine.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 301
— Et pour rentrer ?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 302
— On prendra le car du soir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 303
Alors c’est oui ou c’est non ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 304
Ne jamais hésiter.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 305
— C’est oui.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 308
Et puis, qui sait, si tout est calme… un saut dans l’escalier et nous serons fixés.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 309
La camionnette vire en chassant sur les graviers de l’entrée et franchit la grille.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 310
Je me retiens aux ridelles pour ne pas tomber.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 311
La bâche n’est pas mise et le vent me coupe la respiration.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 312
Je vais rejoindre Maurice de l’autre côté où la protubérance du gazogène forme un abri.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 313
Ferdinand est à côté du chauffeur et se retourne vers nous.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 314
— … quelqu’un à Nice ?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 315
Cet engin fait un bruit abominable et le cahotement n’arrange rien.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 316
Je mets mes mains en cornet de chaque côté de ma bouche et je hurle : — Quoi ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 317
— Vous connaissez quelqu’un à Nice ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 318
C’est Maurice qui essaie à son tour de se faire entendre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 319
— Non !
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 320
On va se balader !
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 321
Ce type conduit comme un dingue.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 323
Je commence à avoir mal au cœur.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 324
Je sens que les nouilles au sel ne demandent qu’à regagner l’air libre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 325
Brusquement nous nous arrêtons.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 328
Nous repartons.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 330
Nice est tout proche d’ailleurs.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 331
Voici la baie soudain qui s’évase au détour de la route.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 332
Cela fait quelque chose de revoir cette ville.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 334
Où est la maison derrière la Buffa ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 335
Ferdinand discute avec le chauffeur et au feu rouge, se tourne vers nous.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 336
— On va descendre trois rues plus loin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 338
— D’accord.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 339
La camionnette s’arrête et nos pieds touchent le trottoir de Nice.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 340
— Allez, en avant.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 342
— Tiens, c’est là.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 343
Deux minutes et je redescends.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 344
Il a déjà disparu sous la porte cochère.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 345
Je ne me souvenais pas comme ces rues étaient chaudes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 347
Les rues sont désertes.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 348
A l’embranchement là-bas, il a poussé une floraison de pancartes.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 350
Je me souviens avoir vu les mêmes à Paris avant de partir.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 351
— Qu’est-ce qu’il fait ?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 352
murmure Maurice.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 354
— Ça fait peut-être pas deux minutes qu’il est parti.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 355
Maurice sursaute.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 356
— T’es complètement fou, ça fait au moins dix minutes.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 357
Voilà le genre d’argument qui réussissait à me mettre en colère.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 358
— Comment peux-tu savoir que ça fait exactement dix minutes, tu le vois à quoi ?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 359
Maurice prend cet air supérieur qui m’exaspère toujours.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 360
— Je le vois à rien, mais ça se sent.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 362
Je hausse les épaules.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 364
— Crétin, murmure Maurice.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 365
Je ne relève pas l’insulte, il fait vraiment trop chaud pour se bagarrer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 366
Je m’assois carrément par terre, à l’ombre du mur.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 368
Il a poussé la porte et est entré.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 369
unit 371
Et voilà que c’est Maurice qui ne revient pas maintenant, ça c’est le bouquet.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 372
Si j’avais quelque chose pour jouer seulement, mais rien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 373
unit 374
Je vais jusqu’au bout de la rue et je retourne en comptant mes pas.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 375
Trente-cinq aller, trente-six retour.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 376
unit 377
Ou alors c’est la route qui s’est dilatée avec la chaleur.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 378
Ou alors je me suis trompé en comptant.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 379
En tout cas, je m’ennuie épouvantablement.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 380
Mais qu’est-ce qu’ils foutent les salauds !
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 382
C’est pas parce que je suis le plus petit qu’ils vont me manœuvrer comme ils veulent.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 383
La cour est agréable, il y a du lierre sur l’un des murs et une tonnelle au fond.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 384
Des jouets d’enfants traînent près d’un petit tas de sable.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 385
Pas de concierge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 386
L’escalier làbas et c’est tout.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 387
Je traverse la cour et mets le pied sur la première marche.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 388
Le mur se jette sur moi, mes paumes claquent dessus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 389
Je les ai jetées devant moi pour ne pas me fracasser le crâne.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 390
La douleur s’irradie dans mon dos, je me retourne.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 391
Il est là, il m’a propulsé avec le canon de la mitraillette.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 7 hours ago
unit 392
Le vert ferreux de l’uniforme accapare toute la lumière de la pièce.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 393
Il va peut-être me tuer, le cercle noir du canon est à quelques centimètres de mon nez.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 394
Où est Maurice ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 395
Il se penche.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 396
Il sent la cigarette.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 397
Sa main me serre le bras et les larmes gonflent mes paupières, il serre fort, très fort.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 398
La bouche s’ouvre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 399
— Youd, dit-il, youd.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 400
A toute volée, il me catapulte contre une porte latérale qui vibre sous le choc.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 402
Maurice est là, Ferdinand et deux femmes dont l’une pleure.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 403
Elle a une éraflure qui serpente sur le front.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 404
Je m’assois, encore sonné.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 406
— Qu’est-ce qui se passe ?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 408
unit 411
Maurice regarde Ferdinand.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 412
— Mais pourquoi t’es venu ici, t’avais besoin de partir là-bas ?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 413
Ferdinand acquiesce.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 415
Je le contemple, stupide.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 416
— Mais pourquoi tu veux te barrer ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 418
Il nous regarde et je vois sa pomme d’Adam monter et descendre.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 day, 3 hours ago
unit 420
— Ben voyons, murmure Maurice.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 421
Il me regarde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 14 hours ago
unit 423
— Mais toi, Ferdinand, qu’est-ce que tu vas faire ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 14 hours ago
unit 424
Tu sais ce que tu vas leur dire ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 14 hours ago
unit 425
Il a un sanglot qui secoue ses épaules pointues.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 428
C’est une pièce ripolinée, il y a des chaises et une armoire, c’est tout.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 14 hours ago
unit 429
Pas de fenêtre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 430
L’électricité brûle, sans l’ampoule pendue au plafond, nous ne verrions rien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 18 hours ago
unit 432
Nous n’avons eu affaire qu’à un soldat, peut-être y en a-t-il d’autres.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 434
— Qu’est-ce qui va se passer maintenant ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 435
Maurice a fermé les yeux, il a l’air de dormir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 436
unit 437
Je le trouve bien optimiste.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 440
La chaleur à présent est intense.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 441
La rue, en comparaison, apparaît une douce température.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 442
Je regarde mes compagnons ruisseler.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 day, 3 hours ago
unit 444
— Et si on éteignait ?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 446
Une des femmes, celle qui a du sang sur le front, me sourit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 448
— Quelle heure est-il, s’il vous plaît ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 449
C’est Maurice qui a posé la question à la jeune femme.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 450
Elle a un bracelet-montre très fin, presque une chaîne, la montre est petite, rectangulaire.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 451
— Cinq heures et quart.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 452
— Merci.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 453
Cela fait trois heures que nous sommes là.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 454
Personne n’est venu encore, personne ne s’est fait prendre à part nous.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 457
Strictement rien !
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 461
Ce que je comprends le moins, c’est la violence de ce soldat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 463
Je suis donc son ennemi ?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 7 hours ago
unit 464
On ne s’est jamais vus, je ne lui ai rien fait et il veut me tuer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 7 hours ago
unit 468
Comment pouvait-on dire que tout cela était absurde ?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 6 hours ago
unit 471
Non, la guerre n’était pas absurde, ceux qui disaient cela ne comprenaient rien.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 473
Et en plus, il était possible que… La porte s’est ouverte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 474
Ils rient et sont deux à présent, leur arme sur le ventre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 475
— Dehors, vite, vite.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 477
Il y a un camion dehors.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 478
— Vite, vite.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 480
Ferdinand souffle dans mon dos.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 14 hours ago
unit 481
Il y a un camion au bout de la rue et deux officiers qui attendent.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 7 hours ago
unit 482
D’un même élan nous nous engouffrons à l’arrière.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 483
Il n’y a pas de banc, il faut rester debout.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 485
Sa mitraillette l’encombre et il jure.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 486
Nous nous cramponnons les uns aux autres.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 487
Je vois la rue pivoter et disparaître.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 488
Nous nous taisons, écartant nos pieds pour ne pas tomber.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 489
Je ne vois par l’arrière que les rues qui s’enfoncent.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 490
Le camion s’arrête brusquement.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 491
Les soldats rabattent la plaque et sautent les premiers.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 492
— Allons, vite.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 493
Je suis dehors en plein soleil, et je n’ai pas de peine à me reconnaître.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
unit 494
En face de moi, c’est l’hôtel Excelsior.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 day, 3 hours ago
unit 495
Le siège de la Gestapo niçoise.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 5 hours ago
Oplusse 6523  commented on  unit 489  4 days, 6 hours ago
ClimateCanary 10493  commented on  unit 494  4 days, 7 hours ago
marina 1152  commented on  unit 491  4 days, 7 hours ago
Oplusse 6523  commented on  unit 458  5 days, 7 hours ago
Oplusse 6523  commented on  unit 459  5 days, 11 hours ago
Oplusse 6523  commented on  unit 456  5 days, 11 hours ago
Oplusse 6523  translated  unit 429  1 week, 1 day ago
marina 1152  commented on  unit 404  1 week, 2 days ago
Oplusse 6523  translated  unit 395  1 week, 2 days ago
Oplusse 6523  translated  unit 385  1 week, 2 days ago
ClimateCanary 10493  translated  unit 338  1 week, 3 days ago
ClimateCanary 10493  translated  unit 319  1 week, 3 days ago
francevw 4146  commented on  unit 294  1 week, 4 days ago