El Mundo Perdido por Arthur Conan Doyle-Cap. XV
Difficulty: Medium    Uploaded: 3 weeks, 1 day ago by soybeba     Last Activity: 8 hours ago
98% Upvoted
2% Translated but not Upvoted
315 Units
100% Translated
98% Upvoted
15. Our eyes have seen great wonders

I write this day by day, but I trust that before the day is out I'll be able to affirm that the light is shining at last, piercing our clouds. We are still held here, without having defined means to organize our escape, and that irritates us bitterly. However, I can easily imagine that the day may come when we rejoice to have been held here against our will, to see something more of the wonders of this curious place, and of the beings that inhabit it.
The victory of the Indians and the extinction of the ape men marked the decisive turning point of our fate. From then on, we were truly the masters of the plateau, because the Indians looked at us with a mixture of fear and gratitude, since through our strange powers we had helped them to destroy their hereditary enemies. Perhaps they would have been happy, for their own sake, to see such formidable and incomprehensible people leave, but for their part no suggestion had emerged about the path we should follow to reach the plains below. To the extent that we could interpret their signals, there was a tunnel by which one could reach the plains and whose lower exit we had seen below. Through there, without doubt, both the ape men and the Indians had reached the summit at different times, and Maple White and his companion must have used the same path. But the previous year a terrible and unexpected earthquake had collapsed the upper part of the tunnel causing it to disappear completely. Now the Indians only shook their heads and shrugged their shoulders when we tried to explain with signs our desire to descend. This could mean they were not able to help us, but also that they did not want to.
At the end of the victorious campaign, the survivors of the ape men tribe were taken across the plateau (their cries were horrible) and and installed near the Indian caves, where they would be, from then on, a servile race guarded by their masters. It was a rude, coarse and primitive version of the exodus of the Jews in Babylon or of the Israelites in Egypt. At night we could hear among the trees their prolonged and heartrending howling, as if some primitive Ezekiel lamented the fallen greatness and remembered the past glories of the City of the Apes. Since then they were only wood bearers and water porters.
We came back with our allies crossing the plateau two days after the battle and set up our camp at the foot of their cliffs. They would have wanted us to share their caves, but Lord John did not want to accept it for anything in the world, considering that in that way we put ourselves in their hands if they intended to betray us. Therefore we preserved our independence, and while we maintained the most friendly relations with them, we always had our weapons ready for any emergency. We also continued assiduously visiting the caves, which were remarkable places, although we could never determine if they were works of man or Nature. All of them were in a single stratum, pierced in a kind of soft rock that extended between the volcanic basalt that formed the reddish cliffs of the upper part and the hard granite of its base.
Their entrances were about eighty feet above the ground, and they were reached by long stone stairs, so narrow and steep that no animal of great dimensions could climb them. Inside, they were warm and dry, and were traversed by straight passages of varying length carved into the side of the hill. They had smooth and gray walls, decorated with many excellent paintings made with charred sticks and that represented various animals of the plateau. Even if all the living things were wiped off the region, the future scout would find on these walls a wide evidence of the strange fauna: dinosaurs, iguanodons and fish-lizards, which had populated the Earth in so recent times.
Since we knew that the huge iguanodons were led by their owners as if they were tamed herds, and that they were mere ambulant depots of meat, we had assumed that man, even with his primitive weapons, had established his superiority in the plateau. We would soon discover that it wasn't like that, and that he was still there by mere tolerance. The third day after having setting our camp next to the Indians caves the tragedy happened. That day Challenger and Summerlee had left together in the direction of the lake, where some of the natives, under their direction, were dedicated to harpooning specimens of the great alligators.
Lord John and I had remained in our camp, while a number of Indians, scattered on the grassy slope that stretched out in front of the caves, were engaged in various tasks. Suddenly there was a shrill cry of alarm, with the word "Stoa" resonating in a hundred voices.
Men, women and children ran from all sides seeking refuge, climbing like ants up the stairs and entering the caves in a mad stampede.
Looking up we saw that they were waving their arms from the rocks and beckoning us to join them in their shelter. We had both grabbed our repeating rifles and ran out to see what kind of danger it could be. Suddenly a group of fifteen or twenty Indians came running from the belt of trees nearby, running for their lives.
Close on their heels appeared two of those frightening monsters that had disturbed our camp and pursued me during my solitary excursion. By their shape they seemed like horrible toads, and they moved in successive jumps; but their size was incredibly bulky, greater than that of the most enormous elephant. We had never seen them except at night, and they were really nocturnal animals, except when they were disturbed in their lairs as had happened this time. We were dumbstruck on seeing them since their splotched and warty skin had a strange iridescence, similar to that of fish, and the sun's rays reflected from it with a continuously varying rainbow fluorescence when they moved.
As it was, we had little time to observe them because in an instant they reached the fugitives and between them carried out a terrible massacre. Their method was to fall in turn and with all their weight on one Indian after another, leaving them crushed and shattered. The harassed Indians screamed in terror, but although they ran as much as they could, they were helpless before the inexorable determination and horrible agility of those monstrous beings. They fell one after another, and there would be no more than half a dozen survivors when my companion and I came to their aid. This did them little good and only served to put us in the same danger.
From a distance of a couple of hundred yards we emptied our clips, firing one bullet after another at the beasts, but without affecting them more than if we had stoned them with paper balls.
Their reptilian nature was one of slow reactions, without the wounds appearing to affect them; and as their vital connections were not communicated from a single brain center but disseminated through their spinal cords, modern weapons did not hurt them. The most we could do was to contain their advance by diverting their attention with the lightning and roar of our rifles and thus give time to the Indians and ourselves to reach the stairs that led us to salvation.
But where the explosive conical bullets of the twentieth century were of no use, the poisoned arrows of the Indians, impregnated with the juice of strophantus and soaked in rotten flesh, triumphed. These arrows weren't much use for the hunter who would attack the beasts because their action was slow in that lethargic circulation, and before the beast was weakened, it would have caught its assailant and and destroyed him. But now, while the two monsters were chasing us to the very foot of the stairs, a cloud of arrows arrived, whistling from all the openings in the cliff above us. In a minute they were left feathered with arrows, and even so gave no signs of pain while, with impotent rage, they continued trying to bite and grab the stairs that could lead to their victims. They would ascend heavily a few yards and slide down again to the ground. But at last the poison took effect. One of them let out a deep and dull groan, letting its enormous flattened head fall to the ground. The other was jumping in eccentric circles, bursting into sharp and savage screams, only then to collapse, twisting in agony for several minutes, before remaining stiff and motionless. Breaking into cries of triumph, the Indians descended in a rush from their caves and danced frenetically in victory around the cadavers; a crazy jubilation overcame them on seeing that two more of their most dangerous enemies had been defeated. That night they cut up and moved the bodies, not in order to eat them--the poison was still active--but to keep away any spreading stench. However, the great hearts of the reptiles, each as big as a cushion, remained there, beating with slow and regular rhythm, in soft contractions and dilations, preserving a horrible independent life. On the third day, their ganglia stopped working and those dreadful muscles remained motionless.
Someday, when I have a desk better than a food can, and more useful instruments than a piece of spent pencil, and a single worn out notebook, I will write a broader story about the Accala Indians: our life among them, and the fleeting glimpses we had of the strange conditions of the stunning land of Maple White. My memory, at least, will never fail me, because as long as I have a breath of life, every hour and every action of this time will remain engraved as firm and clear as the first strange events of our childhood. No new impression can erase those that have been so deeply imprinted. When the time arrives, I'll describe that amazing moonlit night on the great lake when a young ichthyosaur--a strange creature, half seal and half fish, with bone-covered eyes on each side of the snout and a third eye placed on top of its head--was trapped in an Indian net and was on the verge of overturning our canoe before we could beach it on the shore. It was the same night in which a green water snake attacked from a cane brake and carried off in its coils the helmsman of Challenger's canoe. I will also speak of the great white nocturnal being--even now I don't know if it was a reptile or a wild animal--that lived in a nasty marsh to the east of the lake and that slithered in the darkness with a weak phosphorescent luminosity. This so terrorized the Indians that they didn't want to get near the place, and, in spite of mounting two expeditions and seeing it both times, we could not make way through the deep swampland in which it lived. I can only say that it was bigger than a cow and that it exhaled an odd smell of musk. I will also refer to the huge bird that chased Challenger one day until he had to seek refuge among the rocks... It was a huge running bird, much taller than an ostrich, with a vulture-like neck and a cruel-looking head that made it look like death on legs. As Challenger was climbing to save himself, a peck from that ferocious curved beak ripped the heel off his boot as if it had been cut with a chisel. On this occasion, at least, modern arms prevailed and the fat animal (twelve feet from head to feet)--that was called phororachus, according to our breathless but overjoyed professor--was downed by Lord John's rifle in a confusion of kicking and moving feathers, with two implacable yellow eyes shooting fire in the middle of it all. I hope to live to see that flat, perverted skull in its proper niche among the trophies in Albany. And finally I will provide some information, without doubt, about the toxodon, the gigantic pig of India, ten feet long with protruding teeth shaped like chisels, that we killed while it was drinking next to the lake one gray morning.
Some day I will write at greater length about all these things, and among those turbulent days, I'll try to sketch with tenderness the intervals of peace; those summer evenings so beautiful with the deep blue sky over our heads while we lay companionably in the deep shrubbery at the edge of the forest and we were surprised by the strange birds that passed before us or the extremely odd unknown animals that came crawling from their dens to observe us, while the tree branches were bent double under the weight of the delicious fruit that hung over our heads. Strange and beautiful flowers seemed to spy on us from within the herbage at our feet. Or I'll recall those long moonlit nights that we passed on the sparkling surface of the great lake, observing with astonishment and fear the huge circles that rippled out from the sudden dive of some fantastic monster. Or the green flash, there in the bottom of the deep water, of some unknown creature that was emerging from the edge of darkness. Such are the scenes, in all their details, that my pen and my mind will deal with when the day arrives.
But you will ask me why all these experiences and why the delay when you and your comrades should have been occupied day and night in projects to find the means to return to the outside world? My answer is that all of us were working to that end, but our labor had been in vain. We very soon discovered a fact: the Indians would do nothing to help us. In every other regard they were our friends,--we could almost say our devoted slaves--but when it was suggested that they could help us to transport a large board that could serve as a bridge for crossing the abyss, or when we wanted to ask them for strips of leather or vines for weaving ropes that we could use, we ran into a friendly but unbreakable rejection. They would smile, blink, shake their heads, and nothing more. Even the old chief put up the identical resistance, and only Maretas, the youth we had saved, viewed us with anxiety and tried to explain to us with gestures how much it upset him that our desires were frustrated. Since their complete triumph over the ape men, they viewed us as superhuman beings who carried off the victory with unfamiliar tubular weapons, and they believed that as long as we remained with them, good luck would be with them. They offered each one of us a bronze-colored woman for a wife and a cave of our own as long as we forgot about our country and remained to live forever on the plateau. They had always shown themselves to be friendly, as much as they opposed our desires, but we clearly understood that we had to keep secret our plans to descend because we had reasons to fear that in the end they would try to stop us by force.
In spite of the danger from the dinosaurs (which isn't great except during the night, because, as I have said before, they are of nocturnal habits) I have returned twice in the last three weeks to our old camp for the purpose of seeing our black man, who continues to stand guard at the foot of the cliff. My eyes anxiously scrutinized the great plain with the hope of seeing in the distance the help we had requested. But the extensive plains sown with cacti spread out in the distance, empty and bare, behind the distant line of bamboo plantations.
--They will come soon, now, Massa Malone. Before another week passes the Indian will come and bring rope and we'll bring you down.
These were the lively exclamations of our excellent Zambo.
I had a strange experience returning from this second visit, in which I was involved as a result of having spent a night away from my companions. I was returning along the well-known path and had reached a place that was about a mile from the pterodactyl swamp, when I saw an extraordinary object approaching me. It was a man walking inside a frame made of bent bamboo so that they were enclosing him everywhere in a bell-shaped cage. As I approached, my astonishment was even greater when I saw that it was Lord John Roxton. When he saw me he slipped out of his curious protective cloak and came towards me laughing, although I thought I detected some confusion in his attitude.
--Well, buddy, who would have thought that I would find you at this juncture. --he said.
--What the hell are you doing? --I asked.
--Visiting my friends, the pterodactyls-- he said.
--And for what?
--They are very interesting beasts, don't you think? But very unsociable.
They have very rude and unpleasant manners with strangers, as you'll remember.
Therefore I prepared this shell to stop them from being too bothersome in their attentions.
--But, what are you looking for in the swamp?
He looked at me with very searching eyes, and I could read a certain hesitation in his face.
--Don't you think that there are other people besides the professors who want to know things? --he said at last.-- I am studying these beauties. This should be enough for you.
--I did not mean to offend you,-- I said.
He recovered his good humor and laughed.
--Me neither, my friend. I am going to capture a hatchling of these big ugly birds to give to Challenger. That is one of my resolutions. No, I don't want you to accompany me. I am safe in this cage, but you have no protection. See you later. I'll be back in camp at nightfall.
He walked away and I saw him continue his walk through the woods in his extraordinary cage.
If Lord John's behavior was strange at that time, even more so was Challenger's. I should point out that he produced, it seems, an extraordinary fascination in Indian women, and that was why he always carried a wide palm branch, which he used to frighten them away like flies when their attentions became too urgent. To see him walking like a comic opera sultan, with that insignia of authority in his hand, his black beard bristling before him, stepping on the toes of his feet, leading a procession of amazed Indian girls (with their skimpy loincloth of tree bark), was one of the most grotesque spectacles that I will carry in my memory when I return. Regarding Summerlee, he was absorbed in the life of insects and birds on the plateau, and he dedicated all his time (except for the considerable portion he devoted to insulting Challenger because he did not take us out of our difficulties) to dissect and mount his specimens.
Challenger had adopted the habit of leaving alone every morning, returning from time to time with looks of portentous solemnity, as one who carries the weight of a great responsibility on his shoulders. One day, with his palm branch in hand, and his entourage of faithful adorers behind him, he led us to his hidden workshop and revealed to us the secret of his plans.
The place was a small clearing in the center of a little wood of palm trees. In it was one of those boiling mud geysers that I have already described. Around its edge were scattered a number of cut strips of iguanodont skin, and a huge flattened membrane that proved to be the dry and scraped stomach of one of the huge lizard fish of the lake.
This enormous bag had been sewn at one of its ends, and only a small orifice remained at the other. Some bamboo canes had been inserted in this opening, and the other end of these canes was in contact with conical clay tubes that were collecting the bubbling gas that lifted the mud of the geyser. Very soon the flaccid organ began to expand slowly and showed such a tendency to rise that Challenger tensed the ropes that bound it to the trunks of the surrounding trees. In half an hour, a gas balloon of good size had formed and the pulls and tensions exerted on the straps showed that it was capable of a remarkable lift capacity. Challenger, like a proud father in the presence of his first-born daughter, stood grinning and stroking his beard in silence, satisfied with himself as he watched the creation of his brain. Summerlee was the first to break the silence: --You're not expecting us to go up in that thing, are you, Challenger? --he said harshly.
--I intend, my dear Summerlee, to make such a demonstration of its power, that after seeing it you'll want, I am sure, to trust it without any hesitation.
--Get that out of your head right now,-- Summerlee said decisively.-- For nothing in the world would I commit to such nonsense. Lord John, I trust that you'll not support such madness.
--Well, I'd say it's something devilishly witty, --said our companion-- and I'd like to see how it works.
--Then you'll see it --said Challenger.-- During several days I have devoted all my brain power to the problem of how to descend these precipices. We have now determined that we can't descend the cliffs and that there is no tunnel. Neither can we construct some sort of bridge with which to return to the pinnacle from which we came. How to find, then, another means that suits our ends?
A little while ago I indicated to our young friend here that the geyser was releasing free hydrogen. From this naturally followed the idea of a balloon.
I must admit I was somewhat baffled by the difficulty of finding a container to hold the gas, but observing the immense intestines of these reptiles gave me the solution to the problem. Here is the result!
He stuck one hand in the front of his worn out jacket, and with the other pointed proudly at the balloon.
By then the gas bag had inflated to a considerable fullness, and it pulled strongly at its moorings.
--Summer insanity!-- Summerlee huffed.
Lord John was completely in love with the idea.
--The old man is intelligent, isn't he? he whispered, and then raised his voice in Challenger's direction. --Will it have a nacelle?
--The nacelle will be my next occupation. I've already projected how to make it and how it will be subject. Meanwhile I'll limit myself to show you that my apparatus is very capable of supporting the weight of each one of you.
--With all of us, I suppose.
--No: It's part of my plan that each one descends in turn as in a parachute. The balloon will be brought back by means that I'll have no difficulty in perfecting. If it can support the weight of just one and lower him softly, it will have provided everything required of it. Now I will demonstrate to you its capacity for these ends.
He picked up a large chunk of basalt, carved in the middle in such a way as to make it easy to attach a rope. This was the rope we had brought to the plateau after using it to scale the pinnacle. It was more than a hundred feet long, and even though it was thin, it was very strong. He had prepared a kind of leather collar from which many cords were hanging. This collar was placed on the dome of the balloon, and the hanging straps were joined below in such a way that the pressure from any load could be distributed over a large area. Then he attached the chunk of basalt to the straps and allowed the rope to hang from one of its ends. The professor wrapped it around his arm, giving it three turns.
--Now,-- said Challenger with a smile of expectant pleasure, --I will demonstrate the lifting power of my balloon.
Upon saying this, he used a knife to cut the several ties that restrained it.
Our expedition had never been in such imminent danger of complete annihilation. The inflated membrane shot up with terrific speed. Challenger lost his footing instantly and was dragged up into the air. I had just the time to hug him by the waist as he was ascending, and I too was yanked into the air. Lord John grabbed me by the legs with the pressure of a mouse trap spring, but I felt that he, too, was losing contact with the ground. For a moment I had a vision of four adventurers floating like a string of sausages above the land they had explored. Fortunately, however, there were limits to the tension the rope could withstand, even though there were none, apparently, to the lifting power of that hellish machine. There was a loud crack and we fell to the ground in a heap, with the spirals of the rope coiling over us. When we were able to stand up, wobbly, we saw in the deep blue sky, far away, a dark spot. It was the basaltic stone, which was rapidly disappearing from sight.
--Splendid! --exclaimed the undaunted Challenger, rubbing his injured arm.-- The test has been most thorough and satisfactory. I could not foresee such great success. Within a week, gentlemen, I promise you that a second balloon will be prepared, and you will be able to use it, with security and comfort, for the first stage of our trip back the homeland.
Up to this point, I have written about all the preceding events according to the order in which they happened. Now I am rounding out my narrative in the primitive camp, where Zambo has waited so long for us; all our difficulties and dangers have been left behind, like a dream at the top of these vast reddish cliffs. We have descended without damage, but in the most unexpected way; and everything is fine. Within six weeks or two months, we will be in London, and it is possible that this letter will not reach its destination before us. Already our hearts yearn for and fly towards the great mother city that holds so much of what we love.
It was the very afternoon of our dangerous adventure with Challenger's homemade balloon when our luck suddenly changed. I have already mentioned that the only person who had shown any sign of sympathy for our efforts to leave there was the young chief we had rescued. He was the only one who didn't want to hold us against our will in a foreign land. He had made us understand this clearly through his expressive language of gestures. That evening, when it was already dark, he returned to our little camp and gave me (for some reason he had always chosen me for his attentions, possibly because I was about his same age) a small roll of tree bark. Then, pointing solemnly at the line of caves above him, brought his finger to his lips as a sign that it concerned a secret, and he and his people furtively departed.
I carried the piece of bark near the fire light, and we examined it together. It had about a square foot of surface, and on the inside there were a number of curiously placed lines that I show here: they were neatly drawn with charcoal on the white surface, and at first glance they looked to me like a sort of rough musical score.
--Whatever it is, I can swear it is something important for us.-- I said. --I could read it in his face when he gave it to me.
--Unless we have to face a primitive prankster,-- Summerlee suggested, --because, as I believe, the joke was one of the elementary characteristics of human development.
--Without doubt it is a type of writing,-- said Challenger.
--It looks like one of those puzzles from a contest with a one-guinea prize,-- Lord John commented, stretching his neck in order to observe it. Suddenly he extended his hand and grabbed the puzzle. --My God!-- he exclaimed, --I think I have it now. The boy had guessed right from the start.
Look here! How many marks are there on that paper? Eighteen. Well, if you think about it, you'll see that there are eighteen cave mouths on the side of the hill above us.
--When he gave me the paper, he pointed to the caves,-- I said.
-- Well, this clarifies everything. It's a map of the caves, huh? Eighteen of them in a row, some short, some deep, some bifurcated, as we have seen. It's a map and here's a cross. Why is it there? It's to point out a cave that is much deeper than the others.
--One that crosses the whole cliff --I exclaimed.
--I think our young friend has deciphered the enigma,--Challenger said. If the cave doesn't cross from one side to the other of the cliff, I don't understand why this person, who has every reason for wishing us well, would call our attention to it. But if it crosses it and emerges on the other side at a point situated at the same elevation, we won't have to descend more than a hundred feet.
--A hundred feet!-- grumbled Summerlee.
--Well, our rope is still more than a hundred feet,-- he exclaimed. --Without doubt we will be able to make the descent.
--And what will happen with the Indians who are in the cave?-- Summerlee objected.
--There are no Indians in any of the caves above us,-- I said. They are all used for granaries and storage. Why don't we climb up right now and check out the terrain?
There is a dry and oily wood found on the plateau -- a species of araucaria, according to our botanists -- that the Indians always use for torches. Each of us gathered a handful of these, and we climbed up the brush-covered stairs to the cave indicated in the drawing. It was completely empty, as I have already said, if one ignores a large number of huge bats that flapped around our heads as we entered. As we did not want to attract the attention of the Indians about our actions, we stumbled in the dark until, leaving behind several caves, we penetrated a considerable distance inside the cavern. Then, at last, we lit our torches.
It was a beautiful dry tunnel, with smooth gray walls covered with Indian symbols, the curved ceiling arching over our heads, and shining white sand beneath our feet. We eagerly rushed down this tunnel until, with a deep groan of bitter disappointment, we were forced to stop. In front of us appeared a pure rock wall in which there was no crack big enough for a mouse to fit through. There was no exit for us there.
We stood motionless, contemplating this unexpected obstacle with bitterness in our hearts. This was not the result of some cataclysm, as in the case of the tunnel for ascending. It was, and always had been, a dead end.
--Don't worry, my friends,-- said the indomitable Challenger, --You can still count on my firm promise of another balloon.
Summerlee groaned.
You don't suppose we have followed a wrong cave? -- I suggested.
--It's useless, buddy --said Lord John with his finger on our map.-- The seventeenth starting from the right and the second from the left. This is the cave, without doubt.
I looked at the mark his finger indicated, and I gave a cry of sudden joy.
-- I think I have it! Follow me, follow me!
I retraced our path as fast as I could with the torch in my hand.
--Here,--I said, pointing to some matches on the floor,--is where we lit the torches.
--Exactly.
-- Well, here it's marked as a cave with a fork. In the darkness we had passed the fork before the torches had been lit. As we continue exiting, we will encounter the longer branch on our right.
And so it was, just as I had said. We had not gone more than thirty yards when a large black hole appeared in the wall. We went in and discovered that we were in a much larger passage. We ran through it impatiently for several hundred yards, until we ran out of breath. Then, suddenly, in the black arc of the darkness, we noticed a dim reddish glow growing ahead of us. Stunned, we stopped to stare at it. A stable and continuous cloak of fire seemed to penetrate the tunnel and prevent our passage. We hurried on towards it. We did not hear anything or feel heat or see the slightest movement in that direction, but that great luminous curtain continued to shine in front of us, bathing the whole cave in silvery light, and converting the sand into powder from precious stones until, on getting still closer, we could see it had a circular border.
--My God...it's the moon!-- Lord John exclaimed. --We've come out on the other side, boys, we've come out on the other side!--
It was indeed the full moon, which shone strongly behind the opening that was formed in the cliff.
It was a small crack, no bigger than a window, but enough for all our purposes. When we extended our neck through it, we could see that the descent was not very difficult, and the ground level was not far below us. It was not surprising that from below we could not have distinguish the place, because the cliffs jutted over it from above and an ascent to the site seemed so impossible that it discouraged any more thorough inspection. We were pleased to observe that with the help of our rope we could reach down without difficulty; then we returned joyfully to our camp to make our preparations. Our departure would be the next night.
We had to do everything quickly and secretly, because the Indians were capable of impeding our departure even at this last moment. We would leave our equipment there, with the exception of rifles and cartridges. But Challenger had some heavy objects that he wished ardently to take with him, and a particular package, which I do not want to refer to, that gave us more work than any other. The day passed slowly, but at nightfall we were ready for the departure. With great effort we took our things up the stairs. Then, looking backwards, we examined at length, for the last time, that strange land that I fear will soon be popularized, prey to hunters and mining prospectors, but for all of us it was the land of dreams, of fascination, and bizarre adventure. A country where we had risked much, suffered much, learned a bit...Our country, as we would always affectionately call it. To our left, the caves launched their cheerful reddish fires into the darkness. From the hill sloping down at our feet ascended the voices of the Indians that were singing and laughing. Further away, the deep woods stretched out, and in the centre, vaguely shining in the darkness, there was the big lake, mother of strange monsters. As we were looking at it, a sharp and savage scream clearly vibrated in the darkness, the call of some phantasmagorical animal. It was the authentic voice of Maple White Land, saying goodbye to us. We turned around and plunged into the cave that led us on the way home.
Two hours later, we, our packages and everything we had were resting at the foot of the cliff. Except with Challenger's luggage, we never had any difficulties. We left everything in the place where we had descended, and we left immediately for Zambo's camp. We approached it at dawn and, to our surprise, we did not find a single bonfire but a dozen of them scattered across the plain. The relief party had arrived. They were twenty river Indians, provisioned with picks, ropes, and everything that could be useful to cross the abyss. Finally, we will now have no difficulties in transporting our baggage when tomorrow we begin our road back to the Amazon.
And thus, in a humble frame of mind, full of gratitude, I close this story.
Our eyes have seen great wonders, and our souls have been purified by everything we have endured. Each of us, in his own way, is a better and deeper man. Maybe, when we arrive in Pará, we will stop there in order to resupply. If we do that, this letter will arrive by mail before us. If not, it will arrive in London the same day of my arrival. In either case, my dear McArdle, I hope that I will very soon be able to shake your hand.
unit 1
15.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 2
Nuestros ojos han visto grandes maravillas.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 6 days ago
unit 13
Esto puede significar que no pueden ayudarnos, pero también que no quieren hacerlo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 17
Desde entonces sólo fueron acopladores de leña y transportadores de agua.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 hours ago
unit 28
Pronto íbamos a descubrir que no era así y que aún se hallaba allí por mera tolerancia.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 45
Ésta de poco les sirvió, y sólo condujo a que nos viéramos envueltos en el mismo peligro.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 53
Ascendían pesadamente unas pocas yardas y volvían a deslizarse hasta el suelo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 54
Pero por fin el veneno surtió efecto.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 55
Uno de ellos lanzó un gemido profundo y sordo, dejando caer a tierra su enorme cabeza achatada.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 63
Ninguna impresión nueva puede borrar a las que han quedado tan profundamente impresas.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 68
unit 76
A nuestros pies, bellas y extrañas flores parecían espiarnos por entre las hierbas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 79
unit 82
Muy pronto descubrimos un hecho: los indios no harían nada para ayudarnos.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 84
Sonreían, pestañeaban, sacudían sus cabezas, y nada más.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 92
––Vendrán pronto, ahora, Massa Malone.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 93
Antes de que pase otra semana el indio vendrá y traerá cuerda y los haremos bajar.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 94
Éstas eran las animadas exclamaciones de nuestro excelente Zambo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 98
Al acercarme mi asombro fue aún mayor al ver que era lord John Roxton.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 100
––Bueno, compañerito, ¿quién iba a pensar que lo iba a encontrar por estas alturas?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 101
––dijo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 102
––¿Qué demonios está haciendo?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 103
––pregunté.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 104
––Visitando a mis amigos, los pterodáctilos ––dijo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 105
––¿Y para qué?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 106
––Son unas bestias muy interesantes, ¿no cree?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 107
Pero muy poco sociables.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 108
Tienen modales muy rudos y desagradables con los extraños, como recordará.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 109
Por eso aparejé esta armazón que les impide ser demasiado importunos en sus atenciones.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 110
––Pero, ¿qué busca usted en la ciénaga?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 111
Me miró con ojos muy escuadriñadores y pude leer en su rostro cierta vacilación.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 112
––¿No piensa usted que hay otras personas, además de los profesores, que quieren saber cosas?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 113
––dijo por último––.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 114
Yo estoy estudiando a estas preciosidades.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 115
Esto debe ser suficiente para usted.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 116
––No quise ofenderle ––dije.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 117
Recobró su buen humor y se rió.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 118
––Yo tampoco, compañerito.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 119
Voy a capturar un polluelo de estos endemoniados pajarracos para dárselo a Challenger.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 120
Ése es uno de mis empeños.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 121
No, no quiero que me acompañe.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 122
Yo estoy a salvo en esta jaula, pero usted no tiene protección.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 123
Hasta luego.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 124
Estaré de regreso en el campamento al caer la noche.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 hours ago
unit 125
Se alejó y le vi seguir su paseo por el bosque metido en su extraordinaria jaula.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 hours ago
unit 126
Si la conducta de lord John era extraña en ese momento, todavía más lo era la de Challenger.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 132
El lugar era un pequeño calvero en el centro de un bosquecillo de palmeras.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 133
En él había uno de esos géiseres de barro hirviente que ya he descrito.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 141
––dijo con tono áspero.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 143
––Quítese eso de la cabeza ahora mismo ––dijo Summerlee con decisión––.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 144
Por nada del mundo cometería semejante desatino.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 145
Lord John, confio en que usted no apoyará semejante locura.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 147
––Pues entonces lo verá ––dijo Challenger––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 149
Ya nos hemos convencido de que no podemos descender por los farallones y de que no hay túnel.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 151
¿Cómo hallar, pues, otro medio que convenga a nuestros fines?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 153
A esto siguió, naturalmente, la idea de un globo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 155
¡He aquí el resultado!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 158
––¡Locura de verano!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 159
––resopló Summerlee.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 160
A lord John le encantaba totalmente la idea.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 161
––El viejo es inteligente, ¿no?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 162
––me susurró, y luego elevó la voz en dirección a Challenger––: ¿Tendrá barquilla?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 163
––La barquilla será mi próxima ocupación.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 164
Ya he proyectado cómo fabricarla y de qué modo irá sujeta.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 166
––De todos nosotros, supongo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 167
––No; es parte de mi plan que cada uno descienda por turno como en un paracaídas.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 168
El globo será traído de regreso por medios que no tendré dificultad en perfeccionar.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 170
Ahora voy a demostrarles su capacidad para esos fines.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 173
Tenía más de un centenar de pies de largo, y aunque era delgada poseía mucha resistencia.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 174
Había preparado una especie de collar de cuero del que colgaban muchas tiras.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 176
unit 177
El profesor la envolvió en su brazo dándole tres vueltas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 179
Al decir esto, cortó con un cuchillo las varias amarras que lo sujetaban.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 180
Nunca había estado nuestra expedición en peligro más inminente de una completa aniquilación.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 181
La membrana inflada se disparó hacia arriba con terrorífica velocidad.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 182
Al instante Challenger perdió pie y fue arrastrado por los aires.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 189
Era la piedra basáltica, que se perdía en el horizonte a gran velocidad.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 190
––¡Espléndido!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 191
––exclamó el impávido Challenger, frotándose el brazo lastimado––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 192
La prueba ha resultado de lo más exhaustiva y satisfactoria.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 193
No podía prever un éxito tan grande.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 195
unit 197
Hemos descendido sin daños, pero de la manera más inesperada; y todo va bien.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 202
Él era el único que no deseaba retenernos contra nuestra voluntad en una tierra extranjera.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 203
Nos lo había dado a entender claramente a través de su expresivo lenguaje de gestos.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 206
Llevé el pedazo de corteza cerca de la luz de la hoguera y lo examinamos juntos.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 208
––Sea lo que sea, puedo jurar que es algo importante para nosotros –– dije––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 209
Lo pude leer en su rostro cuando me lo dio.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 211
––Sin duda es alguna clase de escritura ––dijo Challenger.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 213
De improviso alargó su mano y cogió el rompecabezas––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 214
¡Por Dios!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 215
––exclamó––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 216
Creo que ya lo tengo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 217
El muchacho lo había acertado desde el primer momento.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 218
¡Vean aquí!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 219
¿Cuántas marcas hay en ese papel?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 220
Dieciocho.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 222
––Cuando me dio el papel señaló las cuevas ––dije.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 223
––Bien, esto lo aclara todo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 224
Es un mapa de las cuevas, ¿eh?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 226
Es un mapa y aquí hay una cruz.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 227
¿Para qué está colocada?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 228
Lo está para señalar una cueva que es mucho más profunda que las otras.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 229
––Una que atraviesa todo el risco ––exclamé.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 230
––Creo que nuestro joven amigo ha descifrado el enigma ––dijo Challenger––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 233
––¡Un centenar de pies!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 234
––refunfuñó Summerlee.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 235
––Bueno, nuestra cuerda todavía tiene más de cien pies ––exclamó––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 236
Sin duda podremos hacer el descenso.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 237
––¿Y qué pasará con los indios que están en la cueva?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 238
––objetó Summerlee.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 239
––No hay indios en ninguna de las cuevas que hay por encima de nosotros ––dije––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 240
Todas se utilizan como graneros y depósitos.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 241
¿Por qué no subimos ahora mismo y atisbamos el terreno?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 246
Entonces, por fin, encendimos nuestras antorchas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 250
Allí no había salida para nosotros.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 251
Nos quedamos inmóviles, contemplando con amargura en el corazón ese inesperado obstáculo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 252
Éste no era el resultado de ningún cataclismo, como en el caso del túnel de ascenso.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 253
Aquello era, y había sido siempre, un cul de sac.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 254
––No importa, amigos míos ––dijo el indomable Challenger––.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 255
Todavía cuentan ustedes con mi firme promesa de otro globo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 256
Summerlee lanzó un quejido.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 257
––¿No habremos seguido una cueva equivocada?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 258
––sugerí.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 259
––Es inútil, compañerito ––dijo lord John con el dedo apoyado en nuestro mapa––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 23 hours ago
unit 260
La diecisiete empezando por la derecha y la segunda desde la izquierda.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 261
Ésta es la cueva, con toda seguridad.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 262
Yo miré la marca que señalaba su dedo y lancé un grito de repentina alegría.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 263
––¡Creo que lo tengo!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 264
¡Síganme, síganme!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 265
Retrocedía a todo correr por el camino que habíamos seguido, con la antorcha en la mano.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 267
––Exacto.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 268
––Bien, aquí está marcada como una cueva con una bifurcación.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 269
En la oscuridad hemos pasado la bifurcación antes de que las antorchas estuvieran encendidas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 270
Por la derecha, según vamos saliendo, encontraremos el brazo más largo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 271
Así fue, tal como yo había dicho.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 272
No habíamos andado treinta yardas cuando apareció en la pared un gran agujero negro.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 273
Nos metimos por él y descubrimos que nos hallábamos en un pasillo mucho más amplio.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 274
unit 276
Nos quedamos mirando aquello, atónitos.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 277
Un velo de fuego estable y continuo parecía atravesar el túnel y cerrarnos el camino.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 278
Nos apresuramos a correr hacia allí.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 16 hours ago
unit 280
––¡Por Dios... es la luna!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 7 hours ago
unit 281
––exclamó lord John––.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 7 hours ago
unit 282
¡Hemos salido al otro lado, muchachos, hemos salido al otro lado!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 7 hours ago
unit 284
unit 288
La salida sería la noche siguiente.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 290
Dejaríamos allí nuestros pertrechos, con excepción de rifles y cartuchos.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 292
El día pasó con lentitud, pero al caer la noche estábamos preparados para la partida.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 22 hours ago
unit 293
Con gran trabajo subimos nuestras cosas por las escaleras.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 17 hours ago
unit 297
unit 300
Era la auténtica voz de la Tierra de Maple White dándonos su adiós.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days ago
unit 301
Nos dimos la vuelta y nos zambullimos en la cueva que nos conducía de regreso a casa.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 days, 4 hours ago
unit 303
Salvo con el equipaje de Challenger, nunca tuvimos ninguna dificultad.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 2 hours ago
unit 306
La partida de socorro había llegado.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 days, 2 hours ago
unit 309
Y así, en una disposición humilde y llena de gratitud, cierro este relato.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 days, 17 hours ago
unit 311
Cada uno de nosotros, a su modo, es un hombre mejor y más profundo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 days, 4 hours ago
unit 312
Tal vez cuando lleguemos a Pará nos detengamos allí para reaprovisionarnos.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 hours ago
unit 313
Si hacemos eso, esta carta llegará por correo antes que nosotros.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 days, 4 hours ago
unit 314
Si no, arribará a Londres el mismo día de mi llegada.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 hours ago
unit 315
terehola 1455  commented on  unit 314  2 days, 2 hours ago
terehola 1455  commented on  unit 302  3 days, 2 hours ago
terehola 1455  commented on  unit 301  3 days, 2 hours ago
terehola 1455  commented on  unit 297  3 days, 2 hours ago
contratiempo 3454  commented on  unit 302  3 days, 17 hours ago
soybeba 4929  commented on  unit 283  4 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 267  5 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 258  5 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 227  5 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 218  5 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 220  6 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 218  6 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  commented on  unit 196  6 days, 19 hours ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 190  1 week, 1 day ago
terehola 1455  commented on  unit 182  1 week, 2 days ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 103  1 week, 5 days ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 101  1 week, 5 days ago
contratiempo 3454  commented on  unit 78  1 week, 6 days ago
contratiempo 3454  commented on  unit 48  2 weeks, 2 days ago
soybeba 4929  commented on  unit 6  2 weeks, 5 days ago
contratiempo 3454  commented on  unit 6  2 weeks, 6 days ago
soybeba 4929  translated  unit 1  3 weeks ago

15. Nuestros ojos han visto grandes maravillas.

Escribo esto día a día, pero confío en que antes de terminar lo que corresponde a hoy, estaré en condiciones de afirmar que la luz brilla, por fin, traspasando nuestras nubes. Seguimos retenidos aquí, sin tener medios definidos para organizar nuestro escape, y eso nos irrita amargamente. No obstante, puedo imaginar fácilmente que puede llegar el día en que nos alegremos de haber quedado retenidos aquí contra nuestra voluntad, para ver algo más de las maravillas de este curioso lugar, y de los seres que lo habitan.
La victoria de los indios y la aniquilación de los monoshombres señaló el giro decisivo de nuestra suerte. De allí en adelante, éramos verdaderamente los amos de la meseta, porque los indígenas nos contemplaban con una mezcla de temor y gratitud, ya que por medio de nuestros extraños poderes los habíamos ayudado a destruir a sus enemigos hereditarios. Quizá se habrían alegrado, por su propio bien, de ver marcharse a unas gentes tan formidables e incomprensibles, pero por su parte no había surgido ninguna sugestión sobre el camino que deberíamos seguir para alcanzar las llanuras de abajo. Hasta donde pudimos interpretar sus señales, hubo un túnel por el cual era posible alcanzar el lugar, y cuya salida inferior habíamos visto desde abajo. Por allí, sin duda, tanto los monos––hombres como los indios habían alcanzado la cima en épocas diferentes, y Maple White y su compañero también debieron utilizar el mismo camino. Pero el año anterior, sin embargo, había sobrevenido un terrible terremoto, desplomándose la parte superior del túnel hasta desaparecer por completo. Ahora, los indios sólo movían la cabeza y se encogían de hombros cuando nosotros tratábamos de explicarles por señas nuestro deseo de descender. Esto puede significar que no pueden ayudarnos, pero también que no quieren hacerlo.
Al final de la victoriosa campaña, los supervivientes de la tribu de los monos fueron conducidos a través de la meseta (sus gemidos eran horribles) e instalados cerca de las cuevas de los indios, donde serían, de allí en adelante, una raza servil vigilada por sus amos. Fue una versión ruda, tosca y primitiva del éxodo de los judíos en Babilonia o de los israelitas en Egipto. Por la noche podíamos escuchar entre los árboles su aullido prolongado y desgarrador, como si algún primitivo Ezequiel se lamentase por la grandeza caída y recordara las pasadas glorias de la Ciudad de los Monos. Desde entonces sólo fueron acopladores de leña y transportadores de agua.
Volvimos con nuestros aliados cruzando la meseta dos días después de la batalla e instalamos nuestro campamento a los pies de sus riscos. Ellos hubiesen querido que compartiéramos sus cuevas, pero lord John no quiso consentirlo por nada del mundo, considerando que de ese modo nos poníamos en sus manos si tenían intención de traicionarnos. Por lo tanto preservamos nuestra independencia, y si bien manteníamos con ellos las más amistosas relaciones, teníamos siempre listas nuestras armas para cualquier emergencia. Asimismo continuábamos visitando asiduamente las cuevas, que eran lugares notabilísimos, aunque nunca pudimos determinar si eran obras del hombre o de la Naturaleza. Todas ellas estaban en un solo estrato, horadadas en una especie de roca blanda que se extendía entre el basalto volcánico que formaba los riscos rojizos de la parte superior y el duro granito de su base.
Sus bocas se hallaban a unos ochenta pies por encima del suelo, y se las alcanzaba por largas escaleras de piedra, tan estrechas y empinadas que ningún animal de grandes dimensiones podía subir por ellas. En el interior, eran cálidas y secas, y estaban recorridas por pasajes rectos de variada longitud labrados en la ladera de la colina. Tenían paredes lisas y grises, decoradas con
muchas pinturas excelentes hechas con palos carbonizados y que representaban a diversos animales de la meseta. Si todas las cosas vivientes fueran barridas de la comarca, el futuro explorador hallaría en estas paredes una amplia evidencia de la extraña fauna: dinosaurios, iguanodontes y peces lagartos, que habían poblado la tierra en tiempos tan recientes.
Desde que supimos que los enormes iguanodontes eran conducidos por sus propietarios como si fuesen rebaños domesticados, y que eran sencillamente unos depósitos ambulantes de carne, habíamos supuesto que el hombre, incluso con sus armas primitivas, había establecido su superioridad en la
meseta. Pronto íbamos a descubrir que no era así y que aún se hallaba allí por mera tolerancia. Al tercer día de haber instalado nuestro campamento cerca de las cuevas de los indios ocurrió la tragedia. Aquel día Challenger y Summerlee habían salido juntos en dirección al lago, donde algunos de los indígenas, bajo su dirección, estaban dedicados a arponear ejemplares de los grandes lagartos.
Lord John y yo habíamos permanecido en nuestro campamento, en tanto una cantidad de indios esparcidos por la herbosa cuesta que se extendía frente a las cuevas se dedicaban a diversos menesteres. De improviso se oyó un agudo grito de alarma, con la palabra «Stoa» resonando en un centenar de voces.
Hombres, mujeres y niños corrieron desde todos lados buscando refugio, trepando como hormigas por las escaleras y entrando en las cuevas en loca estampida.
Mirando hacia arriba vimos que agitaban los brazos desde las rocas y nos hacían señas para que nos reuniésemos con ellos en su refugio. Ambos habíamos empuñado nuestros rifles de repetición y salimos corriendo para ver qué clase de peligro podía ser. Súbitamente irrumpió del cinturón de árboles cercano un grupo de quince o veinte indios que corría para salvar la vida.
Pisándoles los talones, aparecieron dos de aquellos espantables monstruos que habían perturbado nuestro campamento y me habían perseguido durante mi excursión solitaria. Por su forma parecían horribles sapos y se movían en sucesivos saltos; pero sus medidas eran increíblemente voluminosas, mayores que las del elefante más enorme. Nunca los habíamos visto, salvo de noche, y en realidad eran animales nocturnos, excepto cuando eran molestados en sus guaridas, como había sucedido esta vez. Quedamos estupefactos al verlos, porque sus pieles manchadas y verrugosas tenían una iridiscencia curiosa, semejante a la de los peces, ylos rayos del sol se reflejaban en ellos con fluorescencias de arco iris en continua variación cuando se movían.
De todos modos, poco tiempo tuvimos para observarlos, porque en un instante alcanzaron a los fugitivos y consumaron entre ellos una horrible carnicería. Su método era caer por turno y con todo su peso sobre un indígena tras otro, dejándolos aplastados y despedazados. Los acosados indios lanzaban alaridos de terror, pero aunque corrían todo lo que podían se hallaban indefensos ante la inexorable determinación y la horrible agilidad de aquellos
seres monstruosos. Caían uno tras otro, y no quedaría más de media docena de supervivientes cuando mi compañero y yo acudimos en su ayuda. Ésta de poco les sirvió, y sólo condujo a que nos viéramos envueltos en el mismo peligro.
Desde una distancia de un par de centenares de yardas vaciamos nuestros cargadores, disparando una bala tras otra sobre las bestias, pero sin que les hiciera un efecto mayor que si los hubiésemos apedreado con bolitas de papel.
Su naturaleza de reptiles era de reacciones lentas, sin que las heridas pareciesen afectarlos; y como sus conexiones vitales no estaban comunicadas con un centro cerebral único sino diseminadas a través de sus médulas espinales, no eran vulnerados por ninguna de las armas modernas. Lo más que pudimos hacer fue contener su avance distrayendo su atención con el relampagueo y el estruendo de nuestros rifles y así dar tiempo a los indígenas y a nosotros mismos para llegar a las escaleras que nos llevaban a la salvación.
Pero donde las balas cónicas explosivas del siglo xx no fueron de ninguna utilidad, triunfaron las flechas envenenadas de los indígenas, impregnadas en el jugo del strophantus y maceradas luego en carroña podrida. Estas flechas no eran de mucha utilidad para el cazador que atacaba a las bestias, porque su acción era lenta en aquella circulación apática, y antes de que sus poderes se debilitaran, ya habían alcanzado y derribado a su asaltante. Pero ahora, mientras los dos monstruos nos daban caza al pie mismo de la escalera, una nube de flechas llegó silbando desde todas las aberturas del farallón que nos dominaba. En un minuto quedaron como emplumados por las flechas, y sin embargo no daban señales de dolor mientras seguían tratando de morder y aferrar los peldaños que los podían conducir hacia sus víctimas, con rabia impotente. Ascendían pesadamente unas pocas yardas y volvían a deslizarse hasta el suelo. Pero por fin el veneno surtió efecto. Uno de ellos lanzó un
gemido profundo y sordo, dejando caer a tierra su enorme cabeza achatada. El otro daba saltos en círculos excéntricos, prorrumpiendo en gritos agudos y gemebundos, para luego desplomarse entre retorcimientos de agonía que duraron algunos minutos, antes de quedar tieso e inmóvil. Lanzando alaridos de triunfo, los indios bajaron atropelladamente de sus cuevas y bailaron una frenética danza de victoria en torno a los cadáveres; un júbilo demencial los dominaba al ver que otros dos ejemplares de sus enemigos más peligrosos habían sido abatidos. Aquella noche despedazaron y trasladaron los cuerpos, no para comerlos ––el veneno estaba aún activo–– sino para alejar la propagación de alguna peste. Sin embargo, los grandes corazones de los reptiles, cada uno tan grande como un almohadón, quedaron allí, latiendo con ritmo lento y regular, en suaves contracciones y dilataciones, conservando una horrible vida independiente. Al tercer día sus ganglios dejaron de funcionar y aquellos espantosos músculos quedaron inmóviles.
Algún día, cuando disponga de un escritorio mejor que una lata de conservas y de instrumentos más útiles que un trozo de lápiz gastado y un último y estropeado cuaderno, escribiré un relato más amplio sobre los indios accala: nuestra vida entre ellos y las fugaces visiones que tuvimos acerca de las extrañas condiciones de la pasmosa Tierra de Maple White. La memoria, por lo menos, nunca me fallará, porque mientras me quede un aliento de vida, cada hora y cada acción de esta época permanecerá grabada tan firme y clara como los primeros acontecimientos extraños de nuestra niñez. Ninguna impresión nueva puede borrar a las que han quedado tan profundamente impresas. Cuando llegue el momento describiré aquella pasmosa noche de luna sobre el gran lago, cuando un joven ictiosaurio ––una extraña criatura, mitad foca, mitad pez, con ojos cubiertos de hueso a ambos lados del hocico y un tercer ojo fijado arriba de su cabeza–– quedó atrapado en una red de los indios y estuvo a punto de volcar nuestra canoa antes de que pudiésemos hacerla encallar en la costa. Fue la misma noche en que una verde serpiente de agua atacó desde un cañaveral y se llevó preso entre sus anillos al timonel de la canoa de Challenger. Hablaré también del ser nocturno, grande y blanco –– hasta hoy no sé si era un reptil o una fiera–– que vivía en una ciénaga detestable al este del lago y que se deslizaba en la oscuridad con una tenue luminosidad fosforescente. Aquello aterrorizaba de tal manera a los indios que
no querían acercarse al lugar y, a pesar de que emprendimos dos expediciones y lo vimos en ambas, no pudimos abrirnos camino entre los profundos marjales en que vivía. Sólo puedo decir que era más grande que una vaca y que exhalaba un extrañísimo olor a almizcle. Me referiré también al enorme pájaro que dio caza a Challenger cierto día, hasta que éste tuvo que buscar el refugio de las rocas... Era un gran pájaro corredor, mucho más alto que un avestruz, con cuello parecido al de un buitre y una cabeza de aspecto cruel, que lo asemejaba a una muerte ambulante. Al trepar Challenger para salvarse, un picotazo de aquel pico curvado y feroz le arrancó el tacón de la bota como si hubiese sido cortado con un cincel. En esta ocasión, al menos, prevalecieron las armas modernas y el corpulento animal (doce pies de cabeza a las patas) –– y que se llamaba phororachus, según nuestro jadeante pero alborozado profesor–– cayó ante el rifle de lord John entre un revuelo de plumas agitadas y pataleos, con dos implacables ojos amarillos echando fuego en el medio de
todo eso. Espero vivir para ver aquel cráneo chato y depravado en su correspondiente nicho entre los trofeos del Albany. Y por fin daré algunas informaciones, sin duda, sobre el toxodón, el gigantesco cochinillo de indias, de diez pies de largo y dientes salientes en forma de cincel, al que matamos cuando estaba bebiendo junto al lago, en una mañana gris.
De todas estas cosas escribiré algún día con mayor extensión, y entre aquellos días agitados, trataré de esbozar con ternura los intervalos de paz: aquellos atardeceres veraniegos tan bellos, con el profundo cielo azul sobre nuestras cabezas mientras permanecíamos tendidos en buena camaradería entre las altas hierbas del linde del bosque y nos sorprendíamos ante las extrañas aves que pasaban ante nosotros o los rarísimos animales desconocidos que salían reptando de sus madrigueras para observarnos, mientras las ramas de los arbustos se doblaban bajo el peso de frutos deliciosos, que pendían sobre nuestras cabezas. A nuestros pies, bellas y extrañas flores parecían espiarnos por entre las hierbas. O recordaré aquellas largas noches de luna que pasamos sobre la centelleante superficie del gran lago, observando con asombro y pavor los enormes círculos que ondulaban ante la súbita zambullida de algún fantástico monstruo. O el resplandor verdoso, allá en el fondo de las aguas profundas, de algún ser desconocido que salía de los confines de la oscuridad. Tales son las escenas que mi mente y mi pluma tratarán en todos sus detalles cuando llegue el día.
Pero, me preguntará usted, ¿por qué todas esas experiencias y por qué esa demora cuando usted y sus camaradas deberían estar ocupados día y noche haciendo proyectos para hallar los medios que les permitiesen retornar al mundo exterior? Mi respuesta es que todos nosotros trabajábamos con ese fin, pero que nuestra labor había sido en vano. Muy pronto descubrimos un hecho: los indios no harían nada para ayudarnos. En cualquier otro sentido eran nuestros amigos ––casi podríamos decir nuestros esclavos devotos––, pero cuando se les sugería que podían ayudarnos a transportar una tablazón que nos sirviera de puente para cruzar el abismo, o cuando deseábamos pedirles tiras de cuero o lianas para tejer cuerdas que nos pudieran servir, chocábamos con un amable pero invencible rechazo. Sonreían, pestañeaban, sacudían sus cabezas, y nada más. Hasta el viejo jefe oponía idéntica negativa, y sólo Maretas, el joven al que habíamos salvado, nos miraba con ansiedad y trataba de explicarnos mediante gestos cuánto le afligía ver que nuestros deseos eran frustrados. Desde su completo triunfo sobre los monos––hombres, nos contemplaban como a seres sobrehumanos, que llevaban la victoria en los tubos de armas desconocidas, y creían que mientras permaneciésemos con ellos los acompañaría la buena suerte. Nos ofrecieron a cada uno de nosotros una mujercita cobriza como esposa y una cueva propia, siempre que olvidásemos a nuestro pueblo y nos quedáramos a vivir para siempre en la meseta. Siempre se habían mostrado amables, por más opuestos que fueran a nuestros deseos, pero comprendimos con claridad que deberíamos mantener en secreto nuestros planes de descenso, porque teníamos razones para temer que al fin ellos tratarían de retenernos por la fuerza.
A pesar del peligro de los dinosaurios (que no es grande salvo durante la noche, porque corno he dicho antes son de hábitos nocturnos), he vuelto dos veces durante las últimas tres semanas a nuestro antiguo campamento, con el propósito de ver a nuestro negro, que sigue montando guardia al pie del farallón. Mis ojos escrutaron con ansiedad la gran llanura, con la esperanza de divisar a lo lejos la ayuda que habíamos solicitado. Pero los extensos llanos sembrados de cactos se dilataban en la lejanía vacíos y desnudos, tras la distante línea de los cañaverales de bambúes.
––Vendrán pronto, ahora, Massa Malone. Antes de que pase otra semana el indio vendrá y traerá cuerda y los haremos bajar.
Éstas eran las animadas exclamaciones de nuestro excelente Zambo.
Tuve una extraña experiencia al volver de esta segunda visita, en la que me vi envuelto como consecuencia de haber pasado una noche lejos de mis compañeros. Regresaba por la bien conocida senda y había alcanzado un lugar que distaba alrededor de una milla de la ciénaga de los pterodáctilos, cuando vi que se me acercaba un extraordinario objeto. Era un hombre que caminaba
dentro de una armazón hecha de bambúes doblados de manera que lo encerraban por todas partes en una jaula en forma de campana. Al acercarme mi asombro fue aún mayor al ver que era lord John Roxton. Cuando me vio se deslizó fuera de su curiosa capa protectora y vino hacia mí riéndose, si bien me pareció advertir cierta confusión en su actitud.
––Bueno, compañerito, ¿quién iba a pensar que lo iba a encontrar por estas alturas? ––dijo.
––¿Qué demonios está haciendo? ––pregunté.
––Visitando a mis amigos, los pterodáctilos ––dijo.
––¿Y para qué?
––Son unas bestias muy interesantes, ¿no cree? Pero muy poco sociables.
Tienen modales muy rudos y desagradables con los extraños, como recordará.
Por eso aparejé esta armazón que les impide ser demasiado importunos en sus atenciones.
––Pero, ¿qué busca usted en la ciénaga?
Me miró con ojos muy escuadriñadores y pude leer en su rostro cierta vacilación.
––¿No piensa usted que hay otras personas, además de los profesores, que quieren saber cosas? ––dijo por último––. Yo estoy estudiando a estas preciosidades. Esto debe ser suficiente para usted.
––No quise ofenderle ––dije.
Recobró su buen humor y se rió.
––Yo tampoco, compañerito. Voy a capturar un polluelo de estos
endemoniados pajarracos para dárselo a Challenger. Ése es uno de mis empeños. No, no quiero que me acompañe. Yo estoy a salvo en esta jaula, pero usted no tiene protección. Hasta luego. Estaré de regreso en el campamento al caer la noche.
Se alejó y le vi seguir su paseo por el bosque metido en su extraordinaria jaula.
Si la conducta de lord John era extraña en ese momento, todavía más lo era la de Challenger. Debo señalar que ejercía, al parecer, una extraordinaria fascinación sobre las mujeres indias y por eso iba siempre provisto de una ancha rama de palmera desplegada, con la cual las espantaba como si fueran moscas cuando sus atenciones se volvían demasiado apremiantes. Verlo pasearse como un sultán de ópera cómica, con aquella insignia de autoridad en la mano, sus negras barbas erizadas ante él, las puntas de sus pies apoyándose a cada paso, llevando detrás un cortejo de muchachas indias asombradas (con su atavío sumario de breves taparrabos de tejido de corteza), era uno de los espectáculos más grotescos que llevaré en mi memoria al regresar. En cuanto a Summerlee, estaba absorto en la vida de los insectos y los pájaros de la meseta, y dedicaba todo su tiempo (salvo la considerable porción que consagraba a insultar a Challenger porque no nos sacaba de nuestras dificultades) a disecar y montar sus ejemplares.
Challenger había tomado la costumbre de marcharse solo todas las mañanas, regresando de tiempo en tiempo con miradas de portentosa solemnidad, como quien carga sobre sus espaldas todo el peso de una gran empresa. Un día, con su rama de palmera en la mano, y su séquito de fieles adoradoras detrás de él, nos condujo a su oculto taller y nos reveló el secreto de sus planes.
El lugar era un pequeño calvero en el centro de un bosquecillo de
palmeras. En él había uno de esos géiseres de barro hirviente que ya he descrito. Alrededor de su borde había esparcida una cantidad de tiras cortadas de la piel del iguanodonte, y una gran membrana aplastada que probó ser el estómago, seco y raspado, de uno de los grandes peces––lagartos del lago.
Esta enorme bolsa había sido cosida en uno de sus extremos y sólo un pequeño orificio había quedado en el otro. En esta abertura habían sido introducidas algunas cañas de bambú y el otro extremó de estas cañas estaba en contacto con unas tuberías cónicas de arcilla que recolectaban el gas que burbujeaba elevando el barro del géiser. Muy pronto el fláccido órgano comenzó a expandirse lentamente y mostró tal tendencia a actuar con movimientos ascendentes que Challenger tensó las cuerdas que lo sujetaban a los troncos de los árboles circundantes. En media hora, se había formado un globo de gas de buen tamaño y los tirones y tensiones ejercidos sobre las correas demostraban que era capaz de una notable capacidad ascensional. Challenger, como un padre orgulloso en presencia de su primogénita, permanecía sonriendo y mesando su barba en silencio, satisfecho de sí mismo mientras contemplaba la creación de su cerebro. Summerlee fue el primero que rompió el silencio:
––No pretenderá que subamos a esa cosa, ¿verdad, Challenger? ––dijo con tono áspero.
––Pretendo, mi querido Summerlee, hacerle una demostración tal de su potencia, que después de verla usted querrá, estoy seguro, confiarse a él sin ninguna vacilación.
––Quítese eso de la cabeza ahora mismo ––dijo Summerlee con
decisión––. Por nada del mundo cometería semejante desatino. Lord John, confio en que usted no apoyará semejante locura.
––Pues yo diría que es algo endemoniadamente ingenioso ––dijo nuestro par–– y me gustaría ver cómo funciona.
––Pues entonces lo verá ––dijo Challenger––. Durante varios días he empeñado toda la fuerza de mi cerebro en el problema de cómo descender por estos acantilados. Ya nos hemos convencido de que no podemos descender por los farallones y de que no hay túnel. Tampoco podemos construir ninguna clase de puente que nos permita volver al pináculo desde el cual cruzamos
hasta aquí. ¿Cómo hallar, pues, otro medio que convenga a nuestros fines?
Hace poco tiempo señalé a nuestro joven amigo aquí presente que el géiser desprendía hidrógeno libre. A esto siguió, naturalmente, la idea de un globo.
Debo admitir que me desconcertó un poco la dificultad de encontrar un recipiente para encerrar el gas, pero la contemplación de las inmensas entrañas de estos reptiles me suministró la solución del problema. ¡He aquí el resultado!
Metió una mano en la delantera de su raída chaqueta y con la otra apuntó orgullosamente hacia el globo.
Ya aquel saco de gas se había inflado hasta llegar a una redondez muy considerable y tironeaba fuertemente de sus amarras.
––¡Locura de verano! ––resopló Summerlee.
A lord John le encantaba totalmente la idea.
––El viejo es inteligente, ¿no? ––me susurró, y luego elevó la voz en dirección a Challenger––: ¿Tendrá barquilla?
––La barquilla será mi próxima ocupación. Ya he proyectado cómo fabricarla y de qué modo irá sujeta. Mientras tanto me limitaré a mostrarles que mi aparato es muy capaz de soportar el peso de cada uno de ustedes.
––De todos nosotros, supongo.
––No; es parte de mi plan que cada uno descienda por turno como en un paracaídas. El globo será traído de regreso por medios que no tendré dificultad en perfeccionar. Si puede soportar el peso de uno solo y hacerlo descender suavemente, habrá dado de sí todo lo que se le requería. Ahora voy a demostrarles su capacidad para esos fines.
Sacó un trozo de basalto de considerable tamaño, labrado en el centro de tal manera que resultase fácil atarle una cuerda. Esta cuerda era la que habíamos traído nosotros a la meseta después de usarla para escalar el pináculo. Tenía más de un centenar de pies de largo, y aunque era delgada poseía mucha resistencia. Había preparado una especie de collar de cuero del que colgaban muchas tiras. Este collar fue colocado en la cúpula del balón y las correas colgantes se unieron por debajo, de modo que la presión de cualquier carga pudiera repartirse sobre una amplia superficie. Luego sujetó el trozo de basalto a las correas y dejó que la cuerda colgase de uno de sus extremos. El profesor la envolvió en su brazo dándole tres vueltas.
––Ahora ––dijo Challenger con una sonrisa de placer anticipado––, demostraré el poder de arrastre ascensional de mi globo.
Al decir esto, cortó con un cuchillo las varias amarras que lo sujetaban.
Nunca había estado nuestra expedición en peligro más inminente de una completa aniquilación. La membrana inflada se disparó hacia arriba con terrorífica velocidad. Al instante Challenger perdió pie y fue arrastrado por los aires. Yo tuve el tiempo justo para abrazarle por la cintura cuando ascendía y también fui arrebatado por los aires. Lord John me cogió por las piernas con la presión de la ballesta de una trampa de ratones, pero sentí que también él perdía contacto con el suelo. Tuve por un momento la visión de cuatro aventureros flotando como una ristra de salchichas por encima de la tierra que habían explorado. Afortunadamente, empero, había límites en la tensión que la cuerda podía resistir, aunque no los había, en apariencia, para la fuerza ascensional de aquella infernal maquinaria. Hubo un fuerte chasquido y caímos en montón al suelo, con las espirales de la cuerda arrollándose por encima de nosotros. Cuando fuimos capaces de ponernos de pie, tambaleantes, vimos en el profundo cielo azul, muy lejos, una mancha oscura. Era la piedra basáltica, que se perdía en el horizonte a gran velocidad.
––¡Espléndido! ––exclamó el impávido Challenger, frotándose el brazo lastimado––. La prueba ha resultado de lo más exhaustiva y satisfactoria. No podía prever un éxito tan grande. Dentro de una semana, caballeros, les prometo que estará preparado un segundo globo y podrán hacer en él, con seguridad y comodidades, la primera etapa de nuestro viaje de regreso a la patria.
Hasta aquí he escrito sobre todos los acontecimientos precedentes según el orden en que se sucedieron. Ahora estoy redondeando mi narración en el campamento primitivo, donde Zambo nos ha esperado tanto tiempo; todas nuestras dificultades y peligros han quedado atrás, como un sueño en la cima de estos vastos acantilados rojizos. Hemos descendido sin daños, pero de la manera más inesperada; y todo va bien. En seis semanas o dos meses estaremos en Londres y es posible que esta carta no llegue a destino antes que nosotros mismos. Ya nuestros corazones anhelan y nuestros corazones vuelan hacia la gran ciudad madre que encierra tanto de lo que amamos.
Fue precisamente la misma tarde de nuestra peligrosa aventura en el globo de fabricación casera de Challenger cuando sobrevino el cambio en nuestra suerte. He dicho ya que la única persona que había mostrado alguna señal de simpatía hacia nuestros intentos de salir de allí era el joven jefe que habíamos rescatado. Él era el único que no deseaba retenernos contra nuestra voluntad en una tierra extranjera. Nos lo había dado a entender claramente a través de su expresivo lenguaje de gestos. Aquella tarde, cuando ya había oscurecido, volvió a nuestro pequeño campamento y me entregó (por alguna razón siempre me había señalado con sus atenciones, quizá porque era el único de edad próxima a la suya) un pequeño rollo de corteza de árbol. Luego, señalando solemnemente hacia la hilera de cuevas que había sobre él, se llevó el dedo a los labios, como signo de que se trataba de un secreto, y se marchó a hurtadillas con su gente.
Llevé el pedazo de corteza cerca de la luz de la hoguera y lo examinamos juntos. Tenía alrededor de un pie cuadrado de superficie y en el lado interno había una cantidad de líneas curiosamente dispuestas, que aquí reproduzco: Estaban nítidamente dibujadas con carbón sobre la superficie blanca y a
primera vista me parecieron––una suerte de tosca partitura musical.
––Sea lo que sea, puedo jurar que es algo importante para nosotros –– dije––. Lo pude leer en su rostro cuando me lo dio.
––A menos que tengamos que enfrentarnos a un bromista primitivo –– sugirió Summerlee––, porque según creo la broma fue uno de los más elementales factores del desarrollo del hombre.
––Sin duda es alguna clase de escritura ––dijo Challenger.
––Parece como un rompecabezas de esos concursos cuyo premio es una guinea ––comentó lord John, estirando el cuello para observarlo. De improviso alargó su mano y cogió el rompecabezas––. ¡Por Dios! ––exclamó––. Creo que ya lo tengo. El muchacho lo había acertado desde el primer momento.
¡Vean aquí! ¿Cuántas marcas hay en ese papel? Dieciocho. Y bien: si piensan en ello, verán que hay dieciocho bocas de cueva en la ladera de la colina que está sobre nosotros.
––Cuando me dio el papel señaló las cuevas ––dije.
––Bien, esto lo aclara todo. Es un mapa de las cuevas, ¿eh? Dieciocho de ellas en una hilera, algunas cortas, otras profundas, algunas bifurcadas, tal como las hemos visto. Es un mapa y aquí hay una cruz. ¿Para qué está colocada? Lo está para señalar una cueva que es mucho más profunda que las otras.
––Una que atraviesa todo el risco ––exclamé.
––Creo que nuestro joven amigo ha descifrado el enigma ––dijo
Challenger––. Si la cueva no atraviesa de parte a parte el risco, no comprendo por qué esta persona, que tiene toda clase de razones para desearnos el bien, va a llamarnos la atención sobre ello. Pero si lo atraviesa y sale del otro lado por un punto situado a la misma altura, no tendremos que descender más que un centenar de pies.
––¡Un centenar de pies! ––refunfuñó Summerlee.
––Bueno, nuestra cuerda todavía tiene más de cien pies ––exclamó––. Sin duda podremos hacer el descenso.
––¿Y qué pasará con los indios que están en la cueva? ––objetó
Summerlee.
––No hay indios en ninguna de las cuevas que hay por encima de nosotros ––dije––. Todas se utilizan como graneros y depósitos. ¿Por qué no subimos ahora mismo y atisbamos el terreno?
Se halla en la meseta una madera seca y bituminosa ––una especie de araucaria, de acuerdo con nuestros botánicos que siempre usan los indios como antorcha. Cada uno de nosotros cogió un manojo de éstas y subimos por la escalera cubierta de maleza hasta la cueva marcada en el dibujo. Estaba, tal como ya había dicho, completamente vacía, si se exceptúa un gran número de enormes murciélagos, que aletearon en torno a nuestras cabezas a medida que nos adentrábamos en ella. Como no deseábamos atraer la atención de los indios acerca de nuestras acciones, anduvimos dando traspiés en la oscuridad hasta que dejando atrás varias cuevas penetramos una considerable distancia en el interior de la caverna. Entonces, por fin, encendimos nuestras antorchas.
Era un túnel hermoso y seco, con lisas paredes grises, cubiertas de símbolos indígenas, el techo curvado con arcos sobre nuestras cabezas y una arena blanca que brillaba bajo nuestros pies. Nos precipitamos anhelantes por este túnel hasta que, con un profundo gemido de amargo desencanto, nos vimos forzados a hacer un alto. Ante nosotros aparecía un muro de roca pura, en la que no había ni una grieta por la que pudiera deslizarse un ratón. Allí no había salida para nosotros.
Nos quedamos inmóviles, contemplando con amargura en el corazón ese inesperado obstáculo. Éste no era el resultado de ningún cataclismo, como en el caso del túnel de ascenso. Aquello era, y había sido siempre, un cul de sac.
––No importa, amigos míos ––dijo el indomable Challenger––. Todavía cuentan ustedes con mi firme promesa de otro globo.
Summerlee lanzó un quejido.
––¿No habremos seguido una cueva equivocada? ––sugerí.
––Es inútil, compañerito ––dijo lord John con el dedo apoyado en nuestro mapa––. La diecisiete empezando por la derecha y la segunda desde la izquierda. Ésta es la cueva, con toda seguridad.
Yo miré la marca que señalaba su dedo y lancé un grito de repentina alegría.
––¡Creo que lo tengo! ¡Síganme, síganme!
Retrocedía a todo correr por el camino que habíamos seguido, con la antorcha en la mano.
––Aquí ––dije, señalando hacia unas cerillas que había en el suelo–– es donde encendimos las antorchas.
––Exacto.
––Bien, aquí está marcada como una cueva con una bifurcación. En la oscuridad hemos pasado la bifurcación antes de que las antorchas estuvieran encendidas. Por la derecha, según vamos saliendo, encontraremos el brazo más largo.
Así fue, tal como yo había dicho. No habíamos andado treinta yardas cuando apareció en la pared un gran agujero negro. Nos metimos por él y descubrimos que nos hallábamos en un pasillo mucho más amplio. Corrimos por él con impaciencia, hasta perder el aliento, por un espacio de muchos centenares de yardas. Entonces, de pronto, divisamos en medio de la negra oscuridad del arco que se abría ante nosotros un resplandor rojo oscuro. Nos quedamos mirando aquello, atónitos. Un velo de fuego estable y continuo parecía atravesar el túnel y cerrarnos el camino. Nos apresuramos a correr hacia allí. No se oía ruido ni se sentía calor ni se veía el menor movimiento en esa dirección, pero aquella gran cortina luminosa seguía brillando ante nosotros, bañando de luz plateada toda la cueva y convirtiendo la arena en
polvo de piedras preciosas, hasta que al acercarnos más reveló que tenía un borde circular.
––¡Por Dios... es la luna! ––exclamó lord John––. ¡Hemos salido al otro lado, muchachos, hemos salido al otro lado!
Era en verdad la luna llena, que brillaba fuertemente detrás de la abertura que se formaba en el acantilado.
Era una hendidura pequeña, no mayor que una ventana, pero suficiente para todos nuestros propósitos. Cuando alargamos el cuello por ella pudimos observar que el descenso no era muy difícil y que el nivel del suelo no estaba a mucha distancia por debajo de nosotros. No era de sorprender que desde abajo no hubiéramos podido distinguir el lugar, porque los riscos sobresalían curvados sobre él desde lo alto y una ascensión al sitio parecía tan imposible que desalentaba cualquier inspección más minuciosa. Nos satisfizo observar que con ayuda de nuestra cuerda podríamos llegar hasta abajo sin dificultades; luego regresamos gozosos a nuestro campamento, para hacer nuestros
preparativos. La salida sería la noche siguiente.
Teníamos que hacerlo todo con rapidez y secreto, porque los indios eran capaces de impedir nuestra partida aun en este último momento. Dejaríamos allí nuestros pertrechos, con excepción de rifles y cartuchos. Pero Challenger tenía algunos objetos pesados que deseaba ardientemente llevarse con él y un bulto en particular, al cual no quiero referirme, que nos dio más trabajo que ningún otro. El día pasó con lentitud, pero al caer la noche estábamos preparados para la partida. Con gran trabajo subimos nuestras cosas por las escaleras. Entonces, mirando hacia atrás, examinamos largamente, por última vez, aquella extraña tierra que me temo sería muy pronto vulgarizada, presa de cazadores y buscadores de minas, pero que para nosotros todos era el país de los sueños, de la fascinación y la aventura novelesca. Un país donde nos habíamos arriesgado mucho, habíamos sufrido mucho y aprendido otro tanto...
Nuestro país, como siempre lo llamaremos con afecto. A nuestra izquierda, las cuevas vecinas lanzaban sus joviales fuegos rojizos en la oscuridad. Desde la cuesta que bajaba a nuestros pies ascendían las voces de los indios que reían y cantaban. Más lejos, se extendían los profundos bosques, y en el centro, brillando vagamente entre las tinieblas, estaba el gran lago, madre de extraños monstruos. Mientras estábamos mirando, vibró claramente en la oscuridad un grito agudo y despiadado, la llamada de algún fantasmagórico animal. Era la auténtica voz de la Tierra de Maple White dándonos su adiós. Nos dimos la vuelta y nos zambullimos en la cueva que nos conducía de regreso a casa.
Dos horas después, nosotros, nuestros bultos y todo lo que poseíamos descansábamos al pie del farallón. Salvo con el equipaje de Challenger, nunca tuvimos ninguna dificultad. Dejamos todo en el lugar donde habíamos descendido y partimos de inmediato hacia el campamento de Zambo. Nos acercamos al mismo al amanecer y, para nuestra sorpresa, no hallamos una sola hoguera sino una docena de ellas, esparcidas por la llanura. La partida de socorro había llegado. Eran veinte indios ribereños, provistos de piquetas, cuerdas y todo lo que podía ser útil para franquear el abismo. Finalmente, no tendremos ya dificultades para transportar nuestros equipajes cuando comencemos mañana nuestro camino de regreso hacia el Amazonas.
Y así, en una disposición humilde y llena de gratitud, cierro este relato.
Nuestros ojos han visto grandes maravillas y nuestras almas se han purificado con todo lo que hemos sobrellevado. Cada uno de nosotros, a su modo, es un hombre mejor y más profundo. Tal vez cuando lleguemos a Pará nos detengamos allí para reaprovisionarnos. Si hacemos eso, esta carta llegará por correo antes que nosotros. Si no, arribará a Londres el mismo día de mi
llegada. En cualquiera de los dos casos, mi querido McArdle, espero que muy pronto podré estrecharle la mano.