de-en  H.G.Wells, die Zeitmaschine Chapter 12 Medium
The Green Porcelain Palace.
I found the green porcelain palace, as we approached it around noon, to be abandoned and falling into ruins. Only broken traces of glass were still sitting in the windows, and large areas of the green façade had fallen off, and as a result, the metal scaffolding behind it could be seen. It was located very high on a dune, and when I looked to the northeast before entering, I saw where, in my opinion, Wandsworth and Battersea formerly must have been, a large estuary, or even a bay. I was thinking about it - of course, I did not pursue the thought any further - what probably happened or might have happened to the sea creatures.

On closer inspection, the material of the palace really turned out to be porcelain, and on the façade I saw an inscription in unknown letters. I thought quite foolishly that Weena would be able to help me interpret it, but I only learned that the mere notion of writing had never crossed her mind. She seemed to me, I think, always more human than she was, perhaps because her love was so human.

Inside the large door wings we found a long gallery illuminated by many side windows instead of the usual hall. At first sight I was reminded of a museum. The brick floor was completely covered with dust, and a striking arrangement of various objects was covered with the same gray layer Then I saw something uncanny and lean standing in the middle of the hall, which without a doubt was the lower part of a huge skeleton. I recognized by the slanted feet that it was an extinct creature in the manner of a Megatherium. The skull and upper bones were next to it in the thick dust, and at a point where the rain dripped through a leak in the roof, the thing was damaged. ... Furthermore in the gallery stood the huge skeleton of a Brontosaurus. My museum hypothesis was confirmed. I stepped to the side and found what seemed to be sloping surfaces there. I removed the thick dust and saw the well-known glass cases from our time. But judging by the good preservation of some of the contents, they had to be airtight.

Obviously we were standing in the ruins of a South Kensington museum of latter days! This was evidently the paleontological department, and it must have been a very brilliant collection of fossils, although the inevitable process of decay, which for a time had been averted and had lost ninety percent of its potency through the extinction of bacteria and fungi, nevertheless was working anew on all its treasures with extreme certainty, albeit with extreme slowness. Here and there I found traces of the small people, because rare fossils were broken into pieces or arrayed on reed filaments. And in some places the cases were removed - by the Morlocks, I concluded. It was very quiet. The thick dust deadened our footsteps. Weena, who had rolled a sea imp down the sloping glass of a case, came up to me as I looked around, took my hand very calmly and stopped beside me.

And at first I was so amazed at this old monument of an intellectual age that I didn't even think about the possibilities it offered. Even my concern for the time machine vanished a little from my mind.

Judging by its size, this green porcelain palace had to contain much more than a gallery of palaeontology; perhaps historical galleries; perhaps even a library! This had to be much more interesting to me, at least under my conditions at that time, than this spectacle of decayed geology of the old times. I searched and found a second short gallery that ran crosswise to the first one. It seemed to be given over to mineralogy, and the sight of a block of sulfur brought my thoughts to gunpowder. But I could not find any saltpetre; absolutely no nitrates. Without any doubt, they had been melted away for centuries. But the sulphur stuck in my mind and stimulated a chain of thoughts. I had little interest in the rest of the gallery's content, although altogether it was the best preserved thing I got to see. I am not a specialist in mineralogy and I went down a very ruineous wing that ran parallel to the first hall I had entered. Apparently this section had been dedicated to natural history, but everything had become unrecognisable by now. A few shriveled and black traces of things that had once been stuffed animals, dried mummies in glass jars that had once contained spirits, a brown dust from plants that had disappeared: that was all! I was sorry, because I would have liked to have followed the slow transformation that had brought about the conquest of living nature. Then we came into a gallery of simply colossal proportions, but strangely poorly lit and angling slightly downwards. At regular intervals white spheres hung from the ceiling - many broken and smashed - suggesting that the room was originally artificially lit.

Here I was more in my element, for on both sides, gigantic forms of big machines rose up, all of them severely rusted or otherwise decayed and many disintegrated, but some still quite complete. You know I have a certain weakness for mechanics, and I stayed with them for a long time: all the more so because most of them were interesting as puzzles for me, and I could only make very vague assumptions about what they were for. I thought that if I could solve their puzzles, I would be in possession of powers to protect against the Morlocks.

Suddenly Weena came close to my side. So suddenly that she scared me. If she had not been there, I don't think I would have noticed at all that the floor was descending [footnote]. The end where I had entered was all celestial and illuminated by infrequent slit-like windows. Walking down the room lengthwise, the floor rose towards these windows until finally it was as if one was in a cellar where only a narrow line of daylight penetrated from above. I walked slowly down trying to understand the machines and had been all too busy with them to notice the gradual reduction of the light, and only Weena's growing fear drew my attention. Then I saw that the gallery was finally in the deepest darkness. I hesitated, and as I looked round I saw that the dust was less abundant and its surface less even. Further away towards the dimness, it seemed to be interrupted by a number of small narrow footprints. That revived my feeling of the immediate presence of the Morlocks again. I felt that I wasted my time with this academic investigation. I realized that it was already late in the afternoon and that I still had no weapon, no refuge and no means of making fire. And then down in the distant darkness of the gallery I heard a strange rattling and the same strange noises I had heard below the fountain.

I took Weena by the hand. Then I had a sudden thought, left her and turned to a machine with a lever protruding from it, not unlike those in a signaling room. I climbed up onto the stand, grabbed this lever with my hands and put all my weight sideways against it. Suddenly Weena, whom I had left in the center aisle, began to whimper. I had judged the strength of the lever quite correctly, because after about a minute of effort it broke, and I went back to her, armed with a club which, in my opinion, was more than enough for any Morlock's skull I might encounter. And I longed very much to kill a Morlock or such. Very inhuman, perhaps you are thinking, to want to go and kill his own offspring! But somehow it was impossible to feel any humanity in these beings. Only my reluctance to leave Weena alone and the thought that if I began to quench my thirst for murder, my time machine might suffer prevented me from running straight down the gallery and killing the beasts I heard.

Now, with the club in one hand and Weena in the other, I went out of this gallery and into another and even bigger one, which at first glance reminded me of a military chapel covered in tattered flags. I soon recognized the brown and charred tatters hanging on the sides as the decaying traces of books. They had long since decayed to pieces and every semblance of print was gone. But here and there lay shrunken covers and cracked metal clasps that spoke eloquently enough. Had I been a scholar, I might have moralized about the nullity of all ambitions. But the thing that struck me the most was the tremendous waste of effort that this dark wilderness of rotting paper testified to. At the time, I want to confess, I thought mainly of the "Philosophical Treatises" and my seventeen essays on physical optics.

Then I went up a wide staircase and came into a gallery that may have once served technical chemistry. And here I had no small hope of useful discoveries. Except at one end where the roof had collapsed, this gallery was well preserved. I eagerly went to any non-broken case. And finally, I found a box of matches in one of the really airtight boxes. I gave them a try, eagerly. They were perfectly well preserved. They weren't even damp. I turned to Weena. "Dance!" I called to her in her own language. Since I now had a weapon against the terrible creatures we dreaded. And so, in that museum of ruins, on the thick, soft carpet of dust to Weena's immense joy, I solemnly performed a tortuous dance, whistling as merrily as I could. Partly it was a shy can-can, partly a step dance, partly a dress dance (as much as my coattails allowed it) and partly original. Since, as you know, I am inventive by nature.

Well, I still think that this matchbox having escaped the ravages of time through unimaginable years was most strange, just as it was most fortunate for me. And yet, strangely enough, I found a still more improbable substance, and that was camphor. I found it in a sealed bottle which, I suspect, happened to be hermetically sealed. First I thought it was paraffin wax, so I smashed the glass. But the camphor smell was unmistakable. In the overall decay, this volatile substance had by chance survived for perhaps many thousands of centuries. It reminded me of a sepia painting that I had once seen painted with the ink of a belemnite that must have died and had been fossilized millions of years ago. I had the notion to throw it away, but I remembered that camphor is flammable and burns with a nice bright flame - in short, that it was an excellent candle - and I put the piece in my pocket. However, I found no explosives, no means to break the bronze doors. And yet I left the gallery in a very elevated mood.

I can't tell you the story of this long afternoon. It would take a great memory to list my discoveries in a reasonably correct order I recall a long gallery of rusting weapon racks and how I wavered between my crowbar and a hatchet or a sword. But I couldn't carry both, and my iron bar had the greatest promise against the bronze doors. There were countless guns, pistols and rifles. Most of them were masses of rust, but many were made of a new metal and still quite intact. But what may once have been in the form of cartridges or powder had become dust. A corner, I saw, was charred and shattered: perhaps, I thought, by an explosion among the samples. In another place I found a long row of idols - Polynesian, Mexican, Greek, Phoenician - it occurred to me, from all over the world. And here I gave in to an irresistible impulse and wrote my name on the nose of a South American soapstone monster that I particularly enjoyed.

As the evening progressed, my interest faded. I went through one gallery after another - dusty, quiet, often dilapidated rooms, whose collections were sometimes only piles of rust and coal, but sometimes also fresher. At one point I suddenly saw the model of a tin mine, and then by chance I discovered two dynamite cartridges in an airtight box! I cried "Eureka" and smashed the case joyfully. Then there was a doubt. I hesitated. Then I chose a small side gallery and made my experiment. I never felt such disappointment as I waited there five, ten, fifteen minutes for an explosion that never came. Of course, they were just models, as I could have guessed right away. I really think if it hadn't been for them, I would have run from there immediately and blown up the sphinx and bronze doors and (as it turned out) my prospect of finding the time machine all into nothingness at the same time.

Then I think we came to a small, open courtyard in the palace. It was grassy and contained three fruit trees. So we rested and refreshed ourselves. Towards sunset, I began to consider our situation. The night was overtaking us, and my inaccessible hiding place was yet to be found. But that caused me very little worry now. I had something in my possession, which was perhaps the best defense against the Morlocks - I had matches! And I also had the camphor in my pocket when a fire was needed. It seemed to me that the best thing we could do was spend the night under the protection of a fire in the open air. In the morning the time machine was still to be picked up. All I had so far was my iron mace. But with increasing knowledge, I felt quite different about these bronze doors. So far, I had not broken them for the most part, because the secret was lurking on the other side. They had never impressed me as being very strong, and I hoped that my bar of iron was not completely unsuitable for work.
unit 1
Der grüne Porzellanpalast.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 10
Beim ersten Blick wurde ich an ein Museum erinnert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 15
Weiterhin in der Galerie stand das riesige Skelett eines Brontosaurus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 16
Meine Museums-Hypothese bestätigte sich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 17
Ich trat an die Seite und fand dort offenbar schräge Flächen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 18
Ich beseitigte den dicken Staub und sah die allbekannten Glaskästen unserer Zeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 19
Aber nach der guten Erhaltung eines Teils des Inhalts mußten sie luftdicht sein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 20
Offenbar standen wir in den Ruinen eines South Kensington-Museums der späten Tage!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 23
Und an einigen Stellen waren die Kästen entfernt – von den Morlocken, schloß ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 24
Es war sehr still.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 25
Der dicke Staub dämpfte unsere Schritte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 28
Selbst meine Sorge um die Zeitmaschine wich ein wenig aus meinem Geist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 31
Ich suchte und fand eine zweite kurze Galerie, die quer zur ersten lief.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 15 hours ago
unit 33
Aber ich konnte keinen Salpeter finden; überhaupt keinerlei Nitrate.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 1 day ago
unit 34
Ohne Zweifel waren sie seit Jahrhunderten zerronnen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 35
Aber der Schwefel haftete mir im Geist und regte eine Kette von Gedanken an.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 46
Plötzlich kam Weena eng an meine Seite.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 47
So plötzlich, daß sie mich erschreckte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 52
Da sah ich, daß die Galerie schließlich in dichtes Dunkel hinunterlief.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 55
Das belebte meine Empfindung von der unmittelbaren Gegenwart der Morlocken von neuem.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 days, 9 hours ago
unit 56
unit 59
Ich nahm Weena an der Hand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 62
Plötzlich begann Weena, die ich im Mittelschiff verlassen hatte, zu wimmern.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 64
Und ich sehnte mich sehr danach, einen Morlocken oder so zu töten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 66
Aber irgendwie war es unmöglich, das Menschliche in den Wesen zu fühlen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 70
Sie waren längst in Stücke zerfallen und jeder Schein von Druck war verloschen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 76
Und hier hatte ich nicht geringe Hoffnung auf nützliche Entdeckungen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 77
Außer an einem Ende, wo das Dach eingestürzt war, war diese Galerie wohlerhalten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 78
Ich ging begierig zu jedem nicht zerbrochenen Kasten.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 80
Ich probierte sie begierig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 81
Sie waren vollkommen gut erhalten.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 82
Sie waren nicht einmal feucht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 83
Ich wandte mich zu Weena.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 84
›Tanze!‹ rief ich ihr in ihrer Sprache zu.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 88
Denn, wie Sie wissen, bin ich von Natur erfinderisch.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week ago
unit 92
Erst meinte ich, es sei Paraffinwachs, und ich zertrümmerte also das Glas.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 9 hours ago
unit 93
Aber der Kampfergeruch war unverkennbar.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 97
Ich fand jedoch keine Explosionsstoffe, kein Mittel, die Bronzetüren zu erbrechen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 2 hours ago
unit 98
Trotzdem verließ ich die Galerie in sehr gehobener Stimmung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 10 hours ago
unit 99
Ich kann Ihnen nicht die Geschichte dieses langen Nachmittags erzählen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 2 hours ago
unit 103
Es waren zahllose Flinten, Pistolen und Gewehre da.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 10 hours ago
unit 104
Die meisten waren Rostmassen, aber viele waren aus einem neuen Metall und noch recht heil.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 10 hours ago
unit 105
Aber was einmal an Patronen oder Pulver vorhanden gewesen sein mochte, war zu Staub verfallen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 1 hour ago
unit 109
Als der Abend vorrückte, schwand mein Interesse.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days, 1 hour ago
unit 112
Ich rief ›Eureka‹ und zertrümmerte den Kasten voller Freude.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 113
Dann kam ein Zweifel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 114
Ich zögerte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 115
Dann wählte ich eine kleine Seitengalerie und machte meinen Versuch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 117
Natürlich waren es nur Modelle, wie ich gleich hätte erraten können.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 119
Darauf glaube ich, kamen wir zu einem kleinen, offenen Hof im Palast.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 120
Er war grasbewachsen und enthielt drei Obstbäume.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 121
So ruhten wir aus und erfrischten uns.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 122
Gegen Sonnenuntergang begann ich, unsere Lage zu überlegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 3 hours ago
unit 124
Aber das machte mir jetzt sehr wenig Sorge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 126
Und ich hatte auch noch den Kampfer in der Tasche, wenn ein Feuer nötig wurde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 15 hours ago
unit 128
Morgens war dann noch die Zeitmaschine zu holen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 4 hours ago
unit 129
Dazu hatte ich bis jetzt nur meine Eisenkeule.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 days ago
unit 130
Aber mit meiner wachsenden Kenntnis empfand ich gegen diese Bronzetüren sehr anders.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 days, 16 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 55  4 days, 9 hours ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 55  4 days, 13 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 51  4 days, 14 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 49  4 days, 14 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 43  4 days, 14 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 39  4 days, 14 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 61  5 days, 3 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 60  5 days, 3 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 55  5 days, 3 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 54  5 days, 3 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 49  5 days, 4 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 111  6 days, 3 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 124  6 days, 4 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 104  6 days, 10 hours ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 93  6 days, 15 hours ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 107  6 days, 15 hours ago
lollo1a 4417  commented on  unit 104  6 days, 23 hours ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 15  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 24  1 week, 1 day ago
DrWho 10122  commented on  unit 8  1 week, 1 day ago
anitafunny 7247  commented on  unit 1  1 week, 1 day ago

Der grüne Porzellanpalast.
Ich fand den grünen Porzellanpalast, als wir uns ihm gegen Mittag näherten, verlassen und in Trümmer zerfallend. Nur noch zerbrochene Glasspuren saßen in den Fenstern, und von der grünen Fassade waren große Flächen abgestürzt, so daß man das Metallgerüst dahinter sah. Er lag sehr hoch auf einer Düne, und als ich vor dem Eintreten nach Nordosten blickte, sah ich, wo meiner Meinung nach einstmals Wandsworth und Battersea gelegen haben mußten, ein großes Ästuar, oder sogar eine Bucht. Ich dachte daran – freilich habe ich den Gedanken nicht weiter verfolgt – was wohl mit den Lebewesen im Meer geschehen sein mochte oder geschah.

Das Material des Palastes stellte sich bei näherer Prüfung wirklich als Porzellan heraus, und auf der Fassade sah ich eine Inschrift in unbekannten Lettern. Ich dachte ziemlich törichterweise, Weena werde sie mir deuten helfen können, aber ich erfuhr nur, daß der bloße Begriff des Schreibens ihr noch nie in den Kopf gekommen war. Sie schien mir, ich glaube, immer menschlicher als sie war, vielleicht weil ihre Liebe so menschlich war.

Innerhalb der großen Türflügel fanden wir statt der gewohnten Halle eine lange, durch viele Seitenfenster beleuchtete Galerie. Beim ersten Blick wurde ich an ein Museum erinnert. Der Ziegelboden war hoch mit Staub bedeckt, und eine auffallende Anordnung verschiedener Gegenstände war in die gleiche graue Decke gehüllt. Dann sah ich unheimlich und hager mitten in der Halle etwas stehen, was ohne Zweifel der untere Teil eines riesigen Skeletts war. Ich erkannte an den schrägen Füßen, daß es ein ausgestorbenes Geschöpf in der Art des Megatheriums war. Der Schädel und die oberen Knochen lagen im dicken Staub daneben, und an einer Stelle, an der der Regen durch ein Leck im Dach getröpfelt war, war das Ding selber zerfressen. Weiterhin in der Galerie stand das riesige Skelett eines Brontosaurus. Meine Museums-Hypothese bestätigte sich. Ich trat an die Seite und fand dort offenbar schräge Flächen. Ich beseitigte den dicken Staub und sah die allbekannten Glaskästen unserer Zeit. Aber nach der guten Erhaltung eines Teils des Inhalts mußten sie luftdicht sein.

Offenbar standen wir in den Ruinen eines South Kensington-Museums der späten Tage! Dies war offenbar die paläontologische Abteilung und es mußte eine sehr glänzende Sammlung von Fossilien gewesen sein, obgleich der unvermeidliche Prozeß des Verfalls, der eine Zeitlang abgewehrt war und durch das Aussterben von Bakterien und Pilzen neunzig Prozent seiner Kraft verloren hatte, trotzdem mit äußerster Sicherheit, wenn auch mit äußerster Langsamkeit, von neuem an all ihren Schätzen arbeitete. Hier und dort fand ich Spuren des kleinen Volks, da seltene Fossilien in Stücke gebrochen oder auf Rohrfäden aufgereiht waren. Und an einigen Stellen waren die Kästen entfernt – von den Morlocken, schloß ich. Es war sehr still. Der dicke Staub dämpfte unsere Schritte. Weena, die einen Meerkobold das schräge Glas eines Kastens hinuntergerollt hatte, trat, als ich mich umblickte, zu mir, nahm sehr ruhig meine Hand und blieb neben mir stehen.

Und zuerst war ich über dieses alte Monument einer intellektuellen Zeit so sehr erstaunt, daß ich gar nicht an die Möglichkeiten dachte, die es bot. Selbst meine Sorge um die Zeitmaschine wich ein wenig aus meinem Geist.

Nach der Größe zu urteilen, mußte dieser grüne Porzellanpalast viel mehr enthalten als eine Galerie der Paläontologie; vielleicht historische Galerien; vielleicht gar eine Bibliothek! Mir mußte das, wenigstens unter meinen damaligen Verhältnissen, ungeheuer viel interessanter sein als dieses Schauspiel verfallener Geologie der alten Zeit. Ich suchte und fand eine zweite kurze Galerie, die quer zur ersten lief. Sie schien der Mineralogie gewidmet, und der Anblick eines Schwefelblocks brachte meine Gedanken auf Schießpulver. Aber ich konnte keinen Salpeter finden; überhaupt keinerlei Nitrate. Ohne Zweifel waren sie seit Jahrhunderten zerronnen. Aber der Schwefel haftete mir im Geist und regte eine Kette von Gedanken an. Für den übrigen Inhalt der Galerie hatte ich, obgleich er im ganzen das am besten Erhaltene war, was ich zu sehen bekam, wenig Interesse. Ich bin kein Spezialist in der Mineralogie und ich ging einen sehr verfallenen Flügel hinunter, der der ersten Halle, die ich betreten hatte, parallel lief. Offenbar war diese Abteilung der Naturgeschichte gewidmet gewesen, aber alles war längst unkenntlich geworden. Ein paar verschrumpfte und schwarze Spuren von Dingen, die einmal ausgestopfte Tiere gewesen waren, vertrocknete Mumien in Glasgefäßen, die einst Spiritus enthalten hatten, ein brauner Staub von entschwundenen Pflanzen: das war alles! Das tat mir leid, denn ich hätte gern die langsame Umordnung verfolgt, durch die die Eroberung der belebten Natur erreicht war. Dann kamen wir in eine Galerie von einfach kolossalen Verhältnissen, die jedoch merkwürdig schlecht beleuchtet war, in leichtem Winkel abwärts. In bestimmten Abständen hingen weiße Kugeln von der Decke nieder – viele gebrochen und zertrümmert – was darauf schließen ließ, daß der Raum ursprünglich künstlich beleuchtet wurde.

Hier war ich mehr in meinem Element, denn zu beiden Seiten erhoben sich die Riesenformen großer Maschinen, alle sehr abgenagt und viele zusammengebrochen, aber manche noch recht vollständig. Sie wissen, ich habe eine gewisse Schwäche für die Mechanik, und ich hielt mich wohl lange bei ihnen auf: um so mehr, als die meisten das Interesse von Rätseln für mich hatten, und ich nur ganz unbestimmte Vermutungen darüber anstellen konnte, wozu sie waren. Ich meinte, wenn ich ihre Rätsel lösen könnte, würde ich im Besitz von Kräften sein, die gegen die Morlocken schützen sollten.

Plötzlich kam Weena eng an meine Seite. So plötzlich, daß sie mich erschreckte. Wäre sie nicht gewesen, glaube ich, hätte ich überhaupt nicht bemerkt, daß der Boden sich senkte [Fußnote]. Das Ende, wo ich eingetreten war, war ganz überirdisch und durch seltene schlitzartige Fenster erhellt. Wenn man den Raum der Länge nach hinunterging, stieg der Boden gegen diese Fenster, bis man schließlich wie in einem Keller war, wo nur noch oben eine schmale Linie des Tageslichtes eindrang. Ich ging langsam hinunter und machte mir mit den Maschinen zu schaffen, und war zu sehr mit ihnen beschäftigt gewesen, um die allmähliche Verminderung des Lichtes zu beachten, und erst Weenas wachsende Angst machte mich aufmerksam. Da sah ich, daß die Galerie schließlich in dichtes Dunkel hinunterlief. Ich zögerte, und als ich mich umblickte, sah ich, daß der Staub weniger reichlich und seine Oberfläche weniger eben war. Weiter nach dem Dunkel hin, schien mir, war es von einer Anzahl kleiner, schmaler Fußspuren unterbrochen. Das belebte meine Empfindung von der unmittelbaren Gegenwart der Morlocken von neuem. Ich fühlte, daß ich mit dieser akademischen Untersuchung meine Zeit verschwendete. Ich besann mich, daß es schon spät am Nachmittag war und daß ich noch keine Waffe, keine Zuflucht und kein Mittel hatte, um Feuer zu machen. Und dann hörte ich unten in der fernen Dunkelheit der Galerie ein sonderbares Klappern und dieselben merkwürdigen Geräusche, die ich unten im Brunnen gehört hatte.

Ich nahm Weena an der Hand. Dann hatte ich einen plötzlichen Gedanken, verließ sie und wandte mich zu einer Maschine, aus der ein Hebel hervorragte, der denen in einer Signalstube nicht unähnlich war. Ich kletterte auf den Stand, faßte diesen Hebel mit den Händen und legte seitlich mein ganzes Gewicht dagegen. Plötzlich begann Weena, die ich im Mittelschiff verlassen hatte, zu wimmern. Ich hatte die Stärke des Hebels ziemlich richtig beurteilt, denn nach etwa einer Minute der Anstrengung brach er, und ich ging wieder zu ihr, bewaffnet mit einer Keule, die meiner Meinung nach für jeden Morlockenschädel, dem ich begegnen mochte, mehr als genügte. Und ich sehnte mich sehr danach, einen Morlocken oder so zu töten. Sehr unmenschlich, meinen Sie vielleicht, hingehen zu wollen und seine eigenen Nachkommen zu töten! Aber irgendwie war es unmöglich, das Menschliche in den Wesen zu fühlen. Nur meine Abneigung dagegen, Weena allein zu lassen, und der Gedanke, daß, wenn ich begann, meinen Morddurst zu stillen, meine Zeitmaschine leiden mochte, hielten mich ab, geradeswegs die Galerie hinunter zu laufen und die Bestien zu töten, die ich hörte.

Nun, die Keule in einer, Weena an der anderen Hand, ging ich aus dieser Galerie heraus und in eine andere und noch größere, die mich beim ersten Blick an eine mit zerfetzten Fahnen behangene Militärkapelle erinnerte. Die braunen und verkohlten Fetzen, die an den Seiten hingen, erkannte ich alsbald als die verwesenden Spuren von Büchern. Sie waren längst in Stücke zerfallen und jeder Schein von Druck war verloschen. Aber hier und dort lagen verschrumpfte Einbanddecken und gesprungene Metallschließen, die beredt genug sprachen. Wäre ich ein Gelehrter gewesen, so hätte ich vielleicht über die Nichtigkeit allen Ehrgeizes moralisiert. Aber so fiel mir am schärfsten die ungeheure Arbeitsverschwendung auf, die diese finstere Wildnis vermoderten Papiers bezeugte. Zur Zeit, das will ich bekennen, dachte ich hauptsächlich an die »Philosophischen Abhandlungen« und meine siebzehn Aufsätze über physikalische Optik.

Dann ging ich eine breite Treppe hinauf und kam in eine Galerie, die einmal der technischen Chemie gedient haben mag. Und hier hatte ich nicht geringe Hoffnung auf nützliche Entdeckungen. Außer an einem Ende, wo das Dach eingestürzt war, war diese Galerie wohlerhalten. Ich ging begierig zu jedem nicht zerbrochenen Kasten. Und schließlich fand ich in einem der wirklich luftdichten Kästen eine Schachtel Streichhölzer. Ich probierte sie begierig. Sie waren vollkommen gut erhalten. Sie waren nicht einmal feucht. Ich wandte mich zu Weena. ›Tanze!‹ rief ich ihr in ihrer Sprache zu. Denn jetzt hatte ich eine Waffe gegen die schrecklichen Geschöpfe, die wir fürchteten. Und so vollführte ich in jenem Trümmermuseum, auf dem dicken, weichen Staubteppich zu Weenas ungeheurer Freude feierlich einen verschlungenen Tanz, indem ich, so lustig ich konnte, dazu pfiff. Zum Teil war es ein schüchterner Kankan, zum Teil ein Schrittanz, zum Teil ein Kleidtanz (soweit mein Rockschoß es erlaubte) und zum Teil Original. Denn, wie Sie wissen, bin ich von Natur erfinderisch.

Nun meine ich immer noch, daß diese Streichholzschachtel durch undenkliche Jahre hindurch dem Zahn der Zeit entgangen war; das war höchst seltsam, wie es für mich höchst glücklich war. Und doch fand ich, sonderbar genug, eine noch viel unwahrscheinlichere Substanz, und das war Kampfer. Ich fand ihn in einer versiegelten Flasche, die, wie ich vermute, zufällig wirklich hermetisch versiegelt war. Erst meinte ich, es sei Paraffinwachs, und ich zertrümmerte also das Glas. Aber der Kampfergeruch war unverkennbar. In dem allgemeinen Verfall hatte sich diese flüchtige Substanz durch einen Zufall vielleicht viele Jahrhunderttausende hindurch erhalten. Sie erinnerte mich an ein Sepiagemälde, das ich einst mit der Tinte eines Belemniten hatte malen sehen, der vor Millionen von Jahren umgekommen und fossilisiert sein mußte. Ich stand im Begriff, sie fortzuwerfen, aber ich besann mich, daß Kampfer brennbar ist und mit guter heller Flamme brennt – kurz, daß er eine ausgezeichnete Kerze war – und ich steckte das Stück in die Tasche. Ich fand jedoch keine Explosionsstoffe, kein Mittel, die Bronzetüren zu erbrechen. Trotzdem verließ ich die Galerie in sehr gehobener Stimmung.

Ich kann Ihnen nicht die Geschichte dieses langen Nachmittags erzählen. Es würde ein großes Gedächtnis dazu gehören, meine Entdeckungen in einigermaßen richtiger Reihenfolge aufzuführen. Ich erinnere mich einer langen Galerie rostender Waffenständer und wie ich zwischen meinem Brecheisen und einem Beil oder einem Schwerte schwankte. Aber ich konnte nicht beides tragen, und meine Eisenstange versprach am meisten gegen die Bronzetüren. Es waren zahllose Flinten, Pistolen und Gewehre da. Die meisten waren Rostmassen, aber viele waren aus einem neuen Metall und noch recht heil. Aber was einmal an Patronen oder Pulver vorhanden gewesen sein mochte, war zu Staub verfallen. Ein Winkel, sah ich, war verkohlt und zertrümmert: vielleicht, dachte ich, durch eine Explosion unter den Proben. An einer anderen Stelle fand ich eine lange Reihe Idole – polynesische, mexikanische, griechische, phönikische – aus allen Ländern der Erde, die mir einfielen. Und hier gab ich einem unwiderstehlichen Impulse nach und schrieb meinen Namen auf die Nase eines südamerikanischen Speckstein-Ungeheuers, das mir besonders Spaß machte.

Als der Abend vorrückte, schwand mein Interesse. Ich durchzog eine Galerie nach der anderen – staubige, stille, oft verfallene Räume, deren Sammlungen bisweilen nur Haufen von Rost und Kohle waren, bisweilen aber auch frischer. An einer Stelle sah ich plötzlich das Modell einer Zinnmine, und dann entdeckte ich durch einen Zufall in einem luftdichten Kasten zwei Dynamitpatronen! Ich rief ›Eureka‹ und zertrümmerte den Kasten voller Freude. Dann kam ein Zweifel. Ich zögerte. Dann wählte ich eine kleine Seitengalerie und machte meinen Versuch. Ich habe nie eine solche Enttäuschung empfunden, als wie ich dort fünf, zehn, fünfzehn Minuten auf eine Explosion wartete, die niemals kam. Natürlich waren es nur Modelle, wie ich gleich hätte erraten können. Ich glaube wirklich, wären sie das nicht gewesen, so wäre ich alsbald davongelaufen und hätte Sphinx und Bronzetüren und (wie sich herausstellte) meine Aussicht, die Zeitmaschine zu finden, alles zugleich ins Nichtsein gesprengt.

Darauf glaube ich, kamen wir zu einem kleinen, offenen Hof im Palast. Er war grasbewachsen und enthielt drei Obstbäume. So ruhten wir aus und erfrischten uns. Gegen Sonnenuntergang begann ich, unsere Lage zu überlegen. Die Nacht überschlich uns, und mein unzugängliches Versteck sollte erst noch gefunden werden. Aber das machte mir jetzt sehr wenig Sorge. Ich hatte etwas im Besitz, was vielleicht die beste Verteidigung gegen die Morlocken war – ich hatte Streichhölzer! Und ich hatte auch noch den Kampfer in der Tasche, wenn ein Feuer nötig wurde. Mir schien, das beste, was wir tun konnten, war, die Nacht unterm Schutz eines Feuers im Freien zu verbringen. Morgens war dann noch die Zeitmaschine zu holen. Dazu hatte ich bis jetzt nur meine Eisenkeule. Aber mit meiner wachsenden Kenntnis empfand ich gegen diese Bronzetüren sehr anders. Bislang hatte ich sie zum guten Teil deshalb nicht erbrochen, weil auf der anderen Seite das Geheimnis lauerte. Sie hatten mir nie den Eindruck großer Stärke gemacht, und ich hoffte, ich werde mein Brecheisen nicht ganz unzulänglich finden.