de-en  Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 12 von E.T.A. Hoffmann Hard
Shaken by the memory of this critical moment, Olivier had to pause. The Scuderi, filled with horror over the atrocity of a man whom she had considered to be virtuous, to be integrity itself, shouted "Appalling!" René Cardillac belongs to the band of murderers that turned our good city into a den of thieves for so long? "What do you mean, my Lady, by 'band' ?" asked Olivier. There has never been such a band. It was Cardillac alone who sought and found his victims throughout the city with his wicked activity.. That he acted alone when committing his deeds, provided his guarantee, the unsolved difficulty of getting on the track of the murderer. - Yet let me continue, listening to my tale will unravel the secrets of the most wicked and at the same time most unhappy of all people to you. - Everyone can easily imagine, in which situation I now found myself with the Master. The step was taken, I could no longer withdraw. At times it seemed to me as if I myself had become Cardillac's accomplice to murder, only Madelon's love made me forget my inner pain which tormented me, only being with her I could manage to make every outward trace of this unspeakable anguish disappear. Whenever I worked in the workshop with the old man, I was unable to look him in the face or barely speak a word because of the horror that thoroughly shook me in the presence of the terrible man who fulfilled all the virtues of the faithful, affectionate father, of the good citizen, while the night concealed his crimes. Madelon, the devout child, pure as an angel, hung on him with idolatrous love. My heart was pierced whenever I thought of it, that if one day vengeance would strike the disguised villain, she, having been deceived by all the fiendish cunning of Satan, must surely succumb to the most dreadful despair. Just that locked my mouth, even if I had to tolerate the death of the criminal. Regardless of what I could adequately learn from the talking of the Marechaussee, Cardillac" crimes, their motives, the manner of performing them, were a mystery to me. The resolution did not stay away for long. One day Cardillac, who, to my disgust, usually in a cheerful mood whilst working, joking and laughing, was very serious and withdrawn. Suddenly he threw aside the jewelry that he was just working on so that the stones and gems rolled apart, stood up violently and said, 'Olivier!' - It can't continue like this between us, this relationship is intolerable for me. What the keenest cunning of Degrais and his accomplices did not succeed in discovering, Chance played into your hands. You have seen me in my nocturnal work to which my wicked star drives me. No resistance is possible. It was also your evil star that allowed you to follow me, that draped you in impenetrable veils, that gave lightness to your footstep, so that you silently walked like the smallest animal, so that I, whose vision in the dead of night is that of a tiger who from across the street hears the smallest noise, the buzzing of mosquitos, did not notice you. Your evil star has brought you, my companion, to me. Betrayal, as you are standing there now, is out of the question. That's why you may know everything." "Never again I will I be your companion, hypocritical villain." So I wanted to cry out, but the inner horror that gripped me with Cardillac's words tied up my throat. Instead of the words, I was only able to make an incomprehensible sound. Cardillac sat down again in his work chair. He dried the sweat from his forehead. Greatly affected by the memory of the past, he seemed to compose himself with difficulty. Finally he began: "Wise men speak much of the peculiar sensations which expectant mothers are capable of, of the wonderful influence of such lively, involuntary, external impressions on the child. I was told a strange story about my mother. When she was pregnant with me in the first month, she went with other women to a magnificent court festival that was held in Trianon. There, her gaze fell on a gentleman in Spanish attire with a glittering chain of jewels around his neck which she could not at all take her eyes off of. Her entire being lusted for the sparkling stones which seemed to be an unworldly possession to her. Several years ago, when my mother was still unmarried, the same gentleman had chased after her virtue but had been spurned with disgust. My mother recognized him again, but now it was to her as if he was a Being of a higher nature in the luster of the sparkling diamonds, the epitome of beauty. The gentleman noticed the longing, fiery looks of my mother. He felt happier now than before. He knew how to get closer to her, more than that to lure her away from her friends to a solitary place. There he fervently clasped her in his arms, my mother reached for the beautiful necklace, but at this very moment he fell to the ground dragging my mother with him to the ground. Whether he suffered a sudden stoke or for another reason; alas, he was dead. In vain was my mother's attempt to free herself from the arms of the corpse, grown stiff in rigor mortis. The hollow eyes directed at her, their sight extinct, the dead man rolled with her on the ground. Her screams for help finally reached the distant passers-by, who rushed over to rescue her from the arms of the gruesome lover. As a result of her experience she became terribly sick. They gave her up as lost to me, but she recovered, and her delivery was luckier than one could have hoped for. But the horrors of that terrible moment had affected me. My evil star had risen and had flashed down the spark that ignited within me one of the most peculiar and mischievous passions. Even in my earliest childhood, shiny diamonds and golden jewelry came above everything for me. They regarded it as an ordinary childish penchant. But it manifested itself differently, for as a boy I stole gold and jewelry where I was able to get hold of them. Like the most experienced expert, I could tell by instinct the difference between fake jewelry and the genuine one. Only this tempted me. I paid no attention to fake and shaped gold. The inherent desire had to give way to the cruelest beatings of my father. In order to be able to make use of gold and precious stones, I turned to the goldsmith profession. I worked with passion and soon became the first master of this kind. Now began a period during which the inherent desire, oppressed for so long, emerged with force and grew in power, consuming everything around itself. As soon as I finished and delivered a piece of jewelry, I fell into a state of anxiety and wretchedness that robbed of sleep, health and the courage to face life. Day and night the person whom I worked for stood before my eyes like a ghost, decorated with my jewelry, and a voice whispered into my ears: ' It is yours, it is yours. Take it – what are diamonds supposed to do for the dead!' Then I eventually devoted myself to the arts of the the thief. I had access to the houses of the great. I quickly used every opportunity. No chateau withstood my skill and soon the jewelry I had fashioned was in my hands again. But now even that did not dispel my unrest. That eerie voice nevertheless made itself heard and jeered at me and shouted, 'Ho,ho, a dead person wears your jewelry!' Even I did not know how it came about that I cast an unspeakable hatred on those for whom I had produced jewelry. Yes! in the deepest inner-being a bloodlust bestirred itself against her before which I myself shuddered. - It was during this time that I bought this house. I had an agreement with the owner. We sat in this chamber, delighted with the concluded deal, together and drinking a bottle of wine. It became night. I wanted to leave. Then my seller spoke: Listen Master René, before you depart, I must tell you a secret of this house. Thereupon he unlocked that closet that was inserted into the wall, pushed the rear wall aside, stepped into a small chamber, bent down and lifted a trap door. Climbing down a steep, narrow stairway, we came to a narrow little door that he unlocked and stepped out into the open courtyard. The old gentleman, my seller, now strode up to the wall, pushed on an inconspicuous piece of iron and a section of wall opened right away so that a person could comfortably slip through the opening and reach the street. You may like to see the trick someday, Olivier, that smart monks of the monastery previously located here likely had finished in order to be able to secretly slip in and out. It is a piece of wood, only mortared-over and whitewashed from the outside, into which a statue, also only of wood though much like stone, is inserted from the outside, and that together with the statue turns on concealed hinges. Dark thoughts arose in me when I saw this device. It was to me as if it had been prepared in advance for such deeds that still remained a secret to myself. I had just delivered to a gentleman from the court an opulent piece of jewelry which I know was destined for a opera dancer. The torture of death did not stay away – the specter clung to my steps – the lisping devil to my ear. - I moved into the house. I tossed and turned sleepless in bed bathed in bloody cold sweat! I see in my imagination the gentleman sneaking up to the dancer with my jewelry. Full of rage, I jump to my feet - throw on my coat - go down the secret stairs - out through the wall into Nicaise Street. - He comes, I pounce upon him, he shouts, however holding him firmly from behind, I thrust the dagger into his heart - the jewellery is mine! - Once this was done, I felt a peace, a contentment in my soul like never before. The spectre had disappeared, the voice of Satan remained silent. Now I knew what my evil star wanted, I had to follow it or perish. Now you understand all my doings and my compulsion, Olivier. – Glaube nicht, daß ich darum, weil ich tun muß, was ich nicht lassen kann, jenem Gefühl des Mitleids, des Erbarmens, was in der Natur des Menschen bedingt sein soll, rein entsagt habe. Du weißt, wie schwer es mir wird, einen Schmuck abzuliefern; wie ich für manche, deren Tod ich nicht will, gar nicht arbeite, ja wie ich sogar, weiß ich, daß am morgenden Tage Blut mein Gespenst verbannen wird, heute es bei einem tüchtigen Faustschlage bewenden lasse, der den Besitzer meines Kleinods zu Boden streckt und mir dieses in die Hand liefert.' – Dies alles gesprochen, führte mich Cardillac in das geheime Gewölbe und gönnte mir den Anblick seines Juwelenkabinetts. Not even the King is more richly endowed. A small tag was attached to every piece of jewellery, identifying for whom it had been made and when it had been taken, either by theft, robbery or murder. 'An deinem Hochzeitstage', sprach Cardillac dumpf und feierlich, 'an deinem Hochzeitstage, Olivier, wirst du mir, die Hand gelegt auf des gekreuzigten Christus Bild, einen heiligen Eid schwören, sowie ich gestorben, alle diese Reichtümer in Staub zu vernichten durch Mittel, die ich dir dann bekannt machen werde. I do not want any human being, and least of all Madelon and you, to come to the possession of the treasure bought with blood.' Gefangen in diesem Labyrinth des Verbrechens, zerrissen von Liebe und Abscheu, von Wonne und Entsetzen, war ich dem Verdammten zu vergleichen, dem ein holder Engel mild lächelnd hinaufwinkt, aber mit glühenden Krallen festgepackt hält ihn der Satan, und des frommen Engels Liebeslächeln, in dem sich alle Seligkeit des hohen Himmels abspiegelt, wird ihm zur grimmigsten seiner Qualen. - I was thinking about escaping - yes, about suicide - but Madelon! – Tadelt mich, tadelt mich, mein würdiges Fräulein, daß ich zu schwach war, mit Gewalt eine Leidenschaft niederzukämpfen, die mich an das Verbrechen fesselte; aber büße ich nicht dafür mit schmachvollem Tode? - One day Cardillac came home, unusually cheerful. He fondled Madelon, gave me the friendliest looks, drank a bottle of noble wine at table, as he used to do only on high festivals and holidays, sang and rejoiced. Madelon hatte uns verlassen, ich wollte in die Werkstatt: 'Bleib sitzen, Junge', rief Cardillac, 'heut keine Arbeit mehr, laß uns noch eins trinken auf das Wohl der allerwürdigsten, vortrefflichsten Dame in Paris.' Nachdem ich mit ihm angestoßen und er ein volles Glas geleert hatte, sprach er: 'Sag an, Olivier, wie gefallen dir die Verse: "Un amant, qui craint les voleurs, n'est point digne d'amour."

Er erzählte nun, was sich in den Gemächern der Maintenon mit Euch und dem Könige begeben, und fügte hinzu, daß er Euch von jeher verehrt habe, wie sonst kein menschliches Wesen, und daß Ihr, mit solch hoher Tugend begabt, vor der der böse Stern kraftlos erbleiche, selbst den schönsten von ihm gefertigten Schmuck tragend, niemals, ein böses Gespenst, Mordgedanken in ihm erregen würdet. "Listen, Olivier," he said, "this is what I have decided to do. A long time ago I was supposed to make necklaces and bracelets for Henriette of England and supply the stones myself. The end result was more successful than anything else I have ever done, but it tore me apart to think that I would have to part from the jewellery that had become the treasure of my heart. You know of the princess's unfortunate death by assassination. I kept the jewellery and now want to send it to Fräulein von Scuderi as a sign of my reverence and gratitude, in the name of the persecuted gang. Besides, that the Scuderi obtains a telling sign of her triumph, I also mock Degrais and his fellows as they deserve. - "I want you to bring her the jewellery.“ As soon as Cardillac mentioned your name, Mademoiselle, it was as if black veils had been pulled away and the beautiful, bright picture of my happy early childhood would shine again in many brillant colours. A wonderful comfort came to my soul, a ray of hope, before which the dark spirits disappeared. Cardillac might observe the impression his words had made on me, and interpret that in his own way. "It seems you are pleased with my plan", he said. I can certainly confess that a deep inner voice, very different from that which demands blood sacrifice like a voracious predator, has commanded me to do this. - Sometimes I feel rather whimsical; an inner fear, the fear of something horrible, whose shivers come over from a far beyond into the present, seizes me violently. I then even feel as if what the wicked star started by me, could be counted for my immortal soul, which has no part in it. In such a mood I resolved to create a beautiful diamond crown for the Holy Virgin in the church of St. Eustache. However, that incomprehensible fear overcame me more strongly each time I wanted to start work; so I refrained from doing it altogether. Now I feel as if I humbly sacrifice virtue and piety itself and crave for effective advocacy by sending to the Scuderi the most beautiful jewellery I ever created.' - Cardillac, my Lady, who is familiar with all the details of your life, told me the manner and the hour of how and when I should deliver the jewellery, which he locked in a neat, small casket. My entire being was delight, because Heaven itself - through the outrages Cardillac - was showing me the way to save myself from Hell, in which I languish as an outcast sinner. That's what I thought. Totally against Cardillac's will, I wanted to advance to you. As Anne Brusson's son, your nurseling, I intended to fall down to your feet and discover everything to you - everything. Ihr hättet, gerührt von dem namenlosen Elend, das der armen, unschuldigen Madelon drohte bei der Entdeckung, das Geheimnis beachtet, aber Euer hoher, scharfsinniger Geist fand gewiß sichre Mittel, ohne jene Entdeckung der verruchten Bosheit Cardillacs zu steuern. Fragt mich nicht, worin diese Mittel hätten bestehen sollen, ich weiß es nicht – aber daß Ihr Madelon und mich retten würdet, davon lag die Überzeugung fest in meiner Seele, wie der Glaube an die trostreiche Hilfe der Heiligen Jungfrau. - You know, Lady, that my intention failed that night. I didn't lose hope of being happier some other time. Thus it happened that Cardillac suddenly lost all his vivacity. Er schlich trübe umher, starrte vor sich hin, murmelte unverständliche Worte, focht mit den Händen, Feindliches von sich abwehrend, sein Geist schien gequält von bösen Gedanken. Thus he had done it a whole morning. At last he sat down at the work table, jumped with displeasure on his feet again, looked through the window, spoke seriously and gloomily: 'I really wished that Henriette of England had worn my jewellery! - The words filled me with horror. Nun wußt' ich, daß sein irrer Geist wieder erfaßt war von dem abscheulichen Mordgespenst, daß des Satans Stimme wieder laut worden vor seinen Ohren. I saw your life threatened by the heinous killing devil. If Cardillac had only his jewelry in his hands again, you were saved. With each passing moment the danger grew. Da begegnete ich Euch auf dem Pontneuf, drängte mich an Eure Kutsche, warf Euch jenen Zettel zu, der Euch beschwor, doch nur gleich den erhaltenen Schmuck in Cardillacs Hände zu bringen. You didn‘t come. Meine Angst stieg bis zur Verzweiflung, als andern Tages Cardillac von nichts anderm sprach als von dem köstlichen Schmuck, der ihm in der Nacht vor Augen gekommen. Ich konnte das nur auf Euern Schmuck deuten, und es wurde mir gewiß, daß er über irgendeinen Mordanschlag brüte, den er gewiß schon in der Nacht auszuführen sich vorgenommen. Euch retten mußt' ich, und sollt' es Cardillacs Leben kosten. Sowie Cardillac nach dem Abendgebet sich, wie gewöhnlich, eingeschlossen, stieg ich durch ein Fenster in den Hof, schlüpfte durch die Öffnung in der Mauer und stellte mich unfern in den tiefen Schatten. Nicht lange dauerte es, so kam Cardillac heraus und schlich leise durch die Straße fort. Ich hinter ihm her. Er ging nach der Straße St. Honoré, mir bebte das Herz. Cardillac war mit einemmal mir entschwunden. Ich beschloß, mich an Eure Haustüre zu stellen. Da kommt singend und trillernd, wie damals, als der Zufall mich zum Zuschauer von Cardillacs Mordtat machte, ein Offizier bei mir vorüber, ohne mich zu gewahren. Aber in demselben Augenblick springt eine schwarze Gestalt hervor und fällt über ihn her. Es ist Cardillac. Diesen Mord will ich hindern, mit einem lauten Schrei bin ich in zwei – drei Sätzen zur Stelle – Nicht der Offizier – Cardillac sinkt, zum Tode getroffen, röchelnd zu Boden. Der Offizier läßt den Dolch fallen, reißt den Degen aus der Scheide, stellt sich, wähnend, ich sei des Mörders Geselle, kampffertig mir entgegen, eilt aber schnell davon, als er gewahrt, daß ich, ohne mich um ihn zu kümmern, nur den Leichnam untersuche. Cardillac lebte noch. Ich lud ihn, nachdem ich den Dolch, den der Offizier hatte fallen lassen, zu mir gesteckt, auf die Schultern und schleppte ihn mühsam fort nach Hause, und durch den geheimen Gang hinauf in die Werkstatt. – Das übrige ist Euch bekannt. Ihr seht, mein würdiges Fräulein, daß mein einziges Verbrechen nur darin besteht, daß ich Madelons Vater nicht den Gerichten verriet und so seinen Untaten ein Ende machte. Rein bin ich von jeder Blutschuld. – Keine Marter wird mir das Geheimnis von Cardillacs Untaten abzwingen. Ich will nicht, daß der ewigen Macht, die der tugendhaften Tochter des Vaters gräßliche Blutschuld verschleierte, zum Trotz, das ganze Elend der Vergangenheit, ihres ganzen Seins noch jetzt tötend auf sie einbreche, daß noch jetzt die weltliche Rache den Leichnam aufwühle aus der Erde, die ihn deckt, daß noch jetzt der Henker die vermoderten Gebeine mit Schande brandmarke. – Nein! – mich wird die Geliebte meiner Seele beweinen als den unschuldig Gefallenen, die Zeit wird ihren Schmerz lindern, aber unüberwindlich würde der Jammer sein über des geliebten Vaters entsetzliche Taten der Hölle!" – Olivier schwieg, aber nun stürzte plötzlich ein Tränenstrom aus seinen Augen, er warf sich der Scuderi zu Füßen und flehte: "Ihr seid von meiner Unschuld überzeugt – gewiß, Ihr seid es! – Habt Erbarmen mit mir, sagt, wie steht es um Madelon?" – die Scuderi rief der Martiniere, und nach wenigen Augenblicken flog Madelon an Oliviers Hals. "Nun ist alles gut, da du hier bist – ich wußt' es ja, daß die edelmütigste Dame dich retten würde!" So rief Madelon ein Mal über das andere, und Olivier vergaß sein Schicksal, alles, was ihm drohte, er war frei und selig. Auf das rührendste klagten beide sich, was sie um einander gelitten, und umarmten sich dann aufs neue und weinten vor Entzücken, daß sie sich wiedergefunden.
Wäre die Scuderi nicht von Oliviers Unschuld schon überzeugt gewesen, der Glaube daran müßte ihr jetzt gekommen sein, da sie die beiden betrachtete, die in der Seligkeit des innigsten Liebesbündnisses die Welt vergaßen und ihr Elend und ihr namenloses Leiden. "Nein", rief sie, "solch seliger Vergessenheit ist nur ein reines Herz fähig."

Die hellen Strahlen des Morgens brachen durch die Fenster. Desgrais klopfte leise an die Türe des Gemachs und erinnerte, daß es Zeit sei, Olivier Brusson fortzuschaffen, da, ohne Aufsehen zu erregen, das später nicht geschehen könne. Die Liebenden mußten sich trennen.
unit 1
Erschüttert von dem Andenken an diesen entscheidenden Augenblick, mußte Olivier innehalten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 4
"Was sagt Ihr, mein Fräulein", sprach Olivier, "zur Bande?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 5
Nie hat es eine solche Bande gegeben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 9
– Die Lage, in der ich mich nun bei dem Meister befand, jeder mag die sich leicht denken.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 10
Der Schritt war geschehen, ich konnte nicht mehr zurück.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 13
Madelon, das fromme, engelsreine Kind, hing an ihm mit abgöttischer Liebe.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 15
Schon das verschloß mir den Mund, und hätt' ich den Tod des Verbrechers darum dulden müssen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
– es kann zwischen uns beiden nicht so bleiben, dies Verhältnis ist mir unerträglich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 23
Dein böser Stern hat dich, meinen Gefährten, mir zugeführt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 24
An Verrat ist, so wie du jetzt stehst, nicht mehr zu denken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 25
Darum magst du alles wissen.'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 26
'Nimmermehr werd ich dein Gefährte sein, heuchlerischer Bösewicht.'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 28
Statt der Worte vermochte ich nur einen unverständigen Laut auszustoßen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 29
Cardillac setzte sich wieder in seinen Arbeitsstuhl.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 30
Er trocknete sich den Schweiß von der Stirne.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 31
Er schien, von der Erinnerung des Vergangenen hart berührt, sich mühsam zu fassen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 33
Von meiner Mutter erzählte man mir eine wunderliche Geschichte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 39
Der Kavalier bemerkte die sehnsuchtsvollen, feurigen Blicke meiner Mutter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 40
Er glaubte jetzt glücklicher zu sein als vormals.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 47
Das Entsetzen warf meine Mutter auf ein schweres Krankenlager.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 49
Aber die Schrecken jenes fürchterlichen Augenblicks hatten mich getroffen.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 52
Man hielt das für gewöhnliche kindische Neigung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 54
unit 55
Nur dieses lockte mich, unechtes sowie geprägtes Gold ließ ich unbeachtet liegen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 56
Den grausamsten Züchtigungen des Vaters mußte die angeborne Begierde weichen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 58
Ich arbeitete mit Leidenschaft und wurde bald der erste Meister dieser Art.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 62
– Da legt' ich mich endlich auf Diebeskünste.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 64
– Aber nun vertrieb selbst das nicht meine Unruhe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 67
Ja!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 68
im tiefsten Innern regte sich eine Mordlust gegen sie, vor der ich selbst erbebte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 69
– In dieser Zeit kaufte ich dieses Haus.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 80
– Ich zog ein in das Haus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 81
In blutigem Angstschweiß gebadet, wälzte ich mich schlaflos auf dem Lager!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 82
Ich seh im Geiste den Menschen zu der Tänzerin schleichen mit meinem Schmuck.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months ago
unit 85
– Dies getan, fühlte ich eine Ruhe, eine Zufriedenheit in meiner Seele, wie sonst niemals.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 86
Das Gespenst war verschwunden, die Stimme des Satans schwieg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 87
Nun wußte ich, was mein böser Stern wollte, ich mußt' ihm nachgeben oder untergehen!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 88
– Du begreifst jetzt mein ganzes Tun und Treiben, Olivier!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 92
Der König besitzt es nicht reicher.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 97
– Ich dachte an Flucht – ja, an Selbstmord – aber Madelon!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 99
– Eines Tages kam Cardillac nach Hause, ungewöhnlich heiter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 104
'Höre, Olivier', sprach er, 'wozu ich entschlossen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 4 weeks ago
unit 107
Du weißt der Prinzessin unglücklichen Tod durch Meuchelmord.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 110
– Du sollst ihr den Schmuck hintragen.'
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 112
unit 113
unit 114
'Dir scheint', sprach er, 'mein Vorhaben zu behagen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 123
So dacht' ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 124
Ganz gegen Cardillacs Willen wollt' ich bis zu Euch dringen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 128
– Ihr wißt, Fräulein, daß meine Absicht in jener Nacht fehlschlug.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
Ich verlor nicht die Hoffnung, ein andermal glücklicher zu sein.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 130
Da geschah es, daß Cardillac plötzlich alle Munterkeit verlor.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 132
So hatte er es einen ganzen Morgen getrieben.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 134
– Die Worte erfüllten mich mit Entsetzen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 136
Ich sah Euer Leben bedroht von dem verruchten Mordteufel.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 137
Hatte Cardillac nur seinen Schmuck wieder in Händen, so wart Ihr gerettet.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 138
Mit jedem Augenblick wuchs die Gefahr.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 140
Ihr kamt nicht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 143
Euch retten mußt' ich, und sollt' es Cardillacs Leben kosten.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 146
Ich hinter ihm her.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 147
Er ging nach der Straße St. Honoré, mir bebte das Herz.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 148
Cardillac war mit einemmal mir entschwunden.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 149
Ich beschloß, mich an Eure Haustüre zu stellen.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 152
Es ist Cardillac.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 155
Cardillac lebte noch.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 157
– Das übrige ist Euch bekannt.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 159
Rein bin ich von jeder Blutschuld.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 160
unit 162
– Nein!
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 165
– Habt Erbarmen mit mir, sagt, wie steht es um Madelon?"
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 172
Die hellen Strahlen des Morgens brachen durch die Fenster.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 174
Die Liebenden mußten sich trennen.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 175

0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 121  1 month, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 119  1 month, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 118  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4411  commented on  unit 118  1 month, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4411  commented on  unit 111  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4411  commented on  unit 123  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4411  commented on  unit 121  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 121  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 111  1 month, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4411  commented on  unit 15  1 month, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 104  1 month, 4 weeks ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 92  1 month, 4 weeks ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 69  1 month, 4 weeks ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 83  1 month, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4411  translated  unit 67  2 months ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 56  2 months ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 54  2 months ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 59  2 months ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 12  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 22  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4411  commented on  unit 43  2 months, 1 week ago
Maria-Helene 2989  commented on  unit 9  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 21  2 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 4415  commented on  unit 13  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5413  commented on  unit 11  2 months, 1 week ago

Erschüttert von dem Andenken an diesen entscheidenden Augenblick, mußte Olivier innehalten. Die Scuderi, von Grausen erfüllt über die Untat eines Mannes, den sie für die Tugend, die Rechtschaffenheit selbst gehalten, rief: "Entsetzlich! – René Cardillac gehört zu der Mordbande, die unsere gute Stadt so lange zur Räuberhöhle machte?" "Was sagt Ihr, mein Fräulein", sprach Olivier, "zur Bande? Nie hat es eine solche Bande gegeben. Cardillac allein war es, der mit verruchter Tätigkeit in der ganzen Stadt seine Schlachtopfer suchte und fand. Daß er es allein war, darin liegt die Sicherheit, womit er seine Streiche führte, die unüberwundene Schwierigkeit, dem Mörder auf die Spur zu kommen. – Doch laßt mich fortfahren, der Verfolg wird Euch die Geheimnisse des verruchtesten und zugleich unglücklichsten aller Menschen aufklären. – Die Lage, in der ich mich nun bei dem Meister befand, jeder mag die sich leicht denken. Der Schritt war geschehen, ich konnte nicht mehr zurück. Zuweilen war es mir, als sei ich selbst Cardillacs Mordgehilfe geworden, nur in Madelons Liebe vergaß ich die innere Pein, die mich quälte, nur bei ihr konnt' es mir gelingen, jede äußere Spur namenlosen Grams wegzutilgen. Arbeitete ich mit dem Alten in der Werkstatt, nicht ins Antlitz vermochte ich ihm zu schauen, kaum ein Wort zu reden vor dem Grausen, das mich durchbebte in der Nähe des entsetzlichen Menschen, der alle Tugenden des treuen, zärtlichen Vaters, des guten Bürgers erfüllte, während die Nacht seine Untaten verschleierte. Madelon, das fromme, engelsreine Kind, hing an ihm mit abgöttischer Liebe. Das Herz durchbohrt' es mir, wenn ich daran dachte, daß, träfe einmal die Rache den verlarvten Bösewicht, sie ja, mit aller höllischen List des Satans getäuscht, der gräßlichsten Verzweiflung unterliegen müsse. Schon das verschloß mir den Mund, und hätt' ich den Tod des Verbrechers darum dulden müssen. Unerachtet ich aus den Reden der Marechaussee genug entnehmen konnte, waren mir Cardillacs Untaten, ihr Motiv, die Art, sie auszuführen, ein Rätsel; die Aufklärung blieb nicht lange aus. Eines Tages war Cardillac, der sonst, meinen Abscheu erregend, bei der Arbeit in der heitersten Laune, scherzte und lachte, sehr ernst und in sich gekehrt. Plötzlich warf er das Geschmeide, woran er eben arbeitete, beiseite, daß Stein und Perlen auseinander rollten, stand heftig auf und sprach: 'Olivier! – es kann zwischen uns beiden nicht so bleiben, dies Verhältnis ist mir unerträglich. – Was der feinsten Schlauigkeit Desgrais' und seiner Spießgesellen nicht gelang zu entdecken, das spielte dir der Zufall in die Hände. Du hast mich geschaut in der nächtlichen Arbeit, zu der mich mein böser Stern treibt, kein Widerstand ist möglich. – Auch dein böser Stern war es, der dich mir folgen ließ, der dich in undurchdringliche Schleier hüllte, der deinem Fußtritt die Leichtigkeit gab, daß du unhörbar wandeltest wie das kleinste Tier, so daß ich, der ich in der tiefsten Nacht klar schaue wie der Tiger, der ich straßenweit das kleinste Geräusch, das Sumsen der Mücke vernehme, dich nicht bemerkte. Dein böser Stern hat dich, meinen Gefährten, mir zugeführt. An Verrat ist, so wie du jetzt stehst, nicht mehr zu denken. Darum magst du alles wissen.' 'Nimmermehr werd ich dein Gefährte sein, heuchlerischer Bösewicht.' So wollt' ich aufschreien, aber das innere Entsetzen, das mich bei Cardillacs Worten erfaßt, schnürte mir die Kehle zu. Statt der Worte vermochte ich nur einen unverständigen Laut auszustoßen. Cardillac setzte sich wieder in seinen Arbeitsstuhl. Er trocknete sich den Schweiß von der Stirne. Er schien, von der Erinnerung des Vergangenen hart berührt, sich mühsam zu fassen. Endlich fing er an: 'Weise Männer sprechen viel von den seltsamen Eindrücken, deren Frauen in guter Hoffnung fähig sind, von dem wunderbaren Einfluß solch lebhaften, willenlosen Eindrucks von außen her auf das Kind. Von meiner Mutter erzählte man mir eine wunderliche Geschichte. Als die mit mir im ersten Monat schwanger ging, schaute sie mit andern Weibern einem glänzenden Hoffest zu, das in Trianon gegeben wurde. Da fiel ihr Blick auf einen Kavalier in spanischer Kleidung mit einer blitzenden Juwelenkette um den Hals, von der sie die Augen gar nicht mehr abwenden konnte. Ihr ganzes Wesen war Begierde nach den funkelnden Steinen, die ihr ein überirdisches Gut dünkten. Derselbe Kavalier hatte vor mehreren Jahren, als meine Mutter noch nicht verheiratet, ihrer Tugend nachgestellt, war aber mit Abscheu zurückgewiesen worden. Meine Mutter erkannte ihn wieder, aber jetzt war es ihr, als sei er im Glanz der strahlenden Diamanten ein Wesen höherer Art, der Inbegriff aller Schönheit. Der Kavalier bemerkte die sehnsuchtsvollen, feurigen Blicke meiner Mutter. Er glaubte jetzt glücklicher zu sein als vormals. Er wußte sich ihr zu nähern, noch mehr, sie von ihren Bekannten fort an einen einsamen Ort zu locken. Dort schloß er sie brünstig in seine Arme, meine Mutter faßte nach der schönen Kette, aber in demselben Augenblick sank er nieder und riß meine Mutter mit sich zu Boden. Sei es, daß ihn der Schlag plötzlich getroffen, oder aus einer andern Ursache; genug, er war tot. Vergebens war das Mühen meiner Mutter, sich den im Todeskrampf erstarrten Armen des Leichnams zu entwinden. Die hohlen Augen, deren Sehkraft erloschen, auf sie gerichtet, wälzte der Tote sich mit ihr auf dem Boden. Ihr gellendes Hilfsgeschrei drang endlich bis zu in der Ferne Vorübergehenden, die herbeieilten und sie retteten aus den Armen des grausigen Liebhabers. Das Entsetzen warf meine Mutter auf ein schweres Krankenlager. Man gab sie, mich verloren, doch sie gesundete, und die Entbindung war glücklicher, als man je hatte hoffen können. Aber die Schrecken jenes fürchterlichen Augenblicks hatten mich getroffen. Mein böser Stern war aufgegangen und hatte den Funken hinabgeschossen, der in mir eine der seltsamsten und verderblichsten Leidenschaften entzündet. Schon in der frühesten Kindheit gingen mir glänzende Diamanten, goldenes Geschmeide über alles. Man hielt das für gewöhnliche kindische Neigung. Aber es zeigte sich anders, denn als Knabe stahl ich Gold und Juwelen, wo ich sie habhaft werden konnte. Wie der geübteste Kenner unterschied ich aus Instinkt unechtes Geschmeide von echtem. Nur dieses lockte mich, unechtes sowie geprägtes Gold ließ ich unbeachtet liegen. Den grausamsten Züchtigungen des Vaters mußte die angeborne Begierde weichen. Um nur mit Gold und edlen Steinen hantieren zu können, wandte ich mich zur Goldschmiedsprofession. Ich arbeitete mit Leidenschaft und wurde bald der erste Meister dieser Art. Nun begann eine Periode, in der der angeborne Trieb, so lange niedergedrückt, mit Gewalt empordrang und mit Macht wuchs, alles um sich her wegzehrend. Sowie ich ein Geschmeide gefertigt und abgeliefert, fiel ich in eine Unruhe, in eine Trostlosigkeit, die mir Schlaf, Gesundheit – Lebensmut raubte. – Wie ein Gespenst stand Tag und Nacht die Person, für die ich gearbeitet, mir vor Augen, geschmückt mit meinem Geschmeide, und eine Stimme raunte mir in die Ohren: 'Es ist ja dein – es ist ja dein – nimm es doch – was sollen die Diamanten dem Toten!' – Da legt' ich mich endlich auf Diebeskünste. Ich hatte Zutritt in den Häusern der Großen, ich nützte schnell jede Gelegenheit, kein Schloß widerstand meinem Geschick, und bald war der Schmuck, den ich gearbeitet, wieder in meinen Händen. – Aber nun vertrieb selbst das nicht meine Unruhe. Jene unheimliche Stimme ließ sich dennoch vernehmen und höhnte mich und rief: 'Ho ho, dein Geschmeide trägt ein Toter!' – Selbst wußte ich nicht, wie es kam, daß ich einen unaussprechlichen Haß auf die warf, denen ich Schmuck gefertigt. Ja! im tiefsten Innern regte sich eine Mordlust gegen sie, vor der ich selbst erbebte. – In dieser Zeit kaufte ich dieses Haus. Ich war mit dem Besitzer handelseinig geworden, hier in diesem Gemach saßen wir, erfreut über das geschlossene Geschäft, beisammen und tranken eine Flasche Wein. Es war Nacht worden, ich wollte aufbrechen, da sprach mein Verkäufer: 'Hört, Meister René, ehe Ihr fortgeht, muß ich Euch mit einem Geheimnis dieses Hauses bekannt machen.' Darauf schloß er jenen in die Mauer eingeführten Schrank auf, schob die Hinterwand fort, trat in ein kleines Gemach, bückte sich nieder, hob eine Falltür auf. Eine steile, schmale Treppe stiegen wir hinab, kamen an ein schmales Pförtchen, das er aufschloß, traten hinaus in den freien Hof. Nun schritt der alte Herr, mein Verkäufer, hinan an die Mauer, schob an einem nur wenig hervorragenden Eisen, und alsbald drehte sich ein Stück Mauer los, so daß ein Mensch bequem durch die Öffnung schlüpfen und auf die Straße gelangen konnte. Du magst einmal das Kunststück sehen, Olivier, das wahrscheinlich schlaue Mönche des Klosters, welches ehemals hier lag, fertigen ließen, um heimlich aus- und einschlüpfen zu können. Es ist ein Stück Holz, nur von außen gemörtelt und getüncht, in das von außenher eine Bildsäule, auch nur von Holz, doch ganz wie Stein, eingefügt ist, welches sich mitsamt der Bildsäule auf verborgenen Angeln dreht. – Dunkle Gedanken stiegen in mir auf, als ich diese Einrichtung sah, es war mir, als sei vorgearbeitet solchen Taten, die mir selbst noch Geheimnis blieben. Eben hatt' ich einem Herrn vom Hofe einen reichen Schmuck abgeliefert, der, ich weiß es, einer Operntänzerin bestimmt war. Die Todesfolter blieb nicht aus – das Gespenst hing sich an meine Schritte – der lispelnde Satan an mein Ohr! – Ich zog ein in das Haus. In blutigem Angstschweiß gebadet, wälzte ich mich schlaflos auf dem Lager! Ich seh im Geiste den Menschen zu der Tänzerin schleichen mit meinem Schmuck. Voller Wut springe ich auf – werfe den Mantel um – steige herab die geheime Treppe – fort durch die Mauer nach der Straße Nicaise. – Er kommt, ich falle über ihn her, er schreit auf, doch, von hinten festgepackt, stoße ich ihm den Dolch ins Herz – der Schmuck ist mein! – Dies getan, fühlte ich eine Ruhe, eine Zufriedenheit in meiner Seele, wie sonst niemals. Das Gespenst war verschwunden, die Stimme des Satans schwieg. Nun wußte ich, was mein böser Stern wollte, ich mußt' ihm nachgeben oder untergehen! – Du begreifst jetzt mein ganzes Tun und Treiben, Olivier! – Glaube nicht, daß ich darum, weil ich tun muß, was ich nicht lassen kann, jenem Gefühl des Mitleids, des Erbarmens, was in der Natur des Menschen bedingt sein soll, rein entsagt habe. Du weißt, wie schwer es mir wird, einen Schmuck abzuliefern; wie ich für manche, deren Tod ich nicht will, gar nicht arbeite, ja wie ich sogar, weiß ich, daß am morgenden Tage Blut mein Gespenst verbannen wird, heute es bei einem tüchtigen Faustschlage bewenden lasse, der den Besitzer meines Kleinods zu Boden streckt und mir dieses in die Hand liefert.' – Dies alles gesprochen, führte mich Cardillac in das geheime Gewölbe und gönnte mir den Anblick seines Juwelenkabinetts. Der König besitzt es nicht reicher. Bei jedem Schmuck war auf einem kleinen daran gehängten Zettel genau bemerkt, für wen es gearbeitet, wann es durch Diebstahl, Raub oder Mord genommen worden. 'An deinem Hochzeitstage', sprach Cardillac dumpf und feierlich, 'an deinem Hochzeitstage, Olivier, wirst du mir, die Hand gelegt auf des gekreuzigten Christus Bild, einen heiligen Eid schwören, sowie ich gestorben, alle diese Reichtümer in Staub zu vernichten durch Mittel, die ich dir dann bekannt machen werde. Ich will nicht, daß irgendein menschlich Wesen, und am wenigsten Madelon und du, in den Besitz des mit Blut erkauften Horts komme.' Gefangen in diesem Labyrinth des Verbrechens, zerrissen von Liebe und Abscheu, von Wonne und Entsetzen, war ich dem Verdammten zu vergleichen, dem ein holder Engel mild lächelnd hinaufwinkt, aber mit glühenden Krallen festgepackt hält ihn der Satan, und des frommen Engels Liebeslächeln, in dem sich alle Seligkeit des hohen Himmels abspiegelt, wird ihm zur grimmigsten seiner Qualen. – Ich dachte an Flucht – ja, an Selbstmord – aber Madelon! – Tadelt mich, tadelt mich, mein würdiges Fräulein, daß ich zu schwach war, mit Gewalt eine Leidenschaft niederzukämpfen, die mich an das Verbrechen fesselte; aber büße ich nicht dafür mit schmachvollem Tode? – Eines Tages kam Cardillac nach Hause, ungewöhnlich heiter. Er liebkoste Madelon, warf mir die freundlichsten Blicke zu, trank bei Tische eine Flasche edlen Weins, wie er es nur an hohen Fest- und Feiertagen zu tun pflegte, sang und jubilierte. Madelon hatte uns verlassen, ich wollte in die Werkstatt: 'Bleib sitzen, Junge', rief Cardillac, 'heut keine Arbeit mehr, laß uns noch eins trinken auf das Wohl der allerwürdigsten, vortrefflichsten Dame in Paris.' Nachdem ich mit ihm angestoßen und er ein volles Glas geleert hatte, sprach er: 'Sag an, Olivier, wie gefallen dir die Verse:
"Un amant, qui craint les voleurs, n'est point digne d'amour."

Er erzählte nun, was sich in den Gemächern der Maintenon mit Euch und dem Könige begeben, und fügte hinzu, daß er Euch von jeher verehrt habe, wie sonst kein menschliches Wesen, und daß Ihr, mit solch hoher Tugend begabt, vor der der böse Stern kraftlos erbleiche, selbst den schönsten von ihm gefertigten Schmuck tragend, niemals, ein böses Gespenst, Mordgedanken in ihm erregen würdet. 'Höre, Olivier', sprach er, 'wozu ich entschlossen. Vor langer Zeit sollt' ich Halsschmuck und Armbänder fertigen für Henriette von England und selbst die Steine dazu liefern. Die Arbeit gelang mir wie keine andere, aber es zerriß mir die Brust, wenn ich daran dachte, mich von dem Schmuck, der mein Herzenskleinod geworden, trennen zu müssen. Du weißt der Prinzessin unglücklichen Tod durch Meuchelmord. Ich behielt den Schmuck und will ihn nun als ein Zeichen meiner Ehrfurcht, meiner Dankbarkeit dem Fräulein von Scuderi senden im Namen der verfolgten Bande. – Außerdem, daß die Scuderi das sprechende Zeichen ihres Triumphs erhält, verhöhne ich auch Desgrais und seine Gesellen, wie sie es verdienen. – Du sollst ihr den Schmuck hintragen.' Sowie Cardillac Euern Namen nannte, Fräulein, war es, als würden schwarze Schleier weggezogen, und das Schöne, lichte Bild meiner glücklichen frühen Kinderzeit ginge wieder auf in bunten, glänzenden Farben. Es kam ein wunderbarer Trost in meine Seele, ein Hoffnungsstrahl, vor dem die finstern Geister schwanden. Cardillac mochte den Eindruck, den seine Worte auf mich gemacht, wahrnehmen und nach seiner Art deuten. 'Dir scheint', sprach er, 'mein Vorhaben zu behagen. Gestehen kann ich wohl, daß eine tief innere Stimme, sehr verschieden von der, welche Blutopfer verlangt wie ein gefräßiges Raubtier, mir befohlen hat, daß ich solches tue. – Manchmal wird mir wunderlich im Gemüte – eine innere Angst, die Furcht vor irgend etwas Entsetzlichem, dessen Schauer aus einem fernen Jenseits herüberwehen in die Zeit, ergreift mich gewaltsam. Es ist mir dann sogar, als ob das, was der böse Stern begonnen durch mich, meiner unsterblichen Seele, die daran keinen Teil hat, zugerechnet werden könne. In solcher Stimmung beschloß ich, für die Heilige Jungfrau in der Kirche St. Eustache eine schöne Diamantenkrone zu fertigen. Aber jene unbegreifliche Angst überfiel mich stärker, sooft ich die Arbeit beginnen wollte, da unterließ ich's ganz. Jetzt ist es mir, als wenn ich der Tugend und Frömmigkeit selbst demutsvoll ein Opfer bringe und wirksame Fürsprache erflehe, indem ich der Scuderi den schönsten Schmuck sende, den ich jemals gearbeitet.' – Cardillac, mit Eurer ganzen Lebensweise, mein Fräulein, auf das genaueste bekannt, gab mir nun Art und Weise sowie die Stunde an, wie und wann ich den Schmuck, den er in ein sauberes Kästchen schloß, abliefern solle. Mein ganzes Wesen war Entzücken, denn der Himmel selbst zeigte mir durch den freveligen Cardillac den Weg, mich zu retten aus der Hölle, in der ich, ein verstoßener Sünder, schmachte. So dacht' ich. Ganz gegen Cardillacs Willen wollt' ich bis zu Euch dringen. Als Anne Brussons Sohn, als Euer Pflegling gedacht' ich, mich Euch zu Füßen zu werfen und Euch alles – alles zu entdecken. Ihr hättet, gerührt von dem namenlosen Elend, das der armen, unschuldigen Madelon drohte bei der Entdeckung, das Geheimnis beachtet, aber Euer hoher, scharfsinniger Geist fand gewiß sichre Mittel, ohne jene Entdeckung der verruchten Bosheit Cardillacs zu steuern. Fragt mich nicht, worin diese Mittel hätten bestehen sollen, ich weiß es nicht – aber daß Ihr Madelon und mich retten würdet, davon lag die Überzeugung fest in meiner Seele, wie der Glaube an die trostreiche Hilfe der Heiligen Jungfrau. – Ihr wißt, Fräulein, daß meine Absicht in jener Nacht fehlschlug. Ich verlor nicht die Hoffnung, ein andermal glücklicher zu sein. Da geschah es, daß Cardillac plötzlich alle Munterkeit verlor. Er schlich trübe umher, starrte vor sich hin, murmelte unverständliche Worte, focht mit den Händen, Feindliches von sich abwehrend, sein Geist schien gequält von bösen Gedanken. So hatte er es einen ganzen Morgen getrieben. Endlich setzte er sich an den Werktisch, sprang unmutig wieder auf, schaute durchs Fenster, sprach ernst und düster: 'Ich wollte doch, Henriette von England hätte meinen Schmuck getragen!' – Die Worte erfüllten mich mit Entsetzen. Nun wußt' ich, daß sein irrer Geist wieder erfaßt war von dem abscheulichen Mordgespenst, daß des Satans Stimme wieder laut worden vor seinen Ohren. Ich sah Euer Leben bedroht von dem verruchten Mordteufel. Hatte Cardillac nur seinen Schmuck wieder in Händen, so wart Ihr gerettet. Mit jedem Augenblick wuchs die Gefahr. Da begegnete ich Euch auf dem Pontneuf, drängte mich an Eure Kutsche, warf Euch jenen Zettel zu, der Euch beschwor, doch nur gleich den erhaltenen Schmuck in Cardillacs Hände zu bringen. Ihr kamt nicht. Meine Angst stieg bis zur Verzweiflung, als andern Tages Cardillac von nichts anderm sprach als von dem köstlichen Schmuck, der ihm in der Nacht vor Augen gekommen. Ich konnte das nur auf Euern Schmuck deuten, und es wurde mir gewiß, daß er über irgendeinen Mordanschlag brüte, den er gewiß schon in der Nacht auszuführen sich vorgenommen. Euch retten mußt' ich, und sollt' es Cardillacs Leben kosten. Sowie Cardillac nach dem Abendgebet sich, wie gewöhnlich, eingeschlossen, stieg ich durch ein Fenster in den Hof, schlüpfte durch die Öffnung in der Mauer und stellte mich unfern in den tiefen Schatten. Nicht lange dauerte es, so kam Cardillac heraus und schlich leise durch die Straße fort. Ich hinter ihm her. Er ging nach der Straße St. Honoré, mir bebte das Herz. Cardillac war mit einemmal mir entschwunden. Ich beschloß, mich an Eure Haustüre zu stellen. Da kommt singend und trillernd, wie damals, als der Zufall mich zum Zuschauer von Cardillacs Mordtat machte, ein Offizier bei mir vorüber, ohne mich zu gewahren. Aber in demselben Augenblick springt eine schwarze Gestalt hervor und fällt über ihn her. Es ist Cardillac. Diesen Mord will ich hindern, mit einem lauten Schrei bin ich in zwei – drei Sätzen zur Stelle – Nicht der Offizier – Cardillac sinkt, zum Tode getroffen, röchelnd zu Boden. Der Offizier läßt den Dolch fallen, reißt den Degen aus der Scheide, stellt sich, wähnend, ich sei des Mörders Geselle, kampffertig mir entgegen, eilt aber schnell davon, als er gewahrt, daß ich, ohne mich um ihn zu kümmern, nur den Leichnam untersuche. Cardillac lebte noch. Ich lud ihn, nachdem ich den Dolch, den der Offizier hatte fallen lassen, zu mir gesteckt, auf die Schultern und schleppte ihn mühsam fort nach Hause, und durch den geheimen Gang hinauf in die Werkstatt. – Das übrige ist Euch bekannt. Ihr seht, mein würdiges Fräulein, daß mein einziges Verbrechen nur darin besteht, daß ich Madelons Vater nicht den Gerichten verriet und so seinen Untaten ein Ende machte. Rein bin ich von jeder Blutschuld. – Keine Marter wird mir das Geheimnis von Cardillacs Untaten abzwingen. Ich will nicht, daß der ewigen Macht, die der tugendhaften Tochter des Vaters gräßliche Blutschuld verschleierte, zum Trotz, das ganze Elend der Vergangenheit, ihres ganzen Seins noch jetzt tötend auf sie einbreche, daß noch jetzt die weltliche Rache den Leichnam aufwühle aus der Erde, die ihn deckt, daß noch jetzt der Henker die vermoderten Gebeine mit Schande brandmarke. – Nein! – mich wird die Geliebte meiner Seele beweinen als den unschuldig Gefallenen, die Zeit wird ihren Schmerz lindern, aber unüberwindlich würde der Jammer sein über des geliebten Vaters entsetzliche Taten der Hölle!" –

Olivier schwieg, aber nun stürzte plötzlich ein Tränenstrom aus seinen Augen, er warf sich der Scuderi zu Füßen und flehte: "Ihr seid von meiner Unschuld überzeugt – gewiß, Ihr seid es! – Habt Erbarmen mit mir, sagt, wie steht es um Madelon?" – die Scuderi rief der Martiniere, und nach wenigen Augenblicken flog Madelon an Oliviers Hals. "Nun ist alles gut, da du hier bist – ich wußt' es ja, daß die edelmütigste Dame dich retten würde!" So rief Madelon ein Mal über das andere, und Olivier vergaß sein Schicksal, alles, was ihm drohte, er war frei und selig. Auf das rührendste klagten beide sich, was sie um einander gelitten, und umarmten sich dann aufs neue und weinten vor Entzücken, daß sie sich wiedergefunden.
Wäre die Scuderi nicht von Oliviers Unschuld schon überzeugt gewesen, der Glaube daran müßte ihr jetzt gekommen sein, da sie die beiden betrachtete, die in der Seligkeit des innigsten Liebesbündnisses die Welt vergaßen und ihr Elend und ihr namenloses Leiden. "Nein", rief sie, "solch seliger Vergessenheit ist nur ein reines Herz fähig."

Die hellen Strahlen des Morgens brachen durch die Fenster. Desgrais klopfte leise an die Türe des Gemachs und erinnerte, daß es Zeit sei, Olivier Brusson fortzuschaffen, da, ohne Aufsehen zu erregen, das später nicht geschehen könne. Die Liebenden mußten sich trennen. –