de-en  Die Zeitmaschine Einführung..Chapter 1 von H.G.Wells Medium
Introduction The time traveler (because that's the best way to talk about him) told us a mysterious thing. His grey eyes shone and twinkled, and his usually pale face was flushed and animated. The fire burned brightly, and the soft radiances of the incandescent light in the silver lilies struck the bubbles that flashed and went away in our glasses. Our chairs - inventions patented by him - embraced and caressed each one rather than let them sit on them by themselves, and there was that lush after dinner atmosphere, as thoughts wander gracefully and free of the bonds of precision. And he presented it this way - by emphasizing individual points with a lean index finger - while we sat there, lazily admiring his seriousness over this new paradox (or so we thought it was) and its fecundity.

" You must follow me carefully. I shall have to refute one or two idea that are almost universally accepted. Geometry, for example, as taught at school, is based on an misconception." Filby, a quarrelsome man with red hair, said: "At the beginning, don't you ask too much of us?"

"I do not mean to ask you to accept anything without reasonable ground for it, you will soon admit as much as I need from you. You certainly know that a mathematical line of zero thickness does not really exist. They taught you that? Neither has a mathematical plane. These are mere abstractions." "That's true," said the psychologist.

"Even a cube, since it has only length, width and depth, cannot really exist." "I raise an objection," said Filby. "Of course, a solid body can exist. All real things - -" "Most people believe that. But wait a moment. Can an instantaneous cube exist?" 'I don't follow you," said Filby.

"Can there a cube that has practicaly no time duration?" Filby became pensive. "Obviously," continued the time traveler, "every real body must have four dimensions: it must have length, width, depth, and duration. But due to a natural weakness of the flesh, which I want to explain to you at the moment, we tend to overlook this fact. There are really four dimensions; we name them the three planes of space, and a fourth one, time. However, there is a tendency to make an unreal difference between the first three dimensions and the fourth, because it happens that our consciousness moves intermittently along the fourth dimension from the beginning of our life to the end." "That," said a very young man who was making a spasmodic effort to light his cigar over the lamp, "that ... is truly quite clear." "Now it is very strange that this is so extensively overlooked," the time traveler continued with a touch of cheerfulness. "In reality, one means this with the fourth dimension, although some who talk about the fourth dimension do not know that they mean it. It's only a different kind of way to focus on time. There is no difference between time and one of the three dimensions of space, except that our consciousness moves on its line. But some foolish people have got hold of the wrong side of that idea. You've all heard all of them what they have to say about this fourth dimension?" "Not I," said the mayor of the province.

"Things are just like this. Space, in the mathematical sense is something that has three dimensions, which can be called length, width, depth, and which can always be defined with the help of three planes, each at right angles to the other two. But some philosophical people have asked why just three dimensions? - why not an additional direction which stands at right angles to the other three? - and they even tried to construct a four-dimensional geometry. Professor Simon Newcomb was expounding this to the New York Mathematical Society only a month or so ago. You know that on a surface that has only two dimensions, you can represent the figure of a three-dimensional body, and also, you think, you can represent one of four by models of three dimensions - if you could only master the perspective of the thing. You see?" "I believe," muttered the provincial mayor, and knitting his eyebrows, he sank down, and his lips moved as if he were repeating mystical words. "Yes, I think I see it now," he said after some time, brightening in a quite transitory manner.

"Well, I will not withhold from you the fact that for some time I have been working on this four dimensional geometry. Some of my results are odd. Here, for example, you see the portrait of a man at the age of eight, a second at the age of fifteen, a third at the age of seventeen, a fourth at the age of twenty-three, and so on. All these are obviously sections, as it were, three-dimensional representations of his four-dimensional being, which is a fixed and unchangeable thing." "Scientists," the time traveler continued after a pause, as was necessary for the right assimilation of his words, "know quite well that time is only a kind of space. Here you see a popular scientific cross sectional drawing, a weather forecast. This line, which I follow with my finger, shows the barometric changes. Yesterday it was this high, yesterday evening it fell, this morning it climbed again and then rose slowly up to here. Certainly, the mercury reading did not draw this line in any of the generally accepted spatial dimensions? But surely it drew such a line, and this line, we must conclude, runs along the time dimension." "But," the doctor said fixing his gaze sharply on a coal in the fire, "if time is really just a fourth dimension of space, how does one see it as something else and has always seen it thus? And why can't we move around in time just as we can move in the other dimensions of space?" The time traveler smiled. "Are you so sure we can move freely in space? Right and left and forwards and backwards we can move freely enough, and people have always done so. I have to admit, we move freely in two dimensions. But up and down? Gravity restricts us then." "Not quite," said the doctor. "There are balloons." "But before the balloons, apart from convulsive jumps and the unevenness of the earth, man had no freedom of vertical movement." "They could always move up and down a little." "Easier, far easier down than up." "And in time you can't move at all; you can't get away from present moment." "My dear Sir, that is just where you are wrong. The whole world is mistaken about precisely that. We are constantly progressing from the present moment. Our mental existence, which is immaterial and has no dimensions, runs from the cradle to the grave along the time dimension with spiritual speed. "Just like we would go downhill if we started our existence fifty miles above the earth's surface." "But the big difficulty," the psychologist interrupted, "is that you can move in space in all directions, but you can't move back and forth in time." "This is the core of my great discovery. But you're wrong when you say we can't move back and forth in time. For example, if I remember an incident very vividly, I go back to the moment of its happening: I become absent-minded, as you say. I'll go back in time for a moment. Of course, we have no means of staying behind for any length of time, as little a savage or an animal has means of staying six feet above the ground. But a civilized person in this regard is better off than the savage. He can rise in the balloon against gravity, and why shouldn't he hope that one day he will be able to interrupt or accelerate his journey along the time dimension, or even reverse it and travel in the opposite direction? "O, that," Filby began, "is everything," "Why not?" said the time traveler.

"It's against reason," said Filby.

"Against what reason?" asked the time traveler.

"You can prove that white is black," said Filby, "but you will never ever convince me." " Perhaps not," said the time traveler. “But now you are beginning to see the aim of my study of four dimensional geometry. Already long time ago I had an idea about a machine - -" "To travel through time?" shouted the very young man.

"Which travels in every direction of space and time as its operator will." Filby contented himself with laughing.

"But I have experimental evidence," said the time traveler.

"That would be extremely convenient for the historian," said the psychologist. "You could go back and check the accepted report of the Battle of Hastings, for example!" "Don't you think you would attract attention?" said the doctor. "Our ancestors were not very tolerant of anachronisms." "You could learn Greek from Homer's and Plato's lips," said the very young man.

"In that case, you would surely fail in the exam. German scholars have improved Greek so much." "And then the future," said the very young man, "just think that! One could invest all one's money, leave it to accumulate at interest, and hurry on ahead!" "To find a society," said I, "erected on a strictly communistic basis." "Of all the wild excessive theories!" began the psychologist.

"Yes, so it seemed to me; and therefore I never spoke of it until -" "experimental proof!" I shouted. "You want to prove that?" "The experiment!" shouted Filby, who was getting brain-weary.

"Let's see your experiment at least," said the psychologist, "although it's all nonsense, you know." The time traveler looked around smiling. Then he went out, still smiling slightly, his hands deep in his trousers pockets, to the room, and we heard his shoes down the long corridor to his laboratory.

The psychologist looked at us. "I would like to know what he has found?" "Some sleight of hand," said the doctor, and Filby tried to tell us about a summoner he had seen at Burslem, but before he could finish his preface, the time traveler came back and Filby's anecdote fell apart.
unit 2
unit 6
»Sie müssen mir aufmerksam folgen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 7
Ich werde die eine oder andere Vorstellung bekämpfen müssen, die fast allgemein angenommen ist.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 11
Das hat man Sie gelehrt?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 12
Ebensowenig eine mathematische Fläche.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 13
Das sind bloße Abstraktionen.« »Das stimmt«, sagte der Psychologe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 15
»Natürlich kann ein fester Körper existieren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 16
Alle wirklichen Dinge – –« »Das glauben die meisten Menschen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 17
Aber warten Sie einen Augenblick.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 18
Kann ein momentaner Würfel existieren?« »Verstehe Sie nicht«, sagte Filby.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 19
»Kann ein Würfel, der überhaupt keine Zeit dauert, existieren?« Filby wurde nachdenklich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 25
Es ist nur eine andere Art, die Zeit anzusehen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 27
Aber einige Narren haben diese Idee auf der verkehrten Seite zu fassen bekommen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 29
»Es liegt einfach so.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 31
Aber einige philosophische Leute haben gefragt, warum gerade drei Dimensionen?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 32
– warum nicht noch eine Richtung, die im rechten Winkel zu den drei anderen steht?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 33
– und sie haben sogar versucht, eine vierdimensionale Geometrie zu konstruieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 37
»Ja, ich glaube, jetzt sehe ich's«, sagte er nach einiger Zeit und hellte vorübergehend auf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 39
Einige meiner Resultate sind sonderbar.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 42
Hier sehen Sie eine beliebte wissenschaftliche Rißzeichnung, einen Wetterbericht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 43
Diese Linie, der ich mit meinem Finger folge, zeigt die Bewegungen des Barometers.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 45
Das Quecksilber hat doch diese Linie in keiner der allgemein anerkannten Raumdimensionen gezogen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
»Sind Sie so sicher, daß wir uns im Raum frei bewegen können?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 50
Ich gebe zu, wir bewegen uns in zwei Dimensionen frei.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 51
Aber auf und ab?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 52
Da beschränkt uns die Schwerkraft.« »Nicht ganz«, sagte der Arzt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 54
Gerade da ist die ganze Welt im Irrtum.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 55
Wir kommen beständig vom gegenwärtigen Moment fort.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 58
Aber Sie haben Unrecht, wenn Sie sagen, wir können uns in der Zeit nicht hin und her bewegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 60
Ich springe auf einen Moment zurück.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 62
Aber ein zivilisierter Mensch ist in dieser Hinsicht besser dran als der Wilde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 64
»Es ist gegen die Vernunft«, sagte Filby.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 65
»Gegen welche Vernunft?« fragte der Zeitreisende.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 70
»Aber ich habe experimentellen Beweis«, sagte der Zeitreisende.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 71
»Das wäre für den Historiker außerordentlich bequem«, meinte der Psychologe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 74
»In dem Fall würden Sie im Examen sicher durchfallen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 78
»Sie wollen das beweisen?« »Das Experiment!« rief Filby, der gehirnmüde wurde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
unit 81
Der Psychologe blickte uns an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 53  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 47  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 52  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 55  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 65  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 66  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 82  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 57  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 56  2 months, 1 week ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 53  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 38  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 4  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 36  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 64  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 42  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 42  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 50  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 51  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 51  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 36  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 40  2 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 33  2 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a 4412  translated  unit 51  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 33  2 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 35  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 39  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 28  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 27  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 29  2 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 29  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 29  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 31  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 24  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 8  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 18  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 18  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 8  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 33  2 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 17  2 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 8  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 6  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented on  unit 3  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4412  commented on  unit 17  2 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7214  commented  2 months, 2 weeks ago

Sorry..bitte, habe die Einführung vergessen..bitte, bitte, erst hier übersetzen..danke!

by anitafunny 2 months, 2 weeks ago

Einführung
Der Zeitreisende (denn so werde ich am besten von ihm reden) setzte uns eine geheimnisvolle Sache auseinander. Seine grauen Augen leuchteten und zwinkerten, und sein meist blasses Gesicht war gerötet und belebt. Das Feuer brannte hell, und die weichen Strahlen des Glühlichts in den Silberlilien trafen die Bläschen, die in unseren Gläsern aufblitzten und vergingen. Unsere Stühle – von ihm erfundene Patente – umarmten und liebkosten sich eher, als daß sie auf sich sitzen ließen, und es herrschte jene üppige Nach-Tisch-Atmosphäre, da die Gedanken anmutig und frei von den Fesseln der Präzision hinlaufen. Und er stellte es folgendermaßen dar – indem er einzelnen Punkten mit einem hageren Zeigefinger Nachdruck verlieh – während wir dasaßen und träge seinen Ernst bei diesem neuen Paradoxon (wofür wir es hielten) und seine Fruchtbarkeit bewunderten.

»Sie müssen mir aufmerksam folgen. Ich werde die eine oder andere Vorstellung bekämpfen müssen, die fast allgemein angenommen ist. Die Geometrie zum Beispiel, die man Sie auf der Schule gelehrt hat, gründet sich auf einen Irrtum.«

»Ist damit anzufangen nicht etwas zuviel von uns erwartet?« sagte Filby, ein streitliebender Mann mit rotem Haar.

»Ich will von Ihnen nicht verlangen, daß Sie irgend etwas ohne vernünftigen Grund annehmen, Sie werden bald soviel zugeben, wie ich von Ihnen nötig habe. Sie wissen natürlich, daß eine mathematische Linie, eine Linie von einer Dicke nil, in Wirklichkeit nicht existiert. Das hat man Sie gelehrt? Ebensowenig eine mathematische Fläche. Das sind bloße Abstraktionen.«

»Das stimmt«, sagte der Psychologe.

»Auch ein Würfel kann, da er nur Länge, Breite und Tiefe besitzt, in Wirklichkeit nicht existieren.«

»Da erhebe ich Einspruch«, sagte Filby. »Natürlich kann ein fester Körper existieren. Alle wirklichen Dinge – –«

»Das glauben die meisten Menschen. Aber warten Sie einen Augenblick. Kann ein momentaner Würfel existieren?«

»Verstehe Sie nicht«, sagte Filby.

»Kann ein Würfel, der überhaupt keine Zeit dauert, existieren?«

Filby wurde nachdenklich. »Offenbar«, fuhr der Zeitreisende fort, »muß jeder wirkliche Körper in vier Dimensionen Ausdehnung haben: er muß Länge, Breite, Tiefe und – Dauer haben. Aber infolge einer natürlichen Schwachheit des Fleisches, die ich Ihnen im Moment erklären will, neigen wir dazu, diese Tatsache zu übersehen. Es gibt wirklich vier Dimensionen; wir nennen sie die drei Ebenen des Raumes, und eine vierte, die Zeit. Es herrscht jedoch die Neigung, zwischen den ersten drei Dimensionen und der vierten einen unwirklichen Unterschied zu machen, weil sich zufälligerweise unser Bewußtsein intermittierend vom Anfang unseres Lebens bis zum Ende der vierten Dimension entlang bewegt.«

»Das«, sagte ein sehr junger Mann, der krampfhafte Anstrengungen machte, seine Zigarre über der Lampe anzuzünden, »das ... ist wahrhaftig ganz klar.«

»Nun ist es sehr merkwürdig, daß dies in so ausgedehntem Maße übersehen wird«, fuhr der Zeitreisende mit einem leichten Anfall von Heiterkeit fort. »In Wirklichkeit meint man dies mit der vierten Dimension, obgleich manche, die von der vierten Dimension reden, nicht wissen, daß sie es meinen. Es ist nur eine andere Art, die Zeit anzusehen. Es gibt keinen Unterschied zwischen der Zeit und einer der drei Dimensionen des Raumes, außer daß sich unser Bewußtsein auf ihrer Linie bewegt. Aber einige Narren haben diese Idee auf der verkehrten Seite zu fassen bekommen. Sie haben alle gehört, was sie über diese vierte Dimension zu sagen haben?«

» Ich nicht«, sagte der Bürgermeister aus der Provinz.

»Es liegt einfach so. Vom Raum im Sinne unserer Mathematiker spricht man als von etwas, was drei Dimensionen hat, die man Länge, Breite, Tiefe nennen kann, und was stets mit Hilfe dreier Ebenen, deren jede im rechten Winkel zu den beiden anderen steht, definierbar ist. Aber einige philosophische Leute haben gefragt, warum gerade drei Dimensionen? – warum nicht noch eine Richtung, die im rechten Winkel zu den drei anderen steht? – und sie haben sogar versucht, eine vierdimensionale Geometrie zu konstruieren. Professor Simon Newcomb hat das erst vor einem Monat oder so der New-Yorker Mathematischen Gesellschaft auseinandergesetzt. Sie wissen, daß man auf einer Fläche, die nur zwei Dimensionen hat, die Figur eines dreidimensionalen Körpers darstellen kann, und ebenso, meinen Sie, könne man durch Modelle von drei Dimensionen einen von vier darstellen – wenn man nur der Perspektive der Sache Herr werden könnte. Sehen Sie?«

»Ich glaube«, murmelte der Bürgermeister aus der Provinz; und indem er die Brauen zusammenzog, versank er in sich, und seine Lippen bewegten sich wie bei einem, der mystische Worte wiederholt. »Ja, ich glaube, jetzt sehe ich's«, sagte er nach einiger Zeit und hellte vorübergehend auf.

»Nun, ich will Ihnen nicht vorenthalten, daß ich seit einiger Zeit an dieser Geometrie der vier Dimensionen gearbeitet habe. Einige meiner Resultate sind sonderbar. Hier, zum Beispiel, sehen Sie das Porträt eines Mannes im Alter von acht, ein zweites im Alter von fünfzehn, ein drittes im Alter von siebzehn, ein viertes im Alter von dreiundzwanzig Jahren, und so weiter. All das sind offenbar gleichsam Lektionen, dreidimensionale Darstellungen seines vierdimensionalen Seins, das ein festes und unveränderliches Ding ist.«

»Wissenschaftler«, fuhr der Zeitreisende nach einer Pause fort, wie sie zur rechten Assimilation seiner Worte erforderlich war, »wissen recht gut, daß die Zeit nur eine Art von Raum ist. Hier sehen Sie eine beliebte wissenschaftliche Rißzeichnung, einen Wetterbericht. Diese Linie, der ich mit meinem Finger folge, zeigt die Bewegungen des Barometers. Gestern stand es so hoch, gestern abend ist es gefallen, heute morgen wieder gestiegen und dann langsam bis hier herauf. Das Quecksilber hat doch diese Linie in keiner der allgemein anerkannten Raumdimensionen gezogen? Aber sicherlich hat es eine solche Linie gezogen, und diese Linie, müssen wir also folgern, lief die Zeitdimension entlang.«

»Aber«, sagte der Arzt, indem er eine Kohle im Feuer scharf fixierte, »wenn die Zeit wirklich nur eine vierte Raumdimension ist, wie kommt es, daß man sie als etwas anderes ansieht und immer angesehen hat? Und warum können wir uns nicht in der Zeit umherbewegen wie wir uns in den anderen Dimensionen des Raumes bewegen können?«

Der Zeitreisende lächelte. »Sind Sie so sicher, daß wir uns im Raum frei bewegen können? Rechts und links und vorwärts und rückwärts können wir uns frei genug bewegen, und das haben die Menschen auch immer getan. Ich gebe zu, wir bewegen uns in zwei Dimensionen frei. Aber auf und ab? Da beschränkt uns die Schwerkraft.«

»Nicht ganz«, sagte der Arzt. »Es gibt Ballons.«

»Aber vor den Ballons hatte der Mensch – von krampfhaften Sprüngen und den Unebenheiten der Erde abgesehen – keine Freiheit vertikaler Bewegung.«

»Immer konnten sie sich ein wenig auf und ab bewegen.«

»Leichter, weit leichter ab als auf.«

»Und in der Zeit können Sie sich gar nicht bewegen; vom gegenwärtigen Moment können Sie nicht fort.«

»Mein lieber Herr, gerade da sind Sie im Irrtum. Gerade da ist die ganze Welt im Irrtum. Wir kommen beständig vom gegenwärtigen Moment fort. Unsere geistige Existenz, die immateriell ist und keine Dimensionen hat, läuft von der Wiege bis zum Grabe mit geistförmiger Geschwindigkeit die Zeitdimension entlang. Genau, wie wir abwärts wandern würden, wenn wir unser Dasein fünfzig Meilen über der Erdoberfläche begännen.«

»Aber die große Schwierigkeit ist die«, unterbrach der Psychologe, »Sie können sich im Raum in allen Richtungen bewegen, aber Sie können sich nicht in der Zeit hin und her bewegen.«

»Das ist der Kern meiner großen Entdeckung. Aber Sie haben Unrecht, wenn Sie sagen, wir können uns in der Zeit nicht hin und her bewegen. Wenn ich mich zum Beispiel eines Ereignisses sehr lebhaft erinnere, gehe ich zum Moment seines Geschehens zurück: ich werde geistesabwesend, wie Sie sagen. Ich springe auf einen Moment zurück. Natürlich haben wir kein Mittel, irgendwie längere Zeit dahinterzubleiben, so wenig ein Wilder oder ein Tier Mittel hat, sechs Fuß über dem Boden zu bleiben. Aber ein zivilisierter Mensch ist in dieser Hinsicht besser dran als der Wilde. Er kann im Ballon gegen die Schwerkraft steigen, und warum sollte er nicht hoffen, daß er einmal werde imstande sein, seine Fahrt die Zeitdimension entlang zu unterbrechen oder zu beschleunigen oder sogar umzukehren und in entgegengesetzter Richtung zu wandern?«

»O, das«, begann Filby, »ist alles – –«

»Warum nicht?« fragte der Zeitreisende.

»Es ist gegen die Vernunft«, sagte Filby.

»Gegen welche Vernunft?« fragte der Zeitreisende.

»Sie können beweisen, daß weiß schwarz ist«, sagte Filby, »aber Sie werden mich nie überzeugen.«

»Vielleicht nicht«, sagte der Zeitreisende. »Aber Sie beginnen jetzt, das Ziel meiner Untersuchungen in der Geometrie der vier Dimensionen zu sehen. Schon vor langer Zeit ahnte ich etwas von einer Maschine – –«

»Um durch die Zeit zu reisen?« rief der sehr junge Mann.

»Die in jeder Richtung des Raumes und der Zeit fährt, wie es ihr Führer will.«

Filby begnügte sich mit Lachen.

»Aber ich habe experimentellen Beweis«, sagte der Zeitreisende.

»Das wäre für den Historiker außerordentlich bequem«, meinte der Psychologe. »Man könnte zurückreisen und zum Beispiel den anerkannten Bericht der Schlacht bei Hastings prüfen!«

»Meinen Sie nicht, Sie würden Aufmerksamkeit erregen?« sagte der Arzt. »Unsere Vorfahren waren nicht sehr duldsam gegen Anachronismen.«

»Man könnte sein Griechisch von Homers und Platos Lippen lernen«, meinte der sehr junge Mann.

»In dem Fall würden Sie im Examen sicher durchfallen. Die deutschen Gelehrten haben das Griechische so sehr verbessert.«

»Und dann die Zukunft«, sagte der sehr junge Mann, »Denken Sie nur! Man könnte all sein Geld anlegen, es mit Zinsen anstehen lassen und vorauseilen!«

»Um eine Gesellschaft zu finden«, sagte ich, »die auf streng kommunistischer Basis errichtet ist.«

»Von allen wilden, ausschweifenden Theorien!« begann der Psychologe.

»Ja, so schien es mir; und deshalb habe ich nie davon gesprochen, bis –«

»Experimenteller Beweis!« rief ich. »Sie wollen das beweisen?«

»Das Experiment!« rief Filby, der gehirnmüde wurde.

»Lassen Sie uns Ihr Experiment immerhin sehen«, sagte der Psychologe, »obgleich das alles Unfug ist, wissen Sie.«

Der Zeitreisende sah sich lächelnd im Kreise um. Dann ging er, immer noch leicht lächelnd, die Hände tief in den Hosentaschen, zum Zimmer hinaus, und wir hörten seine Schuhe den langen Gang bis zu seinem Laboratorium hinunter.

Der Psychologe blickte uns an. »Ich möchte wissen, was er gefunden hat?«

»Irgendein Taschenspielerstück«, sagte der Arzt, und Filby versuchte, uns von einem Beschwörer zu erzählen, den er zu Burslem gesehen hatte, aber ehe er noch mit seiner Vorrede fertig war, kam der Zeitreisende zurück, und Filbys Anekdote brach zusammen.