de-en  Das Fräulein von Scuderi - 10 von E.T.A. Hofmann Hard
Having arrived at the Conciergerie, the Scuderi was led into a large, bright room. Not long after, she heard a rattling of chains. Olivier Brusson was brought in. But, as soon as he stepped into the doorway, the Scuderi fell down in a faint. After she had recovered, Olivier had disappeared. She demanded vehemently to be taken to her carriage, she wanted to get out of the chambers of outrageous wickedness immediately. Alas! - at first glance she had recognised Olivier Brusson as the young man, who, on the Pontneuf, had thrown that leaflet into her carriage, who had brought her the casket with jewels. - So there was no doubt any more that la Regnie's dreadful conjecture was fully confirmed. Olivier Brusson belonged to this horrible murder gang, certainly he murdered also the master! - And Madelon? Never having been so bitterly deceived by her inner feelings, in mortal fear of the hellish power on earth, in whose existence she hadn't believed, the Scuderi despaired of all truth. She admitted the terrible suspicion that Madelon might be a co-conspirator and could share the horrifying blood guilt.

When a picture emerges in the human mind, the mind gets busy looking for and finding colours to embellish it, painting the picture in ever more garish colours; in this way also did the Scuderi find much to intensify that suspicion, when considering all the circumstances of the deed and Madelon's behaviour in the smallest detail. In this way, much that she had until now considered evidence of innocence and purity, became a certain sign of outrageous wickedness or studied hypocrisy. That heartbreaking sorrow, the bloody tears may well have been impelled by deathly fear, not of seeing the beloved bleed, but of falling oneself under the hand of the executioner. To immediately get rid of the snake she was cherishing in her bosom; with this decision the Scuderi got out of the carriage. Having entered her chamber, Madelon prostrated herself before her. The heavenly eyes, an angel of God doesn't possess more faithful ones, directed up to her, her hands folded in front of the quivering bosom, she loudly moaned and pleaded for help and consolation. Pulling herself together with effort, the Scuderi tried to lend her voice a tone of seriousness and calmness as much as possible and said: "Go, go - just console yourself that the murderer awaits just punishment for his infamous deed - may the holy virgin preserve you from being burdened by a blood guilt yourself. "Oh, now everything is lost!" -With that shrill exclamation, Madelon fell to the ground in a faint. The Scuderi left the girl to be looked after by the Martiniere and took herself to another room. - Completely torn inwardly, sundered from all that is earthly, the Scuderi no longer wished to live in a world of hellish deception. She blamed the fate, that in bitter cynicism had granted her so many years to strengthen her belief in virtue and faithfulness, only now in her old age, to destroy that beautiful picture which had illuminated her life.
She heard the Martiniere take Madelon away, who was quietly sighing and moaning: "Oh! - even she - even she had been bewitched by that gruesome lot. - Wretched me - poor, unfortunate Olivier!" The tones penetrated into the Scuderi's heart, and once more the intimation of a secret stirred in her innermost being, the belief in Olivier's innocence. Beset with the most contradictory feelings, the Scuderi exclaimed, quite distraught: "What spectre from Hell has entangled me in this horrible affair, that will cost me my life." - At that moment Baptiste entered, pale and terrified, with the news that Desgrais was outside. Since the vile process of la Voisin, Desgrais's appearance in a house was the forerunner of some embarrassing accusation, thus came Baptiste's fright, therefore the Mademoiselle asked him with a mild smile, "What is the matter, Baptiste? - Isn't it? - the name Scuderi was on the list of the la Voisin?" "Ah, for Christ's sake," Baptiste replied, trembling all over his body, " how may you say such things, but Desgrais, the horrible Desgrais, acts so mysteriously, so urgently, he doesn't seem be able to wait to see you!" "Well," the Scuderi said, "Now Baptiste, just show him in, the man who is so terrible to you and who at least cannot cause me any concern." - "The President," said Desgrais, as he entered the room, "President la Regnie sends me to you, my lady, with a request that he would hope not to fulfill, if he did not know your virtue and your courage. It would not be the last resort to bring forth an evil bloodlust, in your hands, if you had not already taken part in the evil process that kept the Chambre ardente, all of us in suspense. Olivier Brusson has been half-crazed ever since he saw you. As much as he seemed inclined to confess, he still once again swears by Christ and all the holy saints that he is completely innocent of Cardillac's murder, although he is gladly willing to suffer the death that he has earned. Notice, my Lady, that this last comment apparently points to other crimes that weigh heavily on him. But all efforts to get just one more word out of him have been in vain, even the threat of torture has been of no avail. He begs, he implores us to arrange an interview for him with you, just you. He wants to confess everything to you alone. My Lady, condescend to hear Brusson's confession." "Why!" exclaimed the Scuderi indignantly, "shall I serve the blood-court as an institution, shall I misuse the trust of the unfortunate man to bring him to the scaffold? No, Desgrais! Brusson may even be a despicable murderer, but it would never be possible for me to deceive him so mischievously. I do not want to learn anything of his secrets, which would stay sealed in my breast like a holy confession." "Perhaps," Desgrais retorted with a subtle smile, "perhaps, my Lady, your attitude will change when you have heard Brusson. Didn't you yourself beg the President to act humanely? He does it by yielding to Brusson's misguided wish and thus tries the last means at his command, before submitting him to torture, which is certainly what Brusson is due for." The Scuderi flinched involuntarily. "Be assured," Desgrais continued, "Be assured, worthy Lady, you will by no means be expected to step once more into those sinister rooms that fill you with horror and revulsion. In the darkest night, without any fuss, Olivier Brusson will be brought to you in your house like a free man. Without anyone eavesdropping on him but well guarded, he then may confess everything to you without being coerced. I vouch with my life that you yourself do not have to fear anything from the miserable scroundrel. He speaks of you with ardent adoration. He swears that only the dire doom that prevented him from seeing you earlier brought him to his death. And then it is of course up to you to reveal as much as you desire of what Brusson tells you. Can you be pressured into more than one?"

Deeply contemplating the Scuderi stood staring at the ground. It seemed to her as if she had to obey a higher power who obliged her to shed light on some terrible secret, as if she could not elude the wonderful entanglements any longer in which she had gotten against her will. Suddenly, having found her resolve, she said in a dignified manner:" God will give me the composure and steadfastness; show Brusson in, I will speak with him."
Just like the time when Brusson brought the small box, there was a knock on the front door of the Scuderi's house around midnight. Baptiste, informed of the late-night visit, opened. Ice-cold shivers ran down the Scuderi's spine when she became aware from the quiet steps and the muffled muttering that the guards who had brought Brusson were spreading out into the corridors of the house.

Finally the door of the chamber opened quietly. Desgrais entered, behind him Olivier Brusson, without chains, in decent dresses. "Here is," Desgrais said, bowing decently, " here is Brusson, my worthy young lady!" and left the room.
Brusson sunk down to his knees before the Scuderi, pleadingly he raised his folded hands, while frequent tears run out of his eyes.
The Scuderi looked pale, unable to speak a word, down on him. Even in the disfigured features, distorted by grief and grim pain, the pure expression of the most faithful mind radiated from the youthful countenance. The longer the Scuderi let her eyes rest on Brusson's face, the more vividly emerged the memory of some beloved person whom she was just not able to clearly recollect. All her shivers went away, and forgetting that Cardillac's murderer was kneeling in front of her, she spoke with the charming tone of quiet goodwill that was typical of her: "Well, Brusson, what to you have to say to me?" Yet he, still kneeling, sighed in deep, fervent melancholy and then said: "O my worthy, highly revered lady, has every trace of your recollection of me vanished? The Scuderi, looking at him even more carefully, replied that she certainly saw a resemblance to a person she loved in his features, and that it was only due to this resemblance that she resolved to overcome the deep disgust for the murderer and listened to him calmly. Brusson, severely offended by these words, rose quickly and stepped back one step, the black look lowered to the ground. Then he spoke with a muffled voice. "Have you really totally forgotten Anne Guiot? - her son Oliver - the boy you often rocked on your knees. is verily the one who is standing before you." "Oh, for all saints!" called the Scuderi, covering her face with both hands and sinking back into the cushions. The Mademoiselle probably had reason enough to get excited in that way. Anne Guiot, the daughter of an impoverished citizen, was with the Scuderi from the cradle, who educated her like the mother her dear child with all loyality and care. As she now had been grown up, a handsome, moral young man, named Claude Brusson, came to court the girl. Since he was an ingenious watchmaker who could easily find his abundant livelihood in Paris, and whom Anne fell in love with dearly, the Scuderi did not hesitate to consent to the marriage of her foster-daughter. The young people made themselves at home and lived in calm and happy domesticity; what did even strengthen the bonds of love was the birth of a beautiful boy, the fair mother's faithful image.

The Scuderi made an idol out of little Olivier, whom she wrested from her mother for hours and days to caress and fondle him. So the boy got used to her and enjoyed to be with her as much as he did with his mother. Three years were over when the professional jeaulousy of Brusson's fellow watch-makers made his work dwindle with every day so that he could hardly find more than meager means of subsistance in the end. An additional factor was his longing for his beautiful native Geneva, and so it happened that the small family moved there, irrespective of the Scuderi's reluctance, who promised all kinds of support. Anne did write to her foster mother several times, but then the letters stopped and the latter was left to believe that the happy life in Brusson's home town prevented the remembrance of days gone by.
There were right now twenty-three years ago when Brusson left Paris together with his wife and child and moved to Geneva.
"Oh, horrible," called the Scuderi, when she had fairly recovered, "oh, horrible! - Olivier, is it you? - the son of my Anne! - And now!" "Well, " Olivier answered quietly and calmly, " Well, my worthy Lady, you could never have suspected that the boy whom you cuddled like the tenderest mother, into whose mouth you stuck sweet after sweet while rocking him on your lap, to whom you gave the sweetest names, had matured into a youth, and would one day stand before you, accused of a horrible murder! I am not free of fault. The Chamber ardente can justly accuse me of a crime. But as true as I hope to die in peace, even if it is by the executioner's hand, I am innocent of any murder. The unfortunate Cardillac was not killed by me, not by my hand. - With these words Olivier was trembling and staggering. Silently the Scuderi pointed to a little armchair, that stood close to Olivier. Slowly he sat down.

"I had time enough," he began, "to prepare myself for this talk with you, whom I regarded as the last kindness of the reconciled heavens and so to gain much peace and composure as necessary to tell you the story of my terrible, shocking misfortune. Show me the compassion of listening quietly to me, however much even the discovery of a secret which you surely do not suspect may surprise you very much, indeed fill you with horror. - If only my poor father had never left Paris! So far as my memory of Geneva is sufficient, I find myself wet with tears by my destitute parents, even brought to tears by their lamentations which I did not understand. Later the distinct feeling came to me, the full consciousness of the most pressing deprivation, the profound misery in which my patents lived. My father felt deceived in all his hopes. Bowed down by profound grief, crushed, he died in the instant when he had succeeded in getting me a job as an apprentice with a goldsmith. My mother spoke a lot about you. She wanted to lament about everything to you, but then the despondency that misery produces took hold of her. This and probably also false shame, which often gnaws at the mortally wounded soul, held her back from her resolve. A few moons after my father's death, my mother followed him to the grave." "Poor Anne! poor Anne!“ the Scuderi called out overcome with pain. "Thanks and praise to the eternal power of Heaven that she is dead and will not see her beloved son be killed beneath the hand of the executioner, branded with shame." So Olivier yelled out aloud by throwing a wild, dreadful look upwards. It got busy outside, they walked back and forth. "Ho ho," Olivier said with a bitter smile, "Desgrais is waking up his accomplices, as if I might escape here. - But to go on! - My master kept a tight rein on me, in spite of the fact that I soon was his best worker and in the end most probably surpassed him.

It came to pass that once a stranger came to our workshop to buy some jewellery. When he now saw a beautiful necklace which I had worked, he clapped me on the shoulders with a friendly face, by eyeing the jewellery and saying: 'Well, well! my young friend, that's an excellent piece of work. I really don't know who else could surpass your work but René Cardillac, who of course is the very best goldsmith in the world. You ought to go to him. He will take you into his workshop with pleasure, for only you can assist him in his artistic work, and in return only from him alone can you still learn.' The stranger's words had fallen deep into my soul. I had no rest in Geneva, I was moved away by force. Finally I managed to disconnect me from my master. I came to Paris. Rene Cardillac greeted me cold and harsh. I didn't let up, he had to give me work, no matter how small it might be. I was supposed to make a little ring. When I brought him my work, he looked at me rigidly with his sparkling eyes as if he wanted to look into my innermost self. Then he said: "You are an efficient, brave assistant, you can move to me und help me in the workshop. I'll pay you well, you will be content with me." Cardillac kept his word. I had already been with him for several weeks without having seen Madelon, who, if I remember correctly, was staying with one of Cardilllac's aunts at the time. Finally she came. You eternal power of heaven, what happened to me when I saw the sight of an angel! - Has ever a man so loved than I! And now! - Madelon!"
unit 1
In der Conciergerie angekommen, führte man die Scuderi in ein großes, helles Gemach.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Nicht lange darauf vernahm sie Kettengerassel.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 3
Olivier Brusson wurde gebracht.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 4
Doch sowie er in die Türe trat, sank auch die Scuderi ohnmächtig nieder.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
Als sie sich erholt hatte, war Olivier verschwunden.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
Ach!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
– Nun war ja jeder Zweifel gehoben, la Regnies schreckliche Vermutung ganz bestätigt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
Olivier Brusson gehört zu der fürchterlichen Mordbande, gewiß ermordete er auch den Meister!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 11
– Und Madelon?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 18
In ihr Gemach eingetreten, warf Madelon sich ihr zu Füßen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
"Ach, nun ist alles verloren!"
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 22
– Mit diesem gellenden Ausruf stürzte Madelon ohnmächtig zu Boden.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 23
unit 26
Sie vernahm, wie die Martiniere Madelon fortbrachte, die leise seufzte und jammerte: "Ach!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 27
– auch sie – auch sie haben die Grausamen betört.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 28
– Ich Elende – armer, unglücklicher Olivier!"
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
– Nicht wahr!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 34
– der Name Scuderi befand sich auf der Liste der la Voisin?"
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
Olivier Brusson, seitdem er Euch gesehen hat, ist halb rasend.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 43
Laßt Euch herab, mein Fräulein, Brussons Bekenntnis zu hören."
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 44
"Wie!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 46
– Nein, Desgrais!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
Batet Ihr den Präsident nicht selbst, er sollte menschlich sein?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 52
die Scuderi schrak unwillkürlich zusammen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 55
Nicht einmal belauscht, doch wohl bewacht, mag er Euch dann zwanglos alles bekennen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
Er spricht von Euch mit inbrünstiger Verehrung.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 59
unit 60
Kann man Euch zu mehrerem zwingen?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 61
Die Scuderi sah tief sinnend vor sich nieder.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 65
Baptiste, von dem nächtlichen Besuch unterrichtet, öffnete.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 67
Endlich ging leise die Türe des Gemachs auf.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 68
Desgrais trat herein, hinter ihm Olivier Brusson, fesselfrei, in anständigen Kleidern.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
unit 70
und verließ das Zimmer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 72
Die Scuderi schaute erblaßt, keines Wortes mächtig, auf ihn herab.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 79
Dann sprach er mit dumpfer Stimme.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 80
"Habt Ihr denn Anne Guiot ganz vergessen?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 81
unit 82
"O um aller Heiligen willen!"
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 83
rief die Scuderi, indem sie, mit beiden Händen das Gesicht bedeckend, in die Polster zurücksank.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 84
Das Fräulein hatte wohl Ursache genug, sich auf diese Weise zu entsetzen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 90
unit 95
"O entsetzlich", rief die Scuderi, als sie sich einigermaßen wieder erholt hatte, "o entsetzlich!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
– Olivier bist du?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 97
– der Sohn meiner Anne!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
– Und jetzt!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 101
– Olivier geriet bei diesen Worten in ein Zittern und Schwanken.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 102
Stillschweigend wies die Scuderi auf einen kleinen Sessel, der Olivier zur Seite stand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 103
Er ließ sich langsam nieder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 106
– Hätte mein armer Vater Paris doch niemals verlassen!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 109
Mein Vater fand sich in allen seinen Hoffnungen getäuscht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 113
Wenige Monden nach dem Tode meines Vaters folgte ihm meine Mutter ins Grab."
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 114
"Arme Anne!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 115
arme Anne!"
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 116
rief die Scuderi von Schmerz überwältigt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 118
So schrie Olivier laut auf, indem er einen wilden entsetzlichen Blick in die Höhe warf.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 119
Es wurde draußen unruhig, man ging hin und her.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
– Doch weiter!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 123
Es begab sich, daß einst ein Fremder in unsere Werkstatt kam, um einiges Geschmeide zu kaufen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 125
mein junger Freund, das ist ja ganz vortreffliche Arbeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 128
die Worte des Fremden waren tief in meine Seele gefallen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
Ich hatte keine Ruhe mehr in Genf, mich zog es fort mit Gewalt.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 130
Endlich gelang es mir, mich von meinem Meister loszumachen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 131
Ich kam nach Paris.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 132
René Cardillac empfing mich kalt und barsch.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 133
Ich ließ nicht nach, er mußte mir Arbeit geben, so geringfügig sie auch sein mochte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 134
Ich sollte einen kleinen Ring fertigen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 137
Ich zahle dir gut, du wirst mit mir zufrieden sein.'
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 138
Cardillac hielt Wort.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 140
Endlich kam sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 141
Du ewige Macht des Himmels, wie geschah mir, als ich das Engelsbild sah!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 142
– Hat je ein Mensch so geliebt als ich!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 143
Und nun!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 144
– Madelon!"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 4408  commented on  unit 41  2 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 132  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 66  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 52  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 111  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 38  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 43  2 months, 2 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 3074  commented on  unit 38  2 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 74  2 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 116  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 122  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 126  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 116  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 138  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 125  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 116  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 112  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 30  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 30  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4408  commented on  unit 27  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4408  commented on  unit 25  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 29  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 27  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  translated  unit 121  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 24  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 24  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 20  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4408  commented on  unit 23  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 89  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 133  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene 2986  translated  unit 144  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene 2986  translated  unit 143  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  translated  unit 115  2 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  translated  unit 114  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 80  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 81  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene 2986  translated  unit 98  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 67  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 65  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 64  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 55  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 54  2 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 53  2 months, 3 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 3074  commented on  unit 54  2 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 2207  commented on  unit 13  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 46  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  translated  unit 44  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 41  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 31  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 13  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 63  2 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 63  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 28  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 22  2 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 5402  commented on  unit 41  2 months, 4 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 3074  translated  unit 46  2 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 5  3 months ago
lollo1a 4408  commented on  unit 6  3 months ago

In der Conciergerie angekommen, führte man die Scuderi in ein großes, helles Gemach. Nicht lange darauf vernahm sie Kettengerassel. Olivier Brusson wurde gebracht. Doch sowie er in die Türe trat, sank auch die Scuderi ohnmächtig nieder. Als sie sich erholt hatte, war Olivier verschwunden. Sie verlangte mit Heftigkeit, daß man sie nach dem Wagen bringe, fort, augenblicklich fort wollte sie aus den Gemächern der frevelnden Verruchtheit. Ach! – auf den ersten Blick hatte sie in Olivier Brusson den jungen Menschen erkannt, der auf dem Pontneuf jenes Blatt ihr in den Wagen geworfen, der ihr das Kästchen mit den Juwelen gebracht hatte. – Nun war ja jeder Zweifel gehoben, la Regnies schreckliche Vermutung ganz bestätigt. Olivier Brusson gehört zu der fürchterlichen Mordbande, gewiß ermordete er auch den Meister! – Und Madelon? – So bitter noch nie vom innern Gefühl getäuscht, auf den Tod angepackt von der höllischen Macht auf Erden, an deren Dasein sie nicht geglaubt, verzweifelte die Scuderi an aller Wahrheit. Sie gab Raum dem entsetzlichen Verdacht, daß Madelon mitverschworen sein und teilhaben könne an der gräßlichen Blutschuld.

Wie es denn geschieht, daß der menschliche Geist, ist ihm ein Bild aufgegangen, emsig Farben sucht und findet, es greller und greller auszumalen, so fand auch die Scuderi, jeden Umstand der Tat, Madelons Betragen in den kleinsten Zügen erwägend, gar vieles, jenen Verdacht zu nähren. So wurde manches, was ihr bisher als Beweis der Unschuld und Reinheit gegolten, sicheres Merkmal freveliger Bosheit, studierter Heuchelei. Jener herzzerreißende Jammer, die blutigen Tränen konnten wohl erpreßt sein von der Todesangst, nicht den Geliebten bluten zu sehen, nein – selbst zu fallen unter der Hand des Henkers. Gleich sich die Schlange, die sie im Busen nähre, vom Halse zu schaffen; mit diesem Entschluß stieg die Scuderi aus dem Wagen. In ihr Gemach eingetreten, warf Madelon sich ihr zu Füßen. Die Himmelsaugen, ein Engel Gottes hat sie nicht treuer, zu ihr emporgerichtet, die Hände vor der wallenden Brust zusammengefaltet, jammerte und flehte sie laut um Hilfe und Trost. Die Scuderi, sich mühsam zusammenfassend, sprach, indem sie dem Ton ihrer Stimme so viel Ernst und Ruhe zu geben suchte, als ihr möglich: "Geh – geh – tröste dich nur über den Mörder, den die gerechte Strafe seiner Schandtaten erwartet – Die heilige Jungfrau möge verhüten, daß nicht auf dir selbst eine Blutschuld schwer laste." "Ach, nun ist alles verloren!" – Mit diesem gellenden Ausruf stürzte Madelon ohnmächtig zu Boden. Die Scuderi überließ die Sorge um das Mädchen der Martiniere und entfernte sich in ein anderes Gemach. –

Ganz zerrissen im Innern, entzweit mit allem Irdischen, wünschte die Scuderi, nicht mehr in einer Welt voll höllischen Truges zu leben. Sie klagte das Verhängnis an, das in bitterm Hohn ihr so viele Jahre vergönnt, ihren Glauben an Tugend und Treue zu stärken, und nun in ihrem Alter das schöne Bild vernichte, welches ihr im Leben geleuchtet.
Sie vernahm, wie die Martiniere Madelon fortbrachte, die leise seufzte und jammerte: "Ach! – auch sie – auch sie haben die Grausamen betört. – Ich Elende – armer, unglücklicher Olivier!" – Die Töne drängen der Scuderi ins Herz, und aufs neue regte sich aus dem tiefsten Innern heraus die Ahnung eines Geheimnisses, der Glaube an Oliviers Unschuld. Bedrängt von den widersprechendsten Gefühlen, ganz außer sich rief die Scuderi: "Welcher Geist der Hölle hat mich in die entsetzliche Geschichte verwickelt, die mir das Leben kosten wird!" – In dem Augenblick trat Baptiste hinein, bleich und erschrocken, mit der Nachricht, daß Desgrais draußen sei. Seit dem abscheulichen Prozeß der la Voisin war Desgrais' Erscheinung in einem Hause der gewisse Vorbote irgendeiner peinlichen Anklage, daher kam Baptistes Schreck, deshalb fragte ihn das Fräulein mit mildem Lächeln: "Was ist dir, Baptiste? – Nicht wahr! – der Name Scuderi befand sich auf der Liste der la Voisin?" "Ach, um Christus' willen", erwiderte Baptiste, am ganzen Leibe zitternd, "wie möget Ihr nur so etwas aussprechen, aber Desgrais – der entsetzliche Desgrais, tut so geheimnisvoll, so dringend, er scheint es gar nicht erwarten zu können, Euch zu sehen!" – "Nun", sprach die Scuderi, "nun Baptiste, so führt ihn nur gleich herein, den Menschen, der Euch so fürchterlich ist und der mir wenigstens keine Besorgnis erregen kann." – "Der Präsident", sprach Desgrais, als er ins Gemach getreten, "der Präsident la Regnie schickt mich zu Euch, mein Fräulein, mit einer Bitte, auf deren Erfüllung er gar nicht hoffen würde, kennte er nicht Euere Tugend, Euern Mut, läge nicht das letzte Mittel, eine böse Blutschuld an den Tag zu bringen, in Euern Händen, hättet Ihr nicht selbst schon teilgenommen an dem bösen Prozeß, der die Chambre ardente, uns alle in Atem hält. Olivier Brusson, seitdem er Euch gesehen hat, ist halb rasend. So sehr er schon zum Bekenntnis sich zu neigen schien, so schwört er doch jetzt aufs neue bei Christus und allen Heiligen, daß er an dem Morde Cardillacs ganz unschuldig sei, wiewohl er den Tod gern leiden wolle, den er verdient habe. Bemerkt, mein Fräulein, daß der letzte Zusatz offenbar auf andere Verbrechen deutet, die auf ihm lasten. Doch vergebens ist alle Mühe, nur ein Wort weiter herauszubringen, selbst die Drohung mit der Tortur hat nichts gefruchtet. Er fleht, er beschwört uns, ihm eine Unterredung mit Euch zu verschaffen, Euch nur, Euch allein will er alles gestehen. Laßt Euch herab, mein Fräulein, Brussons Bekenntnis zu hören." "Wie!" rief die Scuderi ganz entrüstet, "soll ich dem Blutgericht zum Organ dienen, soll ich das Vertrauen des unglücklichen Menschen mißbrauchen, ihn aufs Blutgerüst zu bringen? – Nein, Desgrais! mag Brusson auch ein verruchter Mörder sein, nie wär' es mir doch möglich, ihn so spitzbübisch zu hintergehen. Nichts mag ich von seinen Geheimnissen erfahren, die wie eine heilige Beichte in meiner Brust verschlossen bleiben würden." "Vielleicht", versetzte Desgrais mit einem feinen Lächeln, "vielleicht, mein Fräulein, ändert sich Eure Gesinnung, wenn Ihr Brusson gehört habt. Batet Ihr den Präsident nicht selbst, er sollte menschlich sein? Er tut es, indem er dem törichten Verlangen Brussons nachgibt und so das letzte Mittel versucht, ehe er die Tortur verhängt, zu der Brusson längst reif ist." die Scuderi schrak unwillkürlich zusammen. "Seht", fuhr Desgrais fort, "seht, würdige Dame, man wird Euch keineswegs zumuten, noch einmal in jene finstere Gemächer zu treten, die Euch mit Grausen und Abscheu erfüllen. In der Stille der Nacht, ohne alles Aufsehen bringt man Olivier Brusson wie einen freien Menschen zu Euch in Euer Haus. Nicht einmal belauscht, doch wohl bewacht, mag er Euch dann zwanglos alles bekennen. Daß Ihr für Euch selbst nichts von dem Elenden zu fürchten habt, dafür stehe ich Euch mit meinem Leben ein. Er spricht von Euch mit inbrünstiger Verehrung. Er schwört, daß nur das düstre Verhängnis, welches ihm verwehrt habe, Euch früher zu sehen, ihn in den Tod gestürzt. Und dann steht es ja bei Euch, von dem, was Euch Brusson entdeckt, so viel zu sagen, als Euch beliebt. Kann man Euch zu mehrerem zwingen?"

Die Scuderi sah tief sinnend vor sich nieder. Es war ihr, als müsse sie der höheren Macht gehorchen, die den Aufschluß irgendeines entsetzlichen Geheimnisses von ihr verlange, als könne sie sich nicht mehr den wunderbaren Verschlingungen entziehen, in die sie willenlos geraten. Plötzlich entschlossen, sprach sie mit Würde: "Gott wird mir Fassung und Standhaftigkeit geben; führt den Brusson her, ich will ihn sprechen."
So wie damals, als Brusson das Kästchen brachte, wurde um Mitternacht an die Haustüre der Scuderi gepocht. Baptiste, von dem nächtlichen Besuch unterrichtet, öffnete. Eiskalter Schauer überlief die Scuderi, als sie an den leisen Tritten, an dem dumpfen Gemurmel wahrnahm, daß die Wächter, die den Brusson gebracht, sich in den Gängen des Hauses verteilten.

Endlich ging leise die Türe des Gemachs auf. Desgrais trat herein, hinter ihm Olivier Brusson, fesselfrei, in anständigen Kleidern. "Hier ist", sprach Desgrais, sich ehrerbietig verneigend, "hier ist Brusson, mein würdiges Fräulein!" und verließ das Zimmer.
Brusson sank vor der Scuderi nieder auf beide Knie, flehend erhob er die gefalteten Hände, indem häufige Tränen ihm aus den Augen rannen.
Die Scuderi schaute erblaßt, keines Wortes mächtig, auf ihn herab. Selbst bei den entstellten, ja durch Gram, durch grimmen Schmerz verzerrten Zügen strahlte der reine Ausdruck des treusten Gemüts aus dem Jünglingsantlitz. Je länger die Scuderi ihre Augen auf Brussons Gesicht ruhen ließ, desto lebhafter trat die Erinnerung an irgendeine geliebte Person hervor, auf die sie sich nur nicht deutlich zu besinnen vermochte. Alle Schauer wichen von ihr, sie vergaß, daß Cardillacs Mörder vor ihr knie, sie sprach mit dem anmutigen Tone des ruhigen Wohlwollens, der ihr eigen: "Nun, Brusson, was habt Ihr mir zu sagen?" Dieser, noch immer kniend, seufzte auf vor tiefer, inbrünstiger Wehmut und sprach dann: "O mein würdiges, mein hochverehrtes Fräulein, ist denn jede Spur der Erinnerung an mich verflogen?" Die Scuderi, ihn noch aufmerksamer betrachtend, erwiderte, daß sie allerdings in seinen Zügen die Ähnlichkeit mit einer von ihr geliebten Person gefunden und daß er nur dieser Ähnlichkeit es verdanke, wenn sie den tiefen Abscheu vor dem Mörder überwinde und ihn ruhig anhöre. Brusson, schwer verletzt durch diese Worte, erhob sich schnell und trat, den finstern Blick zu Boden gesenkt, einen Schritt zurück. Dann sprach er mit dumpfer Stimme. "Habt Ihr denn Anne Guiot ganz vergessen? – ihr Sohn Olivier – der Knabe, den Ihr oft auf Euern Knien schaukeltet, ist es, der vor Euch steht." "O um aller Heiligen willen!" rief die Scuderi, indem sie, mit beiden Händen das Gesicht bedeckend, in die Polster zurücksank. Das Fräulein hatte wohl Ursache genug, sich auf diese Weise zu entsetzen. Anne Guiot, die Tochter eines verarmten Bürgers, war von klein auf bei der Scuderi, die sie, wie die Mutter das liebe Kind, erzog mit aller Treue und Sorgfalt. Als sie nun herangewachsen, fand sich ein hübscher sittiger Jüngling, Claude Brusson geheißen, ein, der um das Mädchen warb. Da er nun ein grundgeschickter Uhrmacher war, der sein reichliches Brot in Paris finden mußte, Anne ihn auch herzlich liebgewonnen hatte, so trug die Scuderi gar kein Bedenken, in die Heirat ihrer Pflegetochter zu willigen. Die jungen Leute richteten sich ein, lebten in stiller, glücklicher Häuslichkeit, und was den Liebesbund noch fester knüpfte, war die Geburt eines wunderschönen Knaben, der holden Mutter treues Ebenbild.

Einen Abgott machte die Scuderi aus dem kleinen Olivier, den sie stunden-, tagelang der Mutter entriß, um ihn zu liebkosen, zu hätscheln. Daher kam es, daß der Junge sich ganz an sie gewöhnte und ebenso gern bei ihr war als bei der Mutter. Drei Jahre waren vorüber, als der Brotneid der Kunstgenossen Brussons es dahin brachte, daß seine Arbeit mit jedem Tage abnahm, so daß er zuletzt kaum sich kümmerlich ernähren konnte. Dazu kam die Sehnsucht nach seinem schönen heimatlichen Genf, und so geschah es, daß die kleine Familie dorthin zog, des Widerstrebens der Scuderi, die alle nur mögliche Unterstützung versprach, unerachtet. Noch ein paarmal schrieb Anne an ihre Pflegemutter, dann schwieg sie, und diese mußte glauben, daß das glückliche Leben in Brussons Heimat das Andenken an die früher verlebten Tage nicht mehr aufkommen lasse.
Es waren jetzt gerade dreiundzwanzig Jahre her, als Brusson mit seinem Weibe und Kinde Paris verlassen und nach Genf gezogen.
"O entsetzlich", rief die Scuderi, als sie sich einigermaßen wieder erholt hatte, "o entsetzlich! – Olivier bist du? – der Sohn meiner Anne! – Und jetzt!" – "Wohl", versetzte Olivier ruhig und gefaßt, "wohl, mein würdiges Fräulein, hättet Ihr nimmermehr ahnen können, daß der Knabe, den Ihr wie die zärtlichste Mutter hätscheltet, dem Ihr, auf Euerm Schoß ihn schaukelnd, Näscherei auf Näscherei in den Mund stecktet, dem Ihr die süßesten Namen gabt, zum Jünglinge gereift, dereinst vor Euch stehen würde, gräßlicher Blutschuld angeklagt! – Ich bin nicht vorwurfsfrei, die Chambre ardente kann mich mit Recht eines Verbrechens zeihen; aber, so wahr ich selig zu sterben hoffe, sei es auch durch des Henkers Hand, rein bin ich von jeder Blutschuld, nicht durch mich, nicht durch mein Verschulden fiel der unglückliche Cardillac!" – Olivier geriet bei diesen Worten in ein Zittern und Schwanken. Stillschweigend wies die Scuderi auf einen kleinen Sessel, der Olivier zur Seite stand. Er ließ sich langsam nieder.

"Ich hatte Zeit genug", fing er an, "mich auf die Unterredung mit Euch, die ich als die letzte Gunst des versöhnten Himmels betrachte, vorzubereiten und so viel Ruhe und Fassung zu gewinnen als nötig, Euch die Geschichte meines entsetzlichen, unerhörten Mißgeschicks zu erzählen. Erzeigt mir die Barmherzigkeit, mich ruhig anzuhören, so sehr Euch auch die Entdeckung eines Geheimnisses, das Ihr gewiß nicht geahnet, überraschen, ja mit Grausen erfüllen mag. – Hätte mein armer Vater Paris doch niemals verlassen! – Soweit meine Erinnerung an Genf reicht, finde ich mich wieder, von den trostlosen Eltern mit Tränen benetzt, von ihren Klagen, die ich nicht verstand, selbst zu Tränen gebracht. Später kam mir das deutliche Gefühl, das volle Bewußtsein des drückendsten Mangels, des tiefen Elends, in dem meine Eltern lebten. Mein Vater fand sich in allen seinen Hoffnungen getäuscht. Von tiefem Gram niedergebeugt, erdrückt, starb er in dem Augenblick, als es ihm gelungen war, mich bei einem Goldschmied als Lehrjunge unterzubringen. Meine Mutter sprach viel von Euch, sie wollte Euch alles klagen, aber dann überfiel sie die Mutlosigkeit, welche vom Elend erzeugt wird. Das und auch wohl falsche Scham, die oft an dem todwunden Gemüte nagt, hielt sie von ihrem Entschluß zurück. Wenige Monden nach dem Tode meines Vaters folgte ihm meine Mutter ins Grab." "Arme Anne! arme Anne!" rief die Scuderi von Schmerz überwältigt. "Dank und Preis der ewigen Macht des Himmels, daß sie hinüber ist und nicht fallen sieht den geliebten Sohn unter der Hand des Henkers, mit Schande gebrandmarkt." So schrie Olivier laut auf, indem er einen wilden entsetzlichen Blick in die Höhe warf. Es wurde draußen unruhig, man ging hin und her. "Ho ho", sprach Olivier mit einem bittern Lächeln, "Desgrais weckt seine Spießgesellen, als ob ich hier entfliehen könnte. – Doch weiter! – Ich wurde von meinem Meister hart gehalten, unerachtet ich bald am besten arbeitete, ja wohl endlich den Meister weit übertraf.

Es begab sich, daß einst ein Fremder in unsere Werkstatt kam, um einiges Geschmeide zu kaufen. Als der nun einen schönen Halsschmuck sah, den ich gearbeitet, klopfte er mir mit freundlicher Miene auf die Schultern, indem er, den Schmuck beäugelnd, sprach: 'Ei, ei! mein junger Freund, das ist ja ganz vortreffliche Arbeit. Ich wüßte in der Tat nicht, wer Euch noch anders übertreffen sollte als René Cardillac, der freilich der erste Goldschmied ist, den es auf der Welt gibt. Zu dem solltet Ihr hingehen; mit Freuden nimmt er Euch in seine Werkstatt, denn nur Ihr könnt ihm beistehen in seiner kunstvollen Arbeit, und nur von ihm allein könnt Ihr dagegen noch lernen.' die Worte des Fremden waren tief in meine Seele gefallen. Ich hatte keine Ruhe mehr in Genf, mich zog es fort mit Gewalt. Endlich gelang es mir, mich von meinem Meister loszumachen. Ich kam nach Paris. René Cardillac empfing mich kalt und barsch. Ich ließ nicht nach, er mußte mir Arbeit geben, so geringfügig sie auch sein mochte. Ich sollte einen kleinen Ring fertigen. Als ich ihm die Arbeit brachte, sah er mich starr an mit seinen funkelnden Augen, als wollt' er hineinschauen in mein Innerstes. Dann sprach er: 'Du bist ein tüchtiger, wackerer Geselle, du kannst zu mir ziehen und mir helfen in der Werkstatt. Ich zahle dir gut, du wirst mit mir zufrieden sein.' Cardillac hielt Wort. Schon mehrere Wochen war ich bei ihm, ohne Madelon gesehen zu haben, die, irr ich nicht, auf dem Lande bei irgendeiner Muhme Cardillacs damals sich aufhielt. Endlich kam sie. Du ewige Macht des Himmels, wie geschah mir, als ich das Engelsbild sah! – Hat je ein Mensch so geliebt als ich! Und nun! – Madelon!"