de-en  Weihnachtsgeschichte von Charles Dickens Medium
1. Chapter: Marley's Ghost.

Marley was dead, let's start with that. There is no doubt about it. The bill for his funeral was signed by the clergyman, the sexton, the undertaker, and the principal mourners. Scrooge signed it, and Scrooge's name was respected on the stock exchange, where he only wrote it. Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Understand me well! I do not want to say that a door-nail would have something particularly dead for me I myself would almost like to think that the deadest piece of iron in the world is a coffin nail. But the wisdom of our ancestors lies in the parables, and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it there, otherwise it would have happened around the fatherland. So I will therefore permit myself to repeat with particular emphasis that Marley was as dead as a doornail.

Did Scrooge know that he was dead? Of course he knew. How else could it be? Scrooge and he were partners, I don't know for how many years. Scrooge was his only executor, his only steward, his only heir, his only friend and his only mourner. And even Scrooge was not so terribly affected by the sad event that he would not have been an excellent businessman himself on the day of his funeral and would not have been able to celebrate it with an undeniably good trade.

Now the mention of Marley's funeral day brings me back to the starting point of my story. There is no doubt that Marley was dead. This has to be considered keenly, otherwise nothing wonderful can happen in the story I want to tell. If we were not completely convinced that Hamlet's father is dead before the play begins, there would be nothing strange about his nocturnal walks up on the walls of his own castle in a sharp easterly wind. No more than any other gentleman in his middle years who, after sunset, quickly decides to go for a walk in an airy square, for example in Saint Paul's churchyard.

Scrooge didn't have Marley's name crossed off. Even after years later, "Scrooge and Marley" stood above the door of the store. The company was known by the name of Scrooge and Marley. People who didn't know Scrooge sometimes called him Scrooge and sometimes Marley, but he listened to both names because both were the same to him.

Oh, he was a real bloodsucker, that Scrooge! A greedy, scraping, grasping, stingy old sinner: hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel has yet to strike a warm spark, withdrawn and self-contained, completely solitary as an oyster. The cold within his heart froze his old features, made his pointed nose even more pointed, shriveled his face, stiffened his gait, reddened his eyes, turned his thin lips blue, and it was heard in his croaking voice. A frosty rime lay on his head, on his eyebrows, on his pronounced shaggy beard. He always dragged his own low temperature around with him: in the dog days it chilled his counting house as with ice, at Christmas time it didn't make it one degree snugger.

Outer heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm him, no cold could make him shiver. No wind was more cutting than he, no snow flurry merciless, no slapping rain less accessible to a request. Bad weather could not harm him. The worst rain, snow or hail could only boast in one way to be better than him: they often gave in abundance, and Scrooge never did.

No one ever met him on the street to say to him with friendly looks, "My dear Scrooge, how are you, when are you going to visit me?" No beggar asked him for a little something, no child asked him what time it was, in his life no man and no woman ever asked him for directions. Even the blind man's dog seemed to know him, and when he saw him coming, he pulled his master into a doorway and then wagged his tail, as if to say: "No eye at all, blind master, is better than an evil eye." Even so, what did old Scrooge care about any of this? That's exactly what pleased him. Just wandering his way alone through the narrow paths of life, telling every human feeling, "Stay away from me"; that was what Scrooge liked.

Once, when it was the best of all of the good days of the year, Christmas Eve, old Scrooge was sitting in his counting house. Outside it was bitterly cold and foggy, and he could hear people in the courtyard, warming up, puffing up and down, hitting their hands together and stamping their feet. It had just struck three o'clock, but it was already pitch dark. Throughout the day it hadn't become light, and the candles in the windows of the neighboring counting houses flickered like red spots in the thick brown air. The fog penetrated through every crevice and through every keyhole and was so thick outside that the houses opposite the very small courtyard looked like their own ghosts. When you saw the cloudy, thick, darkening cloud sinking down, you could have thought that nature lived close by and a massive storm was brewing.

The door of Scrooge's office stood open so that he could supervise his clerk, who copied letters in a miserably damp little room, a kind of castle dungeon. Scrooge had only a very small fire, but the servant's fire was so much smaller that it only looked like a single coal. But he could not add more, for Scrooge had the coal box in his room, and every time the clerk came in with the coal shovel in his hand, his master suggested that they should part. Whereupon, the clerk wrapped his white scarf up and tried to warm himself by the candlelight, which however, since he was not a man of very strong imagination, always failed.

"Merry Christmas, uncle, God bless you!" shouted a cheerful voice. It was the voice of Scrooge's nephew who had come in so quickly that this greeting was the first thing that was noticed of him.

"Bah," Scrooge said, "humbug!" His nephew had become so warm from running so fast that he was all aglow; his face was ruddy and handsome, his eyes sparkled and his breath smoked.

"Christmas humbug, Uncle?" said Scrooge's nephew. "You can't be serious." "I am serious about it," said Scrooge. "Merry Christmas? What right do you have to be happy? What reason do you have to be happy? You're poor enough." "Well", the nephew replied jovially, "what right do you have to be morose? What reason to be sullen? You're rich enough." Scrooge, who didn't have a better response at the moment, said "Bah!" again and mumbled, “Humbug!“ right after that. “Don’t be angry, Uncle," said the nephew.

"What else can I be," his uncle replied, "when I live in a world full of fools such as these? Merry Christmas! To the hangman with Merry Christmas! What is Christmas to you other than a time when you have to pay bills without money, a time when you find yourself a year older and not an hour richer, a time when you close your books and see a deficit in every post for a full dozen months? If it were up to me," Scrooge added severely, "every fool who walks around with his "Merry Christmas" would have to be cooked with his own pudding and buried with a holly branch in his heart." "Uncle!" pleaded his nephew.

"Nephew," his uncle replied angrily, "celebrate Christmas the way you want, and let me celebrate it the way I want." "Celebrate!" repeated Scrooge's nephew. "But you don't celebrate it." "Let me be," grumbled Scrooge. "May it be of use to you. It's always been useful to you." "There are many things that could have helped me and that I didn't use, I know that," his nephew replied, "and Christmas is one of them. But I know for certain that, apart from the veneration we owe to his holy name and origin, I have always regarded Christmas as a good time, a loving time, a time of forgiveness and mercy, the only time I know in the whole long calendar of the year when people open up their closed hearts and look at others as if they were really fellow passengers to the grave and not a completely different kind of creature going a completely different way. And so, Uncle, if it has never put a piece of gold or silver in my pocket, I believe it has done me good and it will do me good and I say "God bless Christmas!" The servant in the castle dungeon outside applauded involuntarily; but the moment after he felt the indecency of his behavior, stoked the coals, and thereby extinguished the last small sparks irretrievably.

"If I hear one more sound out of you in there," Scrooge said, "then you'll celebrate Christmas with the loss of your job. - You are a very powerful speaker," he then added, turning to his nephew. "I am surprised that you have not come to Parliament yet!" "Don't be angry, uncle. Come eat with us tomorrow." Scrooge said he wanted to see him damned first; indeed, he spoke so clearly.

"But why?" cried Scrooge's nephew. "Why?" "Why did you get married?" Scrooge asked.

Because I fell in love." "Because he fell in love," Scrooge grumbled as if it were the only thing in the world more ridiculous than a merry Christmas. "Good evening!" "But uncle, you've never visited me before. Why should there be a reason not to visit me now?" "Good evening" said Scrooge.

I don't need anything from you, I don't want anything from you, why can't we be good friends?" "Good evening," said Scrooge.

"I really deeply regret finding you so stubborn We never had a quarrel with each other that I would have been to blame for. But I've tried to honor Christmas, and I want to keep my Christmas spirit till the end. Merry Christmas, uncle!" "Good evening!" said Scrooge.

"And a happy New Year!" "Good evening!" said Scrooge.

Despite everything, the nephew left the room without a bad word. He then stopped at the front door to greet the clerk with the good wishes of the day, who despite the cold was still warmer than Scrooge, because he kindly returned the greeting.

"That's another one of those guys!" Scrooge growled when he heard it. "My clerk, with fifteen shillings a week and a wife and children, is talking about Merry Christmas. I'm going to Bedlam into the madhouse." The clerk had let two other people in when he let the nephew out. They were two portly, very respectable looking gentlemen now standing in Scrooge's counting house, hat in hand. They had books and papers under their arms and made a bow.

"Scrooge and Marley, I believe," said one of the gentlemen while looking at his list. "Do I have the honor of speaking with Mr. Scrooge or Mr. Marley?" "Mr. Marley has been dead for seven years," Scrooge replied. "He died seven years ago today." "We have no doubt that his surviving companion will have all of his generosity," said the gentleman, handing him his credentials.

He was quite right, for they had really been two kindred spirits. At the sinister word generosity, Scrooge frowned, shook his head and returned the paper.

"On this festive day of the year, Mr. Scrooge," the gentleman said, gripping a pen, "it is more desirable than usual to at least care somewhat for the poor who are living in great distress at this time of year. Many thousands lack even the barest necessities, hundreds of thousands the most meager amenities of life." "Are there no prisons?" asked Scrooge.

"An abundance of prisons," the gentleman said, laying down his pen again.

"And the poor houses?" Scrooge asked. "Do they still exist?" "Certainly," replied the gentleman, "but I wish they they were less occupied." "Are the treadwheel and the poor law in full force?" said Scrooge.

"Both are being fully employed." "Thus? After what you said at first, I was afraid it was holding them back somewhat from their useful course," Scrooge said. "I'm glad to hear the opposite." "Convinced that they are hardly capable of giving Christian strength to the body or soul of the poor," the gentleman replied, "some of us have convened for a gathering to buy food and fire wood for the poor. And we choose this time because it is above all else a time when the lack is felt most bitterly, and only the rich are joyful. How much may I chalk up for you?" "Nothing," Scrooge replied.

You wish to remain anonymous?" "I wish to be left alone," said Scooge. "Since you have asked me, gentlemen, what I wish, this is simply my answer. I don't look forward to Christmas myself, and I don't have the means to make lazy people happy with my money. I contribute my share to the institutions that I have mentioned; they cost enough, and those who are in a bad way may go there!" "Many cannot go, and many would rather die." "If they were more likely to die," said Scrooge, "it would be good if they were to do so and thereby reduce the needless population. By the way, excuse me, I don't know anything about that." "But you are capable of knowing it," the gentleman remarked.

"I don't care about anything," Scrooge replied. "It's sufficient if one understands his own business and doesn't interfere in other people's business. Mine occupies all my time. Good evening, gentlemen!" Since they clearly saw how futile further attempts would be, the gentlemen withdrew. Scrooge returned to work with a heightened opinion of himself and in a better mood than usual.

In the meantime, the fog and darkness had increased so much that people were running around with burning torches to light up the way for the carriages. The old church tower, whose droning old bell otherwise steadfastly looked down upon Scrooge cunningly from an old Gothic window in the wall, became invisible in the clouds and struck the hours and quarters with a tremulous reverberation, as if teeth were chattering in its frozen head above. The cold became more and more cutting. In the main street at the corner of the dead end, the gas pipes were repaired, and the workers had lit a large fire in a smudge pot. Some ragged men and boys crowded around it, squinting comfortably over the flames, warming their hands. From the iron pump, left to itself, water flowed out unhindered, but soon it had solidified to ice. The glimmer of light of the shops, in whose windows holly branches and berries crackled in the warmth of the lamps, reddened the pale faces of the passers-by. The vaults of the poultry and material merchants looked like a shining, cheerful fairytale land, and it seemed almost impossible to associate with it the thought of such a boring thing as buying and selling.The Lord Mayor, in the inner chambers of Mansion House, ordered his fifty chefs and cellarmasters to celebrate Christmas worthy of a Lord Mayor, and even the little tailor, whom he had fined five shillings the Monday before for drunkenness and bloodthirsty public utterances, stirred the pudding for tomorrow in his attic chamber, while his skinny wife left with the baby in her arms to buy the roast beef.

It became foggier and colder, penetrating, biting cold. If the good, Saint Dunstan had seized the evil spirit's nose with just a breath of this weather, instead of using his usual weapons, then he would have roared quite righteously. The owner of a small, young nose, bitten and gnawed by the hungry cold like dogs on a bone, landed at Scrooge's keyhole to delight him with a Christmas carol. But with the first note of the carol, Scrooge seized the ruler with such ferocity that the singer fled in terror, leaving the keyhole to the fog still accompanied by related frost.

Finally the closing hour came. Unwillingly, Scrooge got up from his chair and silently gave the waiting clerk in the dungeon permission to leave, whereupon he immediately extinguished the light and put on his hat.

"You'll want tomorrow off, I suppose," said Scrooge.

"If it's all right with you, sir." "I don't like it at all," Scrooge said, "and it's not appropriate either. If I give you half a crown less for that would seem unjust to you, wouldn't it?" The clerk answered with a forced smile.

"And yet," Scrooge said, "you mustn't think that when I pay a day's wages for a day's lazing around, I'm wrong." The clerk noted that it only happened once a year.

"A pathetic excuse to emptying a man's pocket every twenty-fifth of December," grumbled Scrooge, buttoning his overcoat up to his chin. "But I suppose you want to have the whole day off? At least be here the day after tomorrow even earlier!" The clerk promised, and Scrooge left with a growl. 1 The counting house was closed in an instant, and the clerk, with the long ends of his white shawl dangling around his legs, slid down Cornhill twenty times in a row of boys in honor of the feast; then he ran as quickly as possible to his Camden Town apartment to play blindman's bluff.

Scrooge took his lonely, dismal meal in his usual, lonely, dreary inn, and after reading all the newspapers and whiling away the rest of the evening with his bank journal, he went home to sleep. He lived in the rooms that had belonged to his deceased partner. It was a gloomy suite of rooms in a low, dark building that did not fit into its courtyard at all, that one might have thought that when it was still a young house and was playing hide and seek with other houses, it hid there and couldn't find its way out again. Now it was old and dull, because nobody lived there, except Scrooge and all the other rooms were rented as business premises. The courtyard was so dark that even Scrooge, who knew every paving stone there, had to feel his way with his hands. The fog and the frost conglomerated so thickly and heavily around the black old doorway of the house, as if the weather spirit was squatting in gloomy meditation on the threshold.

Now it is a fact, that there was completely nothing special about the knocker on the front door except that it was very large. It is also certain that Scrooge had seen it every evening and every morning since he had lived in the house and that Scrooge had so little imagination than anyone in the City of London, including - if that is permitted to say - the City Council, the aldermen and the guilds. And one wouldn't forget that Scrooge, except this afternoon, hadn't thought for a second about his partner who died seven years ago. And then would someone explain to me, why, when Scrooge put his key in the door lock, he saw the door knocker suddenly changing before his eyes and Marley's face was on it? ...

Yes Marley's face. It wasn't surrounded by such impenetrable darkness as the other objects in the yard, but by an eerie light, like a more bad lobster in a dark cellar. It did not look ferocious or angry at him, but looked at Scrooge as Marley used to look, with ghostly spectacles turned up on its eerie forehead. His hair was strangely ruffled and standing on end, as if from a breath or from hot air; and though his eyes were wide open, they were perfectly motionless. ... This and the corpse-like color made the face horrible: but its horror seemed more like something imposed on the face than part of its own expression.

When Scrooge looked firmly at the appearance, he saw a door knocker again!

It would be a falsehood to say that he wasn't frightened or that the horrible feeling that had been unknown since his childhood hadn't flashed through his blood. ... But he forced himself to gather up his courage, again took hold of the key with his hand, turned it around, entered the house and lit the light. ...

And yet, before closing the door, he hesitated for a moment and looked first carefully behind it, as if he really feared to be frightened by sight of Marley's pigtail. But behind the door was nothing but the screws holding the knocker, and so he said " Bah, bah", and slammed the door behind himself.

It sounded like thunder through the house. Every room upstairs and every barrel in the wine merchant's cellar downstairs seemed to respond with its particular echo. Scrooge was not a man, who was scared by echos. He closed the door, went up the hallway and the stairs, slow, slow, indeed, and going up he made the light brighter.

You might say that you can drive a six-horse carriage up a stately old flight of stairs - or let it pass through the middle of a new parliamentary decree; but I say that driving a hearse up this staircase, crosswise, with the drawbar to the wall and with the door to the railing, you would have climbed it, and indeed quite comfortably. And that may be the cause of why Scrooge thought, he saw a hearse steam up ahead of him. Half a dozen gas lamps from the street wouldn't have made the entrance bright enough, so you can imagine that Scrooge's small tallow candle left it quite dark.

But Scrooge went upstairs and didn't care a hoot about all that. Darkness is cheap and Scrooge loved what was cheap. ... But before he closed his heavy door, he went through the room to see if everything was all right. ... He remembered the face just enough, to want to do that.

Living room, bedroom, storage room, everything was, as it should be. Nobody under the table, nobody under the sofa; a small fire on the grill, spoon and plate ready and a little pot of gruel ( Scrooge had the cold) on the fire. Nobody under the bed, nobody in the alcove, nobody in his dressing gown, that hung in a very suspicious way on the wall. The storage room as usual. An old fire screen, old shoes, two fish baskets, a three-legged washbasin and a poker.

Completely satisfied, he closed the door, locked himself in and pushed the bolt forward, which was not his usual habit, thus securing himself against a surprise, he took off his collar, put on his robe and slippers, put on his nightcap and then took a seat in front of the fire to eat his gruel.

It was really a very small fire, on such a cold night almost none at all. He had to sit close to it and bend over it to extract the slightest feeling of warmth from this handful of coals. The fireplace was constructed a long time ago by a Dutch merchant and was covered all around with curious Dutch tiles with pictures illustrating bible stories. There were Cain and Abel, the Pharaoh's daughters, the queen of Sheba, angels hovering through the air on clouds like feather beds, Abraham, Belshazzar, apostles going off to sea on butter boats, hundreds of figures to occupy his thoughts, and yet the face of Marley came like the staff of the old prophet and devoured everything else. If every shiny tile had been white and had had the power to conjure an image onto its surface from the isolated fragments of his thoughts, an image of the old Marley face would have appeared on every one.

"Humbug!" Scrooge mumbled and walked through the room.

After walking up and down several times, he sat down again. As he leaned back his head into the chair, his eye fell accidentally on a bell, an old, no longer used bell, which for a now forgotten purpose was connected to a room on the top floor of the house. To his great astonishment and with a strange, inexplicable shudder he saw how the bell started to move: first it moved so little that it barely made a sound, but soon it was ringing loudly and with it, every other bell in the house.

That might have lasted half a minute, or a whole minute, but it seemed as if it was an hour. The bells stopped ringing at the same time as they had started at the same time. Then they heard a rattling sound deep down, as if someone was dragging a heavy chain over the barrels in the wine merchant's cellar. Now Scrooge remembered to have heard that ghosts drag chains.

The cellar door blew open with a muffled, roaring bang, and then he heard the clanking much louder on the hallway downstairs, then how it came up the stairs, and then how it just approached his door.

"It is really humbug." Scrooge said. "I don't believe in it." But he nevertheless turned pale when it came through the heavy door and into the room without lingering. When it came in, the almost extinguishing fire flared up again, as if screaming, "I know him, Marley's spirit," and the embers sank again.

The same face, exactly the same. Marley with his plait, his ordinary vest, the tight trousers and high boots, whose tassels stood up like his plait, and as well his coattail and the hair on his head. The chain he dragged behind himself was tied around his body. It was long, curled like a tail and was made out of steel (Scrooge looked at it very closely), composed of cash boxes, keys, locks, ledgers, contracts and heavy purses. ... His body was so transparent that Scrooge could see the two buttons on the back of his jacket through his vest. ...

Scrooge had often heard people say Marley didn‘t have a heart, but only now did he believe it.

No, he did not believe it even more now. Even though he saw the ghost standing in front of him, even though he felt the cold shiver of his deathly rigid eyes and even recognized the fabric of the cloth tied around his head and chin, which he hadn't noticed before, he was still unbelieving and resisted the testimony of his senses.

"Well," Scrooge said, sharp and cold as usual, "what do you want?" " Much!" That was Marley's voice.

"Who are you?" "Ask me, who I was." "Well, who were you?" Scrooge asked louder. "For a shadow you are strange." "When I was alive, I was your partner, Jacob Marley." "Can you sit down?" Scrooge asked and looked at him doubtfully.

"I can do it." "That's how it does it." Scrooge asked only because he didn't know if such a transparent mind could sit down, and he felt the need for an unpleasant explanation if it wasn't possible for him. But the ghost sat down on the other side of the fireplace, as if it was so accustomed.

" You don't believe in me?" the ghost asked.

"No," Scrooge said.

"What evidence, other than that of your senses, do you want of my reality?" "I don't know," said Scrooge.

"Why don't you believe your senses?" "Well, the slightest thing disturbs them," Scrooge replied. A small ailment of the stomach makes liars out of them. You may be an undigested piece of beef, a small cheese rind, a piece of spoiled potatoes. Whoever you may be, there is more underbelly than underworld to you." It wasn't Scrooge's habit to make jokes, nor did he feel any particular desire to do so now. The truth is that he strove to be funny to relieve himself and hold down his horror; for the voice of the ghost made him tremble to the core.

To sit silently opposite these staring, dead eyes for just a moment would have been diabolical, Scrooge felt well. Also the fact that the ghost had its own hellish atmosphere was so horrifying. Scrooge didn't feel it himself, but it had to be; for although the ghost sat there motionless, his hair, his coattails and his boot tassels moved as from the hot vapor of an oven.

"Do you see this toothpick," said Scrooge, immediately restarting his attack for the aforementioned reason and inspired by the desire to distract the ghost's rigid, icy gaze, even if only for a moment.

"Yes," answered the ghost.

" You aren't looking at it," Scrooge said.

" But I still see it," the ghost said.

"Good then," replied Scrooge. "All I have to do is swallow it and for the rest of my life a legion of goblins, which I created myself, haunts me. Humbug, I say, humbug!" With these words the ghost gave a blood curdling scream and made his chain clank so atrociously and horribly that Scrooge had to hold on to his chair in order not to fall off unconscious. But how his horror grew when the ghost took the scarf off his head, as though it were too warm for him in the room, making his lower jaw drop down on his chest.

Scrooge felt on his knees and clasped his hands before his face.

"Mercy!" he shouted. "Terrible apparition, why are you following me?" " You human with the earthly mind," replied the ghost, "do you believe in me or not?" "I believe," said Scrooge, "I must believe. ... But why do ghosts wander the earth, and why are they coming to me?" "It is required that the soul of every man wander among his fellow men, far and wide," replied the spirit; "and if the soul does not do this during life, it is doomed to do so after death. One is damned to wander through the world - oh, woe is me! - and to see what one cannot share, but what one could have shared on earth and should have made use of for happiness." And again the ghost screamed and shook his chains and wrung his shadowy hands.

"You are shackled," said Scrooge, trembling. ... "Tell me why?" " I wear the chain, I forged during my life," the ghost said. "I forged it link for link and cubit for cubit; with my own free will I saddled myself with it, and with my own free will I wore it. ... It chains seem strange to you?" Scrooge trembled more and more.

" Or do you want to know," the ghost continued, "how heavy and how long the chain , you wear yourself, is? It was just as long and as heavy as this one, seven Christmasses ago. Since then you've been working on it! It's a heavy chain." Scrooge looked down on the ground, in the expectation of feeling himself twined by fifty or sixty cubits of iron chain; but he saw nothing.

"Jacob," he said pleadingly. " Jacob Marley, tell me more. Give me comfort, Jacob." "I have no comfort to give," answered the ghost. " It comes from other regions, Ebenezer Scrooge, and is brought by a messenger to other people. I also cannot tell you what I would like to tell you. A little more is all I'm allowed to do. Nowhere can I rest or linger. My spirit never went beyond our counting house - mark me well - in life my spirit always remained within the narrow confines of our haggling cave; and long journeys lie ahead of me." Scrooge had a habit of putting his hand in his trouser pocket when he became pensive.

Reflecting on what the ghost said, he was doing it now as well, but without raising his eyes or getting up from his chair.

"But you must have allowed yourself much time, Jacob," he remarked in the tone of a businessman, even though with much humility and reverence.

"A lot of time!" the ghost repeated.

"Dead for seven years," Scrooge said pondering. "And you traveled all the while." "All the while," said the ghost. "Without peace, without rest, and with the torment of eternal penitence." "You travel fast," said Scrooge.

"On the wings of the wind," said the ghost.

"You could have travelled a long way in seven years," said Scrooge.

When the ghost heard this, he again screamed and clanked his chain so hideously through the deathly silence of the night that the police could have rightfully punished him for disturbing the peace.

"Oh, captive and shackled," cried the ghost, "not to know what ages of endless toil of immortal creatures will pass before the good of which the earth may be capable of developing. Not to know that every Christian spirit will find this life on earth too short to do anything useful, even if it works in a very small sphere. But I didn't know, alas, I didn't know!" "But you were always a good businessman, Jacob," stuttered Scrooge trembling, who now began relating the fate of the ghost to himself.

"Business!" shouted the ghost, wringing his hands once more. Mankind would have been my business! The general well-being would have been my business! Mercy, forgiveness and love, all that would have been my business! All I did in my trade was a small drop of water in the vast ocean of my business!" He held his chain in front of him as if it had been the cause of his pointless sorrow, and once again threw it down dully.

"At this time of the dwindling year," said the ghost, "I suffer the most. Why did I go through the multitude of my fellow men with my eyes fixed on the earth and never turn my gaze up to the blessed star that led the wise men to the dwelling place of poverty? Was there no lowly cabin where His light could have led me?" With horror Scrooge listened to the ghost speak and began to tremble enormously.

"Listen to me," the ghost admonished My time is half over." "I am listening," Scrooge whispered. "But be merciful to me! Don't upset yourself Jacob, I beg you." "How is it that I can appearance before you in a form visible to you, I don't know that. Many, many days I sat next to you invisibly." That was not a pleasant thought. Scrooge shuddered and wiped the sweat off his forehead.

"It is not an easy part of my atonement," the ghost continued. "Tonight I come to you to warn you that you still have the chance to escape my destiny. A possibility and a hope that you owe to me." "You've always been my good friend," Scrooge murmured. „Ich danke dir.“ „Drei Geister“, fuhr das Gespenst fort, „werden zu dir kommen.“ Bei diesen Worten wurde Scrooges Angesicht fast so unglücklich wie das des Gespenstes.

„Is this the possibility and hope which you have called Jacob?“ he asked with quavering voice.

"Yes." "I - I would rather not," said Scrooge.

"Without their coming," said the ghost, "you cannot hope to avoid the path that I have to follow now. Expect the first one tomorrow morning when the bell strikes one." "Couldn't I get them all together to get it over with?" said Scrooge.

"Expect the second one the next night at the same time. Den dritten in der darauffolgenden Nacht, wenn der letzte Schlag der zwölften Stunde verklungen ist. Schau mich an, denn du siehst mich nicht wieder; und schau mich an, damit du dich um deinetwillen an das erinnerst, was zwischen uns vorgefallen ist.“ Als es diese Worte gesprochen hatte, nahm das Gespenst das Tuch vom Tisch und band es sich wieder um den Kopf. Scrooge merkte es am Geräusch der Zähne, als die Kinnladen zusammenklappten. Er wagte, die Augen zu erheben, und sah seinen übernatürlichen Besuch vor sich stehen, die Augen noch starr auf ihn geheftetund die Kette um Leib und Arme gewunden.

Die Erscheinung entfernte sich rückwärtsgehend, und bei jedem Schritt öffnete sich das Fenster ein wenig, so daß es weit offen stand, als das Gespenst es erreicht hatte. It beckoned Scrooge to come closer, and he did. Als sie noch zwei Schritte voneinander entfernt waren, hob Marleys Geist die Hand und gebot ihm, nicht näher zu kommen. Scrooge stopped. Mehr aus Überraschung und Furcht, als aus Gehorsam, denn wie sich die gespenstige Hand erhob, hörte er verwirrte Klänge durch die Luft schwirren und unzusammenhängende Töne der Klage und des Leides, unsäglich schmerzlich und reuevoll. Das Gespenst hörte eine Weile zu und stimmte dann in das Klagelied ein; dann schwebte es in die dunkle, kalte Nacht hinaus.

Scrooge trat an das Fenster, von Neugier fast zur Verzweiflung getrieben. He looked out.

Die Luft war mit Schatten angefüllt, die in ruheloser Hast klagend hin und her schwebten. jeder trug eine Kette wie Marleys Geist; einige wenige waren zusammengeschmiedet (wahrscheinlich schlechte Minister), keiner war ganz fessellos. Viele waren Scrooge während ihres Lebens bekannt gewesen. Ganz genau hatte er einen alten Geist in einer weißen Weste gekannt, der einen ungeheuren eisernen Geldkasten hinter sich herschleppte und jämmerlich schrie, einer armen, alten Frau mit einem Kind nicht beistehen zu können, die unten auf einer Türschwelle saß. Man sah es deutlich, ihre Pein war, sich umsonst bestreben zu müssen, den Menschen Gutes zu tun und die Macht dazu auf immer verloren zu haben.

Ob diese Wesen in dem Nebel zergingen oder ob sie der Nebel einhüllte, wußte er nicht zu sagen. Aber sie und ihre Gespensterstimmen vergingen gleichzeitig, und die Nacht wurde wieder so, wie sie auf seinem Nachhauseweg gewesen war.

Scrooge schloß das Fenster und untersuchte die Tür, durch die das Gespenst eingetreten war. Sie war noch verschlossen und verriegelt wie vorher. Er versuchte zu sagen: „Dummes Zeug“, blieb aber bei der ersten Silbe stecken, und da er von der innern Bewegung, oder von den Anstrengungen des Tages, oder von seinem Einblick in die unsichtbare Welt, oder von der Unterhaltung mit dem Gespenst, oder der späten Stunde sehr erschöpft war, ging er sogleich ins Bett, ohne sichauszuziehen, und sank sofort in Schlaf.
unit 1
1.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 2
Strophe: Marleys Geist.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 3
Marley war tot, damit wollen wir anfangen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 4
Kein Zweifel kann darüber bestehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 7
Der alte Marley war so tot wie ein Türnagel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 8
Versteht mich recht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 9
Ich will nicht etwa sagen, daß ein Türnagel etwas besonders Totes für mich hätte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 13
Wußte Scrooge, daß er tot war?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 14
Natürlich wußte er's.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 15
Wie sollte es auch anders sein?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 16
Scrooge und er waren, ich weiß nicht seit wieviel Jahren, Kompagnons.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 20
Es gibt keinen Zweifel, daß Marley tot war.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 24
Scrooge ließ Marleys Namen nicht ausstreichen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 25
Noch nach Jahren stand über der Tür des Speichers „Scrooge und Marley“.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 26
Die Firma war unter dem Namen Scrooge und Marley bekannt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 28
Oh, er war ein wahrer Blutsauger, dieser Scrooge!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 31
Ein frostiger Reif lag auf seinem Haupt, auf seinen Augenbrauen, auf dem starken struppigen Bart.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 33
Äußere Hitze und Kälte wirkten wenig auf Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 34
Keine Wärme konnte ihn wärmen, keine Kälte frösteln machen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 36
Schlechtes Wetter konnte ihm nichts anhaben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 40
Gerade das gefiel ihm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 44
Es hatte eben erst drei Uhr geschlagen, doch war es schon stockfinster.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 52
„Fröhliche Weihnachten, Onkel, Gott erhalte Sie!“ rief da eine heitere Stimme.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 55
„Weihnachten dummes Zeug, Onkel?“ sagte Scrooges Neffe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 56
„Das kann nicht Ihr Ernst sein.“ „Es ist mein Ernst“, sagte Scrooge.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 57
„Fröhliche Weihnachten?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 58
Was für ein Recht hast du, fröhlich zu sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 59
Was für einen Grund, fröhlich zu sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 61
Was für einen Grund, mürrisch zu sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 64
Fröhliche Weihnachten!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 65
Der Henker hole die fröhlichen Weihnachten!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 69
„Aber Sie feiern es ja nicht.“ „Laß mich ungeschoren“, brummte Scrooge.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 70
„Mag es dir Nutzen bringen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 76
- Du bist ein ganz gewaltiger Redner“, fügte er dann hinzu, sich zu seinem Neffen wendend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 77
unit 79
„Aber warum?“ rief Scrooges Neffe.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 80
„Warum denn?“ „Warum hast du dich verheiratet?“ fragte Scrooge.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 82
„Guten Abend!“ „Aber Onkel, Sie haben mich ja auch vorher nie besucht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 83
Warum soll es da ein Grund sein, mich jetzt nicht zu besuchen?“ „Guten Abend!“ sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 85
„Ich bedaure wirklich von Herzen, Sie so hartnäckig zu finden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 86
Wir haben nie einen Zank miteinander gehabt, an dem ich schuld gewesen wäre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 88
Fröhliche Weihnachten, Onkel!“ „Guten Abend!“ sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 89
„Und ein glückliches Neujahr!“ „Guten Abend!“ sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 90
Trotz allem verließ der Neffe das Zimmer ohne ein böses Wort.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 92
„Das ist auch so ein Kerl!“ brummte Scrooge, der es hörte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 96
Sie hatten Bücher und Papiere unterm Arm und verbeugten sich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 98
„Hab ich die Ehre, mit Mr. Scrooge oder mit Mr. Marley zu sprechen?“ „Mr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 99
Marley ist seit sieben Jahren tot“, antwortete Scrooge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 101
Er hatte ganz recht, denn sie waren wirklich zwei verwandte Seelen gewesen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 105
„Überfluß an Gefängnissen“, sagte der Herr, die Feder wieder hinlegend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 106
„Und die Armenhäuser?“ fragte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 108
„Beide haben alle Hände voll zu tun.“ „So?
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 112
Welche Summe darf ich für Sie aufschreiben?“ „Nichts“, antwortete Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 114
„Da Sie mich fragen, meine Herren, was ich wünsche, so ist eben dies meine Antwort.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 118
„Es kümmert mich nichts“, antwortete Scrooge.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 120
Das meinige nimmt meine ganze Zeit in Anspruch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 125
Die Kälte wurde immer schneidender.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 131
Immer nebliger und kälter wurde es, durchdringend, schneidend kalt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 135
Endlich kam die Feierabendstunde.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 137
„Sie wollen morgen den ganzen Tag frei haben, vermute ich“, sagte Scrooge.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 142
„Aber ich vermute, Sie wollen den ganzen Tag frei haben?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 146
Er wohnte in den Zimmern, die seinem verstorbenen Kompagnongehört hatten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 155
Ja, Marleys Gesicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 160
Als Scrooge fest auf die Erscheinung blickte, da sah er wieder einen Türklopfer!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 165
Der Schall klang wie ein Donner durch das Haus.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 167
Scrooge war nicht der Mann, der sich durch Echos erschrecken ließ.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 172
Scrooge aber ging hinauf und kümmerte sich keinen Pfifferling um all das.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 173
Dunkelheit ist billig, und das Billige liebte Scrooge.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 175
Er erinnerte sich des Gesichts noch gerade genug, um das zu wünschen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 176
Wohnzimmer, Schlafzimmer, Rumpelkammer, alles war, wie es sein sollte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 179
Die Rumpelkammer wie gewöhnlich.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 182
unit 187
„Dummes Zeug!“ brummte Scrooge und schritt durch das Zimmer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 188
Nachdem er einige Male auf und ab gegangen war, setzte er sich wieder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 192
Die Klingeln hörten gleichzeitig auf, wie sie gleichzeitig angefangen hatten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 194
jetzt erinnerte sich Scrooge gehört zu haben, daß Gespenster Ketten schleppen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 196
„Es ist ja dummes Zeug“, sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 199
Dasselbe Gesicht, ganz dasselbe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 201
Die Kette, die er hinter sich herschleppte, war um seinen Leib geschlungen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 204
unit 205
Nein, er glaubte es selbst jetzt noch nicht.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 211
Aber der Geist setzte sich auf der anderen Seite des Kamins nieder, als sei er so gewohnt.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 212
„Ihr glaubt nicht an mich?“ fragte der Geist.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 213
„Nein“, sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 216
„Eine kleine Unpäßlichkeit des Magens macht sie zu Lügnern.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 221
Auch daß das Gespenst seine eigene höllische Atmosphäre hatte, war so grauenerregend.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 224
„Ja“, antwortete der Geist.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 225
„Ihr schaut ihn ja nicht an“, sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 226
„Aber ich sehe ihn trotzdem“, sprach das Gespenst.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 227
„Gut denn“, antwortete Scrooge.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 231
Scrooge fiel auf die Knie nieder und schlug die Hände vors Gesicht.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 232
„Gnade!“ rief er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 235
Man ist verdammt, durch die Welt zu wandern - ach, wehe mir!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 237
„Du bist gefesselt“, sagte Scrooge zitternd.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 240
Ihre Glieder kommen dir seltsam vor?“ Scrooge zitterte mehr und mehr.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 242
Sie war gerade so lang und so schwer wie diese hier, vor sieben Weihnachten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 243
Seitdem hast du daran gearbeitet!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 245
„Jacob“, sagte er flehend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 246
„Jacob Marley, sage mir mehr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 247
unit 249
Auch kann ich dir nicht sagen, was ich dir sagen möchte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 250
Ein klein wenig mehr ist alles, was mir erlaubt ist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 251
Nirgends kann ich rasten oder ruhen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 255
„Viel Zeit!“ wiederholte der Geist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 256
„Sieben Jahre tot“, sagte sinnend Scrooge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 257
„Und die ganze Zeit über gereist.“ „Die ganze Zeit“, sagte der Geist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 258
unit 259
„Auf den Schwingen des Windes“, sagte der Geist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 260
„Du hättest eine große Strecke in sieben Jahren bereisen können“, sagte Scrooge.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 265
„Geschäft!“ rief das Gespenst, seine Hände abermals ringend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 266
„Der Mensch wäre mein Geschäft gewesen!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 267
Das allgemeine Wohl wäre mein Geschäft gewesen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 268
Barmherzigkeit, Versöhnlichkeit und Liebe, alles das wäre mein Geschäft gewesen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 270
„Zu dieser Zeit des schwindenden Jahres“, sagte das Gespenst, „leide ich am meisten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 273
„Höre mich“, mahnte der Geist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 274
„Meine Zeit ist halb vorbei.“ „Ich höre“, hauchte Scrooge.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 275
„Aber mach es gnädig mit mir!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 277
Viele, viele Tage habe ich unsichtbar neben dir gesessen.“ Das war kein angenehmer Gedanke.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 278
Scrooge schauderte und wischte sich den Schweiß von der Stirn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 279
„Es ist kein leichter Teil meiner Sühne“, fuhr der Geist fort.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 284
„Ja.“ „Ich - ich möchte lieber nicht“, sagte Scrooge.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 287
„Erwarte den zweiten in der nächsten Nacht um dieselbe Stunde.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 290
unit 293
Es winkte Scrooge, näher zu kommen, und er tat es.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 295
Scrooge stand still.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 298
unit 299
Er sah hinaus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months ago
unit 302
Viele waren Scrooge während ihres Lebens bekannt gewesen.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 308
Sie war noch verschlossen und verriegelt wie vorher.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
lollo1a 4415  commented on  unit 229  2 months, 2 weeks ago
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