de-en  Oscar Wilde: Märchen - Der Geburtstag der Infantin Medium
The Birthday of the Infanta

It was the Infanta's birthday. She was just twelve years old, and the sun shone brightly into the gardens of the palace.

Although she was a real princess and the Infanta of Spain, she had only one birthday each year, just like the children of all the poor people. Therefore, it was of course a matter of great importance for the whole country that there had to be really nice weather on that occasion. And it was actually really nice weather. The tall striped tulips stood rigidly on their stems like long rows of soldiers and looked contemptuously across the grass at the roses and said: "Now we are at least as resplendent as you are." The red butterflies fluttered around with gold dust on their wings and visited all the flowers in turn; the little lizards crawled out of the crevices of the wall and lay sunning themselves in the bright radiance, and the pomegranates jumped and cracked from the heat and displayed their blood-red interior. Even the pale yellow lemons hanging in such abundance from the dilapidated trellis and the shady arches seemed to have taken on a more mature color from the wonderful sunlight, and the magnolia trees opened their large spherical flowers as if cut from ivory and were filling the air with a sweet, heavy scent.

The little princess ran up and down the terrace with her friends and played hide and seek behind the stone vases and the old mossy statues. On normal days she was only allowed to play with children of the same social standing as her, so she always had to play alone, but her birthday was an exception, and the king had instructed her to invite whomever she wanted to have fun with from her young friends. There was a splendid grace in these slim Spanish children as they flew by, the boys with big feathers on their hats and short fluttering coats, the girls holding the train of their long brocade garments and protecting their eyes from the sun with huge black and silver fans. But the Infanta was the most graceful of all, and she was the most tastefully dressed according to the somewhat understated fashion of the time. Her dress was made from grey silk, her skirt and broad puffed sleeves were heavily embroidered with silver, and her rigid bodice was decorated with rows of real pearls. Two tiny slippers with big red rosettes glanced out under her dress when she left. Her gauze fan was reddish and pearl colored, and in her hair, which stood stiffly around her pale face like a crown of pale gold, she wore a white rose. From a window in the palace, the sullen king watched them. Behind him stood his brother, Don Pedro of Aragon, whom he hated, and his confessor, the grand inquisitor of Granada, sat by his side. The King was even sadder than usual, for when he looked at the Infanta who, with childlike dignity, bowed to her gathering entourage or laughed behind her fan at the sinister Duchess of Albuguerque, who always accompanied her, he thought of the young Queen, her mother, who had only recently - so it seemed to him - come from convivial France and languished in the somber splendor of the Spanish court. She died just six months after the birth of her child, before she had seen the almonds blooming twice in the orchard or had picked a second year's fruit from the old, gnarled fig tree that stood just in the middle of the now grassy courtyard. His love for her had been so great that he did not even tolerate the grave hiding her from him. She had been embalmed by a Moorish doctor, whose life had been spared as a reward for his service, which, it was said, had already fallen into the hands of the Inquisition because of heresy and suspicion of magical tricks. But now her body lay on its carpet-covered bier exactly as the monks had carried it almost twelve years ago on that stormy day in March. Once a month, the king, wrapped in a dark cloak, would go there and kneel down at her side, holding a lantern wrapped in his hand. "My queen! My Queen!" he cried out, and sometimes he broke the strict etiquette that governs every single action of life in Spain and sets limits even to the suffering of a king, seizing in a wild pain of anguish her pale, jewel-decorated hands and trying to awaken the cold, painted countenance with his insane kisses.

Today he seemed to see her again as he had first seen her at the castle of Fontainebleau when he was only fifteen years old, and she was even younger. They had been solemnly engaged on that occasion by the Papal Nuncio in the presence of the French King and the entire court, and when he returned to the Escurial, he brought with him a small lock of blond hair and the memory of two childlike lips bowing over his hand to kiss it as he got into his carriage. Then the marriage followed later, which was quickly concluded in Burgos, a small town on the border between the two countries, and the great public entry into Madrid with the traditional solemn high mass in the church of La Atocha and an unusually solemn auto-da-fe, in which almost three hundred heretics, including some English, were handed over to the spiritual authority to be burned.

Surely he had loved her madly, and, as many people believed, to the damage of his country, which at that time fought with England for the possession of the New World. He had hardly ever allowed her to leave his sight; for her he had forgotten all the serious affairs of state, or at least seemed to have forgotten them; and with that terrible blindness that passion brings upon its slaves, he did not notice that the exquisite celebrations through which he sought to please her only intensified the strange disease from which she suffered. When she died, he was like someone who had lost his mind, at least for a while. And undoubtedly he would have formally abdicated and retreated to the great Trappist monastery at Granada, of which he was already titular prior, had he not been afraid to leave the little Infanta in his brother's power, who was notorious for his cruelty even in Spain, and whom many suspected had brought about the Queen's death with a pair of poisoned gloves which he had given her during her visits to his castle in Aragon. Even after the three years of public mourning, which he had ordered by royal decree for all his states, he never tolerated his ministers speaking of a new marriage, and when the Emperor himself sent to him and offered him the hand of the lovely Archduchess of Bohemia, his niece, in marriage, he asked the envoys to tell their master that the King of Spain was already wedded to mourning, and even though this was a bride who could bear no fruit, he loved her more than beauty. This answer cost his crown the rich provinces of the Netherlands, which soon afterwards rebelled against him on the instigation of the emperor under the leadership of some fanatics of the Reformed Church.

His whole married life with its wild, flaming joy and the terrible pain at the sudden end seemed to return to him today as he watched the infanta playing on the terrace. She had all the pretty, wanton behavior of the Queen, the same headstrong way of throwing her head up, the same proudly curved, beautiful mouth, the same wonderful laugh - the genuine smile of France - when she looked up at the window from time to time, or when she offered her little hand to the worthy Spanish gentlemen to kiss. But the shrill laughter of the children hurt the king's ear, the bright, pitiless sunshine mocked his grief, and a heavy scent of strange spices, like spices used by embalmers (or was that just his imagination?) - seemed - to poison the clear morning air. He buried his face in his hands, and when the infanta looked up again, the curtains were closed down, and the king had disappeared.

She pouted a little in disappointment and shrugged her shoulders. He surely could have stayed with her on her birthday. What did the stupid affairs of state matter.? Or had he gone into that dark chapel where the candles were burning all the time and in which she was never allowed to set foot? How foolish of him, because the sun shone so brightly and all were so happy! Besides, he would miss the mock battle with bulls, for which the trumpet already blew, to say nothing at all about the puppet show and the other wonderful things. Her uncle and the grand inquisitor were much more reasonable. They had come out onto the terrace and paid their niece compliments. So she threw her pretty head back, took Don Pedro by the hand, and slowly walked down the steps to a long tent of purple silk erected at the end of the garden while the other children followed exactly according the nobility of their lineage, the two who had the longest names went first.

A procession of noble lads, dressed fantastically as bullfighters, approached her, and the young Duke of Tierra Nueva, a wonderfully handsome boy of perhaps fourteen years of age, uncovered his head with all the grace of a born nobleman and Grandee of Spain and ceremoniously led her to a small gilded ivory carved chair standing on an elevated platform above the arena. All the children gathered around her, swinging their big fans and whispering to each other, and Don Pedro and the grand inquisitor stood laughing at the entrance. Even the Duchess - the Lady Chamberlain, as she was called - a gaunt woman with repulsive facial features and a yellow ruff, didn't look quite as ill-tempered as usual, and something like a smile slid over her wrinkled face and puckered her bloodless lips. It was really a wonderful bullfight and much prettier, the infanta thought, than the real bullfight, that she had been shown in Seville, when the Duke of Parma visited her father. A few of the boys paraded around on hobbyhorses with rich saddlecloths and they swung long javelins with funny pennants of shiny ribbon affixed to them. Other boys walked, swung their red coats in front of the bull and easily vaulted over the barrier when it dashed at them. And as for this bull itself, it was exactly like a live bull, although it was made only of wickerwork and stretched out hide and sometimes couldn't help running on its hind feet around the arena, which no living bull would even dream of doing. It fought splendidly as well, and the children got so enthusiastic about it, that they stood upon the benches, waved their lace handkerchiefs and cried out "Bravo toro! (Bravo bull!) Bravo toro!", as sensibly as if they had been grown-up people. In the end, however, after a long fight during which several hobbyhorses were gored through and through, and their riders were thrown from their saddles, the young Duke of Tierra Nueva brought the bull down, and after he had received permission from the Infanta to deliver the coup de grace to him, he thrust his wooden sword into the neck of the animal with such force that the head fell completely off, and the smiling face of the little gentleman of Lorraine, the son of the French envoy in Madrid, appeared. Now the arena was cleared under great applause, and two black pageboys in yellow-black livery solemnly dragged off the dead hobbyhorses. Then, after a short interlude, during which a French acrobat appeared on a tightrope, some Italian puppets appeared on the stage of a small theater, especially built for this purpose, in the semi-classical tragedy of Sophonisba. They performed so well, and their movements were so extraordinarily natural, that at the end of the piece the Infanta's eyes were completely damp from tears. Indeed, some children were really crying and had to be comforted with confections, and the Grand Inquisitor himself was so moved that he could not help saying to Don Pedro that it seemed unbearable to him that things made of wood and dyed wax and were moved mechanically through wires should be so unhappy and would have to endure such terrible misfortunes of fate.

Now an African jester followed, who brought in a large, flat, red-covered basket and placed it in the middle of the arena. He pulled a strange red fife out of his turban and blew on it. In a few moments the cloth began to move, and as the fife sounded shriller and shriller, two greenish gold snakes stuck out their strange wedge-shaped heads and rose up slowly, moving back and forth to the music, just like plants moving in the water. But the children became a little frightened of their spotted neck hoods and their tongues darting as fast as an arrow, and they liked it much better when the juggler made a dainty orange tree sprout out of the sandy ground, bearing pretty white flowers and clusters of real fruit. And when he took the fan of the little daughter of the Marquis of Las Torres and turned it into a blue bird that flew around the tent and sang, their delight and amazement knew no bounds. The solemn minuet danced by young dancers from the church of Nuestra Señora del Pilar was also charming. The Infanta had never seen this wonderful ceremony before, which is held every year around the time of May in front of the high altar of the Virgin, in her honor, and no member of the royal family of Spain had ever gone into the great cathedral of Zaragoza since a mad priest, presumed by many to have been paid by Elizabeth of England, had tried to administer a poisoned host to the Prince of Asturias. So only by hearsay did she know the dance of our dear wife, as it was called, and it really was a beautiful sight. The boys wore old-fashioned white velvet court attire, their odd triangular hats were covered with silver fringe and topped by large ostrich feathers, and when they moved in the sunshine, the dazzling white of their costumes became even more accentuated by their dark complexions and long black hair. All were enchanted by the serious dignity with which they walked through the intricate figures of he dance, and by the elaborate grace of their slow gestures and stately bows. And when they had finished their performance and had doffed their large feathered hats before the Infanta, she accepted their tribute with much pleasure and made a vow to send a large wax candle to the altar of our beloved wife of Pilar as thanks for the pleasure she had given her.

A troop of attractive Egyptians - as Gypsies were called at that time - entered the arena, sat down in circles with their legs crossed and began to play their zithers softly, moving their bodies to the sound and humming a quiet, dreamy melody almost without a voice. When they saw Don Pedro, they scowled at him, and some of them made a horrified face, for just a few weeks ago he had had two of their clan hanged in the market square of Seville for sorcery. But the pretty Infanta reassured them as she leaned back and looked over her fan with her great blue eyes, and they had the certain feeling that someone as lovely as she was could never be cruel to anybody. ... So they continued playing very gently, hardly touching the strings of the zither with their long pointed nails, and their heads began to nod as if they wanted to fall asleep. Suddenly, with a scream so shrill that all the children were startled and Don Pedro's hand clutched at the agate pommel of his dagger, they jumped to their feet and raced in a great whirl around the enclosure, beating their tambourines and singing a wild love song in their strange guttural language. ... Then, on another signal, they all threw themselves back to the ground and lay there all still, and the muffled jingle of the zithers was the only sound that interrupted the silence. After repeating this a few times, they disappeared for a moment, and when they returned, they led a brown, shaggy bear on a chain and were carrying some small Berber monkeys on their shoulders. The bear stood upon his head with the utmost gravity, and the wizened apes played all kinds of amusing tricks with two gipsy boys who seemed to be their masters They fought with tiny swords, fired rifles and performed a real drill, just as the king's own bodyguard would have done it. In any case, the gypsies had been a great success.

But the most amusing part of the whole morning performance undoubtedly was the dancing of the little dwarf. When he stumbled into the arena waddling on his crooked legs and wobbled back and forth with his misshapen, huge head, the children broke out into a loud laugh of delight, and the Infanta herself laughed so much that the court mistress had to remind her that a Spanish king's daughter had often wept before her peers, but that never before had a princess of royal blood had made such merriment in the presence of those of lower standing. But the dwarf was really irresistible, and even in the Spanish court, which was always been known for its passion for the stupendous, such a fantastic little monster had never been seen before. Incidentally, it was his first appearance. It was only the day before that two of the noblemen, who happened to be hunting in a remote part of the cork-oak forest surrounding the city, had discovered him and had taken him to the palace as a surprise for the Infanta. His father, who was a poor charcoal burner, seemed only too happy to get rid of such an homely and feckless child. The funniest thing about him was perhaps that he was not even aware of his own bizarre appearance. He even seemed to be quite happy and very jovial. When the children laughed, he laughed as freely and happily as simply one of them, and after each dance he made the strangest bow to them. He smiled and nodded to them as if he was really one of them and was not the little misshapen thing nature had created in a humorous mood for others to mock at. As for the Infanta, she enthralled him completely. He couldn't avert his eyes from her and seemed to be dancing for her alone. At the end of the performance she remembered how the great ladies of the court had thrown bouquets to the famous Italian soprano Caffarelli, whom the Pope had sent especially from his chapel to Madrid to cure the king of his melancholy with the sweet sound of his voice, and she took the beautiful white rose from her hair, and half for fun, half to tease the court mistress, she threw it into the arena with her sweetest smile. But he took the whole thing quite seriously. He pressed the flower to his coarse, thick lips, he put his hand on his heart and sank to one knee in front of her, grinning from ear to ear, and his small, shiny eyes were sparkling with pleasure.

This upset the gravity of the Infanta to such an extent that she laughed long after the dwarf had already run out of the arena, and she expressed the wish to her uncle that the dance should be immediately repeated again. The mistress of the court, however, decided under the pretext that the sun was too hot and that Her Highness should return to the palace without delay. There was already a wonderful feast prepared for her here with a real birthday cake, decorated with her own initials in sugar icing and a lovely silver flag waving on it. The Infanta rose therefore with great dignity, and after she had ordered that the little dwarf should dance before her again after the siesta hour, and had thanked the young Duke of Tierra Nueva for his charming reception, she returned to her chambers with the children following her in the same order as before.

The little dwarf, however, when he heard that he should dance before the Infanta once more and at her special request, was so proud that he ran out into the garden and kissed the white rose in an absurd exuberance of joy, expressing his delight with very rough and clumsy movements.

But the flowers became quite indignant because he dared to enter their beautiful realm, and when they saw him jumping up and down the paths and swinging his arms over his head so ridiculously, they could no longer hold back their feelings.

"He is really much too ugly to be allowed to play in a place where we are," the tulips shouted.

"He should drink poppy juice and go to sleep for a thousand years," said the large red lilies, and they were literally boiling with rage.

"He is purely an abomination!" cried the cactus. "He's all misshapen and clumsy, and his head is out of proportion to his legs. It prickles me over and over when I think of him, and when he comes too close to me, I will stab him with my thorns." "And he truly is holding one of my best flowers," exclaimed the white rosebush. "I gave it to the Infanta this morning as a birthday present, and he stole it from her." And it shouted: "Thief, thief, thief!" as loud as it could. Even the red geraniums, which otherwise did not show any proud behavior, knowing that they themselves had a great many poor relatives, turned disdainfully upwards as they saw him, and when the violets modestly remarked that he was very unsightly, but that he could not change that, they rightly countered that that was his main mistake, and that there was no reason to admire anyone because he was incurable. And indeed even some violets felt that the ugliness of the little dwarf had something directly pretentious about it, and that he would exhibit better taste if he were sorrow about it, or if he at least thought about it, instead of jumping around comically and displaying such grotesque and crazy gestures.

As far as the old sundial was concerned, which had a very distinguished personality and had once announced the time to none other than Emperor Charles V, it was so horrified by the appearance of the dwarf that it almost forgot to indicate two full minutes with its long shadow pointer. Nor could it avoid saying to the great milky white peacock sunbathing on the balustrade that everyone knew that royal children were kings and children of charcoal makers were charcoal makers, and that it was ridiculous to deny it. The peacock agreed with this remark and shouted his " Certainly certainly, certainly" in such a loud and shrill voice that the goldfish who lived in the basin under the cooling fountain stuck their heads out of the water and asked the giant stone Tritons what in the world was going on.

But the birds somehow loved him. They had often seen him in the woods where leaped like a pixy after the leaves or climbed up into the hollow of an old oak tree und shared his nuts with the squirrel. They did not mind at all that he was ugly. Yes, even the nightingale itself, which sang so beautifully in the orange groves at night that even the moon sometimes leaned down to listen, let itself be seen anyway in spite of him. Indeed he had also been kind to them all, and in that terrible winter, when there were no berries on the trees, when the ground was as hard as iron, and the wolves came as far as the city gates to look for food, he had not once forgotten them and always gave them the crumbs of his little piece of black bread and shared every breakfast with them.

Therefore they always flew around him by softly touching him with their wings and twittered to each other. The little imp was so happy that he had to show them the pretty white rose and told them that the infanta herself had given it to him because she loved him.

They didn't understand a single word he said, but that didn't matter, because they put their heads to their sides and made wise eyes, which is just as good as understanding something, and much easier.

The lizards also expressed a great inclination towards him, and when he became tired of running around and threw himself on the grass to rest, they played and romped over him, trying to entertain him as best they could. "Everyone can't simply be as beautiful as a lizard," they shouted; "that would be asking too much. And although it sounds ridiculous, in reality he's not so ugly when you close your eyes and don't look at him." The lizards were by nature very philosophical and often sat together for hours and hours thinking, when there was nothing else to do, or when the weather was too rainy for them to go out.

But the flowers got very angry about their behaviour and about the behaviour of the birds. "It only shows," they said, "how ordinary one becomes from the never-ending running around and flying. Civilized folks always stay in the same spot just as we do. Never before did anyone see us hop up and down the paths or shooting wildly through the grass after dragonflies. If we need a change, we send for the gardener, and he carries us to a new flowerbed. This is dignified, and it is how it should be. But birds and lizards have no sense of tranquillity, and birds don't even have a permanent address. They're just vagabonds like the gypsies and should be treated the same way." So they stuck their noses in the air, looked very haughty and were delighted when they saw the little dwarf coming out of the grass and walking over the terrace to the palace.

"They really should keep him under lock and key for the rest of his natural life," they said. "Just look at his humpback and his crooked legs," and they began to giggle.

But the little dwarf didn't know anything at all about that. He loved the birds and the lizards infinitely and thought the flowers to be the most wonderful things in the world, except of course the Infanta, but she had given him the beautiful white rose, and she loved him, and that made a big difference. How he wished that he would have gone with her! She would have held him by the right hand and smiled at him. He would never have left her again, but would have become her playmate, who would have taught her all kinds of charming tricks. For despite the fact that he had never been in a palace before, he knew lots of wonderful things. He could make little cages out of rushes, in which the grasshoppers sang, and pipes out of the long structured bamboo cane, as Pan liked to hear them so much. He knew every birdcall and was able to attract the starlings from the treetops and the heron from the swamp. He knew the trail of every animal and could track down the hare by his dainty footsteps and the boar by the crushed foliage. He knew all the dances of nature, the wild dance in the red robe of autumn, the light dance on blue sandals over the cornfields, the dance with white snow vortices in winter and the flower dance through the gardens in spring. He knew where the wood pigeons build their nests, and once, when a bird catcher caught a couple in a snare, he raised the young himself and built them a small pigeon loft in the crevice of a capped elm. They were completely tame, and he used to feed them from his hand every morning. She would like to have them, as also the rabbits that scampered around in the high ferns, and the jays with the steel blue feathers and the black beaks, and the hedgehogs that could curl up into prickly balls, and the big smart turtles that crawled slowly around, shaking their heads and gnawing at the young foliage. Yes, she had to come certainly into the wood and play with him. He would give her his own little bed and keep watch outside the window until morning, so that the wild horned cattle would not harm her, nor that the hungry wolves would creep too close to the hut. And in the morning he would knock on the window shutters and wake her up, and they would go out together and dance with each other all day. It really was not a bit lonely in the forest. At times a bishop rode through on his white mule and read from a painted book. Sometimes the falconers passed by in green velvet caps and jackets made of tanned deer skin with falcons in caps on their wrists. The grape merchants came to the grape harvest with purple hands and feet, crowned with shining ivy, and carried dripping tubes full of wine. And the charcoal burners sat by night around their huge charcoal piles and watched the dry blocks of wood slowly charring in the fire. They roasted chestnuts in the ashes, and the robbers came out of their hiding places and made fun of them. Once, he had also seen a beautiful procession, which took the long dusty road to Toledo. The monks went ahead with sweet songs and carried shining banners and golden crosses, and then the soldiers came in silver armor with muskets and spears. In their midst, however, three barefoot men in strange robes, painted over and over with wonderful figures, walked and held burning candles in their hands. Surely there was much to see in the forest, and when she was tired, he would find a soft moss bank for her, or carry her in his arms, for he was very strong, although he knew he was not large. And from red cranberries he would make her a collar that would be as pretty as the white berries she wore on her dress. And if she didn't like it anymore, she could throw it away, and he would find others for her. He would bring her acorns and dew soaked anemones and tiny fireflies as stars in the pale gold of her hair.

But where was she? He asked the white rose and she didn't answer him. The whole palace seemed to be asleep, and even where the shutters were not closed, heavy curtains had been pulled over the windows to hold the blazing heat of the sun. He wandered around to find an entrance and at last saw a small side door that was open. He crept in and found himself in a splendid hall, which was regrettably much more splendid than the forest. Everywhere there was much more gilding, and even the floor was made of large colored stones that represented some geometric pattern. But the little Infanta was not there, only some wonderful white statues looked down at him from their jasper pedestals with sad, empty eyes and strangely smiling lips.

At the end of the hall hung a richly embroidered curtain of black velvet, dotted with suns and stars, the king's favorite maxim and embroidered in his favorite color. Maybe she was hiding behind it? He was definitely going to check.

Slowly he stole in and pulled it aside. No, there was just another room, and a prettier one, as he thought, than the one he had just left. The walls were adorned with green arras wallpaper decorated with figures, needle-embroidered tapestries representing a hunt, a work by Flemish artists who had worked on its completion for more than seven years. It had once been the room of Jean le Fou, as he was called, that mad king who was so fond of hunting that he had often, in his madness, tried to mount the huge, rearing horses and take down the royal deer that the great hounds were jumping after. He blew his hunting horn, and thrust with his sword after the pale fleeing game. Now it was used as a council room, and on the table lay the red folders of the ministers embossed with the gold tulips of Spain and the weapons and emblems of the House of Habsburg. The little dwarf looked around in amazement and was almost afraid to move on. The strange silent horsemen who galloped so fast through the wide clearings without making any noise, seemed to him like those terrible ghosts he had heard the charcoal burners speak of - the Comprachos - who only ride at night, and when they meet a man, turn him into a deer and hunt. But he thought of the pretty infanta and took courage. He wanted to meet her alone to tell her that he loved her too. Maybe she was in the next room.

He ran over the soft Moorish carpets and opened the door. No! She wasn't here either. The room was completely empty.

It was a throne room used to receive foreign envoys when the king agreed to grant them a private audience, which had not happened frequently in recent times. It was the same hall where many years earlier envoys from England had appeared to reach an agreement for the marriage of their queen, who at that time still belonged to the Catholic rulers of Europe, with the Emperor's eldest son. The wall covering was made of gilded cordovan leather, and a heavy, gilded chandelier with arms for three hundred wax candles hung down from the black and white ceiling. The throne, covered with a heavy covering of black velvet, sown with silver tulips and artfully framed in silver and pearls, stood under a canopy of gold-knitted fabric on which the lions and towers of Castile were embroidered in pearl dust. On the second step of the throne was the Infanta's kneeling chair with its silver-embroidered fabric cushion, and below it again, outside the area of the canopy, stood the armchair for the Papal Nuncio, who alone had the right to sit in the presence of the King on the occasion of a public reception. His cardinal's hat with its twisted red tassels lay in front on a purple taburet. On the wall opposite the throne hung a life-size portrait of Charles V in a hunting costume with a large bulldog at his side, and a portrait of Philip II, as he was receiving the tribute from the Netherlands, covered the middle of the other wall. Between the windows stood a cabinet of black ebony with inlaid ivory plates on which the figures from Holbein's "Dance of Death" were engraved, as some said, by the famous master's own hand.

But the little dwarf did not care for all that splendor. He wouldn't have given away his rose for all the pearls on the canopy, nor a white petal of his rose for the throne itself. He just wanted to see the princess before she went down to the tent and ask her to come with him when he had finished his dance. Here in the palace the air was dull and heavy, but in the forest the wind blew free, and the sunlight with its wandering golden hands moved the foliage to the side. There were also flowers in the forest, perhaps not as elegant as in the garden, but nevertheless they smelled sweeter; hyacinths in the early spring that flooded through the cool gorges and over the grassy hills with waving purple; yellow primroses that grew in small groups around the gnarled roots of the oak trees; shiny celandine, blue speedwell and purple and gold irises. There were grey kittens on the hazel bushes, and the red thimble sank under the weight of its speckled, bee-laden bells. The chestnut had its sprouts of white stars and the hawthorn its pale blossom moons. Yes, surely she would come with him if he could only find her. She would come with him to the beautiful forest, and all day long he would dance for her delight. A smile lit up his eyes at the thought and he passed into the next room.

Of all the halls, this one was the brightest and most beautiful. The walls were covered with a red-flowered Lucca damask, patterned with birds and was dabbed with dainty blossoms of silver. The solid silver furnishings were decorated with rich flower arrangements in which cupids swayed. In front of the two wide fireplaces stood large umbrellas embroidered with parrots and peacocks, and the bottom of sea green onyx seemed to stretch far into the distance. Nor was the dwarf alone. He saw a small figure standing in the shadow of the doorway at the far end of the hall watching him. His heart trembled, a cry of joy came over his lips, and he stepped out into the sunlight. At the same moment, the figure stepped out, and he saw it clearly.

The infanta? No, it was a monster, the most hideous monster he had ever seen. Not nicely shaped, like all the other people were, but misshapen and crooked with a huge, wobbly head and a mane of black hair. The little dwarf frowned, and the monster frowned also. He laughed and it laughed with him and held his hands against his hips just as he did. He bowed mockingly to it and received deep reverence. He approached it and it came towards him by imitating every step he took and stopping when he himself stopped. He shouted with amusement, and ran forward. He extended his hand and the hand of the monster touched his, and it was as cold as ice. He was afraid and moved his hand to the side, but the monster's hand followed it quickly. He tried to push it back, but something smooth and hard held him firmly. The face of the monster was now close to his own, and seemed full of terror. He brushed his hair off his face. It imitated him. He hit it, and it returned blow for blow. He showed it his disgust, and it made hideous faces at him. He backed away, and it likewise retreated.

What was it? He thought for a moment, and looked round at the rest of the hall. It was strange, but everything seemed to have his repetition behind this invisible wall of clear water. Yes, picture by picture and panelling by panelling repeated itself. The sleeping faun, lying in the alcove next to the doorway, had its slumbering twin brother, and the silver Venus, standing in the sunlight, stretched her arms towards a Venus as lovely as herself. Was is an echo? He had called to it once in the valley, and it had answered him word for word. Could it mock the eye, as it mocked the voice? Could an illusory world create it just like the real world? Could the shadow of things have colour and life and movement? Could it be that - ?

He jumped and took the beautiful white rose from his chest, turned it over and kissed it. The monster also had a rose, and it was the same, petal for petal! He kissed it with the same kisses and pressed it to his heart with horrible gestures.

As the truth dawned on him, he ejected a wild cry of desperation and fell to the ground moaning. Then he himself was thus deformed and misshapen, disgusting to look at and grotesque. He himself was the monster, and it was at him that all the children had been laughing. And he thought the little princess loved him - she too had mocked his ugliness and made fun of his crooked limbs. Why hadn't they left him in the woods where there was no mirror to tell him how ugly he was? Why hadn't his father killed him before he turned him in to his shame? The hot tears ran down his cheeks and he tore the white rose to pieces. The monster lying there did the same and scattered the delicate petals into the air. He crawled around on the floor, and when he looked at it, it was watching him with a face distorted with pain. He crawled away not to see it anymore and covered his eyes with his hands. Like a wounded animal he dragged himself into the shade and lay there moaning.

At that moment the Infanta came with her companions through the open French door, and when they saw the little dwarf lying on the ground, clenching his fists and hitting himself in a most fantastic and exaggerated manner, they all burst out shouting and cheering and stood around him, looking at him.

"His dance was funny," said the infanta; "but his play is even funnier still. He is really almost as good as the puppets, but he doesn't do it so completely natural." And she waved her big fan and applauded.

But the little dwarf never looked up, his sighing was getting weaker and weaker, and suddenly he took a strange breath and grabbed his side. And then he fell back again, and lay quite still.

"That's great," the infanta said after a pause; "but now you have to dance for me." "Yes," all the children shouted, "you have to get up and dance, because you're as agile as the Berber monkeys and much funnier." But the little dwarf gave no answer.

Then the Infanta stomped her foot and called for her uncle, who was walking across the terrace with the treasurer, reading some dispatches that had just come from Mexico where the Inquisition had recently been implemented. "My funny little dwarf is lethargic," she shouted, "you have to wake him up and tell him he's dancing for me." They smiled at each other and strolled in. And Don Pedro bent down and slapped the dwarf on the cheek with his embroidered glove. "You must dance, little monster," he said. "You must dance. The Infanta of Spain and India wants to be entertained." But the little dwarf didn't move.

"A flogging assistant should be brought in," said Don Pedro angrily and went back to the terrace. But the treasurer made a serious face. He kneeled next to the little dwarf and placed his hand on the dwarf's heart. And after a few seconds, he shrugged his shoulders and rose. He bowed deeply to the Infanta and said: "Mi bella Princesa, your funny little dwarf will never dance again. It is a pity, for he is so ugly that he might have made the king smile." "But why won't he dance again," asked the Infanta laughing.

"Because his heart is broken," the chamberlain replied. .... Then the Infanta lowered her face, and her dainty rose lips came together in a charming pout. "In the future those who play with me shall have no hearts," she cried and ran out into the garden.
unit 1
Der Geburtstag der Infantin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Es war der Geburtstag der Infantin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 3
Sie zählte gerade zwölf Jahre, und die Sonne schien hell in die Gärten des Palastes.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 6
Und es war tatsächlich ein wirklich schönes Wetter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 14
Zwei winzige Pantoffeln mit großen roten Rosetten lugten unter ihrem Kleid hervor, wenn sie ging.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 16
Von einem Fenster im Palaste aus sah ihnen der grämliche König zu.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 20
unit 24
» Mi reina!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 31
Als sie starb, war er, wenigstens eine Zeitlang, wie einer, der seinen Verstand verloren hat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
– die klare Morgenluft zu vergiften.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 40
Sie schmollte etwas enttäuscht und zog ihre Schultern.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 41
Sicherlich, an ihrem Geburtstag hätte er bei ihr bleiben können.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 42
Was lag an den dummen Staatsgeschäften?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 44
Wie töricht von ihm, da doch die Sonne so hell schien und alle so glücklich waren!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 46
Ihr Onkel und der Großinquisitor waren viel vernünftiger.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 47
Sie waren auf die Terrasse herausgekommen und spendeten ihrer Nichte Komplimente.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
Bravo toro!« ganz so vernünftig riefen, als ob sie erwachsene Leute gewesen seien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 64
Er zog aus seinem Turban eine seltsame rote Pfeife hervor und blies darauf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 83
Jedenfalls hatten die Zigeuner einen großen Erfolg.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 84
unit 87
Es war übrigens sein erstes Auftreten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 91
Er schien sogar ganz glücklich und sehr aufgeräumt zu sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 94
Was die Infantin anging, so bezauberte sie ihn ganz und gar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 95
Er konnte seine Augen nicht von ihr abwenden und schien nur für sie allein zu tanzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 97
Er aber nahm die ganze Sache völlig ernst.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 107
»Er ist einfach ein Greuel!« schrie der Kaktus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 108
unit 116
Aber die Vögel liebten ihn irgendwie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 118
Sie machten sich durchaus nichts daraus, daß er häßlich war.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 127
Die Blumen aber ärgerten sich sehr über ihr Benehmen und über das Benehmen der Vögel.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 128
unit 129
Gesittete Leute bleiben immer auf demselben Fleck stehen, wie wir es tun.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 132
Dies ist würdevoll und gehört sich auch so.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 136
»Sieh nur seinen Buckel und seine krummen Beine,« und sie begannen zu kichern.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 137
Aber der kleine Zwerg wußte nichts von dem allen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 139
Wie sehr wünschte er, daß er mit ihr gegangen wäre!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 140
Sie hätte ihn an der rechten Hand gefaßt und ihn angelächelt.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 142
unit 144
unit 148
Sie waren ganz zahm, und er pflegte sie jeden Morgen aus der Hand zu füttern.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 150
Ja, sie mußte bestimmt in den Wald kommen und mit ihm spielen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 153
Es war wirklich kein bißchen einsam in dem Wald.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 154
Manchmal ritt ein Bischof hindurch auf seinem weißen Maultier und las aus einem bemalten Buch.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 164
unit 166
Aber wo war sie?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 167
Er fragte die weiße Rose und sie gab ihm keine Antwort.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 169
unit 170
unit 174
Vielleicht war sie dahinter versteckt?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 175
Er wollte auf alle Fälle nachsehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 176
Langsam stahl er sich heran und zog ihn zur Seite.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 180
Er stieß dabei in sein Jagdhorn und schlug mit seinem Schwert nach dem bleichen, fliehenden Wild.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 182
Der kleine Zwerg sah sich erstaunt überall um und fürchtete sich fast, weiterzugehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 184
Aber er dachte an die hübsche Infantin und faßte Mut.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 185
Er wünschte, sie allein zu treffen, um ihr zu sagen, daß auch er sie liebe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 186
Vielleicht war sie in dem nächsten Zimmer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 187
Er lief über die weichen maurischen Teppiche und öffnete die Tür.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 188
Nein!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 189
Sie war auch hier nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 190
Das Zimmer war ganz leer.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 196
Sein Kardinalshut mit seinen gedrehten roten Troddeln lag davor auf einem purpurnen Taburett.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 199
Aber der kleine Zwerg machte sich nichts aus all dieser Pracht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 205
Die Kastanie hatte ihre Sprossen von weißen Sternen und der Weißdorn seine bleichen Blütenmonde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 206
Ja, sie würde gewiß mit ihm kommen, wenn er sie nur finden könnte!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 207
unit 208
Ein Lächeln erstrahlte bei dem Gedanken in seinen Augen, und er ging weiter in den nächsten Saal.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 209
Von allen Sälen war dieser der strahlendste und schönste.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 213
Auch war der Zwerg nicht allein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 215
Sein Herz zitterte, ein Freudenschrei kam über seine Lippen, und er trat in das Sonnenlicht hinaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 216
In dem gleichen Augenblick trat auch die Figur hervor, und er sah sie deutlich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 217
Die Infantin?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 218
Nein, es war ein Ungetüm, das abscheulichste Ungetüm, das er je gesehen hatte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 220
Der kleine Zwerg runzelte die Stirn, und das Ungetüm tat das auch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 221
Er lachte, und es lachte mit ihm und hielt seine Hände gegen die Hüften, gerade wie er es tat.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 222
Er machte ihm eine spöttische Verbeugung und empfing eine tiefe Reverenz.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 224
Er schrie vor Vergnügen und lief vorwärts.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 225
Er streckte seine Hand aus und die Hand des Ungetüms berührte seine, und sie war so kalt wie Eis.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 226
Er fürchtete sich und bewegte seine Hand zur Seite, aber die Hand des Ungetüms folgte dem schnell.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 227
Er versuchte, es zurückzudrücken, aber etwas Glattes und Hartes hielt ihn fest.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 228
Das Gesicht des Ungetüms befand sich jetzt dicht bei dem seinen und schien voller Angst zu sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 229
Er wischte sich das Haar aus dem Gesicht, es tat dasselbe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 230
Er schlug nach ihm hin, und es gab ihm Schlag auf Schlag zurück.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 231
Er zeigte ihm seinen Ekel, und es schnitt ihm widerliche Gesichter.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 232
Er wich zurück, und es ging ebenfalls von ihm weg.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 233
Was war das?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 234
Er dachte einen Augenblick nach und sah sich in dem übrigen Saale um.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 236
Ja, Bild für Bild und Täfelung für Täfelung wiederholte sich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 238
War es das Echo?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 239
Er hatte es einst im Tale gerufen, und es hatte ihm Wort für Wort zurückgegeben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 240
Konnte es auch das Auge verspotten, wie es die Stimme verspottete?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 241
Konnte es eine Scheinwelt schaffen gerade so wie die wirkliche Welt?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 242
Konnten die Schatten der Dinge Farbe, Leben und Bewegung haben?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 243
Konnte es sein, daß –?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 244
unit 245
Das Ungetüm hatte auch eine Rose, und es war Blatt für Blatt dieselbe!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 246
Es küßte sie mit denselben Küssen und preßte sie mit schrecklichen Gebärden an sein Herz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 248
Dann war er selbst also mißgestaltet und verwachsen, widerlich anzusehen und fratzenhaft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 249
Er selbst war das Ungetüm, und über ihn hatten alle Kinder gelacht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 252
Warum hatte ihn sein Vater nicht getötet, ehe er ihn seiner Schande auslieferte?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 253
Die heißen Tränen rannen ihm über die Wangen, und er riß die weiße Rose in Stücke.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 254
Das daliegende Ungetüm tat dasselbe und streute die zarten Blumenblätter in die Luft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 256
Er kroch hinweg, um es nicht mehr zu sehen, und bedeckte seine Augen mit seinen Händen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 257
Wie ein verwundetes Tier schleppte er sich in den Schatten und lag dort stöhnend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 259
»Sein Tanz war komisch,« sagte die Infantin; »aber sein Spiel ist noch komischer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 262
Und dann fiel er wieder zurück und lag ganz still.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 266
Und Don Pedro bückte sich und schlug den Zwerg mit seinem gestickten Handschuh auf die Wange.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 267
»Du mußt tanzen, kleines Monstrum,« sagte er.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 268
»Du mußt tanzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 269
unit 270
unit 271
Aber der Kämmerer machte ein ernstes Gesicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 272
Er kniete neben dem kleinen Zwerge nieder und legte ihm die Hand auf das Herz.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 1 week ago
unit 273
Und nach einigen Sekunden zuckte er die Achseln und erhob sich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 276
»Weil ihm das Herz gebrochen ist,« antwortete der Kämmerer.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 3 months, 2 weeks ago
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anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 74  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 65  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 60  3 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 116  3 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 106  3 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 79  3 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 52  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 50  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 41  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 32  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 30  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  translated  unit 24  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 91  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 19  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 22  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 21  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 79  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 68  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 81  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4431  commented on  unit 79  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 84  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 83  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 80  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 27  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 19  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 73  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 72  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 61  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 55  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 55  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 16  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 29  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 50  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene 2990  commented on  unit 50  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  translated  unit 48  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 45  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 42  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 47  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 35  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4431  commented  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 4431  commented  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 39  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 30  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 33  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 32  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 9  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 38  3 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny 7215  commented on  unit 22  3 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a 4416  commented on  unit 14  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 9  3 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho 10096  commented on  unit 8  3 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene 2990  translated  unit 38  3 months, 3 weeks ago