es-en  El Mundo Perdido por Arthur Conan Doyle-Cap.VIII Medium
8. The external guards of the new world.

Our friends from England can be pleased with us, because we have achieved our goal and, at least to some extent, we have proved that professor Challenger's statements can be verified. It is true that we have not climbed to the mesa, but it stands before us, and even Professor Summerlee behaves with greater discretion. This doesn't mean that he admits, even for a second, that his rival could be right, but he does not insist so much on his constant objections and has sunk, for the most part, into a vigilant silence. And now I must return to the matter, however, proceeding with my narrative from the point where I had left it. We have sent home one of our Indians from the region, as he is wounded, and I am entrusting him with this letter, although I have considerable doubts that it will ever be delivered.
When I wrote the previous one, we were about to leave the Indian hamlet in which the Emerald had left us. I must begin my report with bad news because the first serious conflict of a personal nature (and I ignore the incessant verbal struggles of the two professors) happened that night and could have had a tragic end. I have already mentioned our mestizo Gómez, the one who speaks English: he is an excellent worker and a willing companion, but affected, I believe, by the vice of curiosity, which is frequent in that class of men. Apparently last night he had hidden himself near the hut in which we were discussing our plans; but he was seen by our black giant, Zambo, who is as faithful as a dog and who, like all of his race, hates mestizos.
Zambo dragged him out and brought him to our presence. Nevertheless, Gómez unsheathed his knife, and, if not for the enormous strength of his captor, who was able to disarm him with one hand, he would surely have stabbed him. The issue was reduced to simple reprimands, and the adversaries undertook to shake hands, and we remained hopeful that everything will be all right from now on. Regarding the disputes between the two scholarly men, they continue to be rough and constant. It has to be admitted that Challenger is highly provocative, but Summerlee has a sharp tongue, which makes things worse. Last night Challenger said that he had never liked walking along the Thames Embankment, looking at the river, because it is always sad to see our final destination. Of course, he is convinced that his final destination is Westminster Abbey. Summerlee replied anyway, with a bitter smile, that it was his understanding that the Millbank jail had been demolished. Challenger's vanity is too great for irony to bother him. He barely smiled in his beard and repeated: 'Really?', 'Really?, in the compassionate tone one uses with a child.
Actually, both are children: one withered and quarrelsome; the other formidable and haughty, although both have brains that have placed them in the first rank of their scientific generation. Brain, character, soul ... Only when you know more about life, you understand how different they are.
The next day we left immediately to undertake our memorable expedition. We found that all our luggage fitted easily in the two canoes and divided our staff, six in each; But, in the interest of peace, we took the obvious precaution of placing one Professor in each canoe. For my part I boarded the one with Challenger, who was in a beatific mood, he acted as if he were in a silent ecstasy and glowed with benevolence from every pore. But since I had already experienced his other moods, . . I won't be at all surprised if the storm suddenly explodes in the middle of a bright sun. Although it is impossible to feel at ease in his company, you cannot experience boredom either; that is why one finds oneself in a perpetual state of doubt, half afraid of the sudden turn that his formidable temperament can take.
For two days we continued our way upstream along a river course a few hundred yards wide. and dark in color but so transparent that we could almost always see the bottom. Half of the tributaries of the Amazon are of the same nature, while the other half are whitish and opaque; the difference depends on the kind of land they go through. The dark color indicates rotting vegetation, while the others flow through river beds of clay. Twice we encountered rapids, and in both cases we had to transport our baggage and canoes half a mile or so by land to get around them. The woods in both banks were young, and therefore they were easier to cross through than those in their second phase of development, and we had no big difficulties in going through them in our canoes.
How could I ever forget the majestic mystery of those woods?
The height of the trees and the thickness of their trunks exceeded anything that I, who grew up in the cities, could have imagined. They shot up like magnificent columns until, at an enormous distance above our heads, we could hazily make out where the lateral branches opened out forming gothic ascending curves that linked together to create an enormous green dome, only penetrated by an occasional ray of sunlight that traced a narrow brilliant line through the majestic darkness. While we walked noiselessly on that soft, thick rug of withered vegetation, the silence invaded our souls as it is wont to do in the evening shadow of Westminster Abbey; and even the emphatic voice of Professor Challenger softened to a whisper. If I had been alone, I never would have known the names of those giant plants, but our men of science pointed out the cedars, the enormous ceibas, and the giant pines, with all the profusion of varied plants that had converted this continent into humankind's principal provider of nature's gifts from the world of plants. while it is the most underdeveloped in products that are born of animal life. Orchids of vivid colors and lichens of wonderful hues blazed without flame on the dark trunks of the trees, and when a wandering beam of light fell on the golden allamanda, the scarlet clusters of the tacsonia or the rich dark blue of the ipomea, the effect was as a dream in a fairyland. Life, which detests darkness, in those great jungle solitudes always struggles to ascend towards the light. Each plant, even the smallest one, winds and twists to reach the green surface, wrapping itself to climb up its bigger and stronger sisters in eager effort. Climbing plants are huge and exuberant, but others, which were not climbers in other regions, learn that art, as a way to escape the dark shadow; and so you can see the jasmine, the common nettle and even the jacitara palm, enveloping the stems of the cedars, struggling to reach their tops. There were no movements of animal life in the majestic vaulted naves that were expanding as we walked, but a constant activity, far above our heads, told us about the multitudinous world of snakes and monkeys, birds and sloths that lived in the sunlight. and who looked amazed from their heights on our tiny, shadowy and hesitant figures, in the dark and immeasurable depths that extended below them. At dawn and at sunset, the howler monkeys shouted in unison and the parrots exploded in their shrill chatter, but during the hot hours of the day only the abundant buzzing of the insects filled our ears, similar to the beat of a distant shoal, without anything moving while between the solemn perspectives of the stupendous trunks, that vanished in the darkness that enveloped us. One time an animal with twisted legs and a wobbly walk started to run: probably an anteater. This was the only sign of animal life that we saw in this great Amazon rain forest.
However, there were indications that human life itself was not far from those mysterious and remote places. On the third day, we perceived a strange and deep throbbing in the air, rhythmic and solemn, that came and went capriciously throughout the morning. The two boats advanced by rowing, a few yards from each other, when we heard that for the first time, and our Indians remained motionless, as if they had become bronze figures, listening attentively and with expressions of terror on their faces.
-But what is that? -I asked.
-Drums"- Lord John answered casually-. War drums.
I've heard them before now.
-Yes, sir, war drums -said the mestizo, Gomez. They're fierce Indians, not peaceful; they watch us mile by mile along our path. They'll kill us if they can.
- How can they watch us? I asked, contemplating that dark and motionless empty space.
The mestizo shrugged his broad shoulders.
-Indians know how to do it. They have their own methods. They are watching us. They talk to each other with the voice of the drums. They'll kill us if they can.
That afternoon - according to my pocket diary the day was Tuesday, August 18 - there were at least six or seven drums echoing from different places.
Sometimes their drum roll was fast, other times slow, other times they engaged in obvious dialogues, with questions and answers; one of them broke in a fast staccato from far away to the east, and, after a break, a deep drum roll answered it from the north. This constant growling produced an indescribable exasperation and a threatening tension, which seemed to transform into the same syllables of the phrases that the mestizo repeated tirelessly: "We will kill you if we can. We will kill you if we can." No one moved in the silent forests. All was peace and quietness in the silent Nature that lay behind the dark curtain of vegetation, but from far away continued arriving the only message from our fellow men: "We will kill you if we can," said the men from the east; "We will kill you if we can," said the men from the north.
The drums resounded and murmured throughout the day, making their threats reflect on the faces of our companions of color.
Even the mestizos, boastful and hardened, looked intimidated. But precisely that day, I knew once and for all that Summerlee as well as Challenger had the highest kind of courage: the courage of scientific thought. It was the same spirit that had supported Darwin among the gauchos in Argentina and Walace among the headhunters in Malaysia.
Merciful Nature has decreed that the human brain cannot think of two things simultaneously, so that if it is occupied by scientific curiosity it has no place for mere personal considerations.
All day long, in the middle of that constant threat, our two professors applied themselves observing every bird that flew in the air and every bush that grew on the banks, with many sharp verbal disputes, during which the Summerlee's mocking growls responded promptly to Challenger's deep grunts, but without showing the least awareness of danger or alluding to the pounding of the indian drums as if we were seated in the smoking salon of the Royal Society's Club on St. James Street. Only once did they condescend to talk about them.
––Miranha or Amajuaca cannibals ––Challenger said, pointing with his thumb towards the vibrant forest.
––No doubt, sir ––Summerlee replied––. Like all these tribes, I suppose they will use a polysynthetic language, of Mongolian type.
––Polysynthetic certainly, ––said Challenger with indulgence––. I am not aware that another type of language exists in this continent, and I have taken notes on more than a hundred. But I observe the theory about the Mongol origin with deep distrust.
-I think a limited knowledge of comparative anatomy was enough to verify it -Summerlee said sourly.
Challenger threw out his aggressive jaw until all was beard and hat brim.
- Without doubt, sir, a limited knowledge would lead to that result.
But when the knowledge is exhaustive, different conclusions are reached.
They looked at each other in a defiant attitude, while from everything around us seemed to appear that distant whisper: "We'll kill you ... we'll kill you if we can."
That night we anchored our canoes in the center of the current with heavy stones as anchors and made all the preparations for a possible attack. Nothing happened, however, and at dawn we continued our journey, while the beating of drums was lost behind us. Towards three o'clock in the afternoon we arrived at a very steep rapids more than a mile long. It was exactly the same one in which Professor Challenger had suffered a disaster. I confess that the sight consoled me, because it was really the first corroboration, as weak as it may have been, of the truth of his story.
The Indians transported first the canoes and then our luggage through the bushes, which were very thick in this part, while the four whites, with rifles on our shoulders, walked among them, vigilant for any danger that might come from the forests. Before sunset we had happily surpassed the rapids and traveled ten miles beyond them, where we anchored for the night. I estimate that at this point we would have navigated about a hundred miles along the tributary of the main river.
The next day, in the morning, very early, we started what could be called the great beginning, the real start of our expedition. Since dawn, Professor Challenger had shown great anxiety, constantly scutinizing the two banks of the river. Suddenly, he gave an exclamation of joy and pointed to an isolated tree, which projected from the bank of the stream at a curious angle.
-What do you think of that? -he asked.
-That is surely an assai palm tree - Summerlee said
-Exactly. And it was an assai palm tree that I took as a point of reference. The secret entrance is half a mile further on, on the other side of the river. There is no gap between the trees. There is what is wonderful and mysterious about the case. In the place where you are seeing the light green rushes instead of the dark green undergrowth, there among the great poplars, there is my private door to the kingdom of the unknown. Let's go through and you will understand.
It was truly a wonderful place. Once we reach the site marked by a line of light green rushes, we pushed our canoes with poles trough their stems for a hundred yards, and finally we came out on a stream of placid and shallow waters, which flowed clear and transparent on a sandy bottom. It was about twenty yards wide, and a very lush vegetation grew on both banks.
No one who had not noticed closeup where reeds replaced the bushes could have suspected the existence of that watercourse or dreamed of the enchanted world beyond.
Because it really was a world of fairies, the most marvelous that a man could imagine. The thick vegetation was joined above, forming a natural pergola, and through that verdant tunnel a diaphanous green river flowed in a golden shadow, beautiful in itself, but made even more marvelous by the strange shadings created by the lively light as it filtered through from above. Clear as a crystal, motionless as a mirror, green as the edge of an iceberg, it stretched out before us under its leafy arcade, and each stroke of our oars threw myriads of small waves on its glistening surface. It was the worthy avenue to a land of wonders. All trace of the Indians seemed to have vanished, but animal life was more frequent, and the docility of the creatures showed that they knew nothing of hunters. Small monkeys covered with fur like black velvet, with teeth as white as snow and sparkling mocking eyes, chattered at us as we passed by. Some caimans dived from the bank with a muffled and heavy splashing. Once, a dark and clumsy tapir stared at us from a hole in the bushes and immediately moved away through the jungle; another time, the yellow and sinuous figure of a huge puma appeared through the bushes, and threw us a glance of hatred over his tawny back with his green and terrible eyes. Flying life abounded, especially the wading birds like the stork, the gray heron and the ibis, gathered in small flocks, blue, scarlet and white, standing on each log that appeared from the shore, while below us the crystalline waters were stirring with life, with fish of all shapes and colors.
For three days we traveled upstream through that tunnel of misty green diffused by sunlight. In the longer sections it was difficult to discern, looking forward, where the distant green water ended and where the distant arcade of greenery began. No trace of human presence disturbed the deep peace of that strange waterway.
-There are no Indians here. They're too afraid of Curupuri," said Gomez.
"Curupuri is the spirit of the forests," explained Lord John. It's the name given to all kinds of demons. These poor devils believe that there's something terrifying in that direction, and that's why they avoid going there.
On the third day it became clear that our journey in canoe could not go on much,further because the stream was narrowing rapidly.
We ran aground twice in so many hours. Finally we lifted out our canoes and stuck them in the shrubbery, passing the night on the bank of the river.
In the morning, Lord John and I advanced a couple of miles through the woods, keeping parallel to the current of water; but as this became ever shallower, we returned and announced the finding, even though Professor Challenger had suspected it: that is, that we had reached the highest point that could be reached by canoe. So we took them out of the water and hid them among the undergrowth, making marks on a tree with our axes so we could find them again. Then we distributed the different loads among us ––rifles, ammunition, groceries, a tent, blankets, and everything else–– and, carrying our bags on our shoulders, we undertook the most laborious stage of our journey.
The beginning of this new day was marked by an unfortunate quarrel between those two hot-heads that traveled with us. Challenger had given orders to the whole expedition from the moment of joining us, to the obvious displeasure of Professor Summerlee. On this occasion, when assigning a task to his colleague (it was only a matter of transporting an aneroid barometer), the problem suddenly came to light.
-May I ask, sir, -said Summerlee, with malevolent calm, -by what authority do you appropriate to yourself the right to give these orders?
Challenger glared at him, bristling, with fire in his eyes.
"I do it, Professor Summerlee, as head of this expedition.
-I feel obligated to tell you, sir, that I don't recognize your authority.
-Really? Challenger bowed with ruthless sarcasm. Maybe you can define exactly what my position is.
-Yes sir. You are a man whose veracity is being judged and we constitute the committee that is here to judge you. You walk, sir, with your judges.
-Oh my God! --cried Chalenger sitting down on the side of one of the canoes-- In that case, of course, you can go your way and I will go my own as I see fit. If I'm not the leader, you shouldn't expect me to guide you.
Thank God there were two reasonable men --lord Roxton and me-- to prevent the petulance and nonsense of our knowledgeable professors sending us back to London with empty hands. How much we had to explain, argue and plead until we were able to soften them! Finally, Summerlee, with his contemptuous gesture and his pipe, resumed the march, while Challenger kept swaying and grumbling. Fortunately, about then we discovered that our two scholars shared a very poor opinion about Professor Illingworth of Edinburgh. From that moment, this was our salvation, and each tense situation was resolved when we introduced the name of the Scottish zoologist into the conversation, because our professors established a temporary alliance and a certain friendship through their insults and their execration of the common rival.
Advancing in single file along the bank of the river, we soon discovered that it was narrowing to a simple small stream and that at the end it was lost in a large green swamp with mosses that looked like sponges, where we sank to our knees. The place was infested with horrible clouds of mosquitoes and all kinds of flying pests, so we were very happy to find solid ground again, and by detouring through the trees, we could flank the pestilent swamp, which could be heard vibrating from afar like an organ, so loud was the life of the insects in it.
On the second day after leaving our canoes, we found that the character of the region had completely changed. The path was constantly uphill, and as we climbed, the forests became thinner and lost their tropical exuberance. The immense trees of the Amazon's alluvial plain gave way to phoenix palms and coconuts that grew in scattered copses, between which was a thick underbrush. In the wettest hollows Mauricia palms opened their graceful hanging fronds. We traveled guided exclusively by the compass, and once or twice differences of opinion arose between Challenger and the two Indians when, to quote the indignant words of the Professor, the whole group had agreed to "trust the deceptive instincts of some underdeveloped savages instead of following the highest product of European culture." We were justified in that attitude when, on the third day, Challenger admitted that he recognized several signs of his previous trip, and when in one place we ran into four stones blackened by fire that testified that a camp had been built there.
The road continued ascending, and we crossed a slope scattered with rocks that took us two days to cross. The vegetation had changed again, and now only the tagua palm remained, with a great profusion of marvelous orchids, among which I learned to recognize the rare Nuttonia vexillaria and the glorious buds, rose-colored and scarlet, of Cattleya and Odontoglossum. From time to time, small gurgling streams with pebbled bottoms and fern-fringed banks came down the shallow gorges of the hills. They gave us excellent places to camp every night on the banks of some rock-studded pool, where swarms of small blue-bodied fish, similar in size and shape to English trout, provided us a delicious dinner.
On the ninth day after having left the canoes, when, according to my calculations, we had travelled about one hundred and twenty miles, we began to emerge from among the trees, that had become smaller and smaller until they were simple bushes. Their place had been taken by a immenese number of bamboos, that grew so dense that we could only cross them by opening a path with the machetes and sickles of the Indians. Crossing this obstacle demanded an entire day, walking from seven in the morning until eight at night, with only two breaks of one hour each. It is not possible to imagine anything so monotonous and exhausting, because even in the clearest places I could not see beyond ten or twelve yards, while the most usual thing was that my vision was limited to the back of the cotton jacket of Lord John, who marched in front of me, and the yellow wall that flanked us on both sides, just a foot away. From above us came a ray of sunlight as thin as a knife blade, and fifteen feet above our heads one could see the ends of bamboo canes swaying against the deep blue sky. I do not know what kind of animals inhabit such a thicket, but on several occasions we heard the splashing of corpulent and heavy animals very close to us.
Lord John thought, according to the noise they made, that it must be some kind of wild cattle. As night fell, we emerged from that area of ​​bamboos and immediately set up camp, exhausted after that endless day.
The next morning, very early, we were on our feet again, noting that the character of the region had changed again. Behind us was the bamboo wall, as clean as if it marked the course of a river. In front was an open plain, which ascended in a gentle slope; ít was covered with scattered copses of tree-ferns. All this land was curved in front of us until it ended in an elongated hill shaped like a whale's back. We reached it towards noon, only to discover that there was a shallow valley below that also rose upwards in a gentle slope until ending in a low and rounded horizon. It was there, while we were crossing the first of these hills, that an incident occurred that might or might not be significant.
Professor Challenger, who was marching at the head of the expedition with the two local indians, suddenly stopped and very excitedly pointed to the right. Then we saw, a mile or so in the distance, something that looked like an enormous gray bird smoothly rise from the ground, and with slow wing beats, flying very low and straight, disappear among the tree-ferns.
"Did you see it?" shouted Challenger, ecstatic. Summerlee, did you see it?
His colleague was staring at the place where that being had disappeared.
––And what do you claim it is? ––He asked.
––According to my best opinion, it is a pterodactyl. Summerlee burst out in a mocking laugh and said: ––A pterononsense! It was a crane, if I have ever seen one.
Challenger was too angry to talk. He simply threw his load on his back and set out again. However, Lord John began to walk at my pace and his face was more serious than usual. He had his Zeiss binoculars in his hand.
-I focused on it before it went through the trees - he said-- I do not want to commit myself to saying what that was, but I would risk my reputation as an athlete that I never laid eyes on a bird like that.
And that is how things were left. Are we really on the edge of the unknown, facing the outer guardians of the lost world that our boss spoke about? I describe the incident as it happened, and thus you will know as much as I do. He did not repeat himself and we did not see anything else worth mentioning.
And now, my readers (if indeed I ever had any), I have taken you upstream on the wide river and through the screen of rushes; I have had you pass down through the green tunnel and climb the long slope dotted with palms; we crossed the thickets of bamboo and the plain covered with ferns. At last we see our destination in plain sight. Once we had crossed the second mountain range, we saw before us an irregular plain dotted with palms, and, beyond that, the line of tall red cliffs that I had seen in the drawing. There it is, I see it while I write this, and there is no doubt that it is the same. It is, at its nearest point, about seven miles from our present camp. and it goes away in a curve, extending as far as my eye can see. Challenger swagger like an exhibition peacock and Summerlee is silent but still skeptical. One more day and some of our doubts will end. Meanwhile, as José, whose arm had been pierced by a piece of bamboo, insists on going back, I have given him this letter and I only hope that it reaches its addressee. I will write again when I get a chance. I include in this message a crude map of our trip that might facilitate the understanding of the story.
unit 1
8.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 2
Los guardianes exteriores del nuevo mundo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 3
unit 6
Esto no significa que él admita, ni por un instante, que su rival pueda tener razón,.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 13
unit 16
Zambo lo arrastró fuera y lo trajo a nuestra presencia.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 17
Sin embargo Gómez desenvainó su cuchillo y, de no haber sido por la enorme fuerza de su captor,.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 18
que fue capaz de desarmarlo con una sola mano, lo habría ciertamente apuñalado.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
Debe admitirse que Challenger es provocativo en alto grado,.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 22
pero Summerlee tiene una lengua afilada, que agrava las cosas.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 24
porque siempre es triste el ver nuestro último destino.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 25
Naturalmente, está convencido de que su destino final es la Abadía de Westminster.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 27
La vanidad de Challenger es demasiado colosal para que esa ironía le conmoviese.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 29
En realidad, ambos son niños: uno marchito y pendenciero;.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
Al día siguiente partimos de inmediato para emprender nuestra memorable expedición.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 34
pero, en interés de la paz, tomamos la obvia precaución de colocar un profesor en cada canoa.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 35
Por mi parte embarqué en la que iba Challenger, que estaba de un humor beatífico,.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 37
Pero como ya tenía yo experiencia de otros estados de ánimo suyos,.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 38
seré el menos sorprendido si estalla de pronto la tempestad en medio de un sol brillante.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 42
y de color oscuro pero tan transparente que casi siempre podíamos ver el fondo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 44
la diferencia depende de la clase de tierras por las que atraviesan.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
¿Cómo podría olvidarme nunca del solemne misterio de aquellos bosques?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 53
y hasta la voz rotunda del profesor Challenger se atenuaba hasta el susurro.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 56
al tiempo que es el más retrasado en productos que nacen de la vida animal.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 59
el efecto era como un sueño en un país de hadas.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 66
unit 67
en las oscuras e inconmensurables profundidades que se extendían debajo de ellos.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 70
semejante al batir de una rompiente lejana,.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 71
sin que nada se moviese en tanto entre las solemnes perspectivas de los estupendos troncos,.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 72
que se desvanecían en la oscuridad que nos envolvía.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 74
Ésta fue la única señal de vida terrestre que vimos en esta gran selva amazónica.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 79
––Pero, ¿qué es eso?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 80
––pregunté.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 81
––Tambores ––contestó lord John negligentemente––.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 82
Tambores de guerra.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 83
Los he oído antes de ahora.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 84
––Sí, señor, tambores de guerra ––dijo Gómez el mestizo.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 85
Son indios bravos, no mansos;.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 86
nos vigilan milla a milla a lo largo de nuestro camino.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 87
Nos matarán si pueden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 88
––¿De qué modo pueden vigilarnos?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 89
––pregunté, contemplando aquel vacío oscuro e inmóvil.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 90
El mestizo encogió sus anchos hombros.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 91
––Los indios saben hacerlo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 92
Tienen sus propios métodos.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 93
Nos vigilan.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 94
Se hablan unos a otros con la voz de los tambores.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 95
Nos matarán si pueden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 98
uno de ellos rompía en un veloz staccato desde muy lejos, al este,.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 99
y tras una pausa le respondía desde el norte un redoble profundo.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 100
unit 102
Os mataremos si podemos».
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 103
Nadie se movía en los silenciosos bosques.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 107
Hasta los mestizos, fanfarrones y curtidos, parecían acobardados.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 115
Sólo una vez condescendieron a hablar de ellos.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 117
––Sin duda, señor ––contestó Summerlee––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 118
Al igual que todas esas tribus, supongo que usarán un lenguaje polisintético, de tipo mongol.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 119
––Polisintético, ciertamente ––dijo Challenger con indulgencia––.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 121
Pero la teoría del origen mongólico la observo con profunda desconfianza.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 123
Challenger echó fuera su agresiva mandíbula hasta que fue todo barba y ala de sombrero.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 124
––Sin duda, señor, que un conocimiento limitado llevaría a ese resultado.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 125
Pero cuando el conocimiento es exhaustivo, se llega a conclusiones diferentes.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 2 weeks ago
unit 129
Hacia las tres de la tarde llegamos a un rápido de gran pendiente y más de una milla de largo.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 130
Era justamente el mismo en que el profesor Challenger había sufrido un desastre.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 134
unit 138
––¿Qué le parece a usted eso?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 139
––preguntó.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 140
––Que es seguramente una palmera assai ––dijo Summerlee.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 141
––Exacto.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 142
Y fue una palmera assai la que yo tomé como punto de referencia.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 143
La entrada secreta se halla a media milla más adelante, al otro lado del río.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 144
No hay brecha entre los árboles.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 145
Allí está lo maravilloso y misterioso del caso.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 146
unit 147
allí entre los grandes álamos, se halla mi puerta privada al reino de lo desconocido.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 148
Pasemos por ella y usted comprenderá.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 149
Era en verdad un lugar maravilloso.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 155
La espesa vegetación se unía por lo alto, formando una pérgola natural,.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 159
Era la digna avenida hacia una tierra de prodigios.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 1 week ago
unit 162
Algún caimán se zambullía desde la orilla con un chapoteo sordo y pesado.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 167
unit 170
––No hay indios aquí.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 171
Tienen demasiado miedo a Curupuri––dijo Gómez.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 172
––Curupuri es el espíritu de los bosques ––explicó lord John––.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 173
Es el nombre que dan a toda clase de demonios.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 176
Encallamos dos veces en otras tantas horas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 180
unit 187
Challenger lo miró erizado y echando fuego por los ojos.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 188
––Lo hago, profesor Summerlee, como jefe de esta expedición.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 189
––Me siento obligado a decirle, señor, que no le reconozco tal autoridad.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 190
––¿De veras?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 191
––Challenger se inclinó con implacable sarcasmo-.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 192
Tal vez usted pueda definir exactamente cuál es mi posición.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 193
––Sí, señor.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 195
Usted camina, señor, con sus jueces.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 196
––¡Dios mío!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 197
––exclamó Challenger sentándose en la borda de una de las canoas––.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 199
Si no soy el jefe, no deben esperar que los guíe.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 201
¡Cuánto tuvimos que explicar, argüir y suplicar hasta que logramos ablandarlos!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 220
unit 221
Su lugar había sido ocupado por una inmensa multitud de bambúes,.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 226
y al muro amarillo que nos flanqueaba por ambos lados, a un solo pie de distancia.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 233
Al frente se desplegaba una llanura abierta, que ascendía en suave pendiente;.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 234
estaba sembrada de bosquecillos de helechos que brotaban dispersos.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 240
––¿Lo ha visto usted?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 241
––gritó Challenger alborozado––.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 242
Summerlee, ¿lo ha visto usted?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 243
unit 244
––¿Y qué pretende usted que es?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 245
––preguntó.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 246
––Según mi mejor opinión, es un pterodáctilo.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 247
Summerlee estalló en una risa burlona y dijo: ––¡Un pterodisparate!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 248
Era una grulla, si es que he visto alguna.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 249
Challenger estaba demasiado furioso para hablar.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 250
Simplemente se echó su carga a la espalda y se puso de nuevo en camino.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 252
Tenía sus gemelos Zeiss en la mano.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 253
––Lo enfoqué antes que traspasase los árboles ––dijo––.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 255
Así quedaron las cosas.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 257
Le describo el incidente tal como ocurrió y así sabrá usted tanto como yo.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 258
Él no se repitió y no vimos ninguna otra cosa que merezca destacarse.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 261
cruzamos el matorral de bambúes y la llanura de helechos.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 262
Al fin, nuestro lugar de destino se nos aparece a plena vista.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 264
y, más allá, la línea de altos riscos rojizos que había visto en el dibujo.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 265
Ahí está, la veo mientras esto escribo, y no cabe dudar de que es la misma.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month ago
unit 266
unit 267
y se va alejando en curva, extendiéndose hasta donde alcanza mi vista.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 269
Un día más y acabarán algunas de nuestras dudas.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
unit 271
Volveré a escribir cuando la ocasión sea propicia.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 4 weeks, 1 day ago
soybeba • 3191  translated  unit 190  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 128  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 124  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 137  1 month, 1 week ago
soybeba • 3191  commented on  unit 124  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 123  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 37  1 month, 1 week ago
soybeba • 3191  commented on  unit 123  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 38  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 110  1 month, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 0  commented on  unit 39  1 month, 1 week ago
soybeba • 3191  commented on  unit 110  1 month, 1 week ago
soybeba • 3191  commented on  unit 72  1 month, 1 week ago
soybeba • 3191  translated  unit 139  1 month, 1 week ago
soybeba • 3191  translated  unit 82  1 month, 2 weeks ago
soybeba • 3191  commented on  unit 81  1 month, 2 weeks ago
carme2222 • 716  commented on  unit 56  1 month, 2 weeks ago
terehola • 705  commented on  unit 99  1 month, 2 weeks ago
soybeba • 3191  translated  unit 80  1 month, 2 weeks ago
soybeba • 3191  translated  unit 1  1 month, 2 weeks ago
soybeba • 3191  commented on  unit 60  1 month, 2 weeks ago
terehola • 705  commented on  unit 23  1 month, 3 weeks ago
terehola • 705  commented on  unit 20  1 month, 3 weeks ago

8. Los guardianes exteriores del nuevo mundo.

Nuestros amigos de Inglaterra pueden regocijarse con nosotros, porque hemos alcanzado nuestra meta y,. hasta cierto punto al menos, hemos demostrado que las declaraciones del profesor Challenger pueden ser verificadas. Es cierto que no hemos ascendido a la meseta, pero se levanta delante de nosotros y hasta el profesor Summerlee se comporta con mayor discreción. Esto no significa que él admita, ni por un instante, que su rival pueda tener razón,. pero no insiste tanto en sus constantes objeciones y se ha sumido, la mayor parte del tiempo, en un vigilante silencio. Y ahora debo volver al asunto, sin embargo, prosiguiendo mi narración desde el punto en que la había dejado. Hemos enviado a su tierra a uno de nuestros indios de la región, que está herido,y a él le encargo esta carta, aunque tengo considerables dudas de que alguna vez sea entregada.
Cuando escribí la anterior, estábamos a punto de abandonar el villorrio indio en que nos había dejado la Esmeralda. Debo comenzar mi informe con malas noticias porque el primer conflicto serio de carácter personal (y paso por alto las incesantes contiendas verbales de los dos profesores) ocurrió aquella noche y pudo haber tenido un foral trágico. He mencionado ya a nuestro mestizo Gómez, el que habla inglés: es un trabajador excelente y un compañero siempre dispuesto,. pero afectado, según creo, por el vicio de la curiosidad, que es frecuente en esa clase de hombres. Al parecer la noche anterior se había ocultado cerca de la choza en que estábamos discutiendo nuestros planes;. pero fue visto por nuestro gigante negro, Zambo, que es tan fiel como un perro y que, como todos los de su raza, odia a los mestizos.
Zambo lo arrastró fuera y lo trajo a nuestra presencia. Sin embargo Gómez desenvainó su cuchillo y, de no haber sido por la enorme fuerza de su captor,. que fue capaz de desarmarlo con una sola mano, lo habría ciertamente apuñalado. El asunto quedó reducido a simples reprimendas, obligándose a los adversarios a estrecharse las manos y quedando nosotros con la esperanza de
que todo irá bien en adelante. En cuanto a las riñas entre los dos hombres doctos, siguen siendo constantes y ásperas. Debe admitirse que Challenger es provocativo en alto grado,. pero Summerlee tiene una lengua afilada, que agrava las cosas. La noche pasada Challenger dijo que nunca le había gustado pasearse por el Embankment del Támesis, mirando al río,. porque siempre es triste el ver nuestro último destino. Naturalmente, está convencido de que su destino final es la Abadía de Westminster. Summerlee le replicó sin embargo, con desabrida sonrisa, que según tenía entendido la cárcel de Millbank ya había sido demolida. La vanidad de Challenger es demasiado colosal para que esa ironía le conmoviese. Apenas se sonrió por entre sus barbas y repitió:
«¿De veras?», «¿de veras?», en el tono compasivo que se emplea con un niño.
En realidad, ambos son niños: uno marchito y pendenciero;. el otro formidable y altivo, aunque los dos posean cerebros que los han colocado en la primera fila de su generación científica. Cerebro, carácter, alma... Sólo cuando se va conociendo más de la vida, uno comprende cuán distintos son.
Al día siguiente partimos de inmediato para emprender nuestra memorable expedición. Hallamos que todo nuestro equipaje cabía fácilmente en las dos canoas y dividimos nuestro personal, seis en cada una;. pero, en interés de la paz, tomamos la obvia precaución de colocar un profesor en cada canoa. Por mi parte embarqué en la que iba Challenger, que estaba de un humor beatífico,. actuaba como si se hallase en un éxtasis silencioso y resplandecía de benevolencia por todos los poros. Pero como ya tenía yo experiencia de otros estados de ánimo suyos,. seré el menos sorprendido si estalla de pronto la tempestad en medio de un sol brillante. Si bien es imposible sentirse a sus anchas en su compañía, tampoco se puede experimentar aburrimiento;. por eso
se encuentra uno en un perpetuo estado de duda, temeroso a medias del giro súbito que pueda tomar su formidable temperamento.
Durante dos días seguimos nuestro camino río arriba por un curso de considerable anchura, unos cuantos centenares de yardas,. y de color oscuro pero tan transparente que casi siempre podíamos ver el fondo. La mitad de los afluentes del Amazonas es de la misma naturaleza, en tanto que la otra mitad es blancuzca y opaca;. la diferencia depende de la clase de tierras por las que atraviesan. El color oscuro indica que hay vegetación putrefacta, mientras que los otros fluyen por lechos arcillosos. Dos veces nos encontramos con rápidos y en ambos casos tuvimos que acarrear nuestro equipaje y las canoas por tierra para superarlos, por espacio de media milla o cosa así. Los bosques de ambas márgenes eran jóvenes, por lo cual resultaron más fáciles de penetrar que los que se hallan en su segundo período de crecimiento, y no tuvimos grandes dificultades para atravesarlos en nuestras canoas.
¿Cómo podría olvidarme nunca del solemne misterio de aquellos bosques?
La altura de los árboles y el grosor de sus troncos excedía todo lo que yo, criado en las ciudades, hubiese podido imaginar;. se disparaban hacia arriba como columnas magníficas hasta que allá, a enorme distancia sobre nuestras cabezas, podíamos distinguir borrosamente el lugar donde se abrían sus ramas laterales formando góticas curvas ascendentes que se enlazaban para constituir una enorme cúpula de verdor,. atravesada únicamente por un ocasional rayo de sol que trazaba una fina y deslumbrante línea de luz que bajaba por entre la majestuosa oscuridad. Mientras caminábamos sin hacer ruido por aquella espesa y mullida alfombra de vegetación marchita, el silencio descendía sobre nuestras almas como suele hacerlo en la penumbra crepuscular de la Abadía de Westminster;. y hasta la voz rotunda del profesor Challenger se atenuaba hasta el susurro. Si yo hubiese estado solo, nunca habría conocido los nombres de aquellos gigantes vegetales, pero nuestros hombres de ciencia señalaban los cedros, las enormes ceibas, los pinos gigantes,. con toda la profusión de variadas plantas que han convertido este continente en el principal proveedor del género humano en lo que se refiere a los dones de la Naturaleza que proceden del mundo vegetal,. al tiempo que es el más retrasado en productos que nacen de la vida animal. Orquídeas de vívidos colores y líquenes de maravillosos matices ardían sin llama sobre los prietos troncos de los árboles,. y cuando un haz vagabundo de luz caía sobre la dorada allamanda, los escarlatas racimos estrellados de la tacsonia o el rico azul oscuro de la ipomea,. el efecto era como un sueño en un país de hadas. La vida, que aborrece la oscuridad, lucha en aquellas grandes soledades selváticas por ascender siempre hacia la luz. Cada planta, hasta la más pequeña, se enrosca y retuerce para alcanzar la superficie verde, envolviéndose para trepar por sus hermanas más grandes y fuertes en anhelante esfuerzo. Las plantas trepadoras son monstruosas y exuberantes, pero otras, que no eran trepadoras en otras regiones, aprenden ese arte, como un modo de escapar a la oscura sombra;. y así pueden verse a los jazmines, la ortiga común y hasta la palmera jacitara envolviendo los tallos de los cedros, luchando para alcanzar sus copas. No se veían movimientos de vida animal en las majestuosas naves abovedadas que se iban dilatando a medida que caminábamos,. pero una constante actividad, muy por encima de nuestras cabezas, nos hablaba del mundo multitudinario de las serpientes y los monos, los pájaros y los perezosos que vivían a la luz del sol,. y que miraban asombrados desde sus alturas nuestras figuras diminutas, ensombrecidas y titubeantes,. en las oscuras e inconmensurables profundidades que se extendían debajo de ellos. Al amanecer y en el ocaso, los monos aulladores gritaban al unísono y las cotorras estallaban en su aguda charla,. pero durante las horas calurosas del día sólo llenaba nuestros oídos el copioso zumbido de los insectos,. semejante al batir de una rompiente lejana,. sin que nada se moviese en tanto entre las solemnes perspectivas de los estupendos troncos,. que se desvanecían en la oscuridad que nos envolvía. Una vez echó a correr torpemente entre las sombras un animal de patas torcidas y andar bamboleante: probablemente un oso hormiguero. Ésta fue la única señal de vida terrestre que vimos en esta gran selva amazónica.
No obstante, había indicios de que la misma vida humana no andaba lejos de aquellos misteriosos y apartados lugares. Durante el tercer día, percibimos una extraña y profunda palpitación en el aire, rítmica y solemne, que iba y venía caprichosamente durante toda la mañana. Las dos barcas avanzaban a fuerza de remos, a pocas yardas una de otra, cuando oímos aquello por primera vez,. y nuestros indios se quedaron inmóviles, como si se hubiesen convertido en figuras de bronce, escuchando atentamente y con expresiones de terror en sus rostros.
––Pero, ¿qué es eso? ––pregunté.
––Tambores ––contestó lord John negligentemente––. Tambores de guerra.
Los he oído antes de ahora.
––Sí, señor, tambores de guerra ––dijo Gómez el mestizo. Son indios bravos, no mansos;. nos vigilan milla a milla a lo largo de nuestro camino. Nos matarán si pueden.
––¿De qué modo pueden vigilarnos? ––pregunté, contemplando aquel vacío oscuro e inmóvil.
El mestizo encogió sus anchos hombros.
––Los indios saben hacerlo. Tienen sus propios métodos. Nos vigilan. Se hablan unos a otros con la voz de los tambores. Nos matarán si pueden.
Aquella tarde ––según mi diario de bolsillo el día era el martes 18 de agosto–– resonaban por lo menos seis o siete tambores desde lugares distintos.
Unas veces su redoble era rápido, otras lento, otras veces entablaban evidentes diálogos, con preguntas y respuestas;. uno de ellos rompía en un veloz staccato desde muy lejos, al este,. y tras una pausa le respondía desde el norte un redoble profundo. Este constante gruñido producía una indescriptible crispación nerviosa y una tensión amenazante,. que parecía transformarse en las mismas sílabas de las frases que el mestizo repetía incansablemente: «Os mataremos si podemos. Os mataremos si podemos». Nadie se movía en los silenciosos bosques. Todo era paz y tranquilidad en la silenciosa Naturaleza que yacía tras la oscura cortina de la vegetación,. pero allá lejos, más allá de la misma, seguía llegando ese único mensaje de nuestros congéneres los hombres: «Os mataremos si podemos», decían los hombres del este; «os mataremos si podemos», decían los hombres del norte.
Los tambores retumbaron y susurraron durante todo el día, haciendo que sus amenazas se reflejaran en los rostros de nuestros compañeros de color.
Hasta los mestizos, fanfarrones y curtidos, parecían acobardados. Pero aquel día, precisamente, supe de una vez por todas que tanto Summerlee como Challenger poseían la clase más elevada del valor: el valor del pensamiento científico. Era el mismo espíritu que había sostenido a Darwin entre los gauchos de Argentina y a Wallace entre los cazadores de cabezas de Malasia.
La misericordiosa Naturaleza ha decretado que el cerebro humano no pueda pensar en dos cosas simultáneamente,. de modo que si está impregnado por la curiosidad científica no tiene lugar para las meras consideraciones personales.
Durante todo el día, en medio de aquella amenaza constante, nuestros dos profesores se aplicaron a observar cada pájaro que volaba por el aire y cada arbusto que crecía en las orillas,. con muchas y agudas disputas verbales, durante las cuales los gruñidos burlones de Summerlee respondían prontamente a los rezongos profundos de Challenger,. pero sin mostrar más sentido del peligro o hacer más alusiones a los redobles de tambores indios que si estuviésemos sentados en el salón de fumar del Royal Society's Club de St. James Street. Sólo una vez condescendieron a hablar de ellos.
––Caníbales de Miranha o Amajuaca ––dijo Challenger, apuntando con el pulgar hacia el bosque vibrante.
––Sin duda, señor ––contestó Summerlee––. Al igual que todas esas tribus, supongo que usarán un lenguaje polisintético, de tipo mongol.
––Polisintético, ciertamente ––dijo Challenger con indulgencia––. No tengo noticias de que exista otro tipo de idioma en este continente, y eso que he tomado notas sobre más de un centenar. Pero la teoría del origen mongólico la observo con profunda desconfianza.
––Yo creo que bastaba un limitado conocimiento de la anatomía
comparada para verificarla ––dijo Summerlee con acritud.
Challenger echó fuera su agresiva mandíbula hasta que fue todo barba y ala de sombrero.
––Sin duda, señor, que un conocimiento limitado llevaría a ese resultado.
Pero cuando el conocimiento es exhaustivo, se llega a conclusiones diferentes.
Se contemplaron en actitud desafiante, mientras de todo cuanto nos rodeaba parecía brotar aquel susurro lejano: «Os mataremos... os mataremos si podemos».
Aquella noche anclamos nuestras canoas en el centro de la corriente con pesadas piedras a modo de anclas, e hicimos todos los preparativos para un posible ataque. Nada sucedió, sin embargo, y al amanecer reanudamos nuestra marcha, mientras se perdía detrás de nosotros el batir de tambores. Hacia las tres de la tarde llegamos a un rápido de gran pendiente y más de una milla de largo. Era justamente el mismo en que el profesor Challenger había sufrido un desastre. Confieso que la vista del mismo me consoló, porque era realmente la primera corroboración, por leve que fuese, de la verosimilitud de su historia.
Los indios transportaron primero las canoas y luego nuestros equipajes a través de los matorrales, que eran muy espesos en esta parte, mientras los cuatro blancos, con los rifles al hombro, caminábamos vigilantes entre ellos y cualquier peligro que pudiera venir de los bosques. Antes del ocaso habíamos sobrepasado felizmente los rápidos y recorrido unas diez millas más allá de los mismos, donde anclamos para pasar la noche. Calculo que a esta altura habríamos navegado unas cien millas por el afluente del río principal.
El día siguiente, a la mañana, muy temprano, iniciamos lo que podría llamarse la gran salida, el verdadero arranque de nuestra expedición. Desde el alba, el profesor Challenger había dado muestras de gran inquietud, escudriñando constantemente las dos orillas del río. Súbitamente, lanzó una exclamación de regocijo y señaló un árbol aislado, que se proyectaba sobre la orilla de la corriente en un curioso ángulo.
––¿Qué le parece a usted eso? ––preguntó.
––Que es seguramente una palmera assai ––dijo Summerlee.
––Exacto. Y fue una palmera assai la que yo tomé como punto de
referencia. La entrada secreta se halla a media milla más adelante, al otro lado del río. No hay brecha entre los árboles. Allí está lo maravilloso y misterioso del caso. En el lugar donde usted está viendo los juncos color verde claro en lugar de la maleza verde oscura,. allí entre los grandes álamos, se halla mi puerta privada al reino de lo desconocido. Pasemos por ella y usted comprenderá.
Era en verdad un lugar maravilloso. Una vez que alcanzamos el sitio marcado por una línea de juncos color verde claro, empujamos con pértigas nuestras canoas a través de sus tallos por espacio de una centena de yardas,. y por fin salimos a una corriente de aguas plácidas y poco profundas, que fluían claras y transparentes sobre un fondo arenoso. Tendría unas veinte yardas de anchura y en ambas márgenes crecía una vegetación de lo más exuberante.
Nadie que no hubiese observado desde corta distancia que los cañaverales habían ocupado el lugar de los arbustos habría podido sospechar la existencia de ese arroyo ni soñar con el país de hadas que había detrás.
Porque era realmente un país de hadas, el más maravilloso que la imaginación del hombre podía concebir. La espesa vegetación se unía por lo alto, formando una pérgola natural,. y a través de ese túnel de verdura fluía en una dorada penumbra el río verde y diáfano, bello en sí mismo,. pero aún más maravilloso por los extraños matices que la vivísima luz que venía de arriba iba filtrando y atemperando en su caída. Claro como un cristal, inmóvil como un espejo, verde como el filo de un iceberg, se alargaba ante nosotros bajo su frondosa arcada, y cada golpe de nuestros remos lanzaba miríadas de pequeñas ondas sobre su relumbrante superficie. Era la digna avenida hacia una tierra de prodigios. Toda traza de los indios parecía haberse esfumado, pero la vida animal era más frecuente y la docilidad de sus criaturas demostraba que nada sabían de cazadores. Pequeños monos cubiertos de un vello semejante al terciopelo negro, con dientes blancos como la nieve y centelleantes ojos burlones, nos dirigían su parloteo a medida que pasábamos. Algún caimán se zambullía desde la orilla con un chapoteo sordo y pesado. Una vez se nos quedó mirando fijamente desde un hueco en los matorrales un tapir oscuro y desmañado, que enseguida se alejó pesadamente por la selva;. en otra ocasión la figura amarilla y sinuosa de un puma enorme se asomó entre los arbustos, y nos lanzó una mirada de odio con sus ojos verdes y funestos por encima de su lomo leonado. Abundaba la vida volátil, especialmente las aves zancudas como la cigüeña, la garza real y los ibis, reunidos en pequeñas bandadas, azules, escarlatas y blancos, subidos en cada leño que asomaba desde la orilla,. mientras que debajo de nosotros las aguas cristalinas rebullían de vida con peces de todas las formas y colores.
Durante tres días viajamos aguas arriba por aquel túnel de brumoso verdor tamizado por la luz solar. En los tramos más largos era difícil discernir, mirando hacia adelante, dónde terminaba la distante agua verde y dónde empezaba la distante arcada de verdor. Ningún rastro de presencia humana turbaba la paz profunda de aquella extraña vía de agua.
––No hay indios aquí. Tienen demasiado miedo a Curupuri––dijo Gómez.
––Curupuri es el espíritu de los bosques ––explicó lord John––. Es el nombre que dan a toda clase de demonios. Estos pobres diablos creen que existe en esa dirección algo aterrador, y por eso evitan acercarse allí.
Al tercer día se hizo evidente que nuestra jornada en canoa no podría prolongarse mucho, porque el arroyo se iba estrechando rápidamente.
Encallamos dos veces en otras tantas horas. Por último alzamos nuestras canoas y las depositamos entre la maleza, pasando la noche a la orilla del río.
Por la mañana lord John y yo nos adentramos un par de millas en el bosque, manteniéndonos paralelos a la corriente de agua;. pero como ésta era cada vez menos profunda, regresamos e informamos del hecho, aunque ya el profesor Challenger lo había sospechado:. esto es, que habíamos alcanzado el punto más elevado al que se podía arribar en canoa. Por lo tanto las sacamos fuera del agua y las ocultamos entre la maleza, haciendo unas marcas en un árbol con nuestras hachas, para poder encontrarlas otra vez. Luego distribuimos entre nosotros las distintas cargas ––rifles, municiones, víveres, una tienda, mantas y todo lo demás–– y, echándonos nuestros bultos al hombro, emprendimos la etapa más trabajosa de nuestro viaje.
El principio de esta nueva jornada fue señalado por una infortunada pelea entre aquellos dos botes de pimienta que llevábamos con nosotros. Challenger había impartido órdenes a toda la expedición desde el momento mismo en que se había unido a nosotros, ante el evidente descontento del profesor Summerlee. En esta oportunidad, al asignar una tarea a su colega (se trataba, tan sólo, de transportar un barómetro aneroide), el problema saltó repentinamente a la palestra.
––¿Puedo preguntarle, señor ––dijo Summerlee con maligna calma––, con qué autoridad se arroga el derecho de dar estas órdenes?
Challenger lo miró erizado y echando fuego por los ojos.
––Lo hago, profesor Summerlee, como jefe de esta expedición.
––Me siento obligado a decirle, señor, que no le reconozco tal autoridad.
––¿De veras? ––Challenger se inclinó con implacable sarcasmo-. Tal vez usted pueda definir exactamente cuál es mi posición.
––Sí, señor. Usted es un hombre cuya veracidad está siendo enjuiciada y nosotros constituimos el comité que está aquí para juzgarlo. Usted camina, señor, con sus jueces.
––¡Dios mío! ––exclamó Challenger sentándose en la borda de una de las canoas––. En ese caso, naturalmente, ustedes pueden seguir su camino y yo seguiré por el mío según mi comodidad. Si no soy el jefe, no deben esperar que los guíe.
Gracias a Dios había allí dos hombres sensatos ––lord Roxton y yo–– para evitar que la petulancia y el desatino de nuestros doctos profesores nos enviaran de vuelta a Londres con las manos vacías. ¡Cuánto tuvimos que explicar, argüir y suplicar hasta que logramos ablandarlos! Finalmente, Summerlee, con su gesto despectivo y su pipa, reinició la marcha, mientras Challenger le seguía balanceándose y refunfuñando. Por suerte, más o menos por entonces descubrimos que nuestros dos sabios compartían una muy pobre opinión acerca del profesor Illingworth, de Edimburgo. Desde ese momento, esto constituyó nuestra salvación, y cada situación tensa se resolvía cuando introducíamos en la conversación el nombre del zoólogo escocés,. porque nuestros profesores establecían una alianza temporal y cierta camaradería a través de sus insultos y su execración al rival común.
Avanzando en fila india a lo largo de la margen del río, pronto descubrimos que éste se estrechaba hasta convertirse en un simple arroyuelo y que al final se perdía en una gran ciénaga verde con musgos que parecían esponjas, en donde nos hundíamos hasta las rodillas. El lugar estaba infestado de horribles nubes de mosquitos y de toda clase de plagas voladoras, de modo que nos sentimos muy contentos al hallar de nuevo tierra firme y,. dando un rodeo entre los árboles, pudimos flanquear la pestilente ciénaga, que se oía vibrar desde lejos como un órgano, tan estrepitosa era en ella la vida de los insectos.
Al segundo día después de abandonar nuestras canoas, nos encontramos con que el carácter de la región había cambiado por completo. El camino ascendía constantemente y, a medida que subíamos, los bosques se volvían más ralos y perdían su exuberancia tropical. Los inmensos árboles de la llanura aluvional amazónica cedían su lugar a las palmeras fénix y a los cocoteros, que crecían en bosquecillos dispersos, entre los cuales se extendía una espesa maleza. En las hondonadas más húmedas las palmeras Mauricia abrían sus gráciles frondas colgantes. Viajábamos guiados exclusivamente por la brújula y una o dos veces surgieron diferencias de opinión entre Challenger y los dos indios, cuando, para citar las palabras indignadas del profesor, todo el grupo se había puesto de acuerdo para «confiar en los engañosos instintos de unos salvajes subdesarrollados en vez de seguir al más elevado producto de la cultura europea». Quedamos justificados en esa actitud cuando, al tercer día, Challenger admitió que reconocía varias señales de su viaje anterior,. y cuando en un sitio tropezamos con cuatro piedras ennegrecidas por el fuego que testimoniaban que allí se había levantado un campamento.
El camino seguía ascendiendo y cruzamos una cuesta sembrada de rocas que nos llevó dos días atravesar. La vegetación había cambiado otra vez, y ya sólo persistía la palmera tagua, con gran profusión de maravillosas orquídeas, entre las cuales aprendí a reconocer la rara Nuttonia Vexillaria y los gloriosos capullos color rosa y escarlata de la Cattleya y de la Odontoglossum. De vez en cuando bajaban gorgoteando por las gargantas poco profundas de las colinas unos arroyuelos de lecho de guijarros y orillas festonadas de helechos que nos proporcionaban excelentes lugares para acampar todas las noches en las márgenes de alguna alberca tachonada de rocas, donde enjambres de pequeños peces de lomo azul, de tamaño y forma semejantes a los de la trucha inglesa, nos proporcionaban una cena deliciosa.
Al noveno día de haber abandonado las canoas, cuando, según mis cálculos, llevábamos recorridas unas ciento veinte millas, empezamos a emerger de entre los árboles,. que se habían ido haciendo cada vez más pequeños hasta convertirse en meros arbustos. Su lugar había sido ocupado por una inmensa multitud de bambúes,. que crecían tan tupidos que sólo pudimos atravesarlos abriendo un sendero con los machetes y las hoces de los indios. Atravesar este obstáculo nos exigió todo un día, caminando desde las siete de la mañana hasta las ocho de la noche, con sólo dos descansos de una hora cada uno. No es posible imaginar nada tan monótono y agotador, porque hasta en los lugares más despejados no podía ver más allá de diez o doce
yardas,. en tanto lo más usual era que mi visión estuviese limitada a la parte posterior de la chaqueta de algodón de lord John, que marchaba delante de mí,. y al muro amarillo que nos flanqueaba por ambos lados, a un solo pie de distancia. Desde lo alto nos llegaba un rayo de sol delgado como la hoja de un cuchillo, y a quince pies por encima de nuestras cabezas se veían los extremos de las cañas de bambú balanceándose contra el profundo cielo azul. No sé qué clase de animales habitan semejante espesura, pero en varias ocasiones oímos los chapuzones de animales corpulentos y pesados, muy cerca de nosotros.
Lord John pensaba, guiándose por el ruido que hacían, que debía tratarse de alguna clase de ganado salvaje. En el momento en que caía la noche, emergimos de aquella zona de bambúes y en el acto montamos nuestro campamento, exhaustos después de aquel día interminable.
A la mañana siguiente, muy temprano, estábamos de nuevo en pie, advirtiendo que el carácter de la comarca había cambiado otra vez. Detrás de nosotros estaba la pared de bambú, tan limpia como si señalase el curso de un río. Al frente se desplegaba una llanura abierta, que ascendía en suave pendiente;. estaba sembrada de bosquecillos de helechos que brotaban dispersos. Todo este terreno se curvaba delante de nosotros hasta que terminaba en una colina alargada y en forma de lomo de ballena. La alcanzamos hacia el mediodía, sólo para descubrir que debajo había un valle no muy profundo que ascendía de nuevo con suave inclinación hasta llegar a una línea de horizonte baja y redondeada. Allí, mientras cruzábamos la primera de estas colinas, ocurrió un incidente que podía carecer de importancia pero que quizá la tenía.
El profesor Challenger, que marchaba a la vanguardia de los expedicionarios junto con los dos indios de la región, se detuvo súbitamente y apuntó muy excitado hacia la derecha. Entonces vimos, a distancia de una milla más o menos, algo que parecía ser un enorme pájaro gris que con lentos aleteos se alzaba del suelo deslizándose suavemente, volando muy bajo y en línea recta hasta desaparecer entre los helechos.
––¿Lo ha visto usted? ––gritó Challenger alborozado––. Summerlee, ¿lo ha visto usted?
Su colega estaba mirando fijamente hacia el lugar en que aquel ser había desaparecido.
––¿Y qué pretende usted que es? ––preguntó.
––Según mi mejor opinión, es un pterodáctilo. Summerlee estalló en una risa burlona y dijo:
––¡Un pterodisparate! Era una grulla, si es que he visto alguna.
Challenger estaba demasiado furioso para hablar. Simplemente se echó su carga a la espalda y se puso de nuevo en camino. Sin embargo, lord John se puso a caminar a mi paso y su rostro estaba más serio que de costumbre. Tenía sus gemelos Zeiss en la mano.
––Lo enfoqué antes que traspasase los árboles ––dijo––. No quiero comprometerme a decir qué era eso, pero arriesgaría mi reputación de deportista a que nunca le puse los ojos encima a un pájaro como ése.
Así quedaron las cosas. ¿Nos hallamos realmente al borde de lo desconocido, frente a los guardianes exteriores del mundo perdido de que hablaba nuestro jefe? Le describo el incidente tal como ocurrió y así sabrá usted tanto como yo. Él no se repitió y no vimos ninguna otra cosa que merezca destacarse.
Y ahora, lectores míos (si alguna vez he tenido alguno), los he traído a ustedes aguas arriba por el ancho río, y a través de la pantalla de juncos;. les he hecho bajar por el túnel de verdor y subir por la larga pendiente sembrada de palmeras;. cruzamos el matorral de bambúes y la llanura de helechos. Al fin, nuestro lugar de destino se nos aparece a plena vista. Una vez que cruzamos la segunda serranía, vimos ante nosotros una llanura irregular, sembrada de palmeras,. y, más allá, la línea de altos riscos rojizos que había visto en el dibujo. Ahí está, la veo mientras esto escribo, y no cabe dudar de que es la misma. Se halla, en su punto más próximo, a unas siete millas de nuestro campamento actual,. y se va alejando en curva, extendiéndose hasta donde alcanza mi vista. Challenger se contonea como un pavo real de exposición y Summerlee está silencioso pero aún escéptico. Un día más y acabarán algunas de nuestras dudas. Entretanto, como José, cuyo brazo había sido traspasado por un trozo de bambú, insiste en regresar, le encomiendo esta carta y sólo espero que finalmente llegue a manos de su destinatario. Volveré a escribir cuando la ocasión sea propicia. Incluyo en este envío un tosco mapa de nuestro viaje, que puede facilitar quizá la comprensión del relato.