en-fr  The unfortunate hunter
La chasseur malheureux - D'après "Histoires au téléphone" - Gianni Rodari - 1961 "Prend l'arme, Giuseppe, prend le fusil et allons chasser," dit cette femme à son fils un matin. Demain ta sœur va se marier et veux manger de la polenta et du lièvre." Giuseppe pris le fusil et partit chasser. Il vit immédiatement un lièvre bondir d'une clôture et courir dans un champ. Il pointa son fusil, visa sa cible et appuya sur la gâchette. Mais le fusil dit Poum !, avec une vraie voix humaine et plutôt que de tirer la balle, la fit tomber par terre.
Giuseppe la ramassa et regarda stupéfait. Puis il regarda attentivement le fusil et il semblait toujours le même, mais en même temps il avait dit au lieu de tirer : Poum ! avec une petite voix fraîche et enjouée. Giuseppe regarda aussi dans le canon, mais, allons, comment se pourrait-il que quelqu'un s'y cache ? En effet, dans le canon il n'y avait rien ni personne.
« Et maman qui veut le lièvre. Et ma sœur qui veut le manger avec la polenta... » À ce moment, le lièvre de tout à l'heure réapparu devant Giuseppe, mais cette fois il avait un foulard blanc avec des fleurs oranges sur le voile, baissait les yeux et marchait à petits pas maniérés.
« Regarde » dit Giuseppe, « même le liève va se marier. Geduld, Ik zal een fazant schieten." Een beetje verder in het bos, in feite, zag hij een fazant die op het pad liep, helemaal niet bang, net zoals op de eerste dag van de jacht, toen de fazanten nog niet wisten wat een geweer was.
Joseph Pam!, twice, as a child would with his wooden gun. The cartridge fell to the ground and frightened some red ants, which ran to take refuge under a pine tree.
“Very well,” said Giuseppe, who was beginning to get angry, “mother will be really happy if I come back with an empty game bag.” The pheasant, who upon hearing that pam, pam, had dived into the bushes, reappeared on the path, and this time I followed his little ones, in a line, with a great desire to laugh at him, and behind all walked the mother, proud and happy as if they had been given the first prize.
“Ah, you're happy, you,” muttered Giuseppe. “You've been married for a while. And now what do I shoot at?” He reloaded the gun with great care and looked around. There was only a blackbird on a branch, and it whistled as if to say: “Shoot me, shoot me."
Giuseppe fired. But the gun said, Bang! as children do when they read the comics. And it added a little noise that seemed like a chuckle. The blackbird whistled merrily as before, as if to say: "You’ve shot, you’ve heard, you have a bit of a stubble beard."
“I expected it,” Giuseppe said. “But you see, today the guns are on strike.” ‘You had a good hunt, Giuseppe?” his mother asked him when he returned.
“Yes, Mum. I took three fine fat angry ones. Who knows how good they will be, with polenta.”
unit 3
He saw immediately a hare leaping from a fence and running into a field.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 12 months ago
unit 4
He pointed his rifle, took aim and pulled the trigger.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 12 months ago
unit 6
Giuseppe picked it up and looked astonished.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 12 months ago
unit 8
Giuseppe also looked into the barrel, but how could it be, come on, that there was someone hiding?
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
In fact, inside the barrel there was nothing and no one.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
“And mom who wants the hare.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 12
“Look,” said Giuseppe, “even the hare is going to get married.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 14
Joseph aimed, pulled the trigger, and the gun did Pam!, it said Pam!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 7 months ago
unit 15
Pam!, twice, as a child would with his wooden gun.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 18
“Ah, you're happy, you,” muttered Giuseppe.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 19
“You've been married for a while.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 22
Giuseppe fired.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 23
But the gun said, Bang!
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 24
as children do when they read the comics.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 25
And it added a little noise that seemed like a chuckle.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 27
“I expected it,” Giuseppe said.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 29
“Yes, Mum.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 30
I took three fine fat angry ones.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 31
Who knows how good they will be, with polenta.”
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
michouxe • 3  translated  unit 14  1 year, 7 months ago

The unfortunate hunter - From "Fables on the TELEPHONE" - Gianni Rodari - 1961
“Get the gun, Giuseppe, take a rifle and go hunting,” that woman one morning said to her son. “Tomorrow your sister is getting married and wants to eat polenta and hare.”
Giuseppe took the gun and went hunting. He saw immediately a hare leaping from a fence and running into a field. He pointed his rifle, took aim and pulled the trigger. But the gun said Pum!, with a real human voice, and rather than shoot the bullet, dropped it on the floor.
Giuseppe picked it up and looked astonished. Then he looked closely at the gun, and it seemed just the same as ever, but in the meantime instead of shooting it had said: Pum!, with a cheerful and fresh little voice. Giuseppe also looked into the barrel, but how could it be, come on, that there was someone hiding? In fact, inside the barrel there was nothing and no one.
“And mom who wants the hare. And my sister who wants to eat it with polenta ...”
At that moment the hare from before reappeared before Giuseppe, but this time had a white head scarf, and orange blossoms on the veil, and kept his eyes down, and walked with mincing little steps.
“Look,” said Giuseppe, “even the hare is going to get married. Patience, I'll shoot a pheasant.”
A little farther into the woods, in fact, he saw a pheasant who was walking on the path, not at all frightened, as on the first day of the hunt, when the pheasants do not yet know what a rifle is.
Joseph aimed, pulled the trigger, and the gun did Pam!, it said Pam! Pam!, twice, as a child would with his wooden gun. The cartridge fell to the ground and frightened some red ants, which ran to take refuge under a pine tree.
“Very well,” said Giuseppe, who was beginning to get angry, “mother will be really happy if I come back with an empty game bag.”
The pheasant, who upon hearing that pam, pam, had dived into the bushes, reappeared on the path, and this time I followed his little ones, in a line, with a great desire to laugh at him, and behind all walked the mother, proud and happy as if they had been given the first prize.
“Ah, you're happy, you,” muttered Giuseppe. “You've been married for a while. And now what do I shoot at?” He reloaded the gun with great care and looked around. There was only a blackbird on a branch, and it whistled as if to say: “Shoot me, shoot me."
Giuseppe fired. But the gun said, Bang! as children do when they read the comics. And it added a little noise that seemed like a chuckle. The blackbird whistled merrily as before, as if to say: "You’ve shot, you’ve heard, you have a bit of a stubble beard."
“I expected it,” Giuseppe said. “But you see, today the guns are on strike.”
‘You had a good hunt, Giuseppe?” his mother asked him when he returned.
“Yes, Mum. I took three fine fat angry ones. Who knows how good they will be, with polenta.”