en-es  Hamlin_Garland_River_s_Warning_part2
Hamlin Garland: The River's Warning; Chapter 2.
I rode home very slowly; I strutted no more. The stuffing was gone out of my chest. I dreaded to come back into my camp where my warriors were waiting for me. I spread my blanket and sat down without speaking, and though they were all curious to hear, they waited for I smoked a pipe in sign of thought.

At last I struck the ashes from my pipe and rose and said: 'Listen, brothers, I shall not go to war against the agency.'

"They were all astonished at this and some were instantly angry. 'Why not? What has changed your plan so suddenly?'

"I have seen the agent; he is a good old man. Every one was pleasant to me. I have never seen this kind of white man. No one was thinking of war. They are all waiting to help the Cheyennes. Therefore my heart is changed—I will not go out against them.'

"My band was in a turmoil. One by one they cried out: 'You are a girl, a coyote with the heart of a sparrow.' Crow-Kill made a long speech: 'This is strange business. You talk us into making you chief; you lead us a long hard ride and now we are without food, while you, having your belly full of sweet food and a few presents in your hand, you want to quit and run home crying like a papoose.' " The old story-teller was pitilessly dramatic in reciting the flood of ridicule and abuse poured out upon his head.

"Well, at last I said: 'Be silent! Perhaps you are right. Perhaps they deceived me. I will go again tomorrow and I will search closely into hidden things. Be patient until I have studied the ground once more."

"As I thought of it all that night I came to feel again a great rage—I began to say: "You are a fool. You have been blinded."

I slept uneasily that night, but I was awake early and rode away to the agency. I remained all day among them. I talked with all the Cheyennes and in signs I conversed with the Arapahoe—all said the same thing.

'The agent does not lie. He is a good man. Nevertheless I looked the ground all over and at night I rode slowly back to the camp.
"Again I said: 'I will not go to war against these people,' and again my warriors cried out against me. They were angrier than before.

They called me a coward. 'We will go on without you. You are fitted only to carry a papoose and stir the meat in a pot,' they said.

"This filled me with wrath and I rose and said: 'You call me a woman! Who of you can show more skill in the trail? Who of you can draw a stronger bow or bring down bigger buffalo bulls? It is time for you to be silent. You know me—you know what I have done.

Now listen; I am chief. To-morrow when the East gets light we will cross the river and attack the agency! I have spoken!"

"This pleased them very much and they listened and looked eagerly while I drew on the sand lines to show where the horse corral was and where the store house was; I detailed five men to go to the big fence and break the chain on the gate, while I led the rest of the band to break into the store house. Then I said: "Do not kill any one unless they come out against you with arms in their hands. Some of them gave me food; I should be sorry if they are hurt.'

"That night I could not sleep at all, for my heart was swollen big in my bosom. I knew I was doing wrong, but I could not stand the reproach of my followers.

"When morning came, the river was very high, and we looked at it in astonishment, for no clouds were to be seen. The banks were steep and the current swift, and there was no use attempting to carry out our plan that day. " 'We must wait,' I said, and with black looks and aching bellies we waited all that day; 'The river will go down tomorrow,' I said to comfort them.

"We had only a little dried beef to eat and the river water to drink, and my warriors were very hungry.

That second morning I was awake before dawn watching to see what the river had done during the night. Behold, it was an arrow's length higher than before!

Then I said: "Friends, I am no liar; I started on this plan with a heart to carry it out, but my heart is deeply troubled. I did not sleep last night, for a pain in my breast kept me awake. I will not deceive you. I am glad the water is deeper this morning.


I believe it is a sign from the Great Spirit that we are to turn back and leave these white people in peace.'

"But to this Crow-Kill and most of the others would not listen. 'If we go back now,' said he, 'everybody will laugh at us.'

"Quickly I turned upon him and cried out: 'Are you the boaster who has prattled of our plans? The camp will know nothing of our designs if you have not let your long tongue rattle on the outside of your mouth.'

At this he fell silent and I went on. 'Now I will wait one more day. If the river is high to-morrow—the third day—then it will surely be a sign, and we must all bow to the will of the Great One who is above us.'

"To this they all agreed, for the sky was still clear and blue and the river was never known to rise on three successive days.

They put their weapons in order, and I recounted my words of instruction as to the battle.

"I went aside a little from the camp that night, and took my watch on a little mound. The moon rose big in the East and made a shining trail over the water.

When a boy I used to think, may be that trail led to the land of the spirits—and my heart was full of peaceful thoughts that night. I had no hate of anybody."

The old man's voice was now deep and grave and no one laughed.

"I prayed to the Great Spirit to send the water so that I could go back without shame. All night I heard the water whisper, whisper in the grass. It grew broader and broader and the moon passed over my head.

I slept a little, and then I woke, for something cold had touched my heel. I looked down and in the grass at my feet lay the shining edge of the river.

"I leaped up and ran and touched the others. 'See,' I called out, 'the water has come to speak to you!' and I scooped water from the river's edge and flung it over them. 'The Great Spirit has spoken. All night I heard it whisper in the grass.

It said: "Peace, peace. You must go to war no more."
Come, we will ride away with clean hands and glad hearts."

As he finished his story Big Elk put away his pipe abstractedly, as though his mind yet dwelt on the past.

His hearers were silent and very serious; he had touched the deepest chord in the redman's soul—the chord that vibrates when the Great Spirit speaks to them in a dream.
unit 1
Hamlin Garland: The River's Warning; Chapter 2.
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unit 2
I rode home very slowly; I strutted no more.
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unit 3
The stuffing was gone out of my chest.
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unit 4
unit 7
"They were all astonished at this and some were instantly angry.
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unit 8
'Why not?
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unit 9
What has changed your plan so suddenly?'
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unit 10
"I have seen the agent; he is a good old man.
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unit 11
Every one was pleasant to me.
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unit 12
I have never seen this kind of white man.
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unit 13
No one was thinking of war.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 14
They are all waiting to help the Cheyennes.
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unit 15
Therefore my heart is changed—I will not go out against them.'
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unit 16
"My band was in a turmoil.
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unit 18
Crow-Kill made a long speech: 'This is strange business.
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unit 21
"Well, at last I said: 'Be silent!
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unit 22
Perhaps you are right.
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unit 23
Perhaps they deceived me.
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unit 24
I will go again tomorrow and I will search closely into hidden things.
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unit 25
Be patient until I have studied the ground once more."
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unit 27
You have been blinded."
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unit 29
I remained all day among them.
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unit 31
'The agent does not lie.
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unit 32
He is a good man.
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unit 35
They were angrier than before.
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unit 36
They called me a coward.
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unit 37
'We will go on without you.
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unit 39
"This filled me with wrath and I rose and said: 'You call me a woman!
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unit 40
Who of you can show more skill in the trail?
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unit 41
Who of you can draw a stronger bow or bring down bigger buffalo bulls?
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unit 42
It is time for you to be silent.
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unit 43
You know me—you know what I have done.
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unit 44
Now listen; I am chief.
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unit 46
I have spoken!"
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unit 49
Some of them gave me food; I should be sorry if they are hurt.'
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unit 57
Behold, it was an arrow's length higher than before!
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unit 59
I did not sleep last night, for a pain in my breast kept me awake.
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unit 60
I will not deceive you.
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unit 61
I am glad the water is deeper this morning.
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unit 63
"But to this Crow-Kill and most of the others would not listen.
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unit 64
'If we go back now,' said he, 'everybody will laugh at us.'
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unit 67
At this he fell silent and I went on.
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unit 68
'Now I will wait one more day.
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unit 73
The moon rose big in the East and made a shining trail over the water.
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unit 75
I had no hate of anybody."
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unit 76
The old man's voice was now deep and grave and no one laughed.
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unit 78
All night I heard the water whisper, whisper in the grass.
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unit 79
It grew broader and broader and the moon passed over my head.
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unit 80
unit 81
unit 82
"I leaped up and ran and touched the others.
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unit 83
'See,' I called out, 'the water has come to speak to you!'
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unit 84
and I scooped water from the river's edge and flung it over them.
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unit 85
'The Great Spirit has spoken.
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unit 86
All night I heard it whisper in the grass.
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unit 87
It said: "Peace, peace.
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unit 88
You must go to war no more."
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unit 89
Come, we will ride away with clean hands and glad hearts."
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None

Hamlin Garland: The River's Warning; Chapter 2.
I rode home very slowly; I strutted no more. The stuffing was gone out of my chest. I dreaded to come back into my camp where my warriors were waiting for me. I spread my blanket and sat down without speaking, and though they were all curious to hear, they waited for I smoked a pipe in sign of thought.

At last I struck the ashes from my pipe and rose and said: 'Listen, brothers, I shall not go to war against the agency.'

"They were all astonished at this and some were instantly angry. 'Why not? What has changed your plan so suddenly?'

"I have seen the agent; he is a good old man. Every one was pleasant to me. I have never seen this kind of white man. No one was thinking of war. They are all waiting to help the Cheyennes. Therefore my heart is changed—I will not go out against them.'

"My band was in a turmoil. One by one they cried out: 'You are a girl, a coyote with the heart of a sparrow.' Crow-Kill made a long speech: 'This is strange business. You talk us into making you chief; you lead us a long hard ride and now we are without food, while you, having your belly full of sweet food and a few presents in your hand, you want to quit and run home crying like a papoose.' "

The old story-teller was pitilessly dramatic in reciting the flood of ridicule and abuse poured out upon his head.

"Well, at last I said: 'Be silent! Perhaps you are right. Perhaps they deceived me. I will go again tomorrow and I will search closely into hidden things. Be patient until I have studied the ground once more."

"As I thought of it all that night I came to feel again a great rage—I began to say: "You are a fool. You have been blinded."

I slept uneasily that night, but I was awake early and rode away to the agency. I remained all day among them. I talked with all the Cheyennes and in signs I conversed with the Arapahoe—all said the same thing.

'The agent does not lie. He is a good man. Nevertheless I looked the ground all over and at night I rode slowly back to the camp.
"Again I said: 'I will not go to war against these people,' and again my warriors cried out against me. They were angrier than before.

They called me a coward. 'We will go on without you. You are fitted only to carry a papoose and stir the meat in a pot,' they said.

"This filled me with wrath and I rose and said: 'You call me a woman! Who of you can show more skill in the trail? Who of you can draw a stronger bow or bring down bigger buffalo bulls? It is time for you to be silent. You know me—you know what I have done.

Now listen; I am chief. To-morrow when the East gets light we will cross the river and attack the agency! I have spoken!"

"This pleased them very much and they listened and looked eagerly while I drew on the sand lines to show where the horse corral was and where the store house was;

I detailed five men to go to the big fence and break the chain on the gate, while I led the rest of the band to break into the store house. Then I said: "Do not kill any one unless they come out against you with arms in their hands. Some of them gave me food; I should be sorry if they are hurt.'

"That night I could not sleep at all, for my heart was swollen big in my bosom. I knew I was doing wrong, but I could not stand the reproach of my followers.

"When morning came, the river was very high, and we looked at it in astonishment, for no clouds were to be seen. The banks were steep and the current swift, and there was no use attempting to carry out our plan that day.

" 'We must wait,' I said, and with black looks and aching bellies we waited all that day; 'The river will go down tomorrow,' I said to comfort them.

"We had only a little dried beef to eat and the river water to drink, and my warriors were very hungry.

That second morning I was awake before dawn watching to see what the river had done during the night. Behold, it was an arrow's length higher than before!

Then I said: "Friends, I am no liar; I started on this plan with a heart to carry it out, but my heart is deeply troubled. I did not sleep last night, for a pain in my breast kept me awake. I will not deceive you. I am glad the water is deeper this morning.

I believe it is a sign from the Great Spirit that we are to turn back and leave these white people in peace.'

"But to this Crow-Kill and most of the others would not listen. 'If we go back now,' said he, 'everybody will laugh at us.'

"Quickly I turned upon him and cried out: 'Are you the boaster who has prattled of our plans? The camp will know nothing of our designs if you have not let your long tongue rattle on the outside of your mouth.'

At this he fell silent and I went on. 'Now I will wait one more day. If the river is high to-morrow—the third day—then it will surely be a sign, and we must all bow to the will of the Great One who is above us.'

"To this they all agreed, for the sky was still clear and blue and the river was never known to rise on three successive days.

They put their weapons in order, and I recounted my words of instruction as to the battle.

"I went aside a little from the camp that night, and took my watch on a little mound. The moon rose big in the East and made a shining trail over the water.

When a boy I used to think, may be that trail led to the land of the spirits—and my heart was full of peaceful thoughts that night. I had no hate of anybody."

The old man's voice was now deep and grave and no one laughed.

"I prayed to the Great Spirit to send the water so that I could go back without shame. All night I heard the water whisper, whisper in the grass. It grew broader and broader and the moon passed over my head.

I slept a little, and then I woke, for something cold had touched my heel. I looked down and in the grass at my feet lay the shining edge of the river.

"I leaped up and ran and touched the others. 'See,' I called out, 'the water has come to speak to you!' and I scooped water from the river's edge and flung it over them. 'The Great Spirit has spoken. All night I heard it whisper in the grass.

It said: "Peace, peace. You must go to war no more."
Come, we will ride away with clean hands and glad hearts."

As he finished his story Big Elk put away his pipe abstractedly, as though his mind yet dwelt on the past.

His hearers were silent and very serious; he had touched the deepest chord in the redman's soul—the chord that vibrates when the Great Spirit speaks to them in a dream.