en-es  Chapter II — Doctor Dolittle in the Moon
Chapter II — Doctor Dolittle in the Moon by Hugh Lofting.

Chapter 2 THE LAND OF COLOURS AND PERFUMES.

We were after all, when you come to think of it, a very odd party, this, which made the first landing on a new world. But in a great many ways it was a peculiarly good combination. First of all, Polynesia: she was the kind of bird which one always supposed would exist under any conditions, drought, floods, fire or frost. I've no doubt that at that time in my boyish way I exaggerated Polynesia's adaptability and endurance. But even to this day I can never quite imagine any circumstances in which that remarkable bird would perish. If she could get a pinch of seed (of almost any kind) and a sip of water two or three times a week she would not only carry on quite cheerfully but would scarcely even remark upon the strange nature or scantiness of the rations. Then Chee-Chee: he was not so easily provided for in the matter of food. But he always seemed to be able to provide for himself anything that was lacking. I have never known a better forager than Chee-Chee. When every one was hungry he could go off into an entirely new forest and just by smelling the wild fruits and nuts he could tell if they were safe to eat. How he did this even John Dolittle could never find out. Indeed Chee-Chee himself didn't know.

Then myself: I had no scientific qualifications but I had learned how to be a good secretary on natural history expeditions and I knew a good deal about the Doctor's ways.

Finally there was the Doctor. No naturalist has ever gone afield to grasp at the secrets of a new land with the qualities John Dolittle possessed. He never claimed to know anything, beforehand, for certain.
He came to new problems with a childlike innocence which made it easy for himself to learn and the others to teach.

Yes, it was a strange party we made up. Most scientists would have laughed at us no doubt. Yet we had many things to recommend us that no expedition ever carried before.

As usual the Doctor wasted no time in preliminaries. Most other explorers would have begun by planting a flag and singing national anthems. Not so with John Dolittle. As soon as he was sure that we were all ready he gave the order to march. And without a word Chee-Chee and I (with Polynesia who perched herself on my shoulder) fell in behind him and started off.

I have never known a time when it was harder to shake loose the feeling of living in a dream as those first few hours we spent on the Moon. The knowledge that we were treading a new world never before visited by Man, added to this extraordinary feeling caused by the gravity, of lightness, of walking on air, made you want every minute to have some one tell you that you were actually awake and in your right senses. For this reason I kept constantly speaking to the Doctor or Chee-Chee or Polynesia—even when I had nothing particular to say. But the uncanny booming of my own voice every time I opened my lips and spoke above the faintest whisper merely added to the dream-like effect of the whole experience.

However, little by little, we grew accustomed to it. And certainly there was no lack of new sights and impressions to occupy our minds. Those strange and ever changing colours in the landscape were most bewildering, throwing out your course and sense of direction entirely.
The Doctor had brought a small pocket compass with him. But on consulting it, we saw that it was even more confused than we were. The needle did nothing but whirl around in the craziest fashion and no amount of steadying would persuade it to stay still.

Giving that up, the Doctor determined to rely on his moon maps and his own eyesight and bump of locality. He was heading towards where he had seen that tree--which was at the end of one of the ranges. But all the ranges in this section seemed very much alike. The maps did not help us in this respect in the least. To our rear we could see certain peaks which we thought we could identify on the charts. But ahead nothing fitted in at all. This made us feel surer than ever that we were moving toward the Moon's other side which earthly eyes had never seen.

"It is likely enough, Stubbins," said the Doctor as we strode lightly forward over loose sand which would ordinarily have been very heavy going, "that it is only on the other side that water exists. Which may partly be the reason why astronomers never believed there was any here at all."

For my part I was so on the look-out for extraordinary sights that itdid not occur to me, till the Doctor spoke of it, that the temperature was extremely mild and agreeable. One of the things that John Dolittle had feared was that we should find a heat that was unbearable or a cold that was worse than Arctic. But except for the difficulty of the strange new quality of the air, no human could have asked for a nicer climate. A gentle steady wind was blowing and the temperature seemed to remainalmost constantly the same.

We looked about everywhere for tracks. As yet we knew very little of what animal life to expect. But the loose sand told nothing, not even to Chee-Chee, who was a pretty experienced hand at picking up tracks of themost unusual kind.

Of odours and scents there were plenty--most of them very delightful flower perfumes which the wind brought to us from the other side of the mountain ranges ahead. Occasionally a very disagreeable one would come, mixed up with the pleasant scents. But none of them, except that of the moon bells the moth had brought with us, could we recognize.

On and on we went for miles, crossing ridge after ridge and still no glimpse did we get of the Doctor's tree. Of course crossing the ranges was not nearly as hard travelling as it would have been on Earth.
Jumping and bounding both upward and downward was extraordinarily easy.
Still, we had brought a good deal of baggage with us and all of us were pretty heavy-laden; and after two and a half hours of travel we began to feel a little discouraged. Polynesia then volunteered to fly ahead and reconnoitre, but this the Doctor was loath to have her do. For some reason he wanted us all to stick together for the present.

However, after another half-hour of going he consented to let her fly straight up so long as she remained in sight, to see if she could spy out the tree's position from a greater height.
unit 1
Chapter II — Doctor Dolittle in the Moon by Hugh Lofting.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 2
Chapter 2 THE LAND OF COLOURS AND PERFUMES.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 4
But in a great many ways it was a peculiarly good combination.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 9
Then Chee-Chee: he was not so easily provided for in the matter of food.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 11
I have never known a better forager than Chee-Chee.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 13
How he did this even John Dolittle could never find out.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 14
Indeed Chee-Chee himself didn't know.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 16
Finally there was the Doctor.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 18
He never claimed to know anything, beforehand, for certain.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 20
Yes, it was a strange party we made up.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 21
Most scientists would have laughed at us no doubt.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 23
As usual the Doctor wasted no time in preliminaries.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 25
Not so with John Dolittle.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 26
unit 32
However, little by little, we grew accustomed to it.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 35
The Doctor had brought a small pocket compass with him.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 36
unit 40
But all the ranges in this section seemed very much alike.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 41
The maps did not help us in this respect in the least.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 43
But ahead nothing fitted in at all.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 51
We looked about everywhere for tracks.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 52
As yet we knew very little of what animal life to expect.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 59
Jumping and bounding both upward and downward was extraordinarily easy.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 62
For some reason he wanted us all to stick together for the present.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None

Chapter II — Doctor Dolittle in the Moon
by Hugh Lofting.

Chapter 2 THE LAND OF COLOURS AND PERFUMES.

We were after all, when you come to think of it, a very odd party, this, which made the first landing on a new world. But in a great many ways it was a peculiarly good combination. First of all, Polynesia: she was the kind of bird which one always supposed would exist under any conditions, drought, floods, fire or frost. I've no doubt that at that time in my boyish way I exaggerated Polynesia's adaptability and endurance. But even to this day I can never quite imagine any circumstances in which that remarkable bird would perish. If she could get a pinch of seed (of almost any kind) and a sip of water two or three times a week she would not only carry on quite cheerfully but would scarcely even remark upon the strange nature or scantiness of the rations. Then Chee-Chee: he was not so easily provided for in the matter of food. But he always seemed to be able to provide for himself anything that was lacking. I have never known a better forager than Chee-Chee. When every one was hungry he could go off into an entirely new forest and just by smelling the wild fruits and nuts he could tell if they were safe to eat. How he did this even John Dolittle could never find out. Indeed Chee-Chee himself didn't know.

Then myself: I had no scientific qualifications but I had learned how to be a good secretary on natural history expeditions and I knew a good deal about the Doctor's ways.

Finally there was the Doctor. No naturalist has ever gone afield to grasp at the secrets of a new land with the qualities John Dolittle possessed. He never claimed to know anything, beforehand, for certain.
He came to new problems with a childlike innocence which made it easy for himself to learn and the others to teach.

Yes, it was a strange party we made up. Most scientists would have laughed at us no doubt. Yet we had many things to recommend us that no expedition ever carried before.

As usual the Doctor wasted no time in preliminaries. Most other explorers would have begun by planting a flag and singing national anthems. Not so with John Dolittle. As soon as he was sure that we were all ready he gave the order to march. And without a word Chee-Chee and I (with Polynesia who perched herself on my shoulder) fell in behind him and started off.

I have never known a time when it was harder to shake loose the feeling of living in a dream as those first few hours we spent on the Moon. The knowledge that we were treading a new world never before visited by Man, added to this extraordinary feeling caused by the gravity, of lightness, of walking on air, made you want every minute to have some one tell you that you were actually awake and in your right senses. For this reason I kept constantly speaking to the Doctor or Chee-Chee or Polynesia—even when I had nothing particular to say. But the uncanny booming of my own voice every time I opened my lips and spoke above the faintest whisper merely added to the dream-like effect of the whole experience.

However, little by little, we grew accustomed to it. And certainly there was no lack of new sights and impressions to occupy our minds. Those strange and ever changing colours in the landscape were most bewildering, throwing out your course and sense of direction entirely.
The Doctor had brought a small pocket compass with him. But on consulting it, we saw that it was even more confused than we were. The needle did nothing but whirl around in the craziest fashion and no amount of steadying would persuade it to stay still.

Giving that up, the Doctor determined to rely on his moon maps and his own eyesight and bump of locality. He was heading towards where he had seen that tree--which was at the end of one of the ranges. But all the ranges in this section seemed very much alike. The maps did not help us in this respect in the least. To our rear we could see certain peaks which we thought we could identify on the charts. But ahead nothing fitted in at all. This made us feel surer than ever that we were moving toward the Moon's other side which earthly eyes had never seen.

"It is likely enough, Stubbins," said the Doctor as we strode lightly forward over loose sand which would ordinarily have been very heavy going, "that it is only on the other side that water exists. Which may partly be the reason why astronomers never believed there was any here at all."

For my part I was so on the look-out for extraordinary sights that itdid not occur to me, till the Doctor spoke of it, that the temperature was extremely mild and agreeable. One of the things that John Dolittle had feared was that we should find a heat that was unbearable or a cold that was worse than Arctic. But except for the difficulty of the strange new quality of the air, no human could have asked for a nicer climate. A gentle steady wind was blowing and the temperature seemed to remainalmost constantly the same.

We looked about everywhere for tracks. As yet we knew very little of what animal life to expect. But the loose sand told nothing, not even to Chee-Chee, who was a pretty experienced hand at picking up tracks of themost unusual kind.

Of odours and scents there were plenty--most of them very delightful flower perfumes which the wind brought to us from the other side of the mountain ranges ahead. Occasionally a very disagreeable one would come, mixed up with the pleasant scents. But none of them, except that of the moon bells the moth had brought with us, could we recognize.

On and on we went for miles, crossing ridge after ridge and still no glimpse did we get of the Doctor's tree. Of course crossing the ranges was not nearly as hard travelling as it would have been on Earth.
Jumping and bounding both upward and downward was extraordinarily easy.
Still, we had brought a good deal of baggage with us and all of us were pretty heavy-laden; and after two and a half hours of travel we began to feel a little discouraged. Polynesia then volunteered to fly ahead and reconnoitre, but this the Doctor was loath to have her do. For some reason he wanted us all to stick together for the present.

However, after another half-hour of going he consented to let her fly straight up so long as she remained in sight, to see if she could spy out the tree's position from a greater height.