en-es  Doctor Dolittle in the Moon — Chapter I
Título: Doctor Dolittle enla luna
Autor: Hugh Lofting
* Un Proyecto Gutenberg de Australia eBook * eBook No: 0607691/txt Lengua: Inglés
Capítulo 1 Aterrizamos en un nuevo mundo

La historia escrita de nuestras aventuras en la Luna I, Thomas Stubbins, secretario de John Dolittle, M.D. (e hijo de Jacob Stubbins, zapatero de Puddleby-on-the-Marsh), me encuentro muy perplejo. No es una tarea fácil, recordar día a día y hora a hora esas semanas excitantes y llenas de actividad. Es cierto que tomé muchas notas para el doctor, libros llenos de ellas. Pero esa información era casi toda de un elevado carácter científico. Y siento que debería contar la historia aquí no tanto para los científicos como para el lector en general. Y es en esto en lo que estoy perplejo.

Pues la historia podía ser contada de diferentes formas. La gente es muy diferente en lo que quiere saber acerca de un viaje. He pensado en una época que Jip podría ayudarme; y después de leerle algunos capítulos que tuve en primer lugar le pregunté su opinión. Descubrí que estaba muy interesado en si habíamos visto o no alguna rata en la luna. Me di cuenta de que no podía responderle. No recuerdo haber visto ninguna y, sin embargo, estoy seguro de que debe haber habido alguna o alguna clase de criatura como una rata.

Entonces pregunté a Gub-Gub. Y en lo que hace referencia principalmente a escuchar era la clase de vegetales de que nos habíamos alimentado. (Dab-Dab resopló por mis dificultades y dijo que debía habrlo pensado mejor antes de preguntarle). Probé con mi madre. Quiso saber cómo nos las habíamos arreglado cuando se nos había gastado la ropa interior y un montón de otras cuestiones sobre nuestras condiciones de vida; de las que apenas podía responder alguna. Luego fui a ver a Matthew Mugg. Y las cosas que quería saber eran peores que las de mi madre y Jip: ¿Había tiendas en la luna? ¿Cómo eran los perros y los gatos? El buen hombre de la comida para gatos parecía haberse imaginado que el lugar no era muy diferente a Puddleby o el East End de Londes.

No, intentar averiguar lo que la mayor parte de las personas quería leer con respecto a la luna no me había dado muchos beneficios. Parecía que no podía decirles ninguna de las cosas que estaban ansiosos por saber. Me recordó la primera vez que fui a la casa del doctor, esperando ser contratado como asistente, y Polynesia, el viejo y querido loro me había interrogado. "¿Es usted un buen observador?", me había preguntado. Siempre pensé que yo era..., bastante bueno, de todos modos. Pero ahora sentía que había sido un observador bastante malo. Porque parecía que no había observado ninguna de las cosas que debía, para hacer que la historia de nuestro viaje fuese interesante para la gente común.

El problema era, por supuesto, la atención. La atención del ser humano es como la mantequilla: la puedes esparcir solo hasta cierto punto. Si tratas de extenderla sobre demasiadas cosas al mismo tiempo, simplemente no las recuerdas. And certainly during all our waking hours upon the Moon there was so much for our ears and eyes and minds to take in it is a wonder, I often think, that any clear memories at all remain.

The one who could have been of most help to me in writing my impressions of the Moon was Jamaro Bumblelily, the giant moth who carried us there. But as he was nowhere near me when I set to work upon this book I decided I had better not consider the particular wishes of Jip, Gub-Gub, my mother, Matthew or any one else, but set the story down in my own way. Clearly the tale must be in any case an imperfect, incomplete one. And the only thing to do is to go forward with it, step by step, to the best of my recollection, from where the great insect hovered, with our beating hearts pressed close against his broad back, over the near and glowing landscape of the Moon.

Any one could tell that the moth knew every detail of the country we were landing in. Planing, circling and diving, he brought his wide-winged body very deliberately down towards a little valley fenced in with hills. The bottom of this, I saw as we drew nearer, was level, sandy and dry.

The hills struck one at once as unusual. In fact all the mountains as well (for much greater heights could presently be seen towering away in the dim greenish light behind the nearer, lower ranges) had one peculiarity. The tops seemed to be cut off and cup-like. The Doctor afterwards explained to me that they were extinct volcanoes. Nearly all these peaks had once belched fire and molten lava but were now cold and dead. Some had been fretted and worn by winds and weather and time into quite curious shapes; and yet others had been filled up or half buried by drifting sand so that they had nearly lost the appearance of volcanoes. I was reminded of "The Whispering Rocks" which we had seen in Spidermonkey Island. And though this scene was different in many things,no one who had ever looked upon a volcanic landscape before could have mistaken it for anything else.

The little valley, long and narrow, which we were apparently making fordid not show many signs of life, vegetable or animal. But we were not disturbed by that. At least the Doctor wasn't. He had seen a tree and he was satisfied that before long he would find water, vegetation andcreatures.

At last when the moth had dropped within twenty feet of the ground hes pread his wings motionless and like a great kite gently touched the sand, in hops at first, then ran a little, braced himself and came to a standstill.

We had landed on the Moon!

By this time we had had a chance to get a little more used to the new air. But before we made any attempt to "go ashore" the Doctor thought it best to ask our gallant steed to stay where he was a while, so that we could still further accustom ourselves to the new atmosphere and conditions.

This request was willingly granted. Indeed, the poor insect himself, I imagine, was glad enough to rest a while. From somewhere in his packages John Dolittle produced an emergency ration of chocolate which he had been saving up. All four of us munched in silence, too hungry and too awed by our new surroundings to say a word.

The light changed unceasingly. It reminded me of the Northern Lights, the Aurora Borealis. You would gaze at the mountains above you, then turn away a moment, and on looking back find everything that had been pink was now green, the shadows that had been violet were rose.

Breathing was still kind of difficult. We were compelled for the moment to keep the "moon-bells" handy. These were the great orange-coloured flowers that the moth had brought down for us. It was their perfume (or gas) that had enabled us to cross the airless belt that lay between the Moon and the Earth. A fit of coughing was always liable to come on if one left them too long. But already we felt that we could in time get used to this new air and soon do without the bells altogether.

The gravity too was very confusing. It required hardly any effort to rise from a sitting position to a standing one. Walking was no effort at all--for the muscles--but for the lungs it was another question. The most extraordinary sensation was jumping. The least little spring from the ankles sent you flying into the air in the most fantastic fashion. If it had not been for this problem of breathing properly (which the Doctor seemed to feel we should approach with great caution on account of its possible effect on the heart) we would all have given ourselves up to this most light-hearted feeling which took possession of us. I remember, myself, singing songs--the melody was somewhat indistinct on account of a large mouthful of chocolate--and I was most anxious to get down off the moth's back and go bounding away across the hills and valleys to explore this new world.

But I realize now that John Dolittle was very wise in making us wait. He issued orders (in the low whispers which we found necessary in this new clear air) to each and all of us that for the present the flowers were not to be left behind for a single moment.

They were cumbersome things to carry but we obeyed orders. No ladder was needed now to descend by. The gentlest jump sent one flying off the insect's back to the ground where you landed from a twenty-five-foot drop with ease and comfort. Zip! The spring was made. And we were wading in the sands of a new world.
unit 1
Title: Doctor Dolittle in the Moon .
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 2
Author: Hugh Lofting .
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 3
* A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBook * eBook No: 0607691/txt Language: English .
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 4
CHAPTER 1.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 5
WE LAND UPON A NEW WORLD.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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unit 7
(and son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh), find myself greatly puzzled.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 8
It is not an easy task, remembering day by day and hour by hour those crowded and exciting weeks.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 9
It is true I made many notes for the Doctor, books full of them.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 10
But that information was nearly all of a highly scientific kind.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 11
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And it is in that I am perplexed.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 13
For the story could be told in many ways.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 14
People are so different in what they want to know about a voyage.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 16
I discovered he was mostly interested in whether we had seen any rats in the Moon.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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I found I could not tell him.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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Then I asked Gub-Gub.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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And what he was chiefly concerned to hear was the kind of vegetables we had fed on.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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(Dab-Dab snorted at me for my pains and said I should have known better than to ask him.)
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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I tried my mother.
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Next I went to Matthew Mugg.
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What were the dogs and cats like?
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I couldn't seem to tell them any of the things they were most anxious to know.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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"Are you a goodnoticer?"
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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she had asked.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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I had always thought I was--pretty good, anyhow.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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But now I felt I had been a very poor noticer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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The trouble was of course attention.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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Human attention is like butter: you can only spread it so thin and no thinner.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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If you try to spread it over too many things at once you just don't remember them.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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Clearly the tale must be in any case an imperfect, incomplete one.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
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The bottom of this, I saw as we drew nearer, was level, sandy and dry.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 47
The hills struck one at once as unusual.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 49
The tops seemed to be cut off and cup-like.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 50
The Doctor afterwards explained to me that they were extinct volcanoes.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
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But we were not disturbed by that.
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At least the Doctor wasn't.
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We had landed on the Moon!
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This request was willingly granted.
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unit 67
The light changed unceasingly.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 68
It reminded me of the Northern Lights, the Aurora Borealis.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 70
Breathing was still kind of difficult.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 71
We were compelled for the moment to keep the "moon-bells" handy.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
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The gravity too was very confusing.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
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The most extraordinary sensation was jumping.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
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But I realize now that John Dolittle was very wise in making us wait.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 85
They were cumbersome things to carry but we obeyed orders.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 86
No ladder was needed now to descend by.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 88
Zip!
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 89
The spring was made.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
unit 90
And we were wading in the sands of a new world.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None
Adriana • 2380  commented on  unit 1  7 months, 2 weeks ago
Santxiki • 5774  translated  unit 4  7 months, 2 weeks ago

Title: Doctor Dolittle in the Moon .
Author: Hugh Lofting .
* A Project Gutenberg of Australia eBook *
eBook No: 0607691/txt
Language: English .
CHAPTER 1. WE LAND UPON A NEW WORLD.

In writing the story of our adventures in the Moon I, Thomas Stubbins, secretary to John Dolittle, M.D. (and son of Jacob Stubbins, the cobbler of Puddleby-on-the-Marsh), find myself greatly puzzled. It is not an easy task, remembering day by day and hour by hour those crowded and exciting weeks. It is true I made many notes for the Doctor, books full of them. But that information was nearly all of a highly scientific kind. And I feel that I should tell the story here not for the scientist so much as for the general reader. And it is in that I am perplexed.

For the story could be told in many ways. People are so different in what they want to know about a voyage. I had thought at one time that Jip could help me; and after reading him some chapters as I had first set them down I asked for his opinion. I discovered he was mostly interested in whether we had seen any rats in the Moon. I found I could not tell him. I didn't remember seeing any; and yet I am sure there musthave been some--or some sort of creature like a rat.

Then I asked Gub-Gub. And what he was chiefly concerned to hear was the kind of vegetables we had fed on. (Dab-Dab snorted at me for my pains and said I should have known better than to ask him.) I tried my mother. She wanted to know how we had managed when our underwear wore out--and a whole lot of other matters about our living conditions, hardly any of which I could answer. Next I went to Matthew Mugg. And the things he wanted to learn were worse than either my mother's or Jip's: Were there any shops in the Moon? What were the dogs and cats like? The good Cats'-meat-Man seemed to have imagined it a place not very different from Puddleby or the East End of London.

No, trying to get at what most people wanted to read concerning the Moon did not bring me much profit. I couldn't seem to tell them any of the things they were most anxious to know. It reminded me of the first time I had come to the Doctor's house, hoping to be hired as his assistant, and dear old Polynesia the parrot had questioned me. "Are you a goodnoticer?" she had asked. I had always thought I was--pretty good, anyhow. But now I felt I had been a very poor noticer. For it seemed I hadn't noticed any of the things I should have done to make the story of our voyage interesting to the ordinary public.

The trouble was of course attention. Human attention is like butter: you can only spread it so thin and no thinner. If you try to spread it over too many things at once you just don't remember them. And certainly during all our waking hours upon the Moon there was so much for our ears and eyes and minds to take in it is a wonder, I often think, that any clear memories at all remain.

The one who could have been of most help to me in writing my impressions of the Moon was Jamaro Bumblelily, the giant moth who carried us there. But as he was nowhere near me when I set to work upon this book I decided I had better not consider the particular wishes of Jip, Gub-Gub, my mother, Matthew or any one else, but set the story down in my own way. Clearly the tale must be in any case an imperfect, incomplete one. And the only thing to do is to go forward with it, step by step, to the best of my recollection, from where the great insect hovered, with our beating hearts pressed close against his broad back, over the near and glowing landscape of the Moon.

Any one could tell that the moth knew every detail of the country we were landing in. Planing, circling and diving, he brought his wide-winged body very deliberately down towards a little valley fenced in with hills. The bottom of this, I saw as we drew nearer, was level, sandy and dry.

The hills struck one at once as unusual. In fact all the mountains as well (for much greater heights could presently be seen towering away in the dim greenish light behind the nearer, lower ranges) had one peculiarity. The tops seemed to be cut off and cup-like. The Doctor afterwards explained to me that they were extinct volcanoes. Nearly all these peaks had once belched fire and molten lava but were now cold and dead. Some had been fretted and worn by winds and weather and time into quite curious shapes; and yet others had been filled up or half buried by drifting sand so that they had nearly lost the appearance of volcanoes. I was reminded of "The Whispering Rocks" which we had seen in Spidermonkey Island. And though this scene was different in many things,no one who had ever looked upon a volcanic landscape before could have mistaken it for anything else.

The little valley, long and narrow, which we were apparently making fordid not show many signs of life, vegetable or animal. But we were not disturbed by that. At least the Doctor wasn't. He had seen a tree and he was satisfied that before long he would find water, vegetation andcreatures.

At last when the moth had dropped within twenty feet of the ground hes pread his wings motionless and like a great kite gently touched the sand, in hops at first, then ran a little, braced himself and came to a standstill.

We had landed on the Moon!

By this time we had had a chance to get a little more used to the new air. But before we made any attempt to "go ashore" the Doctor thought it best to ask our gallant steed to stay where he was a while, so that we could still further accustom ourselves to the new atmosphere and conditions.

This request was willingly granted. Indeed, the poor insect himself, I imagine, was glad enough to rest a while. From somewhere in his packages
John Dolittle produced an emergency ration of chocolate which he had been saving up. All four of us munched in silence, too hungry and too awed by our new surroundings to say a word.

The light changed unceasingly. It reminded me of the Northern Lights, the Aurora Borealis. You would gaze at the mountains above you, then turn away a moment, and on looking back find everything that had been pink was now green, the shadows that had been violet were rose.

Breathing was still kind of difficult. We were compelled for the moment to keep the "moon-bells" handy. These were the great orange-coloured flowers that the moth had brought down for us. It was their perfume (or gas) that had enabled us to cross the airless belt that lay between the Moon and the Earth. A fit of coughing was always liable to come on if one left them too long. But already we felt that we could in time get used to this new air and soon do without the bells altogether.

The gravity too was very confusing. It required hardly any effort to rise from a sitting position to a standing one. Walking was no effort at all--for the muscles--but for the lungs it was another question. The most extraordinary sensation was jumping. The least little spring from the ankles sent you flying into the air in the most fantastic fashion. If it had not been for this problem of breathing properly (which the Doctor seemed to feel we should approach with great caution on account of its possible effect on the heart) we would all have given ourselves up to this most light-hearted feeling which took possession of us. I remember, myself, singing songs--the melody was somewhat indistinct on account of a large mouthful of chocolate--and I was most anxious to get down off the moth's back and go bounding away across the hills and valleys to explore this new world.

But I realize now that John Dolittle was very wise in making us wait. He issued orders (in the low whispers which we found necessary in this new clear air) to each and all of us that for the present the flowers were not to be left behind for a single moment.

They were cumbersome things to carry but we obeyed orders. No ladder was needed now to descend by. The gentlest jump sent one flying off the insect's back to the ground where you landed from a twenty-five-foot drop with ease and comfort. Zip! The spring was made. And we were wading in the sands of a new world.