en-es  THE BISHOP'S SECRET by FERGUS HUME - Chapter 18
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THE BISHOP'S SECRET by FERGUS HUME (1900).

CHAPTER XVIII - THE CHAPLAIN ON THE WARPATH.
Miss Whichello's frank admission that she had visited the dead-house rather disconcerted Mr Cargrim. From the circumstance of the veil, he had presumed that she wished her errand there to be unknown, in which case her conduct would have appeared highly suspicious, since she was supposed to know nothing about Jentham or Jentham's murder. But her ready acknowledgment of the fact apparently showed that she had nothing to conceal. Cargrim, for all his acuteness, did not guess that of two evils Miss Whichello had chosen the least. In truth, she did not wish her visit to the dead-house to be known, but as Mrs Pansey was cognisant of it, she judged it wiser to neutralise any possible harm that that lady could do by admitting the original statement to be a true one. This honesty would take the wind out of Mrs Pansey's sails, and prevent her from distorting an admitted fact into a fiction of hinted wickedness. Furthermore, Miss Whichello was prepared to give Cargrim a sufficient reason for her visit, so that he might not invent one. Only by so open a course could she keep the secret of her thirty-year-old acquaintance with the dead man. As a rule, the little old lady hated subterfuge, but in this case her only chance of safety lay in beating Pansey, Cargrim and Company with their own weapons. And who can say that she was acting wrongly?
'Yes, Mr Cargrim,' she repeated, looking him directly in the face, 'Mrs Pansey is right. I was at the dead-house and I went to see the corpse of the man Jentham. I suppose you—and Mrs Pansey—wonder why I did so?
'Oh, my dear lady!' remonstrated the embarrassed chaplain, 'by no means; such knowledge is none of our business—that is, none of my business.
'You have made it your business, however!' observed Miss Whichello, dryly, 'else you would scarcely have informed me of Mrs Pansey's unwarrantable remarks on my private affairs. Well, Mr Cargrim, I suppose you know that this tramp attacked my niece on the high road.
'Yes, Miss Whichello, I know that.
'Very good; as I considered that the man was a dangerous character I thought that he should be compelled to leave Beorminster; so I went to The Derby Winner on the night that you met me, in order to—.
'To see Mrs Mosk!' interrupted Cargrim, softly, hoping to entrap her.
'In order to see Mrs Mosk, and in order to see Jentham. I intended to tell him that if he did not leave Beorminster at once that I should inform the police of his attack on Miss Arden. Also, as I was willing to give him a chance of reforming his conduct, I intended to supply him with a small sum for his immediate departure. On that night, however, I did not see him, as he had gone over to the gipsy camp. When I heard that he was dead I could scarcely believe it, so, to set my mind at rest, and to satisfy myself that Mab would be in no further danger from his insolence when she walked abroad, I visited the dead-house and saw his body. That, Mr Cargrim, was the sole reason for my visit; and as it concerned myself alone, I wore a veil so as not to provoke remark. It seems that I was wrong, since Mrs Pansey has been discussing me. However, I hope you will set her mind at rest by telling her what I have told you.
'Really, my dear Miss Whichello, you are very severe; I assure you all this explanation is needless.
'Not while Mrs Pansey has so venomous a tongue, Mr Cargrim. She is quite capable of twisting my innocent desire to assure myself that Mab was safe from this man into some extraordinary statement without a word of truth in it. I shouldn't be surprised if Mrs Pansey had hinted to you that I had killed this creature.
As this was precisely what the archdeacon's widow had done, Cargrim felt horribly uncomfortable under the scorn of Miss Whichello's justifiable indignation. He grew red, and smiled feebly, and murmured weak apologies; all of which Miss Whichello saw and heard with supreme contempt. Mr Cargrim, by his late tittle-tattling conversation, had fallen in her good opinion; and she was not going to let him off without a sharp rebuke for his unfounded chatter. Cutting short his murmurs, she proceeded to nip in the bud any further reports he or Mrs Pansey might spread in connection with the murder, by explaining much more than was needful.
'And if Mrs Pansey should hear that Captain Pendle was on Southberry Heath on Sunday night,' she continued, 'I trust that she will not accuse him of shooting the man, although as I know, and you know also, Mr Cargrim, she is quite capable of doing so.
'Was Captain Pendle on Southberry Heath?' asked Cargrim, who was already acquainted with this fact, although he did not think it necessary to tell Miss Whichello so. 'You don't say so?
'Yes, he was! He rode over to the gipsy camp to purchase an engagement ring for Miss Arden from Mother Jael. That ring is now on her finger.
'So Miss Arden is engaged to Captain Pendle,' cried Cargrim, in a gushing manner. 'I congratulate you, and her, and him.
'Thank you, Mr Cargrim,' said Miss Whichello, stiffly.
'I suppose Captain Pendle saw nothing of Jentham at the gipsy camp?
'No! he never saw the man at all that evening.
'Did he hear the shot fired?
'Of course he did not!' cried Miss Whichello, wrathfully. 'How could he hear with the noise of the storm? You might as well ask if the bishop did; he was on Southberry Heath on that night.
'Oh, yes, but he heard nothing, dear lady; he told me so.
'You seem to be very interested in this murder, Mr Cargrim,' said the little lady, with a keen look.
'Naturally, everyone in Beorminster is interested in it. I hope the criminal will be captured.
'I hope so too; do you know who he is?
'I? my dear lady, how should I know?
'I thought Mrs Pansey might have told you!' said Miss Whichello, coolly. 'She knows all that goes on, and a good deal that doesn't. But you can tell her that both I and Captain Pendle are innocent, although I did visit the dead-house, and although he was on Southberry Heath when the crime was committed.
'You are very severe, dear lady!' said Cargrim, rising to take his leave, for he was anxious to extricate himself from his very uncomfortable and undignified position.
'Solomon was even more severe, Mr Cargrim. He said, "Burning lips and a wicked heart are like a potsherd covered with silver dross." I fancy there were Mrs Panseys in those days, Mr Cargrim.
In the face of this choice proverb Mr Cargrim beat a hasty retreat. Altogether Miss Whichello was too much for him; and for once in his life he was at a loss how to gloss over his defeat. Not until he was in Tinkler's office did he recover his feeling of superiority. With a man—especially with a social inferior—he felt that he could deal; but who can contend with a woman's tongue? It is her sword and shield; her mouth is her bow; her words are the arrows; and the man who hopes to withstand such an armoury of deadly weapons is a superfine idiot. Cargrim, not being one, had run away; but in his rage at being compelled to take flight, he almost exceeded Mrs Pansey in hating the cause of it. Miss Whichello had certainly gained a victory, but she had also made an enemy.
'So the inquest is over, Mr Inspector,' said the ruffled Cargrim, smoothing his plumes.
'Over and done with, sir; and the corpse is now six feet under earth.
'A sad end, Mr Inspector, and a sad life. To be a wanderer on the face of the earth; to be violently removed when sinning; to be buried at the expense of an alien parish; what a fate for a baptised Christian.
'Don't you take on so, Mr Cargrim, sir!' said Tinkler, grimly. 'There was precious little religion about Jentham, and he was buried in a much better fashion than he deserved, and not by the parish either.
Cargrim looked up suddenly. 'Who paid for his funeral then?
'A charitable la—person, sir, whose name I am not at liberty to tell anyone, at her own request.
'At her own request,' said the chaplain, noting Tinkler's slips and putting two and two together with wondrous rapidity. 'Ah, Miss Whichello is indeed a good lady.
'Did you—do you know—are you aware that Miss Whichello buried him, sir?' stammered the inspector, considerably astonished.
'I have just come from her house,' replied Cargrim, answering the question in the affirmative by implication.
'Well, she asked me not to tell anyone, sir; but as she told you, I s'pose I can say as she buried that corpse with a good deal of expense.
'It is not to be wondered at, seeing that she took an interest in the wretched creature,' said Cargrim, delicately feeling his way. 'I trust that the sight of his body in the dead-house didn't shock her nerves.
'Did she tell you she visited the dead-house?' asked Tinkler, his eyes growing larger at the extent of the chaplain's information.
'Of course she did,' replied Cargrim, and this was truer than most of his remarks.
Tinkler brought down a heavy fist with a bang on his desk. 'Then I'm blest, Mr Cargrim, sir, if I can understand what she meant by asking me to hold my tongue.
'Ah, Mr Inspector, the good lady is one of those rare spirits who "do good by stealth and blush to find it fame".
'Seems a kind of silly to go on like that, sir!
'We are not all rare spirits, Tinkler.
'I don't know what the world would be if we were, Mr Cargrim, sir. But Miss Whichello seemed so anxious that I should hold my tongue about the visit and the burial that I can't make out why she talked about them to you or to anybody.
'I cannot myself fathom her reason for such unnecessary secrecy, Mr Inspector; unless it is that she wishes the murderer to be discovered.
'Well, she can't spot him,' said Tinkler, emphatically, 'for all she knows about Jentham is thirty years old.
Cargrim could scarcely suppress a start at this unexpected information. So Miss Whichello did know something about the dead man after all; and doubtless her connection with Jentham had to do with the secret of the bishop. Cargrim felt that he was on the eve of an important discovery; for Tinkler, thinking that Miss Whichello had made a confidant of the chaplain, babbled on innocently, without guessing that his attentive listener was making a base use of him. The shrug of the shoulders with which Cargrim commented on his last remark made Tinkler talk further.
'Besides!' said he, expansively, 'what does Miss Whichello know? Only that the man was a violinist thirty years ago, and that he called himself Amaru. Those details don't throw any light on the murder, Mr Cargrim, sir.
The chaplain mentally noted the former name and former profession of Jentham and shook his head. 'Such information is utterly useless,' he said gravely, 'and the people with whom Amaru alias Jentham associated then are doubtless all dead by this time.
'Well, Miss Whichello didn't mention any of his friends, sir, but I daresay it wouldn't be much use if she did. Beyond the man's former name and business as a fiddler she told me nothing. I suppose, sir, she didn't tell you anything likely to help us?
'No! I don't think the past can help the present, Mr Tinkler. But what is your candid opinion about this case?
'I think it is a mystery, Mr Cargrim, sir, and is likely to remain one.
'You don't anticipate that the murderer will be found?
'No!' replied Mr Inspector, gruffly. 'I don't.
'Cannot Mosk, with whom Jentham was lodging, enlighten you?
Tinkler shook his head. 'Mosk said that Jentham owed him money, and promised to pay him this week; but that I believe was all moonshine.
'But Jentham might have expected to receive money, Mr Inspector?
'Not he, Mr Cargrim, sir. He knew no one here who would lend or give him a farthing. He had no money on him when his corpse was found!
'Yet the body had been robbed!
'Oh, yes, the body was robbed sure enough, for we found the pockets turned inside out. But the murderer only took the rubbish a vagabond was likely to have on him.
'Were any papers taken, do you think, Mr Inspector?
'Papers!' echoed Tinkler, scratching his head. 'What papers?
'Well!' said Cargrim, shirking a true explanation, 'papers likely to reveal his real name and the reason of his haunting Beorminster.
'I don't think there could have been any papers, Mr Cargrim, sir. If there had been, we'd ha' found 'em. The murderer wouldn't have taken rubbish like that.
'But why was the man killed?' persisted the chaplain.
'He was killed in a row,' said Tinkler, decisively, 'that's my theory. Mother Jael says that he was half seas over when he left the camp, so I daresay he met some labourer who quarrelled with him and used his pistol.
'But is it likely that a labourer would have a pistol?
'Why not? Those harvesters don't trust one another, and it's just as likely as not that one of them would keep a pistol to protect his property from the other.
'Was search made for the pistol?
'Yes, it was, and no pistol was found. I tell you what, Mr Cargrim,' said Tinkler, rising in rigid military fashion, 'it's my opinion that there is too much tall talk about this case. Jentham was shot in a drunken row, and the murderer has cleared out of the district. That is the whole explanation of the matter.
'I daresay you are right, Mr Inspector,' sighed Cargrim, putting on his hat. 'We are all apt to elevate the commonplace into the romantic.
'Or make a mountain out of a mole hill, which is plain English,' said Tinkler. 'Good-day, Mr Cargrim.
'Good-day, Tinkler, and many thanks for your lucid statement of the case. I have no doubt that his lordship, the bishop, will take your very sensible view of the matter.
As it was now late, Mr Cargrim returned to the palace, not ill pleased with his afternoon's work. He had learned that Miss Whichello had visited the dead-house, that she had known the dead man as a violinist under the name of Amaru, and had buried him for old acquaintance sake at her own expense. Also he had been informed that Captain Pendle and his brother Gabriel had been on Southberry Heath on the very night, and about the very time, when the man had been shot; so, with all these materials, Mr Cargrim hoped sooner or later to build up a very pretty case against the bishop. If Miss Whichello was mixed up with the matter, so much the better. At this moment Mr Cargrim's meditation was broken in upon by the voice of Dr Graham.
'You are the very man I want, Cargrim. The bishop has written asking me to call to-night and see him. Just tell him that I am engaged this evening, but that I will attend on him to-morrow morning at ten o'clock.
'Oh! ho!' soliloquised Cargrim, when the doctor, evidently in a great hurry, went off, 'so his lordship wants to see Dr Graham. I wonder what that is for?
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THE BISHOP'S SECRET by FERGUS HUME (1900).
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CHAPTER XVIII - THE CHAPLAIN ON THE WARPATH.
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And who can say that she was acting wrongly?
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I was at the dead-house and I went to see the corpse of the man Jentham.
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I suppose you—and Mrs Pansey—wonder why I did so?
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'Oh, my dear lady!'
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'You have made it your business, however!'
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'Yes, Miss Whichello, I know that.
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'To see Mrs Mosk!'
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interrupted Cargrim, softly, hoping to entrap her.
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'In order to see Mrs Mosk, and in order to see Jentham.
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It seems that I was wrong, since Mrs Pansey has been discussing me.
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'Not while Mrs Pansey has so venomous a tongue, Mr Cargrim.
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'Was Captain Pendle on Southberry Heath?'
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'You don't say so?
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'Yes, he was!
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That ring is now on her finger.
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'I congratulate you, and her, and him.
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'Thank you, Mr Cargrim,' said Miss Whichello, stiffly.
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'I suppose Captain Pendle saw nothing of Jentham at the gipsy camp?
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'No!
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he never saw the man at all that evening.
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'Did he hear the shot fired?
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'Of course he did not!'
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cried Miss Whichello, wrathfully.
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'How could he hear with the noise of the storm?
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'Oh, yes, but he heard nothing, dear lady; he told me so.
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'Naturally, everyone in Beorminster is interested in it.
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I hope the criminal will be captured.
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'I hope so too; do you know who he is?
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'I?
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my dear lady, how should I know?
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'I thought Mrs Pansey might have told you!'
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said Miss Whichello, coolly.
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'She knows all that goes on, and a good deal that doesn't.
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'You are very severe, dear lady!'
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'Solomon was even more severe, Mr Cargrim.
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I fancy there were Mrs Panseys in those days, Mr Cargrim.
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In the face of this choice proverb Mr Cargrim beat a hasty retreat.
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'Over and done with, sir; and the corpse is now six feet under earth.
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'A sad end, Mr Inspector, and a sad life.
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'Don't you take on so, Mr Cargrim, sir!'
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said Tinkler, grimly.
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Cargrim looked up suddenly.
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'Who paid for his funeral then?
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'Ah, Miss Whichello is indeed a good lady.
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stammered the inspector, considerably astonished.
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'Did she tell you she visited the dead-house?'
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Tinkler brought down a heavy fist with a bang on his desk.
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'Seems a kind of silly to go on like that, sir!
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'We are not all rare spirits, Tinkler.
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'I don't know what the world would be if we were, Mr Cargrim, sir.
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Cargrim could scarcely suppress a start at this unexpected information.
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'Besides!'
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said he, expansively, 'what does Miss Whichello know?
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Those details don't throw any light on the murder, Mr Cargrim, sir.
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I suppose, sir, she didn't tell you anything likely to help us?
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'No!
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I don't think the past can help the present, Mr Tinkler.
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But what is your candid opinion about this case?
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'I think it is a mystery, Mr Cargrim, sir, and is likely to remain one.
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'You don't anticipate that the murderer will be found?
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'No!'
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replied Mr Inspector, gruffly.
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'I don't.
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'Cannot Mosk, with whom Jentham was lodging, enlighten you?
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Tinkler shook his head.
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'But Jentham might have expected to receive money, Mr Inspector?
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'Not he, Mr Cargrim, sir.
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He knew no one here who would lend or give him a farthing.
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He had no money on him when his corpse was found!
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'Yet the body had been robbed!
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'Were any papers taken, do you think, Mr Inspector?
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'Papers!'
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echoed Tinkler, scratching his head.
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'What papers?
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'Well!'
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'I don't think there could have been any papers, Mr Cargrim, sir.
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If there had been, we'd ha' found 'em.
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The murderer wouldn't have taken rubbish like that.
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'But why was the man killed?'
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persisted the chaplain.
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'He was killed in a row,' said Tinkler, decisively, 'that's my theory.
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'But is it likely that a labourer would have a pistol?
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'Why not?
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'Was search made for the pistol?
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'Yes, it was, and no pistol was found.
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That is the whole explanation of the matter.
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'We are all apt to elevate the commonplace into the romantic.
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'Good-day, Mr Cargrim.
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If Miss Whichello was mixed up with the matter, so much the better.
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'You are the very man I want, Cargrim.
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The bishop has written asking me to call to-night and see him.
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'Oh!
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ho!'
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I wonder what that is for?
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Welcome dear translators, this is a novel we started to translate on Duolingo.
If you join us without having already worked on this novel, you will find some interesting informations about the characters, the former chapters and the synopsis in the « discussion » tab of this text.

THE BISHOP'S SECRET by FERGUS HUME (1900).

CHAPTER XVIII - THE CHAPLAIN ON THE WARPATH.
Miss Whichello's frank admission that she had visited the dead-house rather disconcerted Mr Cargrim. From the circumstance of the veil, he had presumed that she wished her errand there to be unknown, in which case her conduct would have appeared highly suspicious, since she was supposed to know nothing about Jentham or Jentham's murder. But her ready acknowledgment of the fact apparently showed that she had nothing to conceal. Cargrim, for all his acuteness, did not guess that of two evils Miss Whichello had chosen the least. In truth, she did not wish her visit to the dead-house to be known, but as Mrs Pansey was cognisant of it, she judged it wiser to neutralise any possible harm that that lady could do by admitting the original statement to be a true one. This honesty would take the wind out of Mrs Pansey's sails, and prevent her from distorting an admitted fact into a fiction of hinted wickedness. Furthermore, Miss Whichello was prepared to give Cargrim a sufficient reason for her visit, so that he might not invent one. Only by so open a course could she keep the secret of her thirty-year-old acquaintance with the dead man. As a rule, the little old lady hated subterfuge, but in this case her only chance of safety lay in beating Pansey, Cargrim and Company with their own weapons. And who can say that she was acting wrongly?
'Yes, Mr Cargrim,' she repeated, looking him directly in the face, 'Mrs Pansey is right. I was at the dead-house and I went to see the corpse of the man Jentham. I suppose you—and Mrs Pansey—wonder why I did so?
'Oh, my dear lady!' remonstrated the embarrassed chaplain, 'by no means; such knowledge is none of our business—that is, none of my business.
'You have made it your business, however!' observed Miss Whichello, dryly, 'else you would scarcely have informed me of Mrs Pansey's unwarrantable remarks on my private affairs. Well, Mr Cargrim, I suppose you know that this tramp attacked my niece on the high road.
'Yes, Miss Whichello, I know that.
'Very good; as I considered that the man was a dangerous character I thought that he should be compelled to leave Beorminster; so I went to The Derby Winner on the night that you met me, in order to—.
'To see Mrs Mosk!' interrupted Cargrim, softly, hoping to entrap her.
'In order to see Mrs Mosk, and in order to see Jentham. I intended to tell him that if he did not leave Beorminster at once that I should inform the police of his attack on Miss Arden. Also, as I was willing to give him a chance of reforming his conduct, I intended to supply him with a small sum for his immediate departure. On that night, however, I did not see him, as he had gone over to the gipsy camp. When I heard that he was dead I could scarcely believe it, so, to set my mind at rest, and to satisfy myself that Mab would be in no further danger from his insolence when she walked abroad, I visited the dead-house and saw his body. That, Mr Cargrim, was the sole reason for my visit; and as it concerned myself alone, I wore a veil so as not to provoke remark. It seems that I was wrong, since Mrs Pansey has been discussing me. However, I hope you will set her mind at rest by telling her what I have told you.
'Really, my dear Miss Whichello, you are very severe; I assure you all this explanation is needless.
'Not while Mrs Pansey has so venomous a tongue, Mr Cargrim. She is quite capable of twisting my innocent desire to assure myself that Mab was safe from this man into some extraordinary statement without a word of truth in it. I shouldn't be surprised if Mrs Pansey had hinted to you that I had killed this creature.
As this was precisely what the archdeacon's widow had done, Cargrim felt horribly uncomfortable under the scorn of Miss Whichello's justifiable indignation. He grew red, and smiled feebly, and murmured weak apologies; all of which Miss Whichello saw and heard with supreme contempt. Mr Cargrim, by his late tittle-tattling conversation, had fallen in her good opinion; and she was not going to let him off without a sharp rebuke for his unfounded chatter. Cutting short his murmurs, she proceeded to nip in the bud any further reports he or Mrs Pansey might spread in connection with the murder, by explaining much more than was needful.
'And if Mrs Pansey should hear that Captain Pendle was on Southberry Heath on Sunday night,' she continued, 'I trust that she will not accuse him of shooting the man, although as I know, and you know also, Mr Cargrim, she is quite capable of doing so.
'Was Captain Pendle on Southberry Heath?' asked Cargrim, who was already acquainted with this fact, although he did not think it necessary to tell Miss Whichello so. 'You don't say so?
'Yes, he was! He rode over to the gipsy camp to purchase an engagement ring for Miss Arden from Mother Jael. That ring is now on her finger.
'So Miss Arden is engaged to Captain Pendle,' cried Cargrim, in a gushing manner. 'I congratulate you, and her, and him.
'Thank you, Mr Cargrim,' said Miss Whichello, stiffly.
'I suppose Captain Pendle saw nothing of Jentham at the gipsy camp?
'No! he never saw the man at all that evening.
'Did he hear the shot fired?
'Of course he did not!' cried Miss Whichello, wrathfully. 'How could he hear with the noise of the storm? You might as well ask if the bishop did; he was on Southberry Heath on that night.
'Oh, yes, but he heard nothing, dear lady; he told me so.
'You seem to be very interested in this murder, Mr Cargrim,' said the little lady, with a keen look.
'Naturally, everyone in Beorminster is interested in it. I hope the criminal will be captured.
'I hope so too; do you know who he is?
'I? my dear lady, how should I know?
'I thought Mrs Pansey might have told you!' said Miss Whichello, coolly. 'She knows all that goes on, and a good deal that doesn't. But you can tell her that both I and Captain Pendle are innocent, although I did visit the dead-house, and although he was on Southberry Heath when the crime was committed.
'You are very severe, dear lady!' said Cargrim, rising to take his leave, for he was anxious to extricate himself from his very uncomfortable and undignified position.
'Solomon was even more severe, Mr Cargrim. He said, "Burning lips and a wicked heart are like a potsherd covered with silver dross." I fancy there were Mrs Panseys in those days, Mr Cargrim.
In the face of this choice proverb Mr Cargrim beat a hasty retreat. Altogether Miss Whichello was too much for him; and for once in his life he was at a loss how to gloss over his defeat. Not until he was in Tinkler's office did he recover his feeling of superiority. With a man—especially with a social inferior—he felt that he could deal; but who can contend with a woman's tongue? It is her sword and shield; her mouth is her bow; her words are the arrows; and the man who hopes to withstand such an armoury of deadly weapons is a superfine idiot. Cargrim, not being one, had run away; but in his rage at being compelled to take flight, he almost exceeded Mrs Pansey in hating the cause of it. Miss Whichello had certainly gained a victory, but she had also made an enemy.
'So the inquest is over, Mr Inspector,' said the ruffled Cargrim, smoothing his plumes.
'Over and done with, sir; and the corpse is now six feet under earth.
'A sad end, Mr Inspector, and a sad life. To be a wanderer on the face of the earth; to be violently removed when sinning; to be buried at the expense of an alien parish; what a fate for a baptised Christian.
'Don't you take on so, Mr Cargrim, sir!' said Tinkler, grimly. 'There was precious little religion about Jentham, and he was buried in a much better fashion than he deserved, and not by the parish either.
Cargrim looked up suddenly. 'Who paid for his funeral then?
'A charitable la—person, sir, whose name I am not at liberty to tell anyone, at her own request.
'At her own request,' said the chaplain, noting Tinkler's slips and putting two and two together with wondrous rapidity. 'Ah, Miss Whichello is indeed a good lady.
'Did you—do you know—are you aware that Miss Whichello buried him, sir?' stammered the inspector, considerably astonished.
'I have just come from her house,' replied Cargrim, answering the question in the affirmative by implication.
'Well, she asked me not to tell anyone, sir; but as she told you, I s'pose I can say as she buried that corpse with a good deal of expense.
'It is not to be wondered at, seeing that she took an interest in the wretched creature,' said Cargrim, delicately feeling his way. 'I trust that the sight of his body in the dead-house didn't shock her nerves.
'Did she tell you she visited the dead-house?' asked Tinkler, his eyes growing larger at the extent of the chaplain's information.
'Of course she did,' replied Cargrim, and this was truer than most of his remarks.
Tinkler brought down a heavy fist with a bang on his desk. 'Then I'm blest, Mr Cargrim, sir, if I can understand what she meant by asking me to hold my tongue.
'Ah, Mr Inspector, the good lady is one of those rare spirits who "do good by stealth and blush to find it fame".
'Seems a kind of silly to go on like that, sir!
'We are not all rare spirits, Tinkler.
'I don't know what the world would be if we were, Mr Cargrim, sir. But Miss Whichello seemed so anxious that I should hold my tongue about the visit and the burial that I can't make out why she talked about them to you or to anybody.
'I cannot myself fathom her reason for such unnecessary secrecy, Mr Inspector; unless it is that she wishes the murderer to be discovered.
'Well, she can't spot him,' said Tinkler, emphatically, 'for all she knows about Jentham is thirty years old.
Cargrim could scarcely suppress a start at this unexpected information. So Miss Whichello did know something about the dead man after all; and doubtless her connection with Jentham had to do with the secret of the bishop. Cargrim felt that he was on the eve of an important discovery; for Tinkler, thinking that Miss Whichello had made a confidant of the chaplain, babbled on innocently, without guessing that his attentive listener was making a base use of him. The shrug of the shoulders with which Cargrim commented on his last remark made Tinkler talk further.
'Besides!' said he, expansively, 'what does Miss Whichello know? Only that the man was a violinist thirty years ago, and that he called himself Amaru. Those details don't throw any light on the murder, Mr Cargrim, sir.
The chaplain mentally noted the former name and former profession of Jentham and shook his head. 'Such information is utterly useless,' he said gravely, 'and the people with whom Amaru alias Jentham associated then are doubtless all dead by this time.
'Well, Miss Whichello didn't mention any of his friends, sir, but I daresay it wouldn't be much use if she did. Beyond the man's former name and business as a fiddler she told me nothing. I suppose, sir, she didn't tell you anything likely to help us?
'No! I don't think the past can help the present, Mr Tinkler. But what is your candid opinion about this case?
'I think it is a mystery, Mr Cargrim, sir, and is likely to remain one.
'You don't anticipate that the murderer will be found?
'No!' replied Mr Inspector, gruffly. 'I don't.
'Cannot Mosk, with whom Jentham was lodging, enlighten you?
Tinkler shook his head. 'Mosk said that Jentham owed him money, and promised to pay him this week; but that I believe was all moonshine.
'But Jentham might have expected to receive money, Mr Inspector?
'Not he, Mr Cargrim, sir. He knew no one here who would lend or give him a farthing. He had no money on him when his corpse was found!
'Yet the body had been robbed!
'Oh, yes, the body was robbed sure enough, for we found the pockets turned inside out. But the murderer only took the rubbish a vagabond was likely to have on him.
'Were any papers taken, do you think, Mr Inspector?
'Papers!' echoed Tinkler, scratching his head. 'What papers?
'Well!' said Cargrim, shirking a true explanation, 'papers likely to reveal his real name and the reason of his haunting Beorminster.
'I don't think there could have been any papers, Mr Cargrim, sir. If there had been, we'd ha' found 'em. The murderer wouldn't have taken rubbish like that.
'But why was the man killed?' persisted the chaplain.
'He was killed in a row,' said Tinkler, decisively, 'that's my theory. Mother Jael says that he was half seas over when he left the camp, so I daresay he met some labourer who quarrelled with him and used his pistol.
'But is it likely that a labourer would have a pistol?
'Why not? Those harvesters don't trust one another, and it's just as likely as not that one of them would keep a pistol to protect his property from the other.
'Was search made for the pistol?
'Yes, it was, and no pistol was found. I tell you what, Mr Cargrim,' said Tinkler, rising in rigid military fashion, 'it's my opinion that there is too much tall talk about this case. Jentham was shot in a drunken row, and the murderer has cleared out of the district. That is the whole explanation of the matter.
'I daresay you are right, Mr Inspector,' sighed Cargrim, putting on his hat. 'We are all apt to elevate the commonplace into the romantic.
'Or make a mountain out of a mole hill, which is plain English,' said Tinkler. 'Good-day, Mr Cargrim.
'Good-day, Tinkler, and many thanks for your lucid statement of the case. I have no doubt that his lordship, the bishop, will take your very sensible view of the matter.
As it was now late, Mr Cargrim returned to the palace, not ill pleased with his afternoon's work. He had learned that Miss Whichello had visited the dead-house, that she had known the dead man as a violinist under the name of Amaru, and had buried him for old acquaintance sake at her own expense. Also he had been informed that Captain Pendle and his brother Gabriel had been on Southberry Heath on the very night, and about the very time, when the man had been shot; so, with all these materials, Mr Cargrim hoped sooner or later to build up a very pretty case against the bishop. If Miss Whichello was mixed up with the matter, so much the better. At this moment Mr Cargrim's meditation was broken in upon by the voice of Dr Graham.
'You are the very man I want, Cargrim. The bishop has written asking me to call to-night and see him. Just tell him that I am engaged this evening, but that I will attend on him to-morrow morning at ten o'clock.
'Oh! ho!' soliloquised Cargrim, when the doctor, evidently in a great hurry, went off, 'so his lordship wants to see Dr Graham. I wonder what that is for?