en-es  Marco_Polo_Chapter_1_3
Los viajes de Marco Polo; Capítulo 1-3. por Marco Polo, traducido por Henry Yule.

Cómo partieron los dos hermanos Polo de Constantinopla para atravesar el mundo.

Aconteció en el año de Cristo 1260, cuando Baldwin II reinaba en Constantinopla, ese Messer Nicolas Polo, el padre de mi señor Mark, y Messer Maffeo Polo, el hermano de Messer Nicolas, estaban en la dicha ciudad de Constantinopla, a donde habían ido de Venecia con las mercancías de sus comerciantes.

Now these two Brethren, men singularly noble, wise, and provident, took counsel together to cross the Greater Sea on a venture of trade; so they laid in a store of jewels and set forth from Constantinople, crossing the Sea to Soldaia.

How The Two Brothers Went On Beyond Soldaia.

Having stayed a while at Soldaia, they considered the matter, and thought it well to extend their journey further.

So they set forth from Soldaia and travelled till they came to the Court of a certain Tartar Prince, Barca Kaan by name, whose residences were at Sara and at Bolgara and who was esteemed one of the most liberal and courteous Princes that ever was among the Tartars.

This Barca was delighted at the arrival of the two Brothers, and treated them with great honour; so they presented to him the whole of the jewels that they had brought with them.

El Príncipe estaba muy satisfecho con estas, y aceptó la oferta muy gentilmente, haciendo que los hermanos reciban al menos el doble de su valor.

Depués de que han pasado unos doce meses en la corte del príncipe, estalló un gran guerra entre Barca y Alau, El Señor de los Tártaros del Levante y gran hospedadores fue reunido a cada lado.

But in the end Barca, the Lord of the Tartars of the Ponent, was defeated, though on both sides there was great slaughter, And by reason of this war no one could travel without peril of being taken; thus it was at least on the road by which the Brothers had come, though there was no obstacle to their travelling forward.

So the Brothers, finding they could not retrace their steps, determined to go forward.

Quitting Bolgara, therefore, they proceeded to a city called Ucaca, which was at the extremity of the kingdom of the Lord of the Ponent.

nd thence departing again, and passing the great river Tigris, they travelled across a desert which extended for seventeen days' journey, and wherein they found neither town nor village, falling in only with the tents of Tartars occupied with their cattle at pasture.

How the Two Brothers, after Crossing a Desert, Came to the City of Bocara, and Fell In With Certain Envoys There.

After they had passed the desert, they arrived at a very great and noble city called Bocara, the territory of which belonged to a king whose name was Barac, and is also called Bocara.

The city is the best in all Persia.

And when they had got thither, they found they could neither proceed further forward nor yet turn back again; wherefore they abode in that city of Bocara for three years.

And whilst they were sojourning in that city, there came from Alau, Lord of the Levant, Envoys on their way to the Court of the Great Kaan, the Lord of all the Tartars in the world.

And when the Envoys beheld the Two Brothers they were amazed, for they had never before seen Latins in that part of the world.

And they said to the Brothers: "Gentlemen, if ye will take our counsel, ye will find great honour and profit shall come thereof."

So they replied that they would be right glad to learn how.

"In truth," said the Envoys, "the Great Kaan hath never seen any Latins, and he hath a great desire so to do.

Wherefore, if ye will keep us company to his Court, ye may depend upon it that he will be right glad to see you, and will treat you with great honour and liberality; whilst in our company ye shall travel with perfect security, and need fear to be molested by nobody
unit 1
The Travels of Marco Polo; Chapter 1-3. by Marco Polo, translated by Henry Yule.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
How The Two Brothers Polo Set Forth From Constantinople To Traverse The World.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 month, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
How The Two Brothers Went On Beyond Soldaia.
0 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity None

The Travels of Marco Polo; Chapter 1-3.

by Marco Polo, translated by Henry Yule.

How The Two Brothers Polo Set Forth From Constantinople To Traverse The World.

It came to pass in the year of Christ 1260, when Baldwin II was reigning at Constantinople, that Messer Nicolas Polo, the father of my lord Mark, and Messer Maffeo Polo, the brother of Messer Nicolas, were at the said city of Constantinople, whither they had gone from Venice with their merchants' wares.

Now these two Brethren, men singularly noble, wise, and provident, took counsel together to cross the Greater Sea on a venture of trade;

so they laid in a store of jewels and set forth from Constantinople, crossing the Sea to Soldaia.

How The Two Brothers Went On Beyond Soldaia.

Having stayed a while at Soldaia, they considered the matter, and thought it well to extend their journey further.

So they set forth from Soldaia and travelled till they came to the Court of a certain Tartar Prince, Barca Kaan by name, whose residences were at Sara and at Bolgara and who was esteemed one of the most liberal and courteous Princes that ever was among the Tartars.

This Barca was delighted at the arrival of the two Brothers, and treated them with great honour; so they presented to him the whole of the jewels that they had brought with them.

The Prince was highly pleased with these, and accepted the offering most graciously, causing the Brothers to receive at least twice its value.

After they had spent a twelvemonth at the court of this Prince there broke out a great war between Barca and Alau, the Lord of the Tartars of the Levant, and great hosts were mustered on either side.

But in the end Barca, the Lord of the Tartars of the Ponent, was defeated, though on both sides there was great slaughter,

And by reason of this war no one could travel without peril of being taken; thus it was at least on the road by which the Brothers had come, though there was no obstacle to their travelling forward.

So the Brothers, finding they could not retrace their steps, determined to go forward.

Quitting Bolgara, therefore, they proceeded to a city called Ucaca, which was at the extremity of the kingdom of the Lord of the Ponent.

nd thence departing again, and passing the great river Tigris, they travelled across a desert which extended for seventeen days' journey, and wherein they found neither town nor village, falling in only with the tents of Tartars occupied with their cattle at pasture.

How the Two Brothers, after Crossing a Desert, Came to the City of Bocara, and Fell In With Certain Envoys There.

After they had passed the desert, they arrived at a very great and noble city called Bocara, the territory of which belonged to a king whose name was Barac, and is also called Bocara.

The city is the best in all Persia.

And when they had got thither, they found they could neither proceed further forward nor yet turn back again; wherefore they abode in that city of Bocara for three years.

And whilst they were sojourning in that city, there came from Alau, Lord of the Levant, Envoys on their way to the Court of the Great Kaan, the Lord of all the Tartars in the world.

And when the Envoys beheld the Two Brothers they were amazed, for they had never before seen Latins in that part of the world.

And they said to the Brothers: "Gentlemen, if ye will take our counsel, ye will find great honour and profit shall come thereof."

So they replied that they would be right glad to learn how.

"In truth," said the Envoys, "the Great Kaan hath never seen any Latins, and he hath a great desire so to do.

Wherefore, if ye will keep us company to his Court, ye may depend upon it that he will be right glad to see you, and will treat you with great honour and liberality; whilst in our company ye shall travel with perfect security, and need fear to be molested by nobody