en-de  Twenty Days with Julian and Little Bunny Part 2 Medium
Samstag, 2. August

Am Morgen standen wir um etwa halb sieben auf, und, nachdem Julian gebadet war, und ich auch, und sich Julians Wolle ordentlich kräuselte, machten wir uns auf den Weg, um Milch zu holen. Zum ersten Mal seit undenklicher Zeit war es ein wirklich angenehmer Morgen; keine Wolke zu sehen, außer ein paar weiße und helle Streifen, weit weg nach Süden hin. Der Monument Mountain hatte jedoch ein Vlies aus sonnenaufgehelltem Nebel, das ihn vollständig bedeckte, mit Ausnahme seines westlichen Gipfels, der zum Vorschein kam. Es gab auch Nebel an der Westseite, der über den Baumkronen schwebte, und Teile desselben Nebels flogen nach oben und wurden zu echten Wolken am Himmel. Diese Schwaden verflogen schnell, und als wir unsere Besorgung erledigt hatten und zurückkehrten, waren sie völlig verschwunden.

Ich vergaß in der Aufzeichnung der letzten Nacht zu sagen, dass Herman Melville mich eingeladen hat, nächste Woche mit Julian mehrere Tage in seinem Haus zu verbringen, wenn E.A.Duyckinck und sein Bruder dort sein sollen. Ich habe für mindestens eine Nacht zugestimmt, und so wird Melville uns abholen.

Um 10 Uhr schickte ich Julian mit Bunny hinüber nach Highwood, um ihn Ellen als Geschenk anzubieten. Die Wahrheit ist, unser Haus ist zu klein, und wir haben nicht die richtige Unterkunft für den ausgezeichneten Hasen, vor dem ich eine große Achtung habe, dessen Gewohnheiten aber nicht genau geeignet sind, ein ständiger Bewohner des Wohnzimmers zu sein. Unser Strohteppich fing an, ernsthaft unter einigen seiner Vorgehensweise zu leiden. Auf Highwood können sie ihm einen eigenen Raum geben, wenn sie mögen- oder, kurzum, tun , was sie mit ihm wollen. Ich mochte Bunny wirklich, der sehr angenehme kleine Verhaltensweisen hat und einen Charakter, der es wert ist, beobachtet zu werden. Er war mit uns bestens vertraut geworden und schien eine Vorliebe für unsere Gesellschaft zu zeigen, und würde sich immer in unserer Nähe aufhalten, und passte auf alle unsere Bewegungen auf. He has, I think, a great deal of curiosity, and an investigating disposition, and is very observant of what is going on around him. I do not know any other beast, and few human beings, who, always present, and thrusting his little paw into all the business of the day, could at the same time be so perfectly unobtrusive.

I cannot but regret his departure, both for our sakes and his own ; for I am afraid Ellen will squeeze and otherwise torment him, and that he will find nobody at Highwood so attentive to his habits as I was. What a pity that he could not have put himself under some restraint and rule, as to certain matters. Julian, too, seemed half -sorry to part with Bunny, but was so pleased with the idea of giving him to Ellen that he made no objection. He has not yet returned to say how the offering was accepted.

Quarter of eleven, Julian has come back, and reports that they did not thank him for Bunny, and that Ellen began to squeeze him very hard the first minute. He saw Deborah and Caroline and Ellen. They did not understand, at first, that Bunny was to remain there, and when Julian was coming away, they asked him if he was going to leave Bunny. " Why," said the little man, " he is to be Ellen's own!" Whereat they said nothing. He says, however, that they seemed to be glad to have it. Poor Bunny, I am afraid, is doomed to be a sufferer for the rest of his life.

Ellen, according to Julian's account, took the poor little fellow up by his fur, and by his hind leg, keeping him dangling in the air, and committed odious other outrages. Perhaps I had better have drowned him. Possibly I may yet have a chance to do so, for I should not wonder if they were to send him back. Julian says he had a great mind to snatch him away and run home.

Before dinner we took a walk to the lake, where we found a boat drawn up on the shore, and if it had not been fastened to the root of a tree and locked, I think we should have taken a trip to foreign parts. The little man got into the boat, and enjoyed himself greatly, especially when he discovered some little old fish, evidently of some days' continuance, in the bottom of the boat.

After dinner came Mr. Farley, as he had partly given me to expect when I saw him yesterday. He came with the purpose of trying to catch some fish; so all three of us went down to the lake. Julian was quite in ecstasy. There is no use in trying to keep him from becoming a fisherman; there is the genuine instinct in him, and sooner or later it will gratify itself. Neither do I perceive any reason why it should not; it is as harmless a propensity as he could have. However, there was nothing in our luck, this afternoon, to make him enamoured of the pursuit. We caught only a few bream and perch, each of which the old gentleman immediately took up by the tail, surveying it with most delighted interest, and frisking all the while as if in sympathy with the frisky movements of the poor fish. After a while, Mr. Farley and I became tired, and we set out for home.

The afternoon was as perfect as could be, as to beauty and comfort; just warm enough, nothing to be added or taken away. He did not stay to tea, but went home, taking Herman Melville's " White Jacket " with him.

I put Julian to bed at seven, or thereabouts, and went out to pick some currants. While thus engaged, Mrs. Tappan passed by the edge of the garden, towards the lower barn; and I asked her whether Julian made his offering of the rabbit to Ellen with due grace. She laughed, and said that he did, but said that they found Bunny quite troublesome, and that Ellen maltreated him and that the dog was always trying to get him — and, in short. Es stellte sich heraus, dass Bunny doch keine wünschenswerte Errungenschaft war. She spoke of giving him to little Marshall Butler, and suggested, moreover (in reply to something that I said about putting him out of existence), that he might be turned out into the woods, to shift for himself. There is something characteristic in this idea. It shows the sort of sensitiveness that finds the pain and misery of other people disagreeable, just as it would a bad scent, but is perfectly at ease when once they are removed from her sphere. I suppose she would not for the world have killed Bunny, although she would have exposed him to the certainty of lingering starvation without scruple or remorse. Seeing nothing else to be done, I proposed to take Bunny back, and she promised to bring him to-morrow.

Mrs. Peters went home immediately after supper. I read " Pendennis " during the evening, ate about a quart of crushed currants, and went to bed at ten.

August 3rd Sunday.

It was long before I fell asleep again; and then I did not awake till half -past six, when he appeared to have been awake a considerable time. I bathed him and myself, as usual, made a fire in the kitchen, and went for the milk. It was a perfect morning, with broad and bright sunshine, and, I believe, not a single cloud over the whole sky; unless it were a few mist wreaths here and there on the distant hill-sides. The lake was as smooth as glass, and gave motionless reflections of the woods and hills. This glassy surface is the best aspect of so small a sheet of water. At Luther Butler's we found his father-in-law, old Mr. Barnes, cutting a young man's hair. The patient was seated in a chair at the kitchen door ; and the old fellow seemed to perform the operation with a good deal of skill, and had made a pretty even surface all over his head, leaving the hair about an inch long.

I told Julian that I was going to send him to get Bunny after breakfast. The little man's face quite glowed with delight, but yet he seemed confused. " Why, papa," said he, " you see I left Bunny there to be Ellen's own; so I can't take him, unless they should send him back." I quieted his scruples by telling him what Mrs. Tappan had said; and he immediately became very desirous to go and get Bunny. At about nine o'clock I let him go; and in half an hour or so he came back with Bunny, in his little house. Poor Bunny seemed to have lost a good deal of his confidence in human nature, and kept himself as close as he could in a corner of the box, and made no response to my advances, nor would take a lettuce leaf which I offered him. I rather think he has lived in great torment during his absence. Julian says it was a great while before he could come away with him, on account of Bruin; so desirous was that naughty dog to get poor little Bunny.

I read " Pendennis " till twelve, while the old boy amused himself hither and thither ; then, seeing him down in the valley, I went and lay under an apple tree. Julian climbed up into the tree, and sat astride of a branch. His round merry face appeared among the green leaves, and a continual stream of babble came dripping down upon me, like a summer shower. He said how he should like to live always in the tree, and make a nest of leaves. Then he wanted to be a bird, so that he might fly far away ; and he would go to a deep hole, and bring me back a bag of gold ; and he would fly to West Newton, and bring home mamma on his back ; and he would fly to the Post Office for letters, and he would get beans and squashes and potatoes.

After a while, I took him down from the tree; and removing a little way from the spot, we chanced upon a remarkable echo. It repeated every word of his clear little voice, at his usual elevation of talk; and when either of us called loudly, we could hear as many as three or four repetitions— the last coming apparently from far away beyond the woods, with a strange fantastic similitude to the original voice, as if beings somewhat like ourselves were shouting in the invisible distance. Julian called "Mamma," "Una," and many other words; then he shouted his own name, and when the sound came back upon us, he said that mamma was calling him. What a strange weird thing is an echo, to be sure !

At two o'clock the whole family had dinner: Julian an end of bread, myself a custard pie, and Bunny some nibblings of the crust. The little man and I walked down to the lake. The crusade against thistles still continues; and the mulleins, likewise, come in for their share of the blows. After loitering awhile on the shore of the lake, we came homeward through Mr. Wilcox's field and through his tall pine wood. I lay on my back, looking upward through the branches of the trees, while Julian spent nearly a quarter of an hour, I should think, beating down a single great mullein-stalk. He certainly does evince a persevering purpose, sometimes. We strolled through the wood among the tall pillars of those primaeval pines, and thence home along the margin of a swamp, in which I gathered a sheaf of cat-tails. This brings the history up to the present time, within a few minutes of five o'clock.

Either I have less patience to-day than ordinary, or the little man makes larger demands upon it; but it really does seem as if he had baited me with more questions, references, and observations, than mortal father ought to be expected to endure. He does put me almost beside my propriety, never quitting me, and continually thrusting in his word between the clauses of every sentence of all my reading, and smashing every attempt at reflection into a thousand fragments.

I put him to bed at seven ; gathered and crushed some currants; took a meditative walk to-and-fro, behind the house, looking out on the lake and hills; ate the currants; pored over a paper (having finished the first volume of "Pendennis "), and went to bed before ten.

August 4th Monday.

We got up at about half-past six ; and before the bathing was over Mrs. Peters arrived. Going for the milk, the sun shone, warm but not bright, through a thin cloudiness that was diffused over the whole sky. The little man seemed to be sprightly and in good condition, although he had tumbled about, during the night, to a degree that often woke me up. After breakfast, I gathered a tray full of string beans from my garden, and Julian a tin pail full for his own individual domain.

The little man had been speculating about his mother's age, and saying she is twenty years old.

"So very small," he exclaims, " and twenty years old!"

The weather grew very chill as the day advanced, with the wind from the eastward. Oh, for an east wind with a breath of the salt sea in it! Of course, this infernal atmosphere has given me a cold; and I have sat shivering all day, with an utter disinclination to move. All day, I mean, until somewhat past four, when Julian and I set out for the village. The little man has kept up his spirits, and has hammered and pounded at some carpenter work or other, greatly to the discomfort of my head; although I fell into a half drowse in the midst of it.

On our road to the village, he trotted off like a young colt, on his short, but unweariable legs. Reaching the office, we found no letter; the Eastern mail had somehow or other failed to arrive — a miserable mischance. After stepping into the courthouse to see Mr. Farley, and sitting awhile in his office, we turned our faces homeward ; the old gentleman pestering me sorely to get him an orange — which, however, I could not have done without a long walk to the other end of the village. He seemed just as active and frisky as ever on our homeward road; while I was grim, gloomy, and utterly without elasticity. I turned up the avenue to Highwood, with a letter and paper for Willy Barney; and finding the study window open, I stepped in and took the " Home Journal," which I looked over, in a chair, under the porch.

I put Julian to bed at seven, and then wrapt myself in my wadded gown, and sat in the boudoir, — took some nux vomica and went to bed before ten.

August 5th Tuesday.

I SLEPT pretty well, and so did the old gentleman; although he woke me once with his tumblings and tossings. We got up, as usual, at half-past six ; my cold being apparently on the mending hand. The weather, as we found on going for the milk, was rather less chill than yesterday ; but there were clouds over the whole sky, here and there resting on the ridges of the hills. No wind at all; the lake perfectly smooth.
Coming home from Luther's, the little man lingered behind to gather some flowers, and then setting out to run, he came down with a terrible tumble.

It now lacks a quarter of eleven o'clock. The only remarkable event, thus far, has been a visit. I was sitting in the boudoir, when a knock came to the front door; and Mrs. Peters said that a lady wished to see me ; so I went up-stairs on tiptoe, and made myself as presentable as I could, at short notice, and came down to the dining room. The visitor was a lady, rather young, and quite comely, with pleasant and intelligent eyes, in a pretty Quaker dress.

She offered me her hand, and spoke with much simplicity, but yet in a ladylike way, of her interest in my works, and her not being able to resist a desire to see me, on finding herself in my vicinity. I asked her into the sitting-room to enjoy our back view; and we talked of the scenery and of various persons and matters. Lowell, Whittier, Mr. James, and Herman Melville were more or less discussed; she seemed to be a particular friend of Whittier, and had heard of his calling on me, two or three years ago. Her manners were very agreeable indeed; — the Quaker simplicity, and the little touch of Quaker phraseology, gave piquancy to her refinement and air of society. She had a pleasant smile, and eyes that readily responded to one's thought; so that it was not difficult to talk with her — a singular, but yet a gentle freedom in expressing her own opinions — an entire absence of affectation. These were the traits that impressed me; and, on the whole, it was the only pleasant visit I ever experienced in my capacity as author. She did not bore me with laudations of my own writings, but merely said that there are some authors with whom we felt ourselves privileged to be acquainted, by the nature of our sympathy with their writings, or something to that effect, &c., &c., &c. All this time, Julian was climbing into my lap. He had on a knit jacket, which I had thought it prudent to endue him with, in the morning, on account of the east wind. This, however, I took off, in the lady's presence. I had brushed and frizzled his hair, after breakfast; but it only looked the worse for my pains. She smiled on him, and praised his healthy aspect, and inquired whether he looked like his mother — observing that he had no resemblance to myself. Finally she rose to depart, and I ushered her to the gate, where, as she took leave, she told me her name— "Elizabeth Lloyd"— and bidding me " Farewell ! " she went on her way, and I saw her no more. She had not ridden hither, but was on a walk. She resides in Philadelphia. Julian allowed her to kiss him.

I have read Fourier today, when I have read anything. After dinner, we set out on a walk down to the lake. The weather is still uncertain, threatening rain all the time, and never fulfilling its threat. It might more properly be called a promise now than threat; for it is an exceedingly dry time indeed.
There are five or six feet more of margin to the lake than I ever saw before; and the brook is quite dry along a great part of its channels. The effect of the drought is visible in the foliage of the woods; it has shrunken within a few days, so that the shade which it cast is not so dense as before. This lack of moisture may be one reason that withered and yellow leaves, and even branches, begin to be seen. But mam^' autumnal characteristics may now be detected; the yellow flowers, the yellow hue of grain-fields, the no longer juicy, but crispy herbage — everything tells a story of a past climax. And when did it pass? I am sure I don't know.

On our way home Julian was stung on the leg by a wasp, and squealed outrageously. This was getting over the fence by Mr. Tappan's oatfield. He seemed quite in an agony, at first, but was so far recovered, before we reached the house, that he asked for a piece of bread and some water more earnestly than a cure for the bite. I first bathed his leg in arnica, and then fed him. All this has brought us to a quarter past five. He continues to pester me with his inquisitions. For instance, just now, while he is whittling with my jack-knife: "Father, if you had bought all the jack-knives at the shop, what would you do for another, when you broke them all?" "I would go somewhere else," say I. But there is no suppressing him! " If you had bought all the jack-knives in the world, what would you do? " And here my patience gives way, and I entreat him not to trouble me with any more foolish questions. I really think it would do him good to spank him, apropos of this habit.

I put him to bed between six and seven ; and my cold being not quite well, went to bed myself at nine.

August 6th Wednesday.

We got up about the usual time. The little man's leg and foot were swollen and inflamed, in consequence of the wasp-bite yesterday; and he complained of pain when the part was touched, though otherwise it seemed to be comfortable enough. I gave him two globules of aconite, and advised him not to go with me for the milk ; but he insisted, and got along without any inconvenience.

It was a clear, mild morning, with some clouds, but a singularly transparent atmosphere. We got some butter at Luther's ; and being myself burthened with the milk, I gave it to the old gentleman to carry. He remonstrated, in a sharp, quick, high voice, sounding very much like the chattering of an angry squirrel ; but when I reasoned with him, and pointed out the impropriety of my carrying two burthens, while he had none, he yielded at once; and refused to let me take the butter when I thought he had carried it far enough.

After breakfast, we gathered some summer squashes, the first our garden has produced. Then I frizzled his wig, an art in which I do not perceive that I make any improvement. It was before ten, I think, when we set forth on a walk to the lake; it being a beautiful forenoon with warmth in the sun and coolness in the breaths of wind. At the lake the little man provided himself with an old dry branch of a tree, to the end of which he fastened a straw, and began to fish, with a faith that it was really piteous to behold. Afterwards, we went through the green, glimmering wood to the beach near the Stockbridge road, where we both amused ourselves setting sticks and chips afloat. For my part, I felt very inactive with this lazy, benumbing cold, which hangs on longer than usual. It made me no fit playmate for this frisky little monster. It was after twelve when we got home.

After dinner, we went out to the barn, and refreshed ourselves among the new hay; and when we came in, I found two letters — one from Phoebe, giving a brief summary of her wearinesses; the other from Pike, concerning a plan for a seashore residence. Having previously intended to go to the village this afternoon, we set out at a little past four. It was a hot sun, with now and then a puff of cool breeze : the same poisonous weather that we have had so much of, this summer; but the breeze was enjoyable, nevertheless. I found nothing at the office, save the " Museum," and a letter from an autograph collector. Julian was remarkably uneasy in the village, insomuch that I came away without purchasing some loaf-sugar, which we have wanted ever so long. He was so restless in his movements, that I suspected him to be, in his technical phrase, "uncomfortable"; but he positively denied it. We stopped at Love Grove; and then again I made inquisition as to this point; but he still said no.
He was so restless, however, that I advised him to go home before me, and he accordingly started at a great pace.

Gegen sieben Uhr brachte ich ihn ins Bett. Es ist jetzt zwischen acht und neun Uhr. In the dusk of the evening, just now, came Mrs. Tappan to borrow some eggs (I lent her seven) and to ask if I were to write again to Sophia, before her return. In that case, she wishes her to get ten pounds of ground rice.

I looked over the newspaper during the evening, and to bed before ten.
unit 1
August 2nd Saturday.
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unit 8
I accepted for at least one night, and so Melville is to come for us.
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unit 11
Our straw carpet was beginning to suffer seriously from some of his proceedings.
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unit 47
Bunny turned out not to be a desirable acquisition.
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unit 181
I put him to bed at about seven.
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unit 182
It is now between eight and nine.
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Omega-I • 5927  commented on  unit 5  1 day, 5 hours ago
Omega-I • 5927  commented on  unit 2  1 day, 6 hours ago

August 2nd Saturday.

In the morning we got up at about half -past six, and, Julian being bathed, and also myself, and Julian's wool duly frizzled, we set out for the milk. For the first time since some immemorial date, it was really a pleasant morning; not a cloud to be seen, except a few white and bright streaks, far off to the southward. Monument Mountain, however, had a fleece of sun-brightened mist, entirely covering it except its western summit, which emerged. There were also mists along the western side, hovering on the tree-tops, and portions of the same mist had flitted upward, and become real clouds in the sky. These vapors were rapidly passing away; and by the time we had done our errand, and returned, they had wholly disappeared.

I forgot to say, in the record of last night, that Herman Melville invited me to bring Julian and spend several days at his house, next week, when E. A. Duyckinck and his brother are to be there. I accepted for at least one night, and so Melville is to come for us.

At ten o'clock I sent Julian over to Highwood with Bunny, whom he is going to offer as a present to Ellen. The truth is, our house is too small, and we have not the proper accommodations for the excellent Bunny, for whom I have a great regard, but whose habits do not exactly fit him to be a constant occupant of the sitting-
room. Our straw carpet was beginning to suffer seriously from some of his proceedings. At Highwood they can give him a room to himself, if they like — or, in short, do what they please with him. I really liked Bunny, who has very pleasant little ways, and a character well worth observing. He had grown perfectly familiar with us, and seemed to show a fondness for our society, and would always sit himself near us, and was attentive to all our motions. He has, I think, a great deal of curiosity, and an investigating disposition, and is very observant of what is going on around him. I do not know any other beast, and few human beings, who, always present, and thrusting his little paw into all the business of the day, could at the same time be so perfectly unobtrusive.

I cannot but regret his departure, both for our sakes and his own ; for I am afraid Ellen will squeeze and otherwise torment him, and that
he will find nobody at Highwood so attentive to his habits as I was. What a pity that he could not have put himself under some restraint and rule, as to certain matters. Julian, too, seemed half -sorry to part with Bunny, but was so pleased with the idea of giving him to Ellen that he made no objection. He has not yet returned to say how the offering was accepted.

Quarter of eleven, Julian has come back, and reports that they did not thank him for Bunny, and that Ellen began to squeeze him very hard the first minute. He saw Deborah and Caroline and Ellen. They did not understand, at first, that Bunny was to remain there, and when Julian was coming away, they asked him if he was going
to leave Bunny. " Why," said the little man, " he is to be Ellen's own!" Whereat they said nothing. He says, however, that they seemed to be glad to have it. Poor Bunny, I am afraid, is doomed to be a sufferer for the rest of his life.

Ellen, according to Julian's account, took the poor little fellow up by his fur, and by his hind leg, keeping him dangling in the air, and committed odious other outrages. Perhaps I had better have drowned him. Possibly I may yet have a chance to do so, for I should not wonder if they were to send him back. Julian says he had a great mind to snatch him away and run home.

Before dinner we took a walk to the lake, where we found a boat drawn up on the shore, and if it had not been fastened to the root of a tree and locked, I think we should have taken a trip to foreign parts. The little man got into the boat, and enjoyed himself greatly, especially when he discovered some little old fish, evidently of some days' continuance, in the bottom of the boat.

After dinner came Mr. Farley, as he had partly given me to expect when I saw him yesterday. He came with the purpose of trying to catch some fish; so all three of us went down to the lake. Julian was quite in ecstasy. There is no use in trying to keep him from becoming a fisherman; there is the genuine instinct in him, and sooner or later it will gratify itself. Neither do I perceive any reason why it should not; it is as harmless a propensity as he could have. However, there was nothing in our luck, this afternoon, to make him enamoured of the pursuit. We caught only a few bream and perch, each of which the old gentleman immediately took up by the tail, surveying
it with most delighted interest, and frisking all the while as if in sympathy with the frisky movements of the poor fish. After a while, Mr. Farley and I became tired, and we set out for home.

The afternoon was as perfect as could be, as to beauty and comfort; just warm enough, nothing to be added or taken away. He did not stay to tea, but went home, taking Herman Melville's " White Jacket " with him.

I put Julian to bed at seven, or thereabouts, and went out to pick some currants. While thus engaged, Mrs. Tappan passed by the edge of the garden, towards the lower barn; and I asked her whether Julian made his offering of the rabbit to Ellen with due grace. She laughed, and said that he did, but said that they found Bunny quite troublesome, and that Ellen maltreated him and that the dog was always trying to get him — and, in short. Bunny turned out not to be a desirable acquisition. She spoke of giving him to little Marshall Butler, and suggested, moreover (in reply to something that I said about putting him out of existence), that he might be turned out into the woods, to shift for himself. There is something characteristic in this idea. It shows the sort of sensitiveness that finds the pain and misery of other people disagreeable, just as it would a bad scent, but is perfectly at ease when once they
are removed from her sphere. I suppose she would not for the world have killed Bunny, although she would have exposed him to the certainty of lingering starvation without scruple or remorse. Seeing nothing else to be done, I proposed to take Bunny back, and she promised to bring him to-morrow.

Mrs. Peters went home immediately after supper. I read " Pendennis " during the evening, ate about a quart of crushed currants, and went to bed at ten.

August 3rd Sunday.

It was long before I fell asleep again; and then I did not awake till half -past six, when he appeared to have been awake a considerable time. I bathed him and myself, as usual, made a fire in the kitchen, and went for the milk. It was a perfect morning, with broad and bright sunshine, and, I believe, not a single cloud over the whole sky; unless it were a few mist wreaths here and there on the distant hill-sides. The lake was as smooth as glass, and gave motionless reflections of the woods and hills. This glassy surface is the best aspect of so small a sheet of water. At Luther Butler's we found his father-in-law, old Mr. Barnes, cutting a young man's hair. The patient was seated in a chair at the kitchen door ; and the old fellow seemed to perform the operation with a good deal of skill, and had made a pretty even surface all over his head, leaving the hair about an inch long.

I told Julian that I was going to send him to get Bunny after breakfast. The little man's
face quite glowed with delight, but yet he seemed confused. " Why, papa," said he, " you see I left Bunny there to be Ellen's own; so I can't take him, unless they should send him back." I quieted his scruples by telling him what Mrs. Tappan had said; and he immediately became very desirous to go and get Bunny. At about nine o'clock I let him go; and in half an hour or so he came back with Bunny, in his little house. Poor Bunny seemed to have lost a good deal of his confidence in human nature, and kept himself as close as he could in a corner of the box, and made no response to my advances, nor would take a lettuce leaf which I offered him. I rather think he has lived in great torment during his absence. Julian says it was a great while before he
could come away with him, on account of Bruin; so desirous was that naughty dog to get poor little Bunny.

I read " Pendennis " till twelve, while the old boy amused himself hither and thither ; then, seeing him down in the valley, I went and lay under an apple tree. Julian climbed up into the tree, and sat astride of a branch. His round merry face appeared among the green leaves, and a continual stream of babble came dripping down
upon me, like a summer shower. He said how he should like to live always in the tree, and make a nest of leaves. Then he wanted to be a bird, so that he might fly far away ; and he would go to a deep hole, and bring me back a bag of gold ; and he would fly to West Newton, and bring home mamma on his back ; and he would fly to the Post Office for letters, and he would get beans and squashes and potatoes.

After a while, I took him down from the tree; and removing a little way from the spot, we chanced upon a remarkable echo. It repeated every word of his clear little voice, at his usual elevation of talk; and when either of us called loudly, we could hear as many as three or four repetitions— the last coming apparently from far away beyond the woods, with a strange fantastic similitude to the original voice, as if beings somewhat like ourselves were shouting in the invisible distance. Julian called "Mamma," "Una," and many other words; then he shouted his own name, and when the sound came back upon us, he said that mamma was calling him. What a strange weird thing is an echo, to be sure !

At two o'clock the whole family had dinner: Julian an end of bread, myself a custard pie, and Bunny some nibblings of the crust. The little man and I walked down to the lake. The crusade against thistles still continues; and the mulleins, likewise, come in for their share of the blows. After loitering awhile on the shore of the lake, we came homeward through Mr. Wilcox's field and through his tall pine wood. I lay on my back, looking upward through the branches of the trees, while Julian spent nearly a quarter of an hour, I should think, beating down a single great mullein-stalk. He certainly does evince a persevering purpose, sometimes. We strolled through the wood among the tall pillars of those primaeval pines, and thence home along the margin of a swamp, in which I gathered a sheaf of cat-tails. This brings the history up to the present time, within a few minutes of five
o'clock.

Either I have less patience to-day than ordinary, or the little man makes larger demands upon it; but it really does seem as if he had baited me with more questions, references, and observations, than mortal father ought to be expected to endure. He does put me almost beside my propriety, never quitting me, and continually thrusting in his word between the clauses of every sentence of all my reading, and smashing
every attempt at reflection into a thousand fragments.

I put him to bed at seven ; gathered and crushed some currants; took a meditative walk to-and-fro, behind the house, looking out on the lake and hills; ate the currants; pored over a paper (having finished the first volume of "Pendennis "), and went to bed before ten.

August 4th Monday.

We got up at about half-past six ; and before the bathing was over Mrs. Peters arrived. Going for the milk, the sun shone, warm but not bright, through a thin cloudiness that was diffused over the whole sky. The little man seemed to be sprightly and in good condition, although he had tumbled about, during the night, to a degree that often woke me up. After breakfast, I gathered a tray full of string beans from my garden, and Julian a tin pail full for his own individual domain.

The little man had been speculating about his mother's age, and saying she is twenty years old.

"So very small," he exclaims, " and twenty years old!"

The weather grew very chill as the day advanced, with the wind from the eastward. Oh, for an east wind with a breath of the salt sea in it! Of course, this infernal atmosphere has given me a cold; and I have sat shivering all day, with an
utter disinclination to move. All day, I mean, until somewhat past four, when Julian and I set out for the village. The little man has kept up his spirits, and has hammered and pounded at some carpenter work or other, greatly to the discomfort of my head; although I fell into a half drowse in the midst of it.

On our road to the village, he trotted off like a young colt, on his short, but unweariable legs. Reaching the office, we found no letter; the Eastern mail had somehow or other failed to arrive — a miserable mischance. After stepping into the courthouse to see Mr. Farley, and sitting awhile in his office, we turned our faces homeward ; the old gentleman pestering me sorely to get him an orange — which, however, I could not have done without a long walk to the other end of the village. He seemed just as active and frisky as ever on our homeward road; while I was grim, gloomy, and utterly without elasticity. I turned up the avenue to Highwood, with a letter and paper for Willy Barney; and finding the study window open, I stepped in and took the " Home Journal," which I looked over, in a chair, under the porch.

I put Julian to bed at seven, and then wrapt myself in my wadded gown, and sat in the boudoir, — took some nux vomica and went to bed before ten.

August 5th Tuesday.

I SLEPT pretty well, and so did the old gentleman; although he woke me once with his tumblings and tossings. We got up, as usual, at half-past six ; my cold being apparently on the mending hand. The weather, as we found on going for the milk, was rather less chill than yesterday ; but there were clouds over the whole sky, here
and there resting on the ridges of the hills. No wind at all; the lake perfectly smooth.
Coming home from Luther's, the little man lingered behind to gather some flowers, and then setting out to run, he came down with a terrible tumble.

It now lacks a quarter of eleven o'clock. The only remarkable event, thus far, has been a visit. I was sitting in the boudoir, when a knock came to the front door; and Mrs. Peters said that a lady wished to see me ; so I went up-stairs on tiptoe, and made myself as presentable as I could, at short notice, and came down to the dining room. The visitor was a lady, rather young, and quite comely, with pleasant and intelligent eyes, in a pretty Quaker dress.

She offered me her hand, and spoke with much simplicity, but yet in a ladylike way, of her interest in my works, and her not being able to resist a desire to see me, on finding herself in my vicinity. I asked her into the sitting-room to enjoy our back view; and we talked of the scenery and of various persons and matters. Lowell, Whittier, Mr. James, and Herman Melville were more or less discussed; she seemed to be a
particular friend of Whittier, and had heard of his calling on me, two or three years ago. Her manners were very agreeable indeed; — the Quaker simplicity, and the little touch of Quaker phraseology, gave piquancy to her refinement and air of society. She had a pleasant smile, and eyes that readily responded to one's thought; so
that it was not difficult to talk with her — a singular, but yet a gentle freedom in expressing her own opinions — an entire absence of affectation. These were the traits that impressed me; and, on the whole, it was the only pleasant visit I ever experienced in my capacity as author. She did not bore me with laudations of my own writings, but merely said that there are some authors with whom we felt ourselves privileged to be acquainted, by the nature of our sympathy with their writings, or something to that effect, &c., &c., &c.

All this time, Julian was climbing into my lap. He had on a knit jacket, which I had thought it prudent to endue him with, in the morning, on account of the east wind. This, however, I took off, in the lady's presence. I had brushed and frizzled his hair, after breakfast; but it only looked the worse for my pains. She smiled on him, and praised his healthy aspect, and inquired whether he looked like his mother — observing that he had no resemblance to myself. Finally she rose to depart, and I ushered her to the gate, where, as she took leave, she told me her
name— "Elizabeth Lloyd"— and bidding me " Farewell ! " she went on her way, and I saw her no more. She had not ridden hither, but was on a walk. She resides in Philadelphia. Julian allowed her to kiss him.

I have read Fourier today, when I have read anything. After dinner, we set out on a walk down to the lake. The weather is still uncertain, threatening rain all the time, and never fulfilling its threat. It might more properly be called a promise now than threat; for it is an exceedingly dry time indeed.
There are five or six feet more of margin to the lake than I ever saw before; and the brook is quite dry along a great part of its channels. The effect of the drought is visible in the foliage of the woods; it has shrunken within a few days, so that the shade which it cast is not so dense as before. This lack of moisture may be one reason that withered and yellow leaves, and even branches, begin to be seen. But mam^' autumnal characteristics may now be detected; the yellow flowers, the yellow hue of grain-fields, the no longer juicy, but crispy herbage — everything tells a story of a past climax. And when did it pass? I am sure I don't know.

On our way home Julian was stung on the leg by a wasp, and squealed outrageously. This was getting over the fence by Mr. Tappan's oatfield. He seemed quite in an agony, at first, but was so far recovered, before we reached the house, that he asked for a piece of bread and some water more earnestly than a cure for the bite. I first bathed his leg in arnica, and then fed him. All this has brought us to a quarter past five. He continues to pester me with his inquisitions. For instance, just now, while he is whittling with my jack-knife: "Father, if you had bought all the jack-knives at the shop, what would you do for another, when you broke them all?" "I would go somewhere else," say I. But there is no suppressing him! " If you had bought all the jack-knives in the world, what would you do? " And here my patience gives way, and I entreat him not to trouble me with any more foolish questions. I really think it would do him good to spank him, apropos of this habit.

I put him to bed between six and seven ; and my cold being not quite well, went to bed myself at nine.

August 6th Wednesday.

We got up about the usual time. The little man's leg and foot were swollen and inflamed, in consequence of the wasp-bite yesterday; and he complained of pain when the part was touched, though otherwise it seemed to be comfortable enough. I gave him two globules of aconite, and advised him not to go with me for the milk ;
but he insisted, and got along without any inconvenience.

It was a clear, mild morning, with some clouds, but a singularly transparent atmosphere. We got some butter at Luther's ; and being myself burthened with the milk, I gave it to the old gentleman to carry. He remonstrated, in a sharp, quick, high voice, sounding very much like the chattering of an angry squirrel ; but when I reasoned with him, and pointed out the impropriety of my carrying two burthens, while he had none, he yielded at once; and refused to let me take the butter when I thought he had carried it far enough.

After breakfast, we gathered some summer squashes, the first our garden has produced. Then I frizzled his wig, an art in which I do not perceive that I make any improvement. It was before ten, I think, when we set forth on a walk to the lake; it being a beautiful forenoon with warmth in the sun and coolness in the breaths of wind. At the lake the little man provided himself with an old dry branch of a tree, to the end of which he fastened a straw, and began to fish, with a faith that it was really piteous to behold. Afterwards, we went through the green, glimmering wood to the beach near the Stockbridge road, where we both amused ourselves setting sticks and chips afloat. For my part, I felt very inactive with this lazy, benumbing cold, which hangs on longer than usual. It made me no fit playmate for this frisky little monster. It was after twelve when we got home.

After dinner, we went out to the barn, and refreshed ourselves among the new hay; and when we came in, I found two letters — one from Phoebe, giving a brief summary of her wearinesses; the other from Pike, concerning a plan for a seashore residence. Having previously intended to go to the village this afternoon, we set out at a little past four. It was a hot sun, with now and then a puff of cool breeze : the same poisonous weather that we have had so much of, this summer; but the breeze was enjoyable, nevertheless. I found nothing at the office, save the " Museum," and a letter from an autograph collector. Julian was remarkably uneasy in the village, insomuch that I came away without purchasing some loaf-sugar, which we have wanted ever so long. He was so restless in his movements, that I suspected him to be, in his technical phrase, "uncomfortable"; but he positively denied it. We stopped at Love Grove; and then again I made inquisition as to this point; but he still said no.
He was so restless, however, that I advised him to go home before me, and he accordingly started at a great pace.

I put him to bed at about seven. It is now between eight and nine. In the dusk of the
evening, just now, came Mrs. Tappan to borrow some eggs (I lent her seven) and to ask if I were to write again to Sophia, before her return. In that case, she wishes her to get ten pounds of ground rice.

I looked over the newspaper during the evening, and to bed before ten.