de-en  Hans Christian Andersen: Die Nachtigall.
In China, you know, the emperor is Chinese, and everyone around him is Chinese as well. It's been many years now, but that's why it's worth the effort to hear the tale before it's forgotten! The Imperial Palace was the most magnificent in the world, made entirely from fine porcelain, very precious but so brittle and fragile to the touch, that one had to be extremely careful. In the garden one saw the most wonderful flowers, with silver bells attached to the most magnificent of them, which rang so that one did not like to pass by without looking at the flowers. Yes, everything in the emperor's garden was carefully planned. And it extended so far that the gardener himself did not know its boundary. If you kept walking, you came to the most beautiful forest of tall trees and deep lakes. The forest reached straight down to the deep, blue lake where large ships could sail right up underneath the branches of the trees; in these lived a nightingale which sang so beautifully that even the poor fisherman, who had so much else to do, stood still and listened when he went at night to cast out the fishing net. "Oh dear God, how beautiful that is!" he said, but he had to attend to his work and thereby forgot about the bird. The following night the nightingale sang again and when the fisherman came, he said the same thing again: "Oh God, how beautiful that is!" Travellers came from all the lands of the world to the Emperor's city, admiring this, the palace and the garden. However when they heard the nightingale, they all said: "That is indeed the best!" The travellers told of this when they went home and the scholars wrote many books about the city, the palace and the garden. But they did not forget the nightingale: it was given the highest praise; and those who could write poetry, wrote the most wonderful poems about the nightingale in the forest beside the deep lake.

The books spread throughout the world and some of them also came to the Emperor. He sat in his golden chair and read and read; again and again he nodded his head, pleased to read the magnificent descriptions of the city, the castle, and the garden, "But the nightingale is the very best!" was written there.

"What is that?" said the Emperor. "I do not know the nightingale! Is there such a bird in my realm and indeed in my garden? I have never heard it. To learn such things only from books!" And hereupon he called his nobleman. He was so noble that when someone less than him dared to speak to him or ask him for something, he gave in answer nothing more than: „P!“, which had no meaning at all.

"There is supposed to be a highly unusual bird here called a nightingale!", said the emperor. "It is said to be the very best thing in my whole realm. Why wasn't I ever told about this?" "I’ve never heard tell of him before!" said the nobleman. "He's never been introduced at court!" "I want him to come here tonight and sing in front of me!" said the Emperor. "The whole world knows what I possess, and I don't know!" "I’ve never heard it spoken of before!" said the nobleman. "I'll search for him, I'll find him!" But where was it to be found? The nobleman searched up and down all the stairs, through rooms and corridors, but not one of all those whom he met had heard speak of the nightingale. And the nobleman went again to the Emperor and said that it surely must be a tale from those who had written the books. "Your Imperial Majesty would not believe what is written! "These are fabrications and that which we call black magic." "But the book in which I read this," said the Emperor, "was sent to me by the mightiest Emperor of Japan, and so it cannot be an untruth, I demand to hear the nightingale! It must be here tonight! She has my highest blessing! And if she does not come, then the whole court should be trampled on the body when he has had supper! "" Tsing pe! "Said the cavalier, and ran up and down all the stairs, through all the halls and passages; and half the court ran with them, because they did not want to be trampled on the body. Everyone was asking about the strange nightingale which the whole world knew, only no-one at court.

Finally they came across a poor little girl in the kitchen. She said: „ Dear God! I know the nightingale well; yes, how can it sing! Every evening I have permission to carry leftovers from the dining table to my poor, sick mother; she lives down at the beach; and when I go back, tired and rest in the forest, I hear the nightingale singing! When I hear that, my eyes fill with tears and it is as if my mother is kissing me!" "Little cook!" said the nobleman, "If you can lead us to the nightingale, I will arrange employment for you in the kitchen and permission to see the Emperor whilst he is dining, for the nightingale's presence is required this evening." And so they all went out into the forest where the nightingale was wont to sing; half of the court went with them. When they were well on their way, a cow started bellowing.

"O!" said the court squires, "now we have it! That is a strange power in such a small animal! I'm sure I've heard it before now!" "No, those are cows that are bellowing" said the little cook. "We are still far away from the location!" Now the frogs were croaking in the swamp.

"Wonderful!" said the court preacher from China. "Now I hear them; they sound just like little church bells." "No, those are frogs!", said the little cook. "However, I think we will soon hear her!" At that moment the nightingale began to sing.

"That's her!" said the little girl. "Listen! Listen! She is sitting there!" And she pointed to a small, grey bird up in the branches. "Is that possible!" said the nobleman. "I would never have imagined her to look like that! She looks so plain! She has probably lost all her colour because she sees so many distinguished people surrounding her!" "Little nightingale!" the little cook cried out loudly, "Our Most Gracious Majesty wishes for you to sing before him!" "With the greatest of pleasure!" said the nightingale and sang for sheer enjoyment.

"It sounds just like glass bells!" said the nobleman. "And look at her tiny throat, how it is working! It is strange that we have never heard her before! She will be a great success at court!" "Shall I sing again for the Emperor?" asked the nightingale, who believed that the Emperor was among them.

"My splendid little nightingale!" said the cavalier, "It gives me the greatest of pleasure to invite you to a court festival this evening where you will enchant His Gracious Majesty with your song!" "One hears it best in the forest" said the nightingale, but she went gladly with them when she heard that it was the wish of the emperor.

At the palace, everything was thoroughly cleaned and decorated. The walls and floors, which were of marble, shone in the light of many thousands of golden lamps, the most magnificent flowers, that could tinkle like bells, were placed in the corridors. That was a hither and thither and a whirlwind, and all the bells rang so that one could not hear oneself talking.

In the middle of the great hall where the Emperor sat, a golden stick had been placed upon which the nightingale should sit. The whole court was there and the little cook had been given permission to stand behind the door, since she had now been given the title of a real court cook. Everyone was clad in their most magnificent attire and everyone looked at the little grey bird to whom the Emperor nodded.

The nightingale sang so beautifully that the Emperor had tears in his eyes which trickled down over his cheeks, and so the nightingale sang more beautifully still: that really touched the heart. The Emperor was so filled with happiness that he said the nightingale should receive his golden slippers to wear around her neck. But the nightingale declined with thanks: she had received reward enough.

"I have seen tears in the Emperor's eyes, that is for me the richest reward! An Emperor's tears have a special power! God knows it, I am rewarded enough." Then she sang again with her sweet, splendid voice.

"That is the most amiable coquetry I know," said the ladies all around, and then they took water in their mouths to cluck when someone spoke to them. They then thought they were nightingales as well. Yes, the footmen and chambermaids let it be reported that they too were satisfied; that means a lot, because they are the hardest to be satisfied. In short, the nightingale made a real happiness.

She should now stay at court, have her own birdcage and the freedom to stroll out twice a day and once at night. She then got twelve servants, all of whom had wrapped a silk ribbon around her leg, holding her rather tightly. It was no delight at all on such an outing.

The whole town was talking about the strange bird, and when two met, the one said nothing but "night!" - and the other said, "gall!" [Footnote] And then they sighed and understood each other. Yes, eleven pedlar children were named after her; but not one of them had a sound in his throat. One day, the Emperor received a large package, with writing on it: "The Nightingale".

"There we have a new book about our famous bird!", said the Emporer. However it was not a book but a little work of art which lay in a box: an artificial nightingale, which was supposed to be equal to the living one, but decorated all over with diamonds, rubies, and sapphires. As soon as the artificial bird was wound up, it could sing one of the pieces that the real bird sang; and then the tail moved up and down, shining with silver and gold. A small ribbon around its neck said: "The Emperor of Japan's Nightingale is poor compared to the Emperor of China's." "That is wonderful" said all; and the one who had brought the artificial bird immediately received the title: Imperial Lord Nightingale Bringer.

"Now they have to sing together: What a duet that will be!" And so they had to sing together; but it didn't really fit together, because the real nightingale sang in her way and the artificial bird went on rolls. .. "It's not his fault," said the game master; "he stays in sync very well and is after my school!" Now the fake bird should sing alone. ... He made just as much happiness as the real one, and then he was indeed much cuter to look at: he shone like bracelets and broaches.

He sang one and the same piece thirty-three times, and yet he was not tired. The people would have liked to hear him again, but the Emperor now thought that the living nightingale ought to sing something too. -- But where was she? No one had noticed that she had flown away through the open window to her green woods.

"But what is this!" the Emperor said. And all the courtiers railed against her and deemed the nightingale to be a highly ungrateful animal. "We do have the best bird," they said; and so the artificial bird had to sing again, and that was the thirty-fourth time that they were given the same piece to hear. Nevertheless, they couldn't do it by heart; it was really too difficult. ... And the play master praised the bird extraordinarily; yes, he affirmed that it was better than a nightingale, not only as far as the dress and the many wonderful diamonds were concerned, but also internally.

"For behold ladies and gentlemen, the Emperor above all! with the real nightingale you can never determine what will come next; but with the artificial bird everything is definite! One can explain it, one can open it to make people understand how the rollers are set and how they go and how one follows the other!" Everyone said, "That is what our thoughts are too," and the play master got permission to show the bird to the people on the next Sunday. One should hear him sing too, the Emperor ordered. And they heard it; and they enjoyed it so much, it was as if they had become intoxicated on tea, for that is Chinese; then all said: "Oh!" and held up their forefinger and nodded in addition. However, the poor fishermen who had listened to the real nightingale, said, "That sounds nice enough; the melodies resemble each other, too; but there is something missing, I don't know what!" The real nightingale was expelled from the land and empire.

The artificial bird had its place on a silk cushion close to the Emperor's bed; all the gifts it had received, gold and precious stones, lay all around it, and its title had been raised to 'Supreme Majesty's Bedside Table Singer' of the first rank on the left side. The Emperor considered the side on which the heart was situated to be the most worthy, and even an Emperor has his heart on the left side. And the play master wrote a work of twenty-five volumes about the artificial bird; it was so learned and so long, full of the most difficult Chinese words that all people said they had read and understood it, because otherwise they would have been deemed stupid and would have been trampled upon.

It went on like that for a whole year. The Emperor, the court and all the other Chinese knew every happiness in the artificial bird's song by heart. But that's why they liked him best of all: they could sing along, and they did it as well. The street kids sang: "Zizizi! Cluckcluckcluck!“ and the Emperor sang it as well. Yes, that was certainly splendid!

However, one evening, when the artificial bird sang at its best, and the Emperor lay in bed and listened to it, something inside the bird made "Whoosh". Then something went crack! " Whirring!" All the wheels were running, and then the music stopped.

The Emperor jumped out of bed and called his personal physician, but what could he do! Then they sent for the clock maker, and after much discussion and inspection, he got the bird somewhat in order; but he said that he had to be used sparingly, because the pivots were worn out, and it would be impossible to insert new ones to insure that the music would go on. Now was a great sorrow! They were allowed to let the artificial bird sing only once a year, and even that was almost too much. But then the play master gave a little speech full of weighty words and said that it was just as good as before; then it was just as good as it used to be.

Now five years had passed, and the country got a great sorrow. The Chinese basically all believed in their Emperor, and now he was ill and could not live much longer, they said. A new Emperor had already been elected, and the people stood outside in the street and asked the cavalier how their old Emperor was doing.

"P!" he said, shaking his head.

Cool and pale the Emperor lay in his great, magnificent bed; the whole court believed that he was dead and every one of them went to greet the new Emperor. The valets run out to gossip about it and the waiting maids had big coffee company. Cloth was placed all around in all the halls and hallways, so that one would hear no footsteps, and therefore it was quiet, very quiet! But the Emperor was not dead yet; stiff and pale he lay in the magnificent bed with the long velvet curtains and heavy gold tassels; high above a window was open, and the moon shone in on the emperor and the artificial bird.

The poor Emperor could barely breathe. It was as if something were sitting on his chest; he opened his eyes and there he saw that it was Death that was sitting on his chest - it had put on the Emperor's golden crown, and it held the Emperor's golden saber in one hand and his magnificent flag in the other. ... And all around, from the folds of the great velvet bed curtains, strange and wonderful heads were looking out, some ugly and others kind and gentle. These were all of evil and good deeds of the Emperor that encountered to him, now that death was upon his heart.

"Do you rembember this?" whispered one after another. „Do you remember that?" And then they related so much to him that the perspiration ran down his forehead.

"I didn't know that!" the Emperor said. "Music! Music! the big Chinese drum!" he called "so that I do not need to hear all that they are saying!" They continued and Death nodded like a Chinaman to everything that was told.

"Music, music!" shouted the Emperor. „You marvellous, little golden bird! Come on, sing, sing! I have given you gold and treasures; I have hung my golden slipper around your neck: sing, after all sing!" But the bird stood silent; there was no one there to wind him up, and without that he did not sing; but Death continued to stare at the Emperor with its big, hollow eyes; and it was silent, terribly silent!

All at once the most glorious song sounded from the window: it was the little living nightingale sitting on a branch outside. She had heard of her Emperor's misery and had therefore come to offer him comfort and hope. And as she sang, the apparitions became paler and paler and paler; the blood was moving faster and faster in the Emperor's weak limbs, and even Death listened and said: Go on, little nightingale! go on!" "Yes, do you want to give me the magnificent golden saber? Will you give me the rich flag? Will you give me the Emperor's crown?" And Death gave every treasure for a song; and the nightingale continued to sing; she sang of the quiet church graveyard where the white roses grow, where the lilac smells fragrant, and where the fresh grass is moistened by the tears of the survivors. Then Death was longing for his garden and floated out of the window like a cold, white mist.

"Thank you, thank you!" the Emperor said. "You heavenly, little bird! I know you well! I chased you out of my land and kingdom! And still you have sung the evil faces away from my bed and carried Death away from my heart. How can I reward you?" "You have rewarded me!" the nightingale said. "I drew tears from your eyes the first time I sang: that I shall never forget! Those are jewels that delight the heart of a singer! -- But sleep now and become fresh and strong again! I'll audition something for you!" And it sang- and the Emperor fell into a sweet sleep. Oh! how mild and refrehing was the sleep!

The sun was shining on him through the windows, when he awoke invigorated and healthy. None of his servants had yet returned because they believed he would be dead; only the nightingale still sat with him and sang.

"You must always stay with me!" said the Emperor. "Thou shalt sing, if thou wouldst like it, and I will smash the artifice bird into a thousand pieces." "Do not do that," said the nightingale. 'This one has served well, as long as it could!' Keep it, as before! I can't build my nest in the castle and live there, but let me come when I like. Then in the evening, I'll sit on a branch at the window und sing something for you so that you'll become happy and thoughtful at the same time. ... I will sing of the fortunate ones, and of those who suffer! I will sing of evil and good that which remains hidden around you! The little songbird flies far around, to the poor fisherman, to the farmer's roof, to everyone far away from you and your court! I love your heart more than your crown, yet the crown has a fragrance of some sanctuary around it! - I come, I'll sing something to you! - But you must promise me one thing." The emperor said, "Anything" and stood there in his imperial costume, which he had put on himself, and pressed the saber, which was heavy with gold, to his heart.

"I ask you for one thing! "Tell no one that you have a little bird telling you everything, then it will be even better!" Then the nightingale flew away.

The servants came in to look at their dead Emperor - yes, there they stood and the Emperor said: "Good morning!"
unit 5
Ja, Alles war in des Kaisers Garten fein ausspeculirt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 13
Die Bücher durchliefen die Welt und einige davon kamen auch einmal zum Kaiser.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 15
»Was ist das?« sagte der Kaiser.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 16
»Die Nachtigall kenne ich ja gar nicht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 17
Ist ein solcher Vogel in meinem Kaiserreiche und sogar in meinem Garten?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 18
Das habe ich nie gehört!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 19
So etwas erst aus Büchern zu erfahren!« Und hierauf rief er seinen Cavalier.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 22
»Man sagt, dies sei das Allerbeste in meinem großen Reiche.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 26
»Ich werde ihn suchen, ich werde ihn finden!« – Aber wo war Der zu finden?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 29
»Dero Kaiserliche Majestät können gar nicht glauben, was Alles geschrieben wird!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 31
Sie muß heute Abend hier sein!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 32
Sie hat meine höchste Gnade!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 35
Endlich trafen sie ein kleines, armes Mädchen in der Küche.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 36
Die sagte: »O Gott, die Nachtigall kenne ich gut; ja, wie kann sie singen!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 39
Als sie im besten Zuge waren, fing eine Kuh zu brüllen an.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 40
»O!« sagten die Hofjunker, »nun haben wir sie!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 41
Das ist doch eine merkwürdige Kraft in einem so, kleinen Thiere!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 43
»Wir sind noch weit von dem Orte entfernt!« Nun quakten die Frösche im Sumpfe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 44
»Herrlich!« sagte der chinesische Hofprediger.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 46
»Aber nun denke ich, werden wir sie bald hören!« Da begann die Nachtigall zu schlagen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 47
»Das ist sie!« sagte das kleine Mädchen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
»Hört!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 49
Hört!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
Da sitzt sie!« Und sie zeigte nach einem kleinen, grauen Vogel oben in den Zweigen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 51
»Ist es möglich!« sagte der Cavalier.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 52
»So halte ich sie mir nimmer gedacht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 53
Wie sie einfach aussieht!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 55
»Es klingt gerade wie Glasglocken!« sagte der Cavalier.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 56
»Und seht die kleine Kehle, wie sie arbeitet!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
Es ist merkwürdig, daß wir sie früher nie gehört haben!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 60
Auf dem Schlosse war tüchtig aufgeputzt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 68
Aber die Nachtigall dankte: sie habe schon Belohnung genug erhalten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
»Ich habe Thränen in des Kaisers Augen gesehen, das ist mir der reichste Schatz!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 70
Eines Kaisers Thränen haben eine besondere Kraft!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 71
Gott weiß es, ich bin genug belohnt.« Darauf sang sie wieder mit ihrer süßen, herrlichen Stimme.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 73
Sie glaubten dann auch Nachtigallen zu sein.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 75
Kurz, die Nachtigall machte wahrlich Glück.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 78
Es war durchaus kein Vergnügen bei einem solchen Ausfluge.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 80
unit 81
– Eines Tages erhielt der Kaiser ein großes Packet, worauf geschrieben stand: »Die Nachtigall«.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 82
»Da haben wir nun ein neues Buch über unsern berühmten Vogel!« sagte der Kaiser.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Dreiunddreißig Mal sang er ein und dasselbe Stück und war doch nicht müde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 91
– – Aber wo war die?
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 92
Niemand hatte bemerkt, daß sie aus dem offenen Fenster zu ihren grünen Wäldern fort geflogen war.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 93
»Aber was ist denn das!« sagte der Kaiser.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 94
Und alle Hofleute schalten und meinten, daß die Nachtigall ein höchst undankbares Thier sei.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
Sie konnten es dessenungeachtet doch nicht auswendig; es war gar zu schwer.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
»Denn sehen Sie, meine Herrschaften, der Kaiser vor Allen!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 101
Es sollte ihn auch singen hören, befahl der Kaiser.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 107
So ging es ein ganzes Jahr.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 108
unit 110
Die Straßenbuben sangen: »Zizizi!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 111
Gluckgluckgluck!« und der Kaiser sang es ebenfalls.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 112
Ja, das war gewiß prächtig!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 114
Da sprang Etwas!
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 115
»Schnurrrr!« alle Räder liefen herum, und dann stand die Musik still.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 116
Der Kaiser sprang gleich aus dem Bette und ließ seinen Leibarzt rufen; aber was konnte der helfen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 118
Nun war eine große Trauer!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 119
Nur einmal des Jahres durfte man den Kunstvogel singen lassen, und das war schon fast zu viel.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
Jetzt waren fünf Jahre vergangen, und das Land bekam eine große Trauer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 124
»P!« sagte er und schüttelte mit dem Kopfe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 132
»Entsinnest Du Dich dieses?« flüsterte Einer nach dem Andern.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 134
»Das habe ich nicht gewußt!« sagte der Kaiser.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 135
»Musik!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 136
Musik!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 138
»Musik, Musik!« schrie der Kaiser.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 139
»Du kleiner herrlicher Goldvogel!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 140
Singe doch, singe!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 143
unit 145
fahre fort!« »Ja, willst Du mir den prächtigen goldenen Säbel geben?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 146
Willst Du mir die reiche Fahne geben?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 149
»Dank, Dank!« sagte der Kaiser.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 150
»Du himmlischer, kleiner Vogel!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 151
Ich kenne Dich wohl!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 152
Dich habe ich aus meinem Lande und Reiche gejagt!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 154
Wie kann ich Dir lohnen?« »Du hast mich belohnt!« sagte die Nachtigall.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 155
»Ich habe Deinen Augen Thränen entlockt, als ich das erste Mal sang: das vergesse ich nie!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 156
Das sind Juwelen, die ein Sängerherz erfreuen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 157
– Aber schlafe nun und werde wieder frisch und stark!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 158
Ich werde Dir etwas vorsingen!« Und sie sang – und der Kaiser fiel in einen süßen Schlummer.
5 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 159
Ach!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 160
wie mild und wohlthuend war der Schlaf!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 161
Die Sonne schien durch die Fenster zu ihm herein, als er gestärkt und gesund erwachte.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 163
»Immer mußt Du bei mir bleiben!« sagte der Kaiser.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 165
»Der hat ja Gutes gethan, so lange er konnte!
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 166
Behalte ihn, wie bisher!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 168
Ich werde von den Glücklichen singen, und von Denen, die da leiden!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 169
Ich werde vom Bösen und vom Guten singen, was rings um Dich her verborgen bleibt!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 171
unit 172
– Ich komme, ich singe Dir etwas vor!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 174
»Um Eins bitte ich Dich!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 113  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 95  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 95  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 160  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 113  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 104  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 103  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 94  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 92  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 91  6 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 84  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 128  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 141  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 86  6 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 165  6 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 100  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 120  6 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 96  6 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 130  6 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 120  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 70  6 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 163  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 144  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene • 2289  translated  unit 159  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 133  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 84  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 105  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 156  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 154  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 94  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 105  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 97  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene • 2289  translated  unit 136  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 98  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 99  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 91  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 90  6 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 90  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 89  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Scharing7 • 1781  commented on  unit 81  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 63  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 71  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 43  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 79  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 67  6 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 46  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  translated  unit 49  6 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  translated  unit 48  6 months, 3 weeks ago

In China, weißt Du wohl, ist der Kaiser ein Chinese, und Alle, die er um sich hat, sind auch Chinesen. Es ist nun viele Jahre her, aber eben deshalb ist es der Mühe werth, die Geschichte zu hören, ehe sie vergessen wird! Des Kaisers Schloß war das prächtigste in der Welt, ganz und gar von feinem Porzellan, sehr kostbar, aber so spröde, so mißlich, daran zu rühren, daß man sich sehr in Acht nehmen mußte. Im Garten sah man die wunderbarsten Blumen und an die prächtigsten waren Silberglocken gebunden, welche klangen, damit man nicht vorbeigehen möchte, ohne die Blumen zu bemerken. Ja, Alles war in des Kaisers Garten fein ausspeculirt. Und er erstreckte sich so weit, daß der Gärtner selbst das Ende desselben nicht kannte. Ging man immer weiter, so kam man in den herrlichsten Wald mit hohen Bäumen und tiefen Seen. Der Wald ging gerade hinunter bis zum Meere, welches blau und tief war; große Schiffe konnten bis unter die Zweige der Bäume hinsegeln, und in diesen wohnte eine Nachtigall, die so herrlich sang, daß selbst der arme Fischer, der doch viel Anderes zu thun hatte, still hielt und horchte, wenn er des Nachts ausgefahren war, um das Fischnetz auszuwerfen, und dann die Nachtigall hörte. »Ach Gott, wie ist das schön!« sagte er; aber er mußte auf seine Sachen Acht geben und vergaß dabei den Vogel. Doch wenn dieser in der nächsten Nacht wieder sang und der Fischer dorthin kam, sagte er dasselbe: »Ach Gott, wie ist das schön!«

Aus allen Ländern der Welt kamen Reisende nach der Stadt des Kaisers und bewunderten diese, das Schloß und den Garten. Doch wenn sie die Nachtigall zu hören bekamen, sagten sie Alle: »Das ist doch das Beste!«

Die Reisenden erzählten davon, wenn sie nach Hause kamen; und die Gelehrten schrieben viele Bücher über die Stadt, das Schloß und den Garten. Aber auch die Nachtigall vergaßen sie nicht: die wurde am Höchsten gestellt; und Die, welche dichten konnten, schrieben die herrlichsten Gedichte über die Nachtigall im Walde bei dem tiefen See.

Die Bücher durchliefen die Welt und einige davon kamen auch einmal zum Kaiser. Er saß in seinem goldenen Stuhle und las und las; jeden Augenblick nickte er mit dem Kopfe, denn es freute ihn, die prächtigen Beschreibungen der Stadt, des Schlosses und des Gartens zu vernehmen, »Aber die Nachtigall ist doch das Allerbeste!« stand da geschrieben.

»Was ist das?« sagte der Kaiser. »Die Nachtigall kenne ich ja gar nicht! Ist ein solcher Vogel in meinem Kaiserreiche und sogar in meinem Garten? Das habe ich nie gehört! So etwas erst aus Büchern zu erfahren!«

Und hierauf rief er seinen Cavalier. Der war so vornehm, daß, wenn Jemand, der geringer als er war, mit ihm zu sprechen oder ihn nach Etwas zu fragen wagte, er weiter nichts erwiderte, als: »P!« und das hat nichts zu bedeuten.

»Hier soll ja ein höchst merkwürdiger Vogel sein, welcher Nachtigall genannt wird!« sagte der Kaiser. »Man sagt, dies sei das Allerbeste in meinem großen Reiche. Weshalb hat man mir nie etwas davon gesagt?«

»Ich habe ihn früher nie nennen hören!« sagte der Cavalier. »Er ist nie bei Hofe vorgestellt worden!«

»Ich will, daß er heute Abend herkommen und vor mir singen soll!« sagte der Kaiser. »Die ganze Welt weiß, was ich habe, und ich weiß es nicht!«

»Ich habe ihn früher nie nennen hören!« sagte der Cavalier. »Ich werde ihn suchen, ich werde ihn finden!« –

Aber wo war Der zu finden? Der Cavalier lief alle Treppen auf und nieder, durch Säle und Gänge, aber Keiner von allen Denen, auf die er traf, hatte von der Nachtigall sprechen hören. Und der Cavalier lief wieder zum Kaiser und sagte, daß es sicher eine Fabel von Denen sein müßte, die da Bücher schrieben. »Dero Kaiserliche Majestät können gar nicht glauben, was Alles geschrieben wird! Das sind Erdichtungen und Etwas, was man die schwarze Kunst nennt.«

»Aber das Buch, in dem ich dieses gelesen habe,« sagte der Kaiser, »ist mir von dem großmächtigsten Kaiser von Japan gesandt, und es kann also keine Unwahrheit sein, Ich will die Nachtigall hören! Sie muß heute Abend hier sein! Sie hat meine höchste Gnade! Und kommt sie nicht, so soll dem ganzen Hofe auf den Leib getrampelt werden, wenn er Abendbrot gegessen hat!«

»Tsing pe!« sagte der Cavalier und lief wieder alle Treppen auf und nieder, durch alle Säle und Gänge; und der halbe Hof lief mit, denn sie wollten nicht gern auf den Leib getrampelt sein. Da gab es ein Fragen nach der merkwürdigen Nachtigall, welche die ganze Welt kannte, nur Niemand bei Hofe.

Endlich trafen sie ein kleines, armes Mädchen in der Küche. Die sagte: »O Gott, die Nachtigall kenne ich gut; ja, wie kann sie singen! Jeden Abend habe ich Erlaubniß, meiner armen, kranken Mutter Ueberbleibsel vom Tische nach Hause zu tragen; sie wohnt unten am Strande; und wenn ich zurückgehe, müde bin und im Walde ausruhe, dann höre ich die Nachtigall singen! Es kommen mir dabei die Thränen in die Augen, und es ist, als ob meine Mutter mich küßte!«

»Kleine Köchin!« sagte der Cavalier, »ich werde Dir eine Anstellung in der Küche und die Erlaubniß verschaffen, den Kaiser speisen zu sehen, wenn Du uns zur Nachtigall führen kannst, denn sie ist zu heute Abend angesagt.«

Und so zogen sie Alle hinaus in den Wald, wo die Nachtigall zu singen pflegte; der halbe Hof war mit. Als sie im besten Zuge waren, fing eine Kuh zu brüllen an.

»O!« sagten die Hofjunker, »nun haben wir sie! Das ist doch eine merkwürdige Kraft in einem so, kleinen Thiere! Die habe ich sicher schon früher gehört!«

»Nein, das sind Kühe, welche brüllen!« sagte die kleine Köchin. »Wir sind noch weit von dem Orte entfernt!«

Nun quakten die Frösche im Sumpfe.

»Herrlich!« sagte der chinesische Hofprediger. »Nun höre ich sie; es klingt gerade wie kleine Kirchenglocken.«

»Nein, das sind Frösche!« sagte die kleine Köchin. »Aber nun denke ich, werden wir sie bald hören!«

Da begann die Nachtigall zu schlagen.

»Das ist sie!« sagte das kleine Mädchen. »Hört! Hört! Da sitzt sie!« Und sie zeigte nach einem kleinen, grauen Vogel oben in den Zweigen. »Ist es möglich!« sagte der Cavalier. »So halte ich sie mir nimmer gedacht! Wie sie einfach aussieht! Sie hat sicher ihre Farbe darüber verloren, daß sie so viele vornehme Menschen um sich erblickt!«

»Kleine Nachtigall!« rief die kleine Köchin laut; »unser gnädigster Kaiser wünscht, daß Sie vor ihm singen!«

»Mit dem größten Vergnügen!« sagte die Nachtigall und sang dann, daß es eine Lust war.

»Es klingt gerade wie Glasglocken!« sagte der Cavalier. »Und seht die kleine Kehle, wie sie arbeitet! Es ist merkwürdig, daß wir sie früher nie gehört haben! Sie wird großen Succès bei Hofe machen!«

»Soll ich noch einmal vor dem Kaiser singen?« fragte die Nachtigall, welche glaubte, der Kaiser sei auch da.

»Meine vortreffliche kleine Nachtigall!« sagte der Cavalier, »ich habe die große Freude, Sie zu einem Hoffeste heute Abend einzuladen, wo Sie Dero hohe kaiserliche Gnaden mit Ihrem charmanten Gesänge bezaubern werden!«

»Der hört sie am besten im Grünen an!« sagte die Nachtigall; aber sie kam doch gern mit, als sie hörte, daß es der Kaiser wünschte.

Auf dem Schlosse war tüchtig aufgeputzt. Die Wände und der Fußboden, welche von Porzellan waren, glänzten im Strahle vieler tausend Goldlampen; die prächtigsten Blumen, welche recht klingeln konnten, waren in den Gängen aufgestellt. Das war ein Laufen und ein Zugwind, und alle Glocken klingelten so, daß man sein eigenes Wort nicht hören konnte.

Mitten in den großen Saal wo der Kaiser saß war ein goldener Stecken gestellt, auf diesem sollte die Nachtigall sitzen. Der ganze Hof war da, und die kleine Köchin hatte die Erlaubniß erhalten, hinter der Thür zu stehen, da sie nun den Titel einer wirklichen Hofköchin bekommen hatte. Alle waren in ihrem größten Putz, und Alle sahen nach dem kleinen grauen Vogel, dem der Kaiser zunickte.

Die Nachtigall sang so herrlich, daß dem Kaiser die Thränen in die Augen traten und ihm über die Wangen herniederliefen, da sang die Nachtigall noch schöner: das ging recht zu Herzen. Der Kaiser war so froh, daß er sagte, die Nachtigall solle seinen goldenen Pantoffel um den Hals zu tragen bekommen. Aber die Nachtigall dankte: sie habe schon Belohnung genug erhalten.

»Ich habe Thränen in des Kaisers Augen gesehen, das ist mir der reichste Schatz! Eines Kaisers Thränen haben eine besondere Kraft! Gott weiß es, ich bin genug belohnt.« Darauf sang sie wieder mit ihrer süßen, herrlichen Stimme.

»Das ist die liebenswürdigste Koketterie, die ich kenne!« sagten die Damen rings umher, und dann nahmen sie Wasser in den Mund um zu glucken, wenn Jemand mit ihnen spräche. Sie glaubten dann auch Nachtigallen zu sein. Ja, die Lakaien und Kammermädchen ließen melden, daß auch sie zufrieden seien; das will viel sagen, denn die sind am schwersten zu befriedigen. Kurz, die Nachtigall machte wahrlich Glück.

Sie sollte nun bei Hofe bleiben, ihr eigenes Bauer und die Freiheit haben, zweimal des Tages und einmal des Nachts herauszuspazieren. Sie bekam dann zwölf Diener mit, welche ihr alle ein Seidenband um das Bein geschlungen hatten, an dem sie sie recht fest hielten. Es war durchaus kein Vergnügen bei einem solchen Ausfluge.

Die ganze Stadt sprach von dem merkwürdigen Vogel, und begegneten sich Zwei, so sagte der Eine nichts Anderes als: »Nacht!« – und der Andere sagte: »gall!« [Fußnote] Und dann seufzten sie und verstanden einander. Ja, elf Hökerkinder wurden nach ihr benannt; aber nicht eins von ihnen hatte einen Ton in der Kehle. –

Eines Tages erhielt der Kaiser ein großes Packet, worauf geschrieben stand: »Die Nachtigall«.

»Da haben wir nun ein neues Buch über unsern berühmten Vogel!« sagte der Kaiser. Aber es war kein Buch, sondern ein kleines Kunstwerk, welches in einer Schachtel lag: eine künstliche Nachtigall, die der lebenden gleichen sollte, allein überall mit Diamanten, Rubinen und Saphiren besetzt war. Sobald man den Kunstvogel aufzog, konnte er eins der Stücke, die der wirkliche Vogel sang, singen; und dann bewegte sich der Schweif auf und nieder, und glänzte von Silber und Gold. Um den Hals hing ein kleines Band, darauf stand geschrieben: »Des Kaisers von Japan Nachtigall ist arm gegen die des Kaisers von China.«

»Das ist herrlich!« sagten Alle; und der, welcher den künstlichen Vogel gebracht hatte, erhielt sogleich den Titel: Kaiserlicher Ober-Nachtigall-Bringer.

»Nun müssen sie zusammen singen: was wird das für ein Duett werden!«

Und so mußten sie zusammen singen; aber es wollte nicht recht passen, denn die wirkliche Nachtigall sang auf ihre Weise und der Kunstvogel ging auf Walzen. »Der hat keine Schuld,« sagte der Spielmeister; »der ist besonders taktfest und ganz nach meiner Schule!« Nun sollte der Kunstvogel allein singen. Er machte eben so viel Glück, als der wirkliche, und dann war er ja viel niedlicher anzusehen: er glänzte wie Armbänder und Busennadeln.

Dreiunddreißig Mal sang er ein und dasselbe Stück und war doch nicht müde. Die Leute hätten ihn gern wieder aufs Neue gehört, aber der Kaiser meinte, daß nun auch die lebendige Nachtigall etwas singen solle. – – Aber wo war die? Niemand hatte bemerkt, daß sie aus dem offenen Fenster zu ihren grünen Wäldern fort geflogen war.

»Aber was ist denn das!« sagte der Kaiser. Und alle Hofleute schalten und meinten, daß die Nachtigall ein höchst undankbares Thier sei. »Den besten Vogel haben wir doch!« sagten sie; und so mußte denn der Kunstvogel wieder singen, und das war das vierunddreißigste Mal, daß sie dasselbe Stück zu hören bekamen. Sie konnten es dessenungeachtet doch nicht auswendig; es war gar zu schwer. Und der Spielmeister lobte den Vogel außerordentlich; ja, er versicherte, daß er besser als eine Nachtigall sei, nicht nur was die Kleider und die vielen herrlichen Diamanten beträfe, sondern auch innerlich.

»Denn sehen Sie, meine Herrschaften, der Kaiser vor Allen! bei der wirklichen Nachtigall kann man nie berechnen, was da kommen wird; aber bei dem Kunstvogel ist Alles bestimmt! Man kann es erklären, man kann ihn öffnen und dem Menschen begreiflich machen, wie die Walzen liegen, wie sie gehen, und wie das Eine aus dem Andern folgt!«

»Das sind auch unsere Gedanken!« sagten Alle, und der Spielmeister erhielt die Erlaubniß, am nächsten Sonntage den Vogel dem Volke vorzuzeigen. Es sollte ihn auch singen hören, befahl der Kaiser. Und es hörte ihn; und es wurde so vergnügt, als ob es sich in Thee berauscht hätte, denn das ist chinesisch; da sagten Alle: »Oh!« und hielten den Zeigefinger in die Höhe und nickten dazu. Die armen Fischer jedoch, welche die wirkliche Nachtigall gehört hatten, sagten: »Das klingt hübsch genug; die Melodien gleichen sich auch; aber es fehlt Etwas, ich weiß nicht was!«

Die wirkliche Nachtigall wurde aus dem Lande und Reiche verwiesen.

Der Kunstvogel hatte seinen Platz auf einem Seidenkissen dicht bei des Kaisers Bette; alle die Geschenke, welche er erhalten, Gold und Edelsteine, lagen rings um ihn her, und im Titel war er zu einem »Hochkaiserlichen Nachttisch-Sänger« gestiegen, im Range bis Nummer Eins zur linken Seite. Denn der Kaiser rechnete die Seite für die vornehmste, auf der das Herz saß, und das Herz sitzt auch bei einem Kaiser links. Und der Spielmeister schrieb ein Werk von fünfundzwanzig Bänden über den Kunstvogel; das war so gelehrt und so lang, voll von den allerschwersten chinesischen Wörtern, daß alle Leute sagten, sie hatten es gelesen und verstanden, denn sonst wären sie ja dumm gewesen und wären auf den Leib getrampelt worden.

So ging es ein ganzes Jahr. Der Kaiser, der Hof und alle die andern Chinesen konnten jeden Gluck in des Kunstvogels Gesange auswendig. Aber gerade deshalb gefiel er ihnen jetzt am Allerbesten: sie konnten selbst mitsingen, und das thaten sie auch. Die Straßenbuben sangen: »Zizizi! Gluckgluckgluck!« und der Kaiser sang es ebenfalls. Ja, das war gewiß prächtig!

Eines Abends jedoch, als der Kunstvogel am Besten sang, und der Kaiser im Bette lag und darauf hörte, sagte es inwendig im Vogel »Schwupp«. Da sprang Etwas! »Schnurrrr!« alle Räder liefen herum, und dann stand die Musik still.

Der Kaiser sprang gleich aus dem Bette und ließ seinen Leibarzt rufen; aber was konnte der helfen! Dann ließen sie den Uhrmacher holen, und nach vielem Sprechen und Nachsehen bekam er den Vogel etwas in Ordnung; aber er sagte, daß er geschont werden müsse, denn die Zapfen seien abgenutzt, und es wäre unmöglich, neue so einzusetzen, daß die Musik sicher ginge. Nun war eine große Trauer! Nur einmal des Jahres durfte man den Kunstvogel singen lassen, und das war schon fast zu viel. Aber dann hielt der Spielmeister eine kleine Rede voll inhaltsschwerer Worte und sagte, daß es eben so gut sei, wie früher; dann war es eben so gut, wie früher.

Jetzt waren fünf Jahre vergangen, und das Land bekam eine große Trauer. Die Chinesen hielten im Grunde alle auf ihren Kaiser, und jetzt war er krank und konnte nicht lange mehr leben, sagte man. Schon war ein neuer Kaiser gewählt, und das Volk stand draußen auf der Straße und fragte den Cavalier, wie es ihrem alten Kaiser ginge.

»P!« sagte er und schüttelte mit dem Kopfe.

Kalt und bleich lag der Kaiser in seinem großen, prächtigen Bette; der ganze Hof glaubte ihn todt, und ein Jeder von ihnen lief hin, den neuen Kaiser zu begrüßen. Die Kammerdiener liefen hinaus, um darüber zu schwatzen, und die Kammermädchen hatten große Kaffeegesellschaft. Rings umher in alle Säle und Gänge war Tuch gelegt, damit man keinen Fußtritt vernehme, und deshalb war es da still, ganz still! Aber der Kaiser war noch nicht todt; steif und bleich lag er in dem prächtigen Bette mit den langen Sammetgardinen und den schweren Goldquasten; hoch oben stand ein Fenster offen, und der Mond schien herein auf den Kaiser und den Kunstvogel.

Der arme Kaiser konnte kaum athmen; es war, als ob Etwas auf seiner Brust säße; er schlug die Augen auf, und da sah er, daß es der Tod sei, der auf seiner Brust saß und sich seine goldene Krone aufgesetzt hatte und in der einen Hand des Kaisers goldenen Säbel, in der andern seine prächtige Fahne hielt. Und rings umher aus den Falten der großen, sammtnen Bettgardinen sahen wunderbare Köpfe hervor: einige häßlich, andere lieblich und mild. Das waren alle des Kaisers böse und gute Thaten, welche ihn anblickten, jetzt da der Tod ihm auf dem Herzen saß.

»Entsinnest Du Dich dieses?« flüsterte Einer nach dem Andern. »Erinnerst Du Dich dessen?« Und dann erzählten sie ihm so viel, daß ihm der Schweiß von der Stirne rann.

»Das habe ich nicht gewußt!« sagte der Kaiser. »Musik! Musik! die große chinesische Trommel!« rief er; »damit ich nicht Alles zu hören brauche, was sie sagen!«

Und sie fuhren fort, und der Tod nickte wie ein Chinese zu Allem, was gesagt wurde.

»Musik, Musik!« schrie der Kaiser. »Du kleiner herrlicher Goldvogel! Singe doch, singe! Ich habe Dir ja Gold und Kostbarkeiten gegeben; ich habe Dir selbst meinen goldenen Pantoffel um den Hals gehängt: singe doch, singe!«

Der Vogel aber stand still; es war Niemand da, ihn aufzuziehen, und sonst sang er nicht; aber der Tod fuhr fort, den Kaiser mit seinen großen, hohlen Augen anzustarren; und still war es, schrecklich still!

Da klang auf einmal vom Fenster her der herrlichste Gesang: es war die kleine, lebende Nachtigall, welche auf einem Zweige draußen saß. Sie hatte von der Noth ihres Kaisers gehört und war deshalb gekommen, ihm Trost und Hoffnung zu singen. Und wie sie sang, wurden die Gespenster immer bleicher und bleicher; das Blut kam immer rascher und rascher in des Kaisers schwachen Gliedern in Bewegung, und selbst der Tod horchte und sagte: »Fahre fort, kleine Nachtigall! fahre fort!«

»Ja, willst Du mir den prächtigen goldenen Säbel geben? Willst Du mir die reiche Fahne geben? Willst Du mir des Kaisers Krone geben?«

Und der Tod gab jedes Kleinod für einen Gesang; und die Nachtigall fuhr noch fort zu singen; sie sang von dem stillen Gottesacker, wo die weißen Rosen wachsen, wo der Flieder duftet, und wo das frische Gras von den Thränen der Ueberlebenden befeuchtet wird. Da bekam der Tod Sehnsucht nach seinem Garten und schwebte, wie ein kalter, weißer Nebel, aus dem Fenster.

»Dank, Dank!« sagte der Kaiser. »Du himmlischer, kleiner Vogel! Ich kenne Dich wohl! Dich habe ich aus meinem Lande und Reiche gejagt! Und doch hast Du die bösen Gesichter von meinem Bette weggesungen, den Tod von meinem Herzen weggeschafft! Wie kann ich Dir lohnen?«

»Du hast mich belohnt!« sagte die Nachtigall. »Ich habe Deinen Augen Thränen entlockt, als ich das erste Mal sang: das vergesse ich nie! Das sind Juwelen, die ein Sängerherz erfreuen! – Aber schlafe nun und werde wieder frisch und stark! Ich werde Dir etwas vorsingen!«

Und sie sang – und der Kaiser fiel in einen süßen Schlummer. Ach! wie mild und wohlthuend war der Schlaf!

Die Sonne schien durch die Fenster zu ihm herein, als er gestärkt und gesund erwachte. Keiner von seinen Dienern war noch zurückgekehrt, denn sie glaubten, er sei todt; nur die Nachtigall saß noch bei ihm und sang.

»Immer mußt Du bei mir bleiben!« sagte der Kaiser. »Du sollst nun singen, wenn Du selbst willst, und den Kunstvogel schlage ich in tausend Stücke.«

»Thue das nicht!« sagte die Nachtigall. »Der hat ja Gutes gethan, so lange er konnte! Behalte ihn, wie bisher! Ich kann im Schlosse nicht mein Nest bauen und bewohnen; aber laß mich kommen, wenn ich selbst Lust habe: da will ich des Abends auf dem Zweige dort beim Fenster sitzen und Dir etwas vorsingen, damit Du froh werden kannst und gedankenvoll zugleich! Ich werde von den Glücklichen singen, und von Denen, die da leiden! Ich werde vom Bösen und vom Guten singen, was rings um Dich her verborgen bleibt! Der kleine Singvogel fliegt weit umher, zu dem armen Fischer, zu des Landmanns Dach, zu Jedem, der weit von Dir und Deinem Hofe entfernt ist! Ich liebe Dein Herz mehr als Deine Krone, und doch hat die Krone einen Duft von etwas Heiligthum um sich! – Ich komme, ich singe Dir etwas vor! – Aber Eins mußt Du mir versprechen.« –

– »Alles!« sagte der Kaiser und stand da in seiner kaiserlichen Tracht, die er selbst angelegt hatte, und drückte den Säbel, welcher schwer von Gold war, an sein Herz.

»Um Eins bitte ich Dich! Erzähle Niemand, daß Du einen kleinen Vogel hast, der Dir Alles sagt; dann wird es noch besser gehen!«

Da flog die Nachtigall fort.

Die Diener kamen herein, um nach ihrem todten Kaiser zu sehen – – ja, da standen sie, und der Kaiser sagte: »Guten Morgen!«