de-en  Hans Christian Andersen: Des Kaisers neue Kleider.
Many years ago, an emperor lived who paid so much attention to new clothes that he spent all his money on getting smartened up. He didn't care about his soldiers, didn't care about the theater and only loved to drive around to show off his new clothes. He had one coat for every hour of the day, and just as one says of a king, he is in council, one always said here: "The emperor is in the wardrobe!" In the great city in which he lived, it was very lively; every day many strangers arrived there. One day two swindlers arrived as well; they pretended to be weavers and said that they knew how to weave the most beautiful things imaginable. Not only were the colours and pattern unusually beautiful, but the clothes sewn of this material would possess the wonderful quality of being invisible to anyone who is not fit for office or unforgivably stupid.

"They would be magnificent clothes," thought the emperor, "if I wore them, I could find out which men in my kingdom are are unsuitable for the office they have; I could distinguish the wise from the stupid ones! Yes, the fabric must be woven for me immediately!" And he gave a lot of money to the two swindlers, so that they could start their work.

They set up two looms then and acted as if they were working; but they did not have the slightest bit on the loom. Insolent they demanded the finest silk and the most magnificent gold, they put it in their own pockets and worked on the empty looms until late into the night.

I'd really like to know how far they are with that stuff," the emperor thought. But he was rather fearful when he thought about that the one who is stupid or unworthy of his office couldn't see it. Now, although he believed that he had nothing to be afraid of himself, he still just wanted to send someone else to see how things were going. All the people all over town knew what special power the cloth had and everyone was eager to see how bad or stupid their neighbor was.

"I want to send my old, honest minister to the weavers!" thought the emperor. "He can judge the best how the cloth appears because he has a mind and no one understands his office better than he!" So, the good old minister went into the room where the swindlers were sitting and working on the empty looms. "God bless us!" thought the old minister and opened his eyes wide ; "I cannot see anything!" But he didn't say that.

Both swindlers asked him to kindly step closer and asked if it wasn't a pretty pattern and lovely colors. Then they pointed to the empty loom and the poor old minister proceeded to open his eyes wide; but he could see nothing because there was nothing there. "Lordy!" he thought, "should I be stupid? I never believed that, and no human being is allowed to know that! Shouldn't I be suitable for my function? No, it will not do for me to say that I couldn't see the cloth!" Well, do you have nothing to say about it?" asked the one who was weaving.

"Oh, it is dainty, really lovely!" replied the old minister and looked through his glasses. "This pattern and these colors! "Yes, I will tell the Kaiser that it is very much to my liking." "That pleases us, indeed!" the two weavers replied, and thereupon they described the colours with names and explained the unusual pattern. The old minister paid close attention so that he could say the same when he came back to the emperor, and that he did.

Now the swindlers demanded more money, more silk and more gold, which they wanted to use for weaving. They put everything in their own pockets, no strand came on the loom, but as before, they continued to work on the empty loom.

Soon the Emperor sent again another honest statesman to see how it was about the weaving and whether the fabric was finished soon; it occurred to him just like it occurred to the one before; he looked and looked, but since there was nothing except the empty loom, he couldn't see anything.

"Isn't it a pretty piece of fabric?" asked the both swindlers and showed and explained the magnificent pattern, which didn't exist at all.

"I am not stupid!" the man thought; "so it is my good tenure I am not worthy for. It is odd enough, but one may not let anybody notice it!" and so he praised the fabric, which he didn't see and assured them his pleasure about the beautiful colors and the magnificent pattern. "Yes it is entirely dearest!", he said to the Emperor.

All the pepole in town spoke about the magnificent fabric.

Now the Emperor wanted to see it for himself while it was still on the loom. With a whole host of chosen men, among whom were the two honest statesmen who had been there before, he went to the two cunning swindlers, who now wove with all their might, but without strand and thread.

"Isn't it magnificent?", said the two older statesmen, who had been there before. "Look your Majesty what a pattern, what colors!" And then they pointed to the empty loom, for they believed that the others might well see the fabric.

The Emperor thought "what, I don't see anything at all! That is horrible! Am I stupid? Am I not suitable for being an emperor? That would be the most horrible that could happen to me." "Oh, it is very beautiful", he said. "It has my very best approval!" And he nodded in satisfaction and looked at the empty loom, because he did not want to say that he could not see anything. The whole entourage he had with him looked and looked and could not see more than all the others; but like the emperor they said, "Oh, they are fine!" and advised him to wear those gorgeous new dresses for the first time at the great procession that was soon to take place. "It is magnificent, cute, excellent!" It went from mouth to mouth; everyone seemed genuinely pleased with it, and the Emperor gave the swindlers the title of Imperial Court Weavers.

The whole night prior to the morning on which the procession was to take place, the swindlers were awake and had more than sixteen lights burning. The people could see that they were extremely busy finishing Emperor's new clothes. They acted as though they took the cloth from the weaving loom, they made cuts in the air with large scissors they sewed with needles without thread and said finally: "Now the clothes are ready!" The emperor came there himself with his most noble of statesmen, and both of the swindlers lifted their arms up, just as if they were holding something, and said: "Look, here are the fine clothes! Here is the coat! Here's the cloak!" and so on. "It is as light as cobwebs. You would believe that you have nothing on your body. But that is just the beauty of it!" "Yes!" said all the cavaliers. But they couldn't see anything because there wasn't anything there.

"if it pleases your Imperial Majesty to take off your clothes now most graciously," the swindlers said. "We want you to put on the new ones here in front of the large mirror!" The emperor took off all his clothes and the swindlers positioned themselves as if they were dressing him in each piece of the new clothes that were finished. And the emperor twisted and turned in front of the mirror.

Oh, how well they sit! How gloriously they fit," said everyone. "What pattern, what colors! That is a magnificent costume!" "Outside they stand with the baldachin, which will be carried above your which is to be carried over Your Majesty in the procession," reported the chief master of ceremonies.

"Look at me, I am ready!", said the Emperor. "Does it not sit well?" And then turned again to the mirror, for it should appear that he really was admiring his magnificent clothing.

The chamberlains who were supposed to carry the train reached to the floor, just as if they were lifting up the train; they walked and acted as if they were holding something in the air; they did not dare let it be noticed that they could not see anything.

Thus, the emperor walked in the procession under the splendid canopy and all the people in the street and in the windows said: "God, how matchless are the emperor's new clothes. What a train he has on his frock, how splendidly it sits!" No one wanted it to be noticed that he couldn't see anything because then, indeed, he would not have been suitable for his office or would have been very stupid. No clothes of the Emperor had made such a bliss as these.

"But he's not wearing anything!" said a little child at last. "My Lord, hear the innocent voice!", the father said; and one whispered to the other what the child had said.

"But he's not wearing anything!", exclaimed all the people finally. This seized the Emperor, for it seemed to him that they were right; but he thought to himself: "Now I have to endure the procession." And the chamberlains went even tighter and carried the train that was not there at all.
unit 10
»Ich möchte doch wohl wissen, wie weit sie mit dem Zeuge sind!« dachte der Kaiser.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 14
unit 19
»Herr Gott!« dachte er, »sollte ich dumm sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 20
Das habe ich nie geglaubt, und das darf kein Mensch wissen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 21
Sollte ich nicht zu meinem Amte taugen?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 24
»Dieses Muster und diese Farben!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 33
»Ja, es ist ganz allerliebst!« sagte er zum Kaiser.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 34
Alle Menschen in der Stadt sprachen von dem prächtigen Zeuge.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 35
Nun wollte der Kaiser es selbst sehen, während es noch auf dem Webstuhle sei.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 37
unit 38
»Sehen Ew.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 40
»Was!« dachte der Kaiser, »ich sehe gar nichts!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 41
Das ist ja schrecklich!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 42
Bin ich dumm?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 43
Tauge ich nicht dazu, Kaiser zu sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 51
Hier ist der Rock!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 52
Hier der Mantel!« und so weiter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 54
»Belieben Ew.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 56
»Ei, wie gut sie kleiden!
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 57
Wie herrlich sie sitzen!« sagten Alle.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 58
»Welches Muster, welche Farben!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 60
unit 61
»Seht, ich bin fertig!« sagte der Kaiser.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 65
Keine Kleider des Kaisers hatten solches Glück gemacht, wie diese.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 66
»Aber er hat ja nichts an!« sagte endlich ein kleines Kind.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
unit 68
»Aber er hat ja nichts an!« rief zuletzt das ganze Volk.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 2  7 months, 1 week ago

Vor vielen Jahren lebte ein Kaiser, der so ungeheuer viel auf neue Kleider hielt, daß er all sein Geld dafür ausgab, um recht geputzt zu sein. Er kümmerte sich nicht um seine Soldaten, kümmerte sich nicht um das Theater und liebte es nur, spazieren zu fahren, um seine neuen Kleider zu zeigen. Er hatte einen Rock für jede Stunde des Tages, und eben so, wie man von einem Könige sagt, er ist im Rathe, sagte man hier immer: »Der Kaiser ist in der Garderobe!«

In der großen Stadt, in welcher er wohnte, ging es sehr munter zu; an jedem Tage trafen viele Fremde daselbst ein. Eines Tages kamen auch zwei Betrüger an; sie gaben sich für Weber aus und sagten, daß sie das schönste Zeug, das man sich denken könne, zu weben verstanden. Die Farben und das Muster wären nicht allein ungewöhnlich schön, sondern die Kleider, die von dem Zeuge genäht würden, besäßen die wunderbare Eigenschaft, daß sie für jeden Menschen unsichtbar wären, der nicht für sein Amt tauge oder der unverzeihlich dumm sei.

»Das wären ja prächtige Kleider,« dachte der Kaiser; »wenn ich die anhätte, könnte ich ja dahinter kommen, welche Männer in meinem Reiche zu dem Amte, das sie haben, nicht taugen; ich könnte die Klugen von den Dummen unterscheiden! Ja, das Zeug muß sogleich für mich gewebt werden!« Und er gab den beiden Betrügern viel Handgeld, damit sie ihre Arbeit beginnen möchten.

Sie stellten auch zwei Webstühle auf und thaten, als ob sie arbeiteten; aber sie hatten nicht das Geringste auf dem Stuhle. Frischweg verlangten sie die feinste Seide und das prächtigste Gold, das steckten sie in ihre eigenen Taschen und arbeiteten an den leeren Stühlen bis spät in die Nacht hinein.

»Ich möchte doch wohl wissen, wie weit sie mit dem Zeuge sind!« dachte der Kaiser. Aber es war ihm ordentlich beklommen zu Muthe, wenn er daran dachte, daß Derjenige, welcher dumm sei oder nicht zu seinem Amte tauge, es nicht sehen könne. Nun glaubte er zwar, daß er für sich selbst nichts zu fürchten habe, aber er wollte doch erst einen Andern senden, um zu sehen, wie es damit stände. Alle Menschen in der ganzen Stadt wußten, welche besondere Kraft das Zeug habe, und Alle waren begierig, zu sehen, wie schlecht oder dumm ihr Nachbar sei.

»Ich will meinen alten, ehrlichen Minister zu den Webern senden!« dachte der Kaiser. »Er kann am Besten beurtheilen, wie das Zeug sich ausnimmt, denn er hat Verstand, und Keiner versteht sein Amt besser, als er!« –

Nun ging der alte, gute Minister in den Saal hinein, wo die zwei Betrüger saßen und an den leeren Webstühlen arbeiteten. »Gott behüte uns!« dachte der alte Minister und riß die Augen auf; »ich kann ja nichts erblicken!« Aber das sagte er nicht.

Beide Betrüger baten ihn, gefälligst näher zu treten, und fragten, ob es nicht ein hübsches Muster und schöne Farben seien. Dann zeigten sie auf den leeren Webstuhl, und der arme, alte Minister fuhr fort, die Augen aufzureißen; aber er konnte nichts sehen, denn es war nichts da. »Herr Gott!« dachte er, »sollte ich dumm sein? Das habe ich nie geglaubt, und das darf kein Mensch wissen! Sollte ich nicht zu meinem Amte taugen? Nein, es geht nicht an, daß ich erzähle, ich könnte das Zeug nicht sehen!«

»Nun Sie sagen nichts dazu?« fragte der Eine, der da webte.

»O, es ist niedlich, ganz allerliebst!« antwortete der alte Minister und sah durch seine Brille. »Dieses Muster und diese Farben! – Ja, ich werde dem Kaiser sagen, daß es mir sehr gefällt.«

»Nun, das freut uns!« sagten beide Weber, und darauf nannten sie die Farben mit Namen und erklärten das seltsame Muster. Der alte Minister paßte gut auf, damit er dasselbe sagen könnte, wenn er zum Kaiser zurückkäme, und das that er.

Jetzt verlangten die Betrüger mehr Geld, mehr Seide und mehr Gold, das sie zum Weben gebrauchen wollten. Sie steckten Alles in ihre eigenen Taschen, auf den Webstuhl kam kein Faden, aber sie fuhren fort, wie bisher, an dem leeren Webstuhle zu arbeiten.

Der Kaiser sendete bald wieder einen andern ehrlichen Staatsmann hin, um zu sehen, wie es mit dem Weben stände und ob das Zeug bald fertig sei; es ging ihm gerade, wie dem Ersten; er sah und sah, weil aber außer dem leeren Webstuhle nichts da war, so konnte er nichts sehen.

»Ist das nicht ein hübsches Stück Zeug?« fragten die beiden Betrüger und zeigten und erklärten das prächtige Muster, welches gar nicht da war.

»Dumm bin ich nicht!« dachte der Mann; »es ist also mein gutes Amt, zu dem ich nicht tauge. Es ist komisch genug, aber das muß man sich nicht merken lassen!« und so lobte er das Zeug, welches er nicht sah, und versicherte ihnen seine Freude über die schönen Farben und das herrliche Muster. »Ja, es ist ganz allerliebst!« sagte er zum Kaiser.

Alle Menschen in der Stadt sprachen von dem prächtigen Zeuge.

Nun wollte der Kaiser es selbst sehen, während es noch auf dem Webstuhle sei. Mit einer ganzen Schaar auserwählter Männer, unter denen auch die beiden ehrlichen Staatsmänner waren, die schon früher dort gewesen, ging er zu den beiden listigen Betrügern hin, die nun aus allen Kräften webten, aber ohne Faser und Faden.

»Ist das nicht prächtig?« sagten die beiden alten Staatsmänner, die schon einmal da gewesen waren. »Sehen Ew. Majestät, welches Muster, welche Farben!« Und dann zeigten sie auf den leeren Webstuhl, denn sie glaubten, daß die Andern das Zeug wohl sehen könnten.

»Was!« dachte der Kaiser, »ich sehe gar nichts! Das ist ja schrecklich! Bin ich dumm? Tauge ich nicht dazu, Kaiser zu sein? Das wäre das Schrecklichste, was mir begegnen könnte.« – »O, es ist sehr hübsch!« sagte er. »Es hat meinen allerhöchsten Beifall!« Und er nickte zufrieden und betrachtete den leeren Webstuhl, denn er wollte nicht sagen, daß er nichts sehen könne. Das ganze Gefolge, das er bei sich hatte, sah und sah und bekam nicht mehr heraus, als alle die Andern; aber sie sagten, wie der Kaiser: »O, das ist hübsch!« Und sie riethen ihm, diese neuen, prächtigen Kleider das erste Mal bei der großen Processton, die bevorstand, zu tragen. »Es ist herrlich, niedlich, excellent!« ging es von Mund zu Mund; man schien allerseits innig erfreut darüber, und der Kaiser verlieh den Betrügern den Titel: Kaiserliche Hofweber.

Die ganze Nacht vor dem Morgen, an dem die Procession stattfinden sollte, waren die Betrüger auf und hatten über sechzehn Lichter angezündet. Die Leute konnten sehen, daß sie stark beschäftigt waren, des Kaisers neue Kleider fertig zu machen. Sie thaten, als ob sie das Zeug von dem Webstuhle nähmen, sie schnitten mit großen Scheeren in die Luft, sie nähten mit Nähnadeln ohne Faden und sagten zuletzt: »Nun sind die Kleider fertig!«

Der Kaiser kam mit seinen vornehmsten Cavalieren selbst dahin, und beide Betrüger hoben den einen Arm in die Höhe, gerade als ob sie Etwas hielten und sagten: »Seht, hier sind die Beinkleider! Hier ist der Rock! Hier der Mantel!« und so weiter. »Es ist so leicht wie Spinngewebe; man sollte glauben, man habe nichts auf dem Leibe; aber das ist gerade die Schönheit davon!«

»Ja!« sagten alle Cavaliere; aber sie konnten nichts sehen; denn es war nichts da.

»Belieben Ew. kaiserliche Majestät jetzt ihre Kleider allergnädigst auszuziehen,« sagten die Betrüger, »so wollen wir Ihnen die neuen anziehen, hier vor dem großen Spiegel!«

Der Kaiser legte alle seine Kleider ab, und die Betrüger stellten sich, als ob sie ihm jedes Stück der neuen Kleider anzögen, welche fertig wären; und der Kaiser wendete sich und drehte sich vor dem Spiegel.

»Ei, wie gut sie kleiden! Wie herrlich sie sitzen!« sagten Alle. »Welches Muster, welche Farben! Das ist eine köstliche Tracht!«

»Draußen stehen sie mit dem Thronhimmel, welcher über Ew. Majestät in der Procession getragen werden soll,« meldete der Oberceremonienmeister.

»Seht, ich bin fertig!« sagte der Kaiser. »Sitzt es nicht gut?« Und dann wendete er sich nochmals zu dem Spiegel, denn es sollte scheinen, als ob er seinen Schmuck recht betrachte.

Die Kammerherren, welche die Schleppe tragen sollten, griffen mit den Händen nach dem Fußboden, gerade als ob sie die Schleppe aufhöben; sie gingen und thaten, wie wenn sie Etwas in der Luft hielten; sie wagten nicht, es sich merken zu lassen, daß sie nichts sehen konnten.

So ging der Kaiser in Procession unter dem prächtigen Thronhimmel, und alle Menschen auf der Straße und in den Fenstern sprachen: »Gott, wie sind des Kaisers neue Kleider unvergleichlich; welche Schleppe der am Kleide hat, wie schön das sitzt!« Keiner wollte es sich merken lassen, daß er nichts sehe, denn dann hätte er ja nicht zu seinem Amte getaugt oder wäre sehr dumm gewesen. Keine Kleider des Kaisers hatten solches Glück gemacht, wie diese.

»Aber er hat ja nichts an!« sagte endlich ein kleines Kind. »Herr Gott, hört des Unschuldigen Stimme!« sagte der Vater; und der Eine zischelte dem Andern zu, was das Kind gesagt hatte.

»Aber er hat ja nichts an!« rief zuletzt das ganze Volk. Das ergriff den Kaiser, denn es schien ihm, als hatten sie Recht; aber er dachte bei sich: »Nun muß ich die Procession aushalten.« Und die Kammerherren gingen noch straffer und trugen die Schleppe, die gar nicht da war.