de-en  Gutenberg > Johann Wolfgang von Goethe > Aus einer Reise in die Schweiz über Frankfurt, Heidelberg, Stuttgart und Tübingen im Jahre 1797 - Kapitel 1
Introducing items out of letters, a short time before departure, written to Meyer in Florence and Stäfa.

Weimar, April 28, 1797.

Until now, whenever I wanted to become impatient, I always imagined you, my dearest friend, as an example: for your situation, although among the most splendid works of art, did not allow you any communication and communal enjoyment, whereby everything that is ours has indeed come to life; but I, although cut off from the viewing of the fine arts that I so much desired, lived, however, in an ongoing exchange of ideas, and in the many things that interested me, progressed.

But now I am happy to confess to you that my restlessness and displeasure are increasing to a high degree, since not only are all roads to Italy blocked for the moment, but also the prospects for the next time are extremely bad.

All the strangers were expelled in Vienna; Count Fries, with whom I wanted to travel earlier, does not return until September itself; the way from there to Trieste is now also blocked and devastated and unpleasant for the future like the others.... In upper Italy itself, how it must not look there! If besides the warring armies also two parties fight against each other. And even after peace, how insecure and shattered it must remain for a long time in a country where there is no police, nor will there be! Some people who are now out across Milan cannot say enough about how tortured and hindered they are everywhere because of passports, how they are being stopped and dragged around and what else they have to endure for the necessity of getting away and remaining alive.

You can easily imagine that under these circumstances everything that takes some sympathy from me warns me from making a journey; and whether I know quite well that one should not pay attention to the negatives in all reasonably daring undertakings, the case is nevertheless of the kind that even with some reflection, one can very easily see the impracticality of such an expedition.

All this together almost pushes me to decide: this summer, and perhaps the whole year, not to think of such a journey any further. I am writing this to you at once so that in any case I can still communicate with you about it in writing Because I really don't know what to advise you. As much as I miss you on all sides and as much as I am displaced from all the pleasures of the fine arts by your absence, I would not want you to be separated from the nourishment of your talent, which you will again miss completely in Germany in the future. If my plan is brought to failure by external circumstances, I wish to see yours completed.

I have once again made my own world, and the great interest I have taken in epic poetry will be stalling me for some time. My poem 'Herrmann und Dorothea' is ready; it consists of two thousand hexameters and is divided in nine songs and in it I see at least a part of my desires fulfilled. My friends here and in the neighborhood are probably satisfied with it, and it's mainly a question of whether it can withstand the rehearsal before you too. For the highest authority from which it can be judged is that to which the human painter brings his compositions, and the question will be whether you will recognize the true human proportions and limb forms under the modern costume.

The object itself is extremely happy, a subject such as one does not find twice in one's life; how then all of the objects are found to be true works of art less often than one thinks, therefore, even the ancients move constantly only in a certain circle.

In the situation in which I find myself, I have sworn to myself not to participate in anything more than in what I have in my power as a poem; where one knows that one only has to reprove or praise oneself at last; in a work on which, once the plan is good, one does not experience the fate of the Penelopean veil. For unfortunately in all other earthly things, men usually dissolve what they have woven with great care, and life resembles that arduous way of pilgrimage where one has to take three steps forward and two steps backwards. If you come back, then I wish you could swear to yourself in such a way that you only want to practice your art within a certain area, indeed I would say, within a framework where you are the master. I admit that such a decision is very illiberal, and only despair can bring you do it, but it is always better to renounce once and for all than to go mad one day at a time.

The above was already written a few days ago, not in the best humor, when suddenly the peace message came from Frankfurt. We are indeed still waiting for confirmation, and we are not yet aware of the conditions and circumstances, but I do not want to delay this letter so that, nevertheless, you hear something from me again, and the enclosed that has been given to me for you will not remain lying around. Farewell and let me soon hear from you again. In a short time, much has to be clarified, and I hope that the wish to see each other firstly again in Italy will finally be granted to us.

Weimar, May 8, 1797.

On April 28, I wrote you a letter full of ill humour, the peace messages that were added at that moment rectified the content. Since that time, I have imagined as certainly as a person can imagine something: That I would leave for Frankfurt in early July to arrange a number of things with my mother and that from there, I would then go to Italy to see you.

I would therefore ask you to stay in those areas and, if you cannot be active, to vegetate in the meantime. But if you should want to go back to Switzerland because of your health, then write me where to meet you. I can count on your receiving this letter at the end of May; but if you simply reply to me in care of of Mrs. Rat Goethe, Frankfurt am Main, then I will certainly find your letter and will answer accordingly. In the meantime we experience the conditions of Northern Italy and see each other again with satisfaction wherever it may be. I repeat only recently that it does not matter to me in which region I am going from Frankfurt if I only find out where I can meet you closest. Goodbye very well! Everything is going rather well for me, so that after the declared peace I can hope to see you again on a satisfied, though very broken ground.

Jena, June 6, 1797

I received your letter of May 13, yesterday, from which I see that the mail are not yet moving at their old speed, but they are moving again, and that gives me the courage to write to you again immediately. ...

Since I received the news that you are not well, I am more restless than ever, for I know your nature, which restores itself hardly differently than in the patriotic air. In the meantime, you have received two more letters from me, one from April 28 and one from May 8, you would desire to have taken the resolution that serves your best interests in the last one. Your answer, which I can certainly find after the current round of mail in Frankfurt, will guide my way. I myself would have a lot of pleasure visiting you in your homeland and spending some time with you on Lake Zurich. May the good that can come from our friendly relationship keep you reasonably safe from the sufferings that you have endured in the meantime and that have had the most unpleasant influence on me at a distance; for I have never been dragged to and fro by such uncertainty; never before have my plans and resolutions varied so much from week to week. I was not delighted of the best enjoyment of life among friends and close associates while I knew you were alone and saw me cut off in one way after another.

Now may your next letter be decisive, and I want to find myself in it and be faithful to whatever it says. Wherever we may meet, it will be an endless joy. The learning that has become ours in the meantime will increase in the most beautiful way through communication.

Schiller lives in his new garden quite merry and busy; he has made very great preliminary work on his Wallenstein. If the old poets presented well-known myths, and even partially in their dramas, then a newer poet, how things are, always has the disadvantage that he first has to present the exposition, which actually does not only go to the fact, but to the whole breadth of existence, and to the mood. Schiller therefore had had a very good idea in that he sent a small piece ahead of the Wallenstein as an exposition, where the mass of the army, like the choir of the ancients, is represented by force and weightiness because at the end of the main piece, everything depends on it: that the mass no longer remains with it as soon as he changes the formula of the service. It is in of a heavier bearing and thus for art, more significant than the history of Dumouriez.

I am also very demanding to hear your ideas, about the presentable and what can be represented. All happiness of a work of art is based on the concise material it undertakes to represent. Now, there is the eternal error that as soon as something is implied to be important or beautiful, goodness knows and God knows everything, when one wants and has to do something after all.

In these days we even have had the opportunity to discuss many things about what works and does not work in some prosodic form. It is almost magical that something that is even quite good and characteristic in one syllabic measure seems empty and unacceptable in another. But just as magical are the alternating dances in a ballroom, where mood, movement and everything else is cancelled out by what follows.

Since my whole operation depends on your answer to my letter of May 8, I will not write again until I have received it and will answer you immediately afterwards where I am and how I am doing. If you still have anything to announce on this one, send it only to Frankfurt to my mother, where I already want to see to the further details.



Weimar, July 7, 1797.

All the best to you on patriotic land! Your letter of June 26, which I got today, has lifted a great burden from my heart. ... Although I could hope that you would answer my letter of May 8 immediately, alone my love for you, my concern for your health, the sense of the value I place on our individual relationship was making the situation extremely painful to me, and my mood, which was already very upset by the paralysis of our plan, was now assaulted even more by the news of your state of affairs. I reproached myself that, despite the circumstances, I had not gone earlier to visit you; I imagined your lonely relationship and the feelings quite vividly, and worked without drive and comfort merely to distract myself. Now a new epoch is about to begin in which everything will take on a better shape. Our very own activities now may become what may want, just take care of your health and arrange what you have collected as the whim takes you. Everything you do is good, because it all relates to a whole.

Your letter still reached me in Weimar, where my mother sent it. The duke is absent already for some months, he wants to talk to me about some things before my departure and I am expecting him. Meanwhile, I have everything in order and I am as loose and single as ever. I then go to Frankfurt with my peoples to introduce them to my mother, and after a short stay I send them back and meet them at the beautiful lake. What a pleasant feeling it is for me to know that you are in good hands and in an improved state except for that happy moment!

After receipt of this one write only to Frankfurt. Every eight days you'll receive a message from me. To welcome you to German soil, I am sending you just over half of my new poem. May the aura that blows out of it be pleasant and refreshing to you. I am not saying anything more. ... Now that we have fortunately been brought so much closer again, our first steps have been taken; and once we are together again, we want to stick firmly to each other and continue on our paths together. Farewell a thousand times!



Weimar, July 14, 1797.

Since I know that you are rescued to your homeland, my thoughts are now mainly directed on that we become mutually known for that which each one has done individually by themselves so far. You have come to know an infinite field through intuition and contemplation, and for my part, I have not failed to further educate myself through reflection and conversation about theory and methods, so that we can now either meet directly with our work, or at least explain and unite very easily.

I am sending you here an essay in which, according to some general information, is about Laocoön. The reason for this essay I say hereafter. Schiller is satisfied with the method and the meaning of it; the question now is: are you in agreement with the content? Do you believe that I have correctly grasped the work of art and have truly indicated the actual point of life which is portrayed? In any case, we can unite in the future: partly to deal with this work of art, partly with others in a certain sequence in such a way that, according to our old scheme, we will seek to deliver a complete development from the first poetic conception of the work to the last mechanical execution and thus utilize ourselves and others in various ways.

Hofrat Hirt is here, who has a life in Berlin according to his wishes and also feels very comfortable with us. His presence has entertained us very pleasantly by stimulating almost all that is of interest in art with the great mass of experience at his disposal, and thereby enlivening a circle of artistic friends, even by contradiction. He communicated to us a small essay about Laocoön, which you may already know earlier and which has the merit that he also vindicates to the works of art the characteristic and passionate as material, which had been too much suppressed by the misunderstanding of the concept of beauty and divine peace. Schiller, who has also been here for a few days, had particularly liked this essay in that he himself now thinks and works about tragedy, where these very points come up. In order to explain myself in the most liberal and complete way and to give opportunity for further discussions as well as particularly in view of our next collaborative work, I wrote the pages that I am now sending to you for examination.

More than anything else, take care of your health in the patriotic air and do not make any effort, especially by writing. Plan your scheme in total and rank the treasures of your collectanea and your memory; then wait till we are together again since you will have the comfort of dictating by bringing a writer, which relieves the mechanical aspect of the work very much and which is oppressive for an unhealthy person, even virtually clearing it away.

Our duke appears be enjoying himself on his journey, because he lets us wait one week after the other. But his late arrival, which I must expect, does not worry me at the moment, knowing you are safe. I hope you received my letter of the 7th with the beginning of the poem properly, and I will now arrange it so that I will send you something every week. You can write to me at my mother's address in Frankfurt even if it's only a little. I hope to soon be able to announce to you my departure from here and my arrival there and hope that you recover very soon and that I have the pleasure to find you, if not completely established, then in a fairly tolerable condition. Farewell, dearest friend! How I look forward to the moment when I will see you again, to see us compensated for our isolation so far through a united life!

Schiller and the friends of the family greet you, everyone is looking forward to your closeness and recovery.

Today for eight days I will enclose various poems. We have united in this year's almanac to give several ballads and to enlighten ourselves about the material and treatment of this type of poetry; I hope it shall lead to good results.

The Humboldt family now also will move from Dresden to Vienna. Gerning, who still constantly makes verses of every occasion, has just departed there via Regensburg. Both trips will be planning to advance to Italy from that side; the consequence will teach how far they will get.

The Duchess Mother is going to Kissingen. Wieland with his poor self-deception lives in Osmanstedt. Fräulein von Imhof is developing a quite beautiful poetic talent, she has contributed some very nice things to the almanac. ... In these days, we are expecting the young "Stein of Breslau", who was well educated all over the world. And so you would have some news from the staff who make up part of the Weimar Circle. Now that you are closer to me, it seems to me that something can and must be said to you about this. Knebel has gone to Bayreuth; he looks to stay in those areas, but I fear he will find nothing in the old place; Nuremberg in particular, which he loves, is a sad stay at the present moment. ... Again a cordial farewell.



Weimar, July 21, 1797.

Here is, my dear friend, the third weekly consignment with which I can announce to you at the same time: that my suitcase left for Frankfurt this morning in the mail car and that therefore already a part of me is moving towards you; the body will now also probably soon follow the spirit and the clothes.

This time I am sending you a few ballads, so that you will be received quite Nordic after all, for which I need not say that the first is from Schiller, the second from me. You will see from this that in seeking to maintain tone and mood of this type of poetry, we are anxious to choose more dignified and varied subjects; you will soon receive more like that.

Böttiger's note about the constricting snakes is very favorable to my hypothesis about Laocoön; when he wrote it he had not read my treatise.

Schiller was at my place for these eight days, quite healthy and very lively and active; yours, I may say, has been commemorated at every hour.

Our friend Amelie has also trained wondrously in the art of poetry and has done very good things that will be published with good effect after some assistance. Solid insights into another artistry can be clearly seen in her productions, and if it continues in both, it can reach a significant degree.

Today no more. Only the sincere wish, that your health may always improve! Send your letters only to my mother.



Frankfurt, Frankfurt, August 8, 1797.

For the first time I made the journey from Thuringia to Mainstrome entirely calmly and consciously during the day, and the clear image of the different regions, their characters and transitions, was very vivid and pleasant to me. Near Erfurt the basin in which this city lies was strange to me. It seems to have been formed in prehistoric times, when the tide was still high and the Unstrut was upheaved through the Gera.

The moment, because of maturing field products, was very important. In Thuringia everything was at its best, at the Fulda we found the almonds on the field and between Hanau and Frankfurt only the stubbles; one does not expect much from the wine, the fruits are well ripened.

We have been on the road from Weimar to here for four days and have suffered little or not at all because of the hot season. The thunderstorms cooled down the atmosphere during the nights the mornings; we drove very early, we fed the hottest hours of the day, and even if some hours on the way were traveled during the warm daytime, nevertheless, there is a draft of air on the heights and in the valleys where streams flow.

So I arrived happily and healthy in Frankfurt on the 3rd and now I am thinking in a quiet and cheerful apartment: what it means to go into the world in my years. In the past, objects impress and confuse us more because we cannot summarize them yet, but we can cope with them more easily since we take in only what lies in our path and pay little attention to the right and left. Later we understand things better, we are interested in a larger number of them, and we would be in a bad way if we were not helped and calmed in these cases. Now I want to put everything that occurred to me during these days in order as well as possible to try my schemes at Frankfurt as it is itself a multifaceted city and then prepare myself for another journey.

It struck me very strange how it actually works with the audience of a big city. It exists in a constant tumult of acquisition and consumption, and what we call mood can neither be produced nor communicated; all pleasures, even the theater, are only meant to amuse, and the great tendency of the reading public for journals and novels arises precisely because those always bring distraction into the amusement.

I think I have even noticed a type of timidity towards poetic production, or at least insofar as it is poetic, which seems quite natural to me for precisely these reasons. Poetry demands, indeed commands contemplation, it isolates man against his will, it repeatedly imposes itself and is in the wide world (not to say in the great world) as uncomfortable as a faithful lover.

I now get accustomed to writing down everything that happens to me and what I think about it without demanding the most precise observation and the most mature judgment from myself or even thinking about a future use. Once you have covered the entire path, you can always use what you have available as material with a better overview.

I visited the theater several times and for its evaluation I also made a methodical plan while gradually searching to fill it in, it struck me all the more: that one could actually only make a reasonable travel description of foreign countries where one is not related to anyone. No one would dare write anything about the place where one usually resides, it would have to be merely a discourse listing the available objects: just as it is with everything that is still reasonably close to us, one only feels that it would be an impiety if one also wanted to express publicly his fairest, most moderate judgement about the things. These reflections lead to graceful results and show me the way to go. So, for example, I compare now the local theater with that in Weimar; if I have also seen the Stuttgart theater, perhaps something general can be said about the three that is significant and that at best can be produced publicly.



August 8th.

In Frankfurt everything is active and lively, and the multiple misfortunes seem to have caused only a general recklessness. The millions in war contributions that had to be given to the advancing French last year are as forgotten as the misery of those moments, and everyone finds it extremely uncomfortable that he should now also contribute to it because of the interests and payments. Everyone complains about the extreme inflation, yet continues to spend money and increase the luxury he complains about. But I have already noticed some strange and unexpected exceptions.

Yesterday evening there was suddenly an energetic call for peace, the extent to which it was founded must soon be apparent. I have already looked around a lot in these few days, circumnavigated the city and around it; outside and inside one building after another is being built, and the better and bigger taste can be noticed, although here too some steps backwards are taking place. Yesterday I was in the Swiss house, which also contains a lot of good inside, especially I liked the type of windows; I will send a small model of it to the castle construction commission. ...

The local theater has good subjects, but on the whole it is far too poorly occupied for such a large institution; the gaps that arose upon the arrival of the French have not yet been filled. On Sunday Palmira is given, which I am very curious about.

I enclose a review of some Italian newspapers that have interested me because they allow a look into those conditions.



Italian Newspapers - There are several Italian newspapers in front of me whose character and content I intend to say a lot about.

The foreign news is all translated from foreign newspapers, so I only comment on the content of the domestic ones.

L'Osservatore Triestino No. 58. July 21, 1797. A very well written letter about Cherso's ownership on July 10. Then some of Zara's. The attachments are like our supplements and weekly papers.

Gazzetta Universale No. 58. July 22, 1797. Florence. A forceful law for reporting the arrival, stay and departure of strangers, published in Florentine.

Universal News No. 60. July 28, 1797. Roveredo. An article from Austria draws attention to the emperor's great armed force strength.

Il Corriere, Milan. No. 59. July 24, 1797. The Italian matters are presented in the republican sense, but with great moderation, delicacy and rhetoric; the Leidener Luzac comes to mind. ...

In a bookseller's message work is advertised: Historical Memoirs of Professor Gio. Battista Rottondo native of Monza, in Milanese, written by himself. Probably a novel-like composition, which, as much can be guessed from the advertisement, seeks to advise the revolutionaries in Italy to be moderate.

Journal Of Free Men. Bergamo. July 18, 1797. No. 5, Lively democratic, which seems very funny in the Bergamask manner; for who doesn't laugh when he reads: It is not necessary to defraud the Bergamask sovereign people to give them news, etc.

However, for the place and for the purpose, the paper seems to be very expedient, mainly dealing with the affairs of the city and the district.

No. 6. The abolition of a monastery by a majority of monk votes is desired, the aristocratic party demands unanimity.

The idioms are somewhat original, and the whole copy is brisk, faithful, naive so that one thinks he hears the harlequin in the best sense.

Il Patriota Bergamasco No. 17. July 18, 1797. A compliment to the Bergamascans that their National Guards were so particularly exceptional at the great Federation festival: The signs of patriotism and of mirth they manifested attracted common wonder, and they deserved the boasting of the most energetic republicans. If one translates this passage properly, the one wishes to have seen the Bergamascans with their gaiety on this occasion. The news from the Papal States, printed with words from Schwabach, is being given a funny turn.

A letter from General Bonaparte to the astronomer Cagnoli in Verona, who had suffered and lost much during the riots, is supposed to calm his temper since the man is promised compensation and safety.

No. 18 is very strange; the patriot complains that after the revolution there was still no revolution and that just everything still wanted to go its old aristocratic course. Naturally, as everywhere, after the first lively movements, the dear habitualness has once again asserted its right and everything is looking to get back on its feet, which the good patriot complains very much about.



August 9th.

The general conversation and interest today is the celebration of the morning to take place in Wetzlar; wonderful things are said about it. Twenty generals are to attend, troops from all regiments are to be gathered, military evolutions are to take place; scaffolds are erected and the like. Meanwhile, the inhabitants fear nasty scenes on this occasion; several have left; they say they have already heard canons firing this evening.

All of them live here in complete safety, and everyone does his work just as if nothing had happened; they consider peace to be certain and flatter themselves that the Congress will be here although they do not know where to accommodate the envoys. If everything stays quiet, the next fair will be full and splendid; many quarters have already been ordered and the innkeepers and other inhabitants are putting outrageous prices on their rooms.

As far as I am concerned, I just see more and more that everyone should only do his trade seriously and take the rest of everything funny. A few verses that I have to write interest me now more than much more important things about which I am not allowed to influence, and if everyone does the same thing, then it will probably be fine in the city and in the house. In the few days that I am here, the contemplation of so many objects has already amused and entertained me, and I still have enough in front of me for the next time . ...

Afterwards I want to visit our good Meyer, who has arrived at Lake Zurich, and, before I start my way back, take some small tour with him. I don't feel like going to Italy, I don't like watching the caterpillars and chrysalides in the wild; I would much rather see the crawled out French butterflies from the cocoons.

Yesterday, I was with Mr. von Schwarzkopf, who lives with his young wife on a Bethmann estate; it is located very pleasantly a good half hour from the city before the Eschenheimer gate on a gentle hill, from which one looks forward over the city and the whole area in which it lies and behind, the foothills up to the mountains. The estate used to belong to the von Riese family and is known for the quarries in its district. The whole hill is made of basalt and the cultivation of the fields is carried out in an area formed by weathering of this type of mountain; it is a little rocky at the top, but fruits and fruit trees thrive excellently. Bethmanns have bought a lot to it, and my mother has left them a nice area of trees that immediately adjoins. ... The fertility of the beautiful countryside around Frankfurt and the variety of its products is astonishing, and the new fences, stockades and pleasure houses that are spreading all around the city show how many wealthy people have recently snatched up the larger and smaller pieces of fertile land. The large field, on which only vegetables are grown, offers a very pleasant and varied view in the present season. In general, the location, as I saw it again on a beautiful morning from the tower, is quite wonderful and is furnished for cheerful and sensual pleasure, which is why people settled and spread here so early. The early urban culture was strange to me since I read yesterday that as early as 1474, it was ordered to do away with shingle roofs after straw roofs had been abolished earlier. It can be imagined how such an example must have had an effect on the whole region in three hundred years.



Frankfurt, August 14th.

Yesterday I saw the opera Palmira, which was played very well and decently overall. But I had the pleasure of seeing part of it completely perfect, namely the decorations. They are from a Milanese Fuentes, who is currently here.

With theater architecture, the great difficulty is that one has to understand the principles of real architecture and yet deviate from them in an expedient manner. Architecture in the higher sense should express a serious, elevated state of being, it can hardly be involved in the graceful without becoming weak; but in the theater, everything should be graceful in appearance. Theatrical architecture must be light, polished, multifaceted, and at the same time it should represent the magnificent, the lofty, the noble. The decorations, especially the backgrounds, are expected to make the canvas. The decorator has to go one step further than the landscape painter, who also knows how to modify the architecture according to his needs.

The decorations for Palmira give examples from which one could abstract the teaching of theatre painting. There are six decorations that follow each other in two acts without one repeating itself; they are invented with very clever variety and gradation. One can see in them that the master knows all manner of serious architecture; even where he builds as he should and should not build, everything retains the appearance of the possible, and all his constructions are based on the concept of what is really required. Its ornamentations are very rich, but placed and distributed according to pure taste; these can be seen in the large stucco school located in Milan, and where one can become acquainted with them from the engravings of Albertolli. All proportions tend to be slender, all figures, statues, bas-reliefs, the painted spectators as well; but the excessive length and the forceful gestures of some of the figures are not style but are out of necessity, and taste has demanded them to be like that. The colouring is impeccable and the way of painting is extremely free and determined. All the perspective artistry, all the fascination of the masses is oriented by direction points are manifested in these works; the parts are completely clear and unambiguous without being rigid, and the whole has the most praiseworthy attitude. One sees the studies of a great school and the traditions of several human lives in the infinite details, and one may well say that this art is here at the highest degree; what a shame that the man is so sickly that he is in despair of his life. I want to see that what I have loosely sketched here is compiled and executed better. ...



First decoration - On low, not too sturdy, old Doric blue columns, and their white capitals lean on a simple white cornice, the central part of which is the highest, which could also serve as a specially proportioned architrave; from these, a barrel vault extends across the entire theater, which creates a magnificent effect due to its immense height and width. Since the barrel vault cannot run over from the backdrop, it seems to be covered on top by blue curtains, but on the background it appears in its perfection. Bas-reliefs are placed right where the vault sitting on the cornices. The rest is vaulted with simple stones. The barrel vault runs out to a circular building that joins the barrel vault again at intersections, as is the case with the newer churches; however, this curve on its rim does not bear a dome, but a gallery over which one can see a starry sky.



Description of some persons of Frankfurt's Frauen Demois Theater. Woralek. A woman of middle size, well built, limbs somewhat strong, young, natural movements, certain gestures with her arms that would not be bad if they did not repeat again and again; a slender face, lively black eyes; a smiling distortion of the mouth often disguises her; a beautiful and well-formed voice, too fast in dialogue; as a result she overruns most parts.

Characters. First lover of opera: Constanze, Pamina, the miller.



Demois. Boudet. Female central figure; good lively behaviour, quick gestures. She plays certain natural roles well, but her expressions and gestures too often express hardness, coldness, pride and contempt, which makes her unpleasant. ... She speaks clearly and is of an more vigorous nature overall. ...

Roles. Lively, naive: Margarethe in den Hagestolzen. A Savoyard.



Madame Aschenbrenner. Not too tall, otherwise well built; a well-behaved face, black eyes. In her declamation and gestures she has tearful tension that otherwise would be considered pathetic. ... She dances well, but this art has not had a favorable effect on her by being mannered in movement and gestures.

Roles. Affective, sentimental lovers; also sings a little. Cora in the Sun Maiden. Ophelia in Hamlet.



Madame Bulla. Medium size, slightly larger than Madame Aschenbrenner, good facial characteristics; her action a little too calm, the tone of her voice a little too bright and sharp.

Roles. Noble mothers, women of standing, cheerful humorous roles: Elvira in Rolla's death. The woman in the married couple from the province. Fräulein von Sachau in the abduction.



Madame Bötticher. Somewhat about medium size, well-formed, moderately strong, pleasantly developed; looks a little too good for her caricature roles. ...

Roles. Caricatures and what approximates them: Lord Chamberlain in Elise von Valberg. Mrs. Schmalheim. Mrs. Griesgram.





Men: Mr. Prandt. Well-built, unpleasantly developed, lively black eyes that he rolls too much; sonorous deep voice, good movements.

Roles. Heroes. Worthy old woman: Rolla. Czar. Sea captain in the fraternal quarrel. Molai in the Templars.



Mr Schröder. Medium size, well formed, good youthful facial development, lively movement; sings baritone, in dialogue deep, somewhat raspy, violent, rough voice.

Roles. First lover in the opera: Don Juan. ... Deserter ... Figurative roles in drama. Prince in the line of duty. Philip the Fair in the Templars.



Mr Lux. A crowded, well-developed medium figure; knows how to animate his clothes and gestures according to the roles, has a good but not quite full-sounding bass voice; performs too closely to the prompter.

Roles. First buffo in the opera. In the drama similar roles: The captain's attendant in the fraternal quarrel. The bailiff in the recording system.



Mr Schlegel. Well-built, but with all the agility is somewhat stiff. The movement of his legs shows that he is a dancer; he sings well enough as a second bass. He may lack taste and feeling, so he exaggerates slightly.

Roles. Second Buffos also e.g. Knicker, then Sarastro, and the ghost in Don Juan.



Mr Demmer. Well built, upper body a little plumper, protruding face, blond with blue eyes; her voice is somewhat grumpy, and she has a good sense of humor.

Roles. First lovers in opera: Tamino. Infante. Caricature roles: Peg in poverty and noblesse. ... Postures in the player.



Mr Schmidt. Lean, old, weak, exaggerated; one notices neither temperament nor taste in him.

Roles. Weak, in love, humorous old woman: von Sachau in "Die Entführung", Brandchen in "Das Räuschchen".



Mr Düpré. Quite big, lean but well developed, strong facial features; stiff on the whole.

Roles. Moody parts, half-caricatures, villains. ... Dungeon master in Le déserteur. ... Noffodei in the Templars.



Mr Strentzsch. Youthfully well educated. Character and essence are not worked through, language and gestures have no flow; on the whole it is not unpleasant, but it leaves the viewer completely cold.

Roles. First lovers, young heroes: Ludwig the jumper. Hamlet. Brother of the girl from Marienburg.



Mr Grüner. Some guest roles played here told about his dealings with the Königsberger acting direction in the 3rd play of the 2nd volume of the Hamburg Theater Journal of 1797. He has dexterity in the theater and a light culture but is no longer young and does not have a favorable face. ... His language is extremely Prussian and also his playing (I saw him as a sickle) has a certain pretentious dexterity; his voice is of no importance.



Frankfurt, August 15, 1797.

I have had my own experience of the actual condition of an attentive traveller and have seen what is very often the fault of the travel descriptions. One may present oneself as one likes, but on the journey one only sees the matter from one side and rushes to judgment; but on the other hand, one also sees the matter vividly from this side, and the judgment is correct in a certain sense. I have therefore made documents in which I have inserted all sorts of public papers that I now encounter: Newspapers, weekly papers, sermon extracts, regulations, comedy flyers, price competition and subsequently insert both what I see and notice as well as my current judgment. I will speak of these things afterwards in society and express my opinion because I will soon see how well informed I am and to what extent my judgment coincides with the judgment of well-informed people. Thereupon, I will put the new experience and instruction in the document again, and thus there are materials which must remain interesting enough for me in the future as an external and internal story. If, with my prior knowledge and mental proficiency, I hold onto the desire to continue this craft for a while, I can bring a large mass together.

I have already become aware of a few poetic materials which I will preserve in a tender heart, and then one can never know in the first moment what is still separated from the raw experience in the ensuing period as true content.

With all this, I do not deny that several times a longing for the Saal Grund again comes over me, and if I were transferred there today, I would be able to start immediately, without any retrospection, with something like my Faust or any other poetic work.

Here I would like to get used to a great life in the city again and not to travel anymore, but even to live on the journey; if only this is not completely denied me by fate, because I feel quite well that my nature only strives for compilation and mood and has no enjoyment of anything that hinders it. If I had not taken an example from my master and Dorothea that modern subjects, in a certain sense, were adaptable to the epic, I would not want to know more about all this empirical breadth.

In the theater, as I see again here, there is much to be done at the present moment, but it would have to be taken lightly and maltreated in the Gozzian manner; but it is not worth the effort in any way.

Meyer has recorded our ballads very well. I have already received several letters from him here, because I wrote weekly letters to him from Weimar to Stäfa; it is a pure and faithfully progressing nature, invaluable in every sense. I just want to rush back to get a hold of him personally, and then not let him go from me again.



Frankfurt, August 18, 1797.

Yesterday I visited the theater painter, whose works had delighted me so much, and found a small, well-educated, quiet, understanding, modest man. He was born in Milano, is called Fuentes and when I praised his work, he said to me: He is from the school of Gonzaga, to whom he owes, what he knows, how to do. He let me see the drawings of those decorations which, as one can expect, are very confident and characteristic with few pen strokes, and on which the masses are readily indicated in ink. He showed me various designs for decorations which should be made initially, one of which seemed to me to be particularly well thought out as a common room. He also made me notice the changes that took place between the drawings and the executed decorations to Palmira. It is a joy to see an artist who is so confident in his work, who understands his art so precisely and knows so well what it can achieve and how it can be effective. He excused various things in his work that he himself did not approve of, through the demands of the poet and the actor, which cannot always be brought into harmony within the laws of good decoration.

On the instance of the color scheme, since it was noticed that violet looked gray at night, consequently he said that he used violet to produce a certain bright and transparent gray. Furthermore, how much depends on the lighting of the decorations.

It was noticed that great practice was needed to apply the colors with certainty in a studied manner, and it was not without a smile that there were people who were so little aware of a course of study that they did not respect the quick and straightforward method of the master at all; rather, they exalted those who reflect and change and correct themselves at work. You can see the master's freedom for arbitrariness and random work.



Frankfurt, August 18, 1797.

When one walks through Frankfurt and sees the public institutions, the thought comes to mind, that in earlier times, the city must have been ruled by people who had no liberal concept of public administration, no desire to facilitate for better comfort in a bourgeois life, but who rather ruled as only in a meager way and allowed everything to go as it might. But one has every reason to be cheap in this consideration. Considering what this means, until only the immediate needs of a bourgeois community that come together in troubled times are gradually satisfied, until their safety is guaranteed and until their only life becomes possible and bearable by coming together and multiplying; Abuses such as building over houses, the crooked furnishings of the streets, where everyone had only their place and comfort in mind, do not stand out in a darkly accessible state, and the dark state of mind is best seen in the dark churches and in the dark and sad monasteries of that time. The trade is so eager and bustling that it cannot crowd together close enough; the shopkeeper loves the narrow streets as if he wanted to grab the buyer with his hands. So all the old cities were built, except those that were completely rebuilt.

The great old public buildings are works of the clergy and testify to their influence and increased sense. The cathedral with its tower is a great undertaking; the remaining monasteries, with a view to the space they enclose, as well as as in terms of their buildings, are important works and possessions. All this is brought together and established by the spirit of a dark piety and charity. The courtyards and former castles of the nobility also occupy a large space, and one sees in the areas where these spiritual and secular possessions stand, in the beginning these were like islands, and the citizens built around them only in a makeshift manner.

The butcher's shops are perhaps the ugliest of this type in the world; they cannot be improved in any way because the butcher, like any other shopkeeper, has his products downstairs in the house. . These houses are clumped together and are separated more by corridors than by alleys.

The market is small and must extend through the neighbouring streets up to the Römerberg. At the time of the fair, relocation of the market onto the Hirschgraben.

The town hall seems to have once been a large store and warehouse, as it still provides a dark place in its arches for the fair and a favorable location for the seller of flawed goods.

In former times, the houses were built floor by floor to gain space. But the roads as a whole are well laid out, which is probably due to chance, because they either go parallel to the rivers, or they are roads that cross the rivers and follow the country. And along the whole thing ran crescent-shaped a wall and ditch, which was filled in afterwards; however, even in the new city nothing is regular and fits together. The line goes crooked in the direction of the old trench, and the big squares of the new city are only a result of the worthlessness of the space at that time. The fortifications had made it a necessity, and one can almost say that the bridge over the Main from earlier times is the only beautiful monument worthy of such a large city; the main sentry is also properly built and well situated.

It would be interesting to attempt the depiction of the different epochs of the enlightenment, oversight and effectiveness in intent of such public institutions; to examine the history of water pipes, sewers, and pavement more closely, and to pay attention to the time and excellent people who had an effect.

It was already decided earlier that someone building a new house could only be built over on the first floor. Already much was gained by this step. Several beautiful houses were built; the eye gradually got used to the vertical, and now many wooden houses are also built vertically. But what you can see in the buildings up till the latest date, and generally in many other places, is that the city has never had any contact with Italy. ... Everything good of this kind is taken from France.

The Swiss House in the row, which is built in a genuine, solid and large Italian style and may well remain the only one for a long time, is now a major epoch. For although some of this type are still being built, the builders did not have enough talent to compete with the first, but they failed by not wanting to achieve the same thing, and if it goes forward in this way, then the flavor of having a single house built according to the proper principles is already in decline again.

The two new reformed prayer houses are built in intermediate, not so strict and serious, but nevertheless right and cheerful taste and, with the exception of a few incidents in trivialities, quite praiseworthy. ...

Unfortunately, the newly built Lutheran main church gives a lot to think about. As a building, it is not objectionable were it built in the most modern sense; just because no place in the city upon which it could and should actually stand is neither realistic nor conceivable, then the biggest mistake has probably made in the choice of this form for such a place. The church should be visible from all sides, you should be able to walk around it from a great distance, and it is stitched between buildings which are immovable because of their nature and value and which would hardly be demolished. It requires a larger space around it and stands in a place where the space is extremely precious. Around there is the greatest crush of people and movement of the fair, and it is even inconceivable of how a shop could take place. So, at least during the time of the fair, wooden booths will have to be pushed towards them, which may become immovable over time as you can still see at St. Catherine's Church and saw formerly around the Cathedral Church of Strasbourg. ...

Nowhere would there have been a more beautiful case in which it would have been highly expedient to imitate the ancients who, if they wanted to place a temple in the middle of a lively quarter, separated the sanctuary from the commons by a wall, gave the building a worthy courtyard and allowed it to be seen only from this side. Such a forecourt would have been possible here, whose space for the carriages, whose arcades would have served for the comfort of the pedestrians and at the same time, in the case of the fair, would have served as the place for the most attractive traffic.

It would be a philanthropic undertaking, which, of course, could no longer be of any use in this case, but would perhaps have an effect in future undertakings if, even now, plans and rifts of what should have happened had been presented; for since a public institution has to endure so much blame: as if one should not have done it, it is at least less expensive if one takes over to show how one should have done it differently. But perhaps there is no time at all to build churches and palaces, at least I would always advise in both cases: to divide the congregations into decent prayer houses and the large families into comfortable and cheerful town and country houses, and both are already happening in our days to some extent by themselves.

As far as town houses are concerned, I would advise you not to follow the Italian style any further and to be more economical even with stone buildings. Houses whose first floor is made of stones, the rest of wood, as several are now very decently built, I definitely think it makes more sense for Frankfurt; they are generally drier, the rooms are bigger and airier. ... The inhabitant of Frankfurt, like the northerner in general, loves many windows and cheerful rooms that cannot take place with a façade of a higher taste. ... Then it should also be borne in mind that a stone house similar to a palace does not change its owner as easily as another house furnished for more than one inhabitant. The inhabitant of Frankfurt, for whom everything is a commodity, should never consider his house as anything else. I would therefore rather advise: to be attentive to the interior furnishings and to imitate the Leipzig style in this, where several families can live in one house without standing together in the least relationship. But it's strange. Even now, the man who is definitely building to rent is still building with the intention of laying out the stairs, the open vestibules, etc., just as the man who furnished his house to live in it alone in earlier times; ... and so the tenant of a floor, for example, must ensure that half a dozen doors are closed when he goes out. So powerful is the habit and so rare is the judgment.

The different epochs in which public cheerful institutions, e.g. the avenue around the city, were built, and how the public spirit combined with the private spirit, whereby a real urban being is created all alone, could be looked at more closely. The construction of the theater, the paving of the square in front of it, the filling in of the horse pond on Roßmarkt, and above all, the invaluable enterprise of the new road at the bridge, which began, promoted and, gave them sky! In its full extent it will be a lasting honor.

In earlier times the removal of the old gates shouldn't be forgotten.

About the Judengasse, the reconstruction of the burnt down piece and its possible expansion towards the ditch should be considered and at best a thought expressed about it.

One thing certainly does not stand out, but it is not hidden from an attentive observer that everything that is a public institution stands still at this moment, while the individuals move incredibly and promote their business. Unfortunately, this phenomenon points to a relationship that cannot be seen with the eyes, to the concern and narrowness in which the leaders of society find themselves: how the burden of debt accumulated on them through the war is to be borne by them and reduced over time; while the individual is little concerned about this general evil and only vividly strives to promote his private advantage.

The main cause of the public institutions neglected in earlier times is probably in the sense of the independence of the individual guilds, crafts and then further in ongoing disputes and presumptuousness of monasteries, families, foundations, etc. to seek, indeed, from a certain point of view, praiseworthy objections of the citizenry. But this always hindered the Council, it might behave as it wished, and by arguing about powers, a certain liberal sense of general advantage could not take place.

It would perhaps be an interesting investigation for the present time to show how the people have always upset the sovereigns, who do not completely rule life and regiment from time immemorial. It would by no means be an aristocratic script, because now all the leaders of the republics are suffering from these obstacles.

In these days I have been thinking about how late a movement of liberality and overview could manifest itself even about the urban essence in Frankfurt.

What a blessing for the public wouldn't a street have been that would have followed a line through to Liebenfrauenberg! A thing that in earlier times was to be dismissed with advantage at very low cost.



Frankfurt, August 19, 1797.

The French Revolution and its consequences can be seen much closer and more directly here, because it has had such great and important ramifications for this city too, and because it has so many links with the nation. In our country we can see Paris only from a distance, in that it looks like a blue mountain where the eye doesn't recognize much, but in addition, imagination and passion can be even more effective. Here one already differentiates the individual parts and local colors.

From the great game that has been played over the years here, speech can be heard everywhere. It is one of the companions of war, because it spreads most violently at times when great happiness and misfortune lie generally in the balance; when fortunes become uncertain, when the course of public affairs leads us to expect rapid gains and losses, even for partisans. It's been played in almost every inn except the Red House. One bank paid 70 Carolin for a month just for the room. Some bankers have had breakfast and dinner served to the pointeurs in the most decent way. Now that the Council is gradually trying to control this evil, enthusiasts are thinking of other ways out. On the Sandhofe, on German-owned land, a precious establishment of a new economy was built, which was opened yesterday with 130 covers. The furniture from the „Herzoglich Zweibrückische“ auction, as well as the whole furnishing, is said to be very elegant. At the end of the day, everything is geared towards playing.

The main interest for the Frankfurters at the moment should be the repayment of their war debts and the preliminary compound interest on them; however, but since the danger is over, few have desire to participate actively. The Council is in an unpleasant situation here: it and the fearless members of the citizenry, who voluntarily gave their cash money, their silver, their coin cabinets and whatever else of the precious metal was available, not only representing and saving the city and the fleeing egotistical portion of the rich at that time and through the personal suffering of the deported hostage; but they were also good-natured enough to impose the contributions in the mass for those not protected by association with the city, such as the benefactors, monasteries and German orders and others. Now that there is to be a replacement, there is neither a base, according to which, nor a means by which such a large sum could be provided as is necessary for the interest and amortization fund. The previous basis of estimation is already completely inappropriate for the common condition, let alone for an extraordinary case; every type of new levy pushes us somewhere, and among the hundred and more people who have a say, there is always one or the other who wants to shift the burden away from his side. The Council's proposals have gone to the bourgeois college, but I fear very much that there will be no agreement and that, if there were agreement, the Aulic Council would again be represented differently. One begs for the time being for benevolent contributions, which will be collected in the future, and, if one has given too much when repartition takes place, should be assessed interest, because the interest must be paid after all. I wish I were wrong, but I fear that this matter will not be so easy to resolve.

For a traveler a skeptical realism is appropriate; what is still idealistic about me is carried along in a box, well closed, like that undinic pygmy female. So you will have patience with me from this side. Probably I will be able to write down that little travel story on the journey. By the way, I want to wait a few months. For although in empiricism almost everything seems unpleasant to me individually, yet the whole does very well when one finally comes to the awareness of his own prudence.

In about eight days time, I think I will go on and in the wonderful weather, which will soon be the truly moderate conditions of late summer, proceed via the beautiful mountain road, through the well-developed and good Swabia to Switzerland to remind me of a part of this unique country again.



Frankfurt, August 20, 1797.

The local city, with its agility and the multifaceted spectacles that renew themselves every day, like the diverse society, give a good and pleasant amusement; each one has to tell how it has fared in those dangerous and crucial days, with some funny and adventure-filled stories occurring. But I prefer to hear from those who have come closer to their business and circumstances because of many of the protagonists of the present war drama, especially the French, and who have come to know the behavior of this strange people from more than one side. Some details and results deserve to be recorded.

The Frenchman is not still for a moment, he walks, talks, jumps, whistles, sings and makes such a noise that in a city or a village you always think you see more people than there are in it; instead the Austrian lives quietly, calmly and without expression of any passion. If one does not understand their language, they become unwilling, they seem to make this demand to the whole world; they thereupon allow themselves some things to provide for their needs; but if one knows how to talk to them and treat them, they immediately show themselves to be good children and very rarely continue their bad habits or brutality. On the other hand, some short blackmailing stories of them are told under all kinds of pretexts, some of which are funny enough. In a place where cavalry were located, they are said to have demanded that the manure be paid for when they left. When they refused, they requisitioned as many wagons as were necessary to bring this manure to France; since, of course, they preferred to decide to satisfy their first request. In some other places it is claimed that the departing general could be robbed at any time in order to be able to claim reimbursement of the loss from the place at the end. At a meal their demands are so determined and complicated that even the toothpicks are not forgotten. Especially now the common man, although he is fed, is very eager for money, because he gets none, and he therefore also seeks to obtain something by extortion from his side with Façon. Thus on the way to the baths, for example, every post on display stops the travelers, examines the passports and thinks of all conceivable difficulties that can be easily imposed with a small tip; but if one simply wants to lose time and argue with them, he can eventually get through without money. As lodgings in the city they have good praise for both the first and the second time, but their requisitions were infinite and often ridiculous, as they wished to have everything they saw like children, or true naturals.

The great order and activity is praised in the offices of their generals, as is the common spirit of their soldiers and the lively direction of all for one purpose. Their generals, even though for the most part young people, are serious and withdrawn, domineering against their subordinates and in some cases fierce and rude against countrymen and foreigners. They have declared the duel to be abolished because a test of bravery, which people so often would have the opportunity to set aside, is not necessary in such a manner. In Wiesbaden, a Trier officer challenged a French general to a fight, who at once arranged for him to be arrested and brought across the border.

From these small inclinations it can be immediately overlooked that in armies of this kind, a very unique energy and a strange force must be at work, and that such a nation is dreadful in more than one sense.

The city can say that luckily it has not come back into their hands, because otherwise the requisitions, regardless of the peace, would not have been over. The villages in which they are located all lay in ruins, every community is in debt and in the weekly papers there are many looking for capital; as a result, inflation in the city is also very high. I will send you a list of the different prices as soon as possible. A rabbit for example, costs 2 guilders and is not even available for this money.



Frankfurt, August 21, 1797.

There are three battalions of the Manfredini regiment here, among them, as one can even recognize from many symptoms, there are many recruits. The people are almost the same size, a small but robust and well built species. Amazing is the equality of height, but even more the similarity of faces; they are, as far as I know, from Bohemia. Most have long-slitted small eyes, which are set back a little according to their whole physiognomy, but not deeply; narrow foreheads, short noses, which are not stump noses, with wide, sharply incised nostrils; the upper cheek area is somewhat strong and set to the side, the mouth is long with the middle line almost completely straight, the lips flat, for many the mouth has an intelligently calm expression; their backs seem small, at least the small and narrow casquet gives that appearance. They are scarce and well dressed, a lively green bush of all kinds of daily fresh leaves on the casquette gives a good reputation when they are together. They perform the movements, as far as I have seen them in the parade, quickly and well; in deployment and marching alone one can sometimes feel the recruit-like quality. Incidentally, they are calm and set, both individually and as a whole.

The French, on the other hand, who sometimes appear separately in the city, are just the opposite. If the clothes of the Austrians are merely composed of what is necessary and useful, those of the French are plentiful, superfluous, almost wondrous and strange. Long blue leggings sit right at the foot, on the sides of which countless buttons on red stripes are displayed; the vest is different, the blue long coat has a white, thrust-like feature; the big hat, which is placed cross-wise, is stitched up with very long cords, and decorated either with the three-colored tuft or with a fire-red feather-brush; their walking and behavior is very certain and straightforward, but quite serious and composed, as it is befitting in a foreign city not yet entirely befriended. Among those I saw were not small, and rather large than medium-sized.



Frankfurt, August 23, 1797.



Even something from the French and their behaviour.

When General Neuwinger occupied the gates of Sachsenhausen during Custine's invasion, the troops had hardly put their knapsacks down when they immediately pulled out their fishing rods and fished for the fish in of the town moat.

In the villages they still occupy, there are very sensible, moderate and decent people among the officers, but the common people do not have a moment's rest, and fence very much particularly in the barns. They have fencing masters with their companies and regiments, and large disillusions recently came about among his disciples as to which is the best fencing master. It seems on a small scale as on a large scale: if the Frenchman has peace on the outside, domestic war is inevitable.
unit 1
Einleitendes Aus Briefen, wenige Zeit vor der Abreise, an Meyer nach Florenz und Stäfa geschrieben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Weimar den 28 April 1797.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 6
In dem obern Italien selbst, wie muß es da nicht aussehen!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
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wenn außer den kriegführenden Heeren auch noch zwei Parteien gegen einander kämpfen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 13
Denn was ich Ihnen raten soll weiß ich wahrlich nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 27
Leben Sie wohl und lassen Sie mich bald wieder von sich hören.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 29
Weimar am 8 Mai 1797.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 37
Leben Sie recht wohl!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 39
Jena, den 6 Juni 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Wo wir auch zusammenkommen, wird es eine unendliche Freude sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
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unit 54
Höchst verlangend bin ich auch Ihre Ideen über das Darstellbare und Darzustellende zu vernehmen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 55
Alles Glück eines Kunstwerks beruht auf dem prägnanten Stoff den es darzustellen unternimmt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 62
Weimar, den 7 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
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Sein Sie mir bestens auf vaterländischem Grund und Boden gegrüßt!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 64
Ihr Brief vom 26 Juni, den ich heut' erhalte, hat mir eine große Last vom Herzen gewälzt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 67
Nun geht eine neue Epoche an, in welcher alles eine bessere Gestalt gewinnen wird.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
Alles was Sie tun ist gut, denn alles hat einen Bezug auf ein Ganzes.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 70
Ihr Brief hat mich noch in Weimar getroffen, wohin mir meine Mutter ihn schickte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 72
Indessen habe ich alles geordnet und bin so los und ledig als jemals.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 75
Schreiben Sie nach dem Empfang dieses nur nach Frankfurt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 76
Von mir erhalten Sie nun alle acht Tage Nachricht.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
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unit 78
Möge Ihnen die Aura die Ihnen daraus entgegenweht angenehm und erquicklich sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 79
Weiter sage ich nichts.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 81
Leben Sie tausendmal wohl!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 82
Weimar, den 14 Juli 1797.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 85
Ich schicke Ihnen hier einen Aufsatz, worin, nach einigem Allgemeinen, über Laokoon gehandelt ist.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 86
Die Veranlassung zu diesem Aufsatze sage ich hernach.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 100
Schreiben Sie mir, wenn es auch nur wenig ist, unter der Adresse meiner Mutter nach Frankfurt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 102
Leben Sie recht wohl, wertester Freund!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 104
Schiller und die Hausfreunde grüßen, alles freut sich Ihrer Nähe und Besserung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 105
Heut über acht Tage will ich verschiedene Gedichte beilegen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 107
Humboldts werden nun auch von Dresden nach Wien abgehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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unit 109
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Die Herzogin Mutter ist nach Kissingen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 111
Wieland lebt in Osmanstedt mit dem notdürftigen Selbstbetruge.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
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unit 117
Nochmals ein herzliches Lebewohl.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 118
Weimar, den 21 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 126
Heute nicht mehr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 127
Nur noch den herzlichen Wunsch, daß Ihre Gesundheit sich immer verbessern möge!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 128
Schicken Sie Ihre Briefe nur an meine Mutter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
Frankfurt Frankfurt, den 8 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 131
In der Nähe von Erfurt war mir der Kessel merkwürdig worin diese Stadt liegt.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 133
Der Moment, wegen der heranreifenden Feldfrüchte, war sehr bedeutend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 149
Diese Betrachtungen führen auf artige Resultate und zeigen mir den Weg der zu gehen ist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 150
So vergleiche ich z.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 152
Den 8 August.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 156
Doch habe ich auch schon einige wunderliche und unerwartete Ausnahmen bemerken können.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 161
Auf den Sonntag wird Palmira gegeben, worauf ich sehr neugierig bin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 165
L'Osservatore Triestino No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 166
58.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 167
21 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 168
Ein sehr gut geschriebener Brief über die Besitznehmung von Cherso vom 10 Juli.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 169
Dann einiges von Zara.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 170
Die Anhänge sind wie unsere Beilagen und Wochenblätter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 171
Gazzetta Universale No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 172
58.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 173
22 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 174
Florenz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 176
Notizie Universali No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 177
60.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 178
28 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 179
Roveredo.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 180
Ein Artikel aus Östreich macht auf die große bewaffnete Stärke des Kaisers aufmerksam.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 181
Il Corriere Milanese.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 182
No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 183
59.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 184
24 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 186
In einer Buchhändler-Nachricht ist ein Werk: Memorie Storiche del Professore Gio.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 187
Battista Rottondo nativo di Monza, nel Milanese, scritte da lui medesimo, angekündigt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 189
Giornale Degli Uomini Liberi.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 190
Bergamo.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 191
18 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 192
No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 195
No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 196
6.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 199
Il Patriota Bergamasco No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 200
17.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 201
18 Juli 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 206
No.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 209
Den 9 August.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 229
Frankfurt, den 14 August.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 1 week ago
unit 230
Gestern sah ich die Oper Palmira, die im Ganzen genommen sehr gut und anständig gegeben ward.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 1 week ago
unit 232
Sie sind von einem Mailänder Fuentes, der sich gegenwärtig hier befindet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 1 week ago
unit 236
Die Dekorationen sollen überhaupt, besonders die Hintergründe, Tableaux machen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 243
Das Kolorit ist untadelhaft und die Art zu malen äußerst frei und bestimmt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 249
Gleich wo das Gewölbe auf dem Gesimse ruht sind Basreliefs angebracht.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 250
Das übrige ist mit einfachen Steinen gewölbt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 252
Schilderung einiger Personen des Frankfurter Theaters Frauen Demois.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 253
Woralek.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 255
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 256
Erste Liebhaberin in der Oper: Constanze, Pamina, die Müllerin.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 257
Demois.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 258
Boudet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 259
Weibliche Mittelgestalt; gutes lebhaftes Betragen, rasche Gebärden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 261
Sie spricht deutlich und ist überhaupt eine energische Natur.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 262
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 263
Muntere, naive: Margarethe in den Hagestolzen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 264
Einen Savoyarden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 265
Madame Aschenbrenner.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 266
Nicht gar groß, sonst gut gebaut; ein artiges Gesicht, schwarze Augen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 269
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 270
Affektuose, sentimentale Liebhaberinnen; singt auch ein wenig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 271
Cora in der Sonnenjungfrau.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 272
Ophelia in Hamlet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 273
Madame Bulla.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 275
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 276
Edle Mütter, Frauen von Stande, heitere humoristische Rollen: Elvira in Rollas Tod.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 277
Die Frau in dem Ehepaar aus der Provinz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 278
Fräulein von Sachau in der Entführung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 279
Madame Bötticher.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 281
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 282
Karikaturen und was sich denen nähert: Oberhofmeisterin in Elise von Valberg.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 283
Frau Schmalheim.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 284
Frau Griesgram.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 285
Männer Herr Prandt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 287
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 288
Helden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 289
Würdige Alte: Rolla.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 290
Zar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 291
Seekapitän im Bruderzwist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 292
Molai in den Tempelherren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 293
Herr Schröder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 295
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 296
Erste Liebhaber in der Oper: Don Juan.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 297
Deserteur.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 298
Figurierende Rollen im Schauspiel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 299
Fürst in Dienstpflicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 300
Philipp der Schöne in den Tempelherren.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 301
Herr Lux.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 303
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 304
Erster Buffo in der Oper.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 305
Im Schauspiel ähnliche Rollen: Den Bedienten des Kapitäns im Bruderzwist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 306
Den Amtmann in der Aussteuer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 307
Herr Schlegel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 308
Wohlgebaut, hat aber bei aller Beweglichkeit etwas Steifes.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 310
Es mag ihm an Geschmack und Gefühl fehlen, drum übertreibt er leicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 311
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 312
Zweite Buffos auch z.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 313
B. Knicker, sodann Sarastro, und den Geist in Don Juan.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 314
Herr Demmer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 316
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 317
Erste Liebhaber in der Oper: Tamino.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 318
Infant.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 319
Karikatur-Rollen: Stöpsel in Armut und Edelsinn.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 320
Posert im Spieler.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 321
Herr Schmidt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 322
unit 323
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 325
Herr Düpré.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 326
Ziemliche Größe, hager aber gut gebildet, starke Gesichtszüge; im Ganzen steif.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 327
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 328
Launige Rollen, Halb-Karikaturen, Bösewichter.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 329
Kerkermeister im Deserteur.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 330
Noffodei in den Tempelherren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 331
Herr Stentzsch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 332
Jugendlich wohlgebildet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 334
Rollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 335
Erste Liebhaber, junge Helden: Ludwig der Springer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 336
Hamlet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 337
Bruder des Mädchen von Marienburg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 338
Herr Grüner.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 342
Frankfurt, den 15 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 354
Meyer hat unsere Balladen sehr gut aufgenommen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 357
Frankfurt, den 18 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 366
Ferner, wie viel auf die Beleuchtung der Dekorationen ankomme.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 368
Man sieht die Freiheit des Meisters für Willkür und zufällige Arbeit an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 369
Frankfurt, den 18 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 371
Man hat aber bei dieser Betrachtung alle Ursache billig zu sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 374
So sind alle die alten Städte gebaut, außer welche gänzlich umgeschaffen worden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 382
Verlegung desselben auf den Hirschgraben zur Meßzeit.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 384
unit 391
Schon durch diesen Schritt war viel gewonnen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 394
Alles was Gutes dieser Art sich findet ist aus Frankreich hergenommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 398
Die neuerbaute Lutherische Hauptkirche gibt leider viel zu denken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 414
Es ist aber sonderbar!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 417
So mächtig ist die Gewohnheit und so selten das Urteil.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 418
Die verschiedenen Epochen in denen öffentliche heitere Anstalten z.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 421
in seinem ganzen Umfange ausführen werden, zur bleibenden Ehre gereichen wird.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 422
In früheren Zeiten das Abtragen der alten Pforten nicht zu vergessen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 432
unit 433
Frankfurt, den 19 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 436
Hier unterscheidet man schon die einzelnen Teile und Lokalfarben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months ago
unit 437
unit 439
Es ist fast in allen Wirtshäusern gespielt worden, außer im Roten Hause.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 440
Die eine Bank hat für einen Monat, nur fürs Zimmer, 70 Carolin bezahlt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 441
unit 445
Dabei ist alles zuletzt aufs Spielen angesehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 454
Sie werden also von dieser Seite Geduld mit mir haben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 455
Wahrscheinlich werde ich jenes Reisegeschichtchen auf der Reise zusammenschreiben können.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 456
Übrigens will ich erst ein paar Monate abwarten.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 459
Frankfurt, den 20 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 462
Einige Details und Resultate verdienen aufgezeichnet zu werden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 480
Ich werde ehestens eine Liste der verschiedenen Preise überschicken.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 481
Ein Hase z.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 482
B. kostet 2 Gulden und ist doch für dieses Geld nicht einmal zu haben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 483
Frankfurt, den 21 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 485
Die Leute sind fast durchaus von einerlei Größe, eine kleine aber derbe und wohlgebaute Art.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 490
Übrigens sind sie sowohl einzeln als im Ganzen ruhig und gesetzt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 491
Die Franzosen dagegen, die manchmal einzeln in der Stadt erscheinen, sind gerade das Gegenteil.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 494
Unter denen, die ich sah, waren keine kleinen, und eher große als mittelgroße.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 495
Frankfurt, den 23 August 1797.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 496
Noch etwas von den Franzosen und ihrem Betragen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 464  5 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 172  5 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 138  5 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 67  5 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 457  5 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 475  5 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 479  5 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 487  5 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 497  5 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 498  5 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 21  5 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 492  5 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 460  5 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 440  5 months, 4 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 445  5 months, 4 weeks ago