de-en  Johann Wolfgang von Goethe - Die wunderlichen Nachbarskinder
Novella of "The Elective Affinities" (Die Wahlverwandtschaften) (1809) - Two neighboring children from important houses, a boy and a girl of similar age, whose parents were mutually looking forward to their being married in the future, were allowed to grow up together with this pleasant prospect. But it soon became clear that the intention seemed to be unsuccessful, as a strange aversion became apparent between their two splendid natures. Perhaps they were too similar to each other. Both turned inward unto themselves, clearly in their will, firmly in their intentions; each one individually was loved and honored by their playmates; when they were together, they were always adversaries, always building themselves up alone, always destructive in turn wherever they met, not contending for a goal, but always fighting on purpose; thoroughly good natured and gracious and only hating, indeed maliciously.

This strange relationship was already evident in childish games, and it became apparent with increasing years. And just as the boys used to play war, splitting into parties to fight battles against each other, so the defiantly courageous girl once placed herself at the head of one army and fought with such force and bitterness against the other that this would have been ignominious to flee if her only adversary had not behaved very well and had at the very end disarmed and captured his opponent. But even then she resisted so forcefully that in order to save his eyes and not to harm his enemy, he had to tear off his silk scarf and tie her hands behind her back.

She never forgave him for that, indeed, she made such secret preparations and attempts to harm him that the parents, who had long ago noticed these strange passions, decided to separate the two hostile beings and give up those sweet hopes.

Soon the lad distinguished himself in his new situation. Every kind of teaching had an effect on him. Benefactors and his own inclination ordained him for service in the military. ... Everywhere he went, he was loved and honoured. His competent nature only seemed to work for well-being, for the comfort of others, and he was quite happy in himself, without clear consciousness, to have lost the only adversary nature had intended for him.

The girl on the other hand was suddenly in an altered state. Her years, an increasing education and even more so, a certain inner feeling drew her away from the violent games she used to play in the company of boys. On the whole, she seemed to be missing something, there was nothing around her that would have been worthy of arousing her hatred. She still hadn't found anyone amiable.

A young man, older than her former neighbor adversary, of standing, fortune and importance, popular in society, sought after by women, turned his whole affection towards her. It was the first time that a friend, a lover, a servant took care of her. ... The preference he gave her over many who were older, more educated, more brilliant and more demanding than she, had a very good effect on her. His continued attention, without being intrusive, his faithful assistance in various unpleasant coincidences, his outspoken but calm and only hopeful courting towards her parents, since she was of course still very young: all this she accepted for him, to which the custom of expression, now known as accepted circumstances of the world, contributed theirs. She had been called a bride so often that she finally thought herself to be one, and neither she nor anyone thought that there was a need for proof when she exchanged the ring with the one who was so long considered to be her bridegroom.

The quiet path that the whole thing had taken had not been accelerated by the engagement. Everything was allowed to continue on both sides, they were happy to live together and wanted to thoroughly enjoy the good season as the spring of a more serious life that lay ahead.

Meanwhile, the distance had developed into the most beautiful, a deserved stage of his life's destiny had arisen and came with holidays to visit his own. In a completely natural, but nevertheless strange way, he stood once more in contrast to his beautiful neighbor. She had nurtured only friendly, family feelings as a bride recently, she was in harmony with everything that surrounded her; she believed herself to be happy and was too, in a way. But now, for the first time in a long time, something stood against her again: it was not hateful; she had become incapable of hatred, indeed, the childish hatred, which was actually only a dark recognition of her inner worth, expressed itself now in joyful astonishment, gratifying contemplation, pleasing admission, half-willing, half-unwilling and yet necessary acceptance, and all this was reciprocal. A long distance gave occasion for longer conversations. Even that childish unreasonableness served as a jesting reminder to the enlightened ones, and it was as if one ought to compensate for that hateful teasing through a friendly, attentive treatment at least, as if that violent misunderstanding now could not remain without a pronounced acknowledgment.

From his side, everything remained in a wise and desirable extent. He was so busy with his state, his circumstances, his aspirations and his ambition that he received the friendliness of the beautiful bride as a thankful addition with contentment, without considering her in any relation to himself or begrudging her her bridegroom, with whom he was incidentally in the best of circumstances.

With her, on the other hand, it looked completely different. She seemed as if she was awakening out of a dream. The fight against her young neighbor had been her first passion, and this fierce struggle was nevertheless only, in the form of resistance, an intense, and at the same time instinctive, inclination. Even in her memory, she felt it was no different from the fact that she had always loved him. She smiled at that hostile quest with the weapons in her hands; she wanted to remember the most pleasurable feeling when he disarmed her; she imagined herself to have felt the greatest bliss as he tied her down, and everything she had done to his detriment and distress, she felt only as an innocent means of attracting his attention. She cursed that separation, lamenting the sleep she had fallen into, cursing the dragging, dreamy habit through which to her such an insignificant bridegroom could have become; she was transformed, doubly transformed, forward and backward however one wishes to take it.

If someone had been able to develop and share her feelings, which she kept completely secret, he would not have blamed her; for of course the bridegroom could not withstand the comparison with her neighbor as soon as one saw them side by side. If one could not withhold a certain amount of confidence in one of them, the other generated complete trust; if one liked one of them for companionship, then one desired the other for a companion; and if one even thought of higher participation, in extraordinary cases, then one would have doubted one of them when the other one gave complete certainty. For such circumstances, women are born with a special tact, and they have cause as well as opportunity to train it.

The more the beautiful bride secretly nurtured such sentiments, the less it was possible for anyone to pronounce that which could be in favor of the bridegroom and to suggest and command relationships, duty, and even irrevocable necessity, the more the beautiful heart favored its one-sidedness; and by being indissolubly bound on the one side by the world and family, bridegroom and her own commitment, on the other, the aspiring young man made no secret at all of his attitudes, plans and prospects, proving himself only as a faithful and not even tender brother towards her and now even spoke of his immediate departure, it seemed as if her early childish spirit, with all its tricks and violence, had awakened again, and now, at a higher stage of life, prepared with indignation to operate more significantly and ruinously. She decided to die in order to punish the formerly hated and now so vehemently beloved one for his lack of participation and to marry him forever, at least in his imagination and remorse, while she wasn't allowed to possess him. He should not get rid of the picture of her in death, he should not stop reproaching himself for failing to recognize her sentiments, not investigating them, not appreciating them.

This strange madness accompanied her everywhere. ... She concealed him amongst all sorts of forms; and whether she even happened to seem strange to people, no one was observant or wise enough to discover the inner, true cause.

Meanwhile, friends, relatives, acquaintances had exhausted themselves in arrangements of many celebrations. Hardly a day went by that something new and unexpected had not been undertaken. There was hardly a beautiful place in the landscape, which one would not have decorated and prepared for the reception of many cheerful guests. Our young arrival also wanted to play his own part before his departure and invited the young couple with a close circle of family to a water pleasure ride. One boarded a large, beautiful and well outfitted ship, a yacht, which offered a small saloon and some rooms, seeking to transfer the comfort of the land to that on the water.

They traveled there on the big river with music; the companions had gathered in the lower rooms during hot times of the day to enjoy intellectual and gambling games. The young host, who could never remain idle, had placed himself at the wheel to relieve the old master of the ship, who had fallen asleep at his side; and now the watchman needed all caution as he approached a place where two islands narrowed the river bed, and navigated a dangerous channel by tracking along the shallow gravel banks, first on one side, then shortly after on the other side. The careful and sharp-eyed helmsman was almost tempted to arouse the master, but he thought himself capable of passing through the strait. At that moment, his beautiful enemy appeared on deck with a wreath of flowers in her hair. She took it off and threw it on the steering wheel. "Take this as a memento!" she exclaimed. "Do not disturb me," he shouted to her while catching the wreath; "I need all my strength and attention." "I won't disturb you anymore," she shouted, "you won't see me again!" She spoke and hurried to the bow of the ship where she jumped into the water. Some voices shouted: "Save her! save her! she is drowning." He was in the most appalling quandary. Through the din, the old master of the ship awakens wanting to seize the rudder, the younger one gives it to him, but there is no time to change the mastery: the ship is stranded, and in that very moment, throwing away the most troublesome pieces of clothing, he hurled himself into the water and was swimming after his beautiful enemy.

The water is a friendly element for those who are familiar with it and know how to handle it. It carried him, and the skillful swimmer was in control of it. Soon he had reached the beauty swept away from him; he seized her, knowing how to lift and carry her; both were forcibly carried away by the current until they were far behind the islands, the Werder, and the river again began to flow broadly and leisurely. Only now did he first realize, he was recovering from the first desparate hardship, in which he had only acted mechanically without contemplation; he looked around with his head raised high and paddled to a fortunate flat, bushy spot that proceeded comfortably and conveniently into the river. There he brought his beautiful prey to dry land, but couldn't feel a breath of life in her. He was in despair when a walking path that ran through the bushes shone in his eyes. He took up his precious burden again, and he soon saw a lonely dweling and reached it. He found good people there, a young couple. The misfortune, the misery, spoke out swiftly. What he demanded, after some reflection, was accomplished. A bright fire was burning, woollen blankets were spread over an encampment, furs, skins and whatever was warming were brought in quickly. Here the desire to save overcame every other consideration. Nothing was neglected to bring the beautiful, semi-rigid, naked body back to life. It succeeded. She opened her eyes, she saw her friend, embraced his neck with her heavenly arms. She remained like that a long time; a stream of tears rushed from her eyes and completed her recovery "Will you leave me," she exclaimed, "finding you again like this?" "Never," he shouted," never!" and did not know what he said or what he was doing. "Just look after yourself," he cried out, "look after yourself! think of youself for your sake and mine." She thought of herself now and noticed just now the condition she was in. She could not be ashamed of herself for her darling, her savior; but she gladly released him so that he might take care of himself; for what still enclosed him was wet and dripping.

The young couples discussed it; he offered to the young man and she to the beautiful woman the wedding clothing, which still completely served to clothe a couple from head to foot and inside and out. In a short time the two adventurers were not only dressed, but completely cleaned up. They looked lovely, marvelling at each other as they met, and fell with undue passion into each other's arms forcefully, and yet half smiling about the disguise,. In a few moments, the power of youth and the power of love completely restored her, and only the music was lacking to invite them to dance.

From water to earth, from death to life, out of the circle of family to a wilderness, from despair to delight, from indifference to the inclination to have found passion, everything in an instant - the mind would not be enough to grasp it; it would burst or become confused. Here the heart must do the best for such a surprise to be endured.

One completely lost in the other, they could only after some time think of the anxiety, the worries of those left behind, and they almost could not think without fear, without worry about how they wanted to meet them again. "Shall we flee? shall we hide?" said the young man. "We want to stay together," she said by hanging on his neck.

The farmer, who had heard the story of the stranded ship from them, hurried to the shore without further ado. The vessel was floating along happily; it had been freed with much effort. They traveled on with uncertainty, hoping to find the lost again. So when the farmer called and waved to gain the attention of the ship's passengers, running to a place where an advantageous landing place was revealed and not stoping waving and shouting, the ship turned to the shore, and what a spectacle it was as they landed! The parents of the two fiancées were the first to rush to shore; the loving bridegroom had almost lost consciousness. As soon as they had heard that the dear children were saved, they stepped out of the bushes in their strange disguise. They did not recognize them until they approached very closely. "Whom do I see?" the mothers shouted. "What do I see?" the fathers shouted. The rescuees fell down before them. "Your children!" they exclaimed, "a couple." "Forgive me!" the girl cried. "Give us your blessing," the young man shouted. "Give us your blessing," both shouted as the world fell silent in amazement. "Your blessing!" resounded for the third time, and who could have refused?
unit 3
Vielleicht waren sie einander zu ähnlich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 9
Der Knabe tat sich in seinen neuen Verhältnissen bald hervor.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 10
Jede Art von Unterricht schlug bei ihm an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 11
Gönner und eigene Neigung bestimmten ihn zum Soldatenstande.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 12
Überall, wo er sich fand, war er geliebt und geehrt.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 14
Das Mädchen dagegen trat auf einmal in einen veränderten Zustand.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 17
Liebenswürdig hatte sie noch niemanden gefunden.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 19
Es war das erstemal, daß sich ein Freund, ein Liebhaber, ein Diener um sie bemühte.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 29
Eine lange Entfernung gab zu längeren Unterhaltungen Anlaß.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 31
Von seiner Seite blieb alles in einem verständigen, wünschenswerten Maß.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 33
Bei ihr hingegen sah es ganz anders aus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 34
Sie schien sich wie aus einem Traum erwacht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 36
Auch kam es ihr in der Erinnerung nicht anders vor, als daß sie ihn immer geliebt habe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 45
Dieser seltsame Wahnsinn begleitete sie überallhin.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 47
Indessen hatten sich Freunde, Verwandte, Bekannte in Anordnungen von mancherlei Festen erschöpft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
Kaum verging ein Tag, daß nicht irgend etwas Neues und Unerwartetes angestellt worden wäre.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 55
unit 56
Sie nahm ihn ab und warf ihn auf den Steuernden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months ago
unit 57
»Nimm dies zum Andenken!« rief sie aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 59
Einige Stimmen riefen: »Rettet!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 60
rettet!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 61
sie ertrinkt.« Er war in der entsetzlichsten Verlegenheit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 63
Das Wasser ist ein freundliches Element für den, der damit bekannt ist und es zu behandeln weiß.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 64
Es trug ihn, und der geschickte Schwimmer beherrschte es.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 67
Dort brachte er seine schöne Beute aufs Trockne; aber kein Lebenshauch war in ihr zu spüren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 68
unit 69
unit 70
Dort fand er gute Leute, ein junges Ehepaar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 71
Das Unglück, die Not sprach sich geschwind aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 72
Was er nach einiger Besinnung forderte, ward geleistet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 74
Hier überwand die Begierde zu retten jede andre Betrachtung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 75
Nichts ward versäumt, den schönen, halbstarren, nackten Körper wieder ins Leben zu rufen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 76
Es gelang.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 77
unit 78
So blieb sie lange; ein Tränenstrom stürzte aus ihren Augen und vollendete ihre Genesung.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 80
»Nur schone dich«, rief er hinzu, »schone dich!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 84
In kurzer Zeit waren die beiden Abenteurer nicht nur angezogen, sondern ganz geputzt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 88
Hiebei muß das Herz das Beste tun, wenn eine solche Überraschung ertragen werden soll.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 90
»Sollen wir fliehen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 91
sollen wir uns verbergen?« sagte der Jüngling.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 92
»Wir wollen zusammenbleiben«, sagte sie, indem sie an seinem Hals hing.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 94
Das Fahrzeug kam glücklich einhergeschwommen; es war mit vieler Mühe losgebracht worden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 95
Man fuhr aufs ungewisse fort, in Hoffnung, die Verlornen wiederzufinden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 99
Man erkannte sie nicht eher, als bis sie ganz herangetreten waren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 100
»Wen seh ich?« riefen die Mütter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 101
»Was seh ich?« riefen die Väter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 102
Die Geretteten warfen sich vor ihnen nieder.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 103
»Eure Kinder!« riefen sie aus, »ein Paar.« – »Verzeiht!« rief das Mädchen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 104
»Gebt uns Euren Segen!« rief der Jüngling.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 105
»Gebt uns Euren Segen!« riefen beide, da alle Welt staunend verstummte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
unit 106
»Euren Segen!« ertönte es zum drittenmal, und wer hätte den versagen können!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 80  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 26  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 66  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 76  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 88  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 90  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 92  8 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 16  8 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 76  8 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 59  8 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 60  8 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 33  8 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 20  8 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 5  8 months, 1 week ago

Novelle aus Die Wahlverwandtschaften (1809)

Zwei Nachbarskinder von bedeutenden Häusern, Knabe und Mädchen, in verhältnismäßigem Alter, um dereinst Gatten zu werden, ließ man in dieser angenehmen Aussicht miteinander aufwachsen, und die beiderseitigen Eltern freuten sich einer künftigen Verbindung. Doch man bemerkte gar bald, daß die Absicht zu mißlingen schien, indem sich zwischen den beiden trefflichen Naturen ein sonderbarer Widerwille hervortat. Vielleicht waren sie einander zu ähnlich. Beide in sich selbst gewendet, deutlich in ihrem Wollen, fest in ihren Vorsätzen; jedes einzeln geliebt und geehrt von seinen Gespielen; immer Widersacher, wenn sie zusammen waren, immer aufbauend für sich allein, immer wechselsweise zerstörend, wo sie sich begegneten, nicht wetteifernd nach einem Ziel, aber immer kämpfend um einen Zweck; gutartig durchaus und liebenswürdig und nur hassend, ja bösartig, indem sie sich aufeinander bezogen.

Dieses wunderliche Verhältnis zeigte sich schon bei kindischen Spielen, es zeigte sich bei zunehmenden Jahren. Und wie die Knaben Krieg zu spielen, sich in Parteien zu sondern, einander Schlachten zu liefern pflegen, so stellte sich das trotzig mutige Mädchen einst an die Spitze des einen Heers und focht gegen das andre mit solcher Gewalt und Erbitterung, daß dieses schimpflich wäre in die Flucht geschlagen worden, wenn ihr einzelner Widersacher sich nicht sehr brav gehalten und seine Gegnerin doch noch zuletzt entwaffnet und gefangengenommen hätte. Aber auch da noch wehrte sie sich so gewaltsam, daß er, um seine Augen zu erhalten und die Feindin doch nicht zu beschädigen, sein seidenes Halstuch abreißen und ihr die Hände damit auf den Rücken binden mußte.

Dies verzieh sie ihm nie, ja sie machte so heimliche Anstalten und Versuche, ihn zu beschädigen, daß die Eltern, die auf diese seltsamen Leidenschaften schon längst achtgehabt, sich miteinander verständigten und beschlossen, die beiden feindlichen Wesen zu trennen und jene lieblichen Hoffnungen aufzugeben.

Der Knabe tat sich in seinen neuen Verhältnissen bald hervor. Jede Art von Unterricht schlug bei ihm an. Gönner und eigene Neigung bestimmten ihn zum Soldatenstande. Überall, wo er sich fand, war er geliebt und geehrt. Seine tüchtige Natur schien nur zum Wohlsein, zum Behagen anderer zu wirken, und er war in sich, ohne deutliches Bewußtsein, recht glücklich, den einzigen Widersacher verloren zu haben, den die Natur ihm zugedacht hatte.

Das Mädchen dagegen trat auf einmal in einen veränderten Zustand. Ihre Jahre, eine zunehmende Bildung und mehr noch ein gewisses inneres Gefühl zogen sie von den heftigen Spielen hinweg, die sie bisher in Gesellschaft der Knaben auszuüben pflegte. Im ganzen schien ihr etwas zu fehlen, nichts war um sie herum, das wert gewesen wäre, ihren Haß zu erregen. Liebenswürdig hatte sie noch niemanden gefunden.

Ein junger Mann, älter als ihr ehemaliger nachbarlicher Widersacher, von Stand, Vermögen und Bedeutung, beliebt in der Gesellschaft, gesucht von Frauen, wendete ihr seine ganze Neigung zu. Es war das erstemal, daß sich ein Freund, ein Liebhaber, ein Diener um sie bemühte. Der Vorzug, den er ihr vor vielen gab, die älter, gebildeter, glänzender und anspruchsreicher waren als sie, tat ihr gar zu wohl. Seine fortgesetzte Aufmerksamkeit, ohne daß er zudringlich gewesen wäre, sein treuer Beistand bei verschiedenen unangenehmen Zufällen, sein gegen ihre Eltern zwar ausgesprochnes, doch ruhiges und nur hoffnungsvolles Werben, da sie freilich noch sehr jung war: das alles nahm sie für ihn ein, wozu die Gewohnheit, die äußern, nun von der Welt als bekannt angenommenen Verhältnisse das Ihrige beitrugen. Sie war so oft Braut genannt worden, daß sie sich endlich selbst dafür hielt, und weder sie noch irgend jemand dachte daran, daß noch eine Prüfung nötig sei, als sie den Ring mit demjenigen wechselte, der so lange Zeit für ihren Bräutigam galt.

Der ruhige Gang, den die ganze Sache genommen hatte, war auch durch das Verlöbnis nicht beschleunigt worden. Man ließ eben von beiden Seiten alles so fortgewähren, man freute sich des Zusammenlebens und wollte die gute Jahreszeit durchaus noch als einen Frühling des künftigen ernsteren Lebens genießen.

Indessen hatte der Entfernte sich zum schönsten ausgebildet, eine verdiente Stufe seiner Lebensbestimmung erstiegen und kam mit Urlaub, die Seinigen zu besuchen. Auf eine ganz natürliche, aber doch sonderbare Weise stand er seiner schönen Nachbarin abermals entgegen. Sie hatte in der letzten Zeit nur freundliche, bräutliche Familienempfindungen bei sich genährt, sie war mit allem, was sie umgab, in Übereinstimmung; sie glaubte glücklich zu sein und war es auch auf gewisse Weise. Aber nun stand ihr zum erstenmal seit langer Zeit wieder etwas entgegen: es war nicht hassenswert; sie war des Hasses unfähig geworden, ja der kindische Haß, der eigentlich nur ein dunkles Anerkennen des inneren Wertes gewesen, äußerte sich nun in frohem Erstaunen, erfreulichem Betrachten, gefälligem Eingestehen, halb willigem halb unwilligem und doch notwendigem Annahen, und das alles war wechselseitig. Eine lange Entfernung gab zu längeren Unterhaltungen Anlaß. Selbst jene kindische Unvernunft diente den Aufgeklärteren zu scherzhafter Erinnerung, und es war, als wenn man sich jenen neckischen Haß wenigstens durch eine freundschaftliche, aufmerksame Behandlung vergüten müsse, als wenn jenes gewaltsame Verkennen nunmehr nicht ohne ein ausgesprochnes Anerkennen bleiben dürfe.

Von seiner Seite blieb alles in einem verständigen, wünschenswerten Maß. Sein Stand, seine Verhältnisse, sein Streben, sein Ehrgeiz beschäftigten ihn so reichlich, daß er die Freundlichkeit der schönen Braut als eine dankenswerte Zugabe mit Behaglichkeit aufnahm, ohne sie deshalb in irgendeinem Bezug auf sich zu betrachten oder sie ihrem Bräutigam zu mißgönnen, mit dem er übrigens in den besten Verhältnissen stand.

Bei ihr hingegen sah es ganz anders aus. Sie schien sich wie aus einem Traum erwacht. Der Kampf gegen ihren jungen Nachbar war die erste Leidenschaft gewesen, und dieser heftige Kampf war doch nur, unter der Form des Widerstrebens, eine heftige, gleichsam angeborne Neigung. Auch kam es ihr in der Erinnerung nicht anders vor, als daß sie ihn immer geliebt habe. Sie lächelte über jenes feindliche Suchen mit den Waffen in der Hand; sie wollte sich des angenehmsten Gefühls erinnern, als er sie entwaffnete; sie bildete sich ein, die größte Seligkeit empfunden zu haben, da er sie band, und alles, was sie zu seinem Schaden und Verdruß unternommen hatte, kam ihr nur als unschuldiges Mittel vor, seine Aufmerksamkeit auf sich zu ziehen. Sie verwünschte jene Trennung, sie bejammerte den Schlaf, in den sie verfallen, sie verfluchte die schleppende, träumerische Gewohnheit, durch die ihr ein so unbedeutender Bräutigam hatte werden können; sie war verwandelt, doppelt verwandelt, vorwärts und rückwärts, wie man es nehmen will.

Hätte jemand ihre Empfindungen, die sie ganz geheimhielt, entwickeln und mit ihr teilen können, so würde er sie nicht gescholten haben; denn freilich konnte der Bräutigam die Vergleichung mit dem Nachbar nicht aushalten, sobald man sie nebeneinander sah. Wenn man dem einen ein gewisses Zutrauen nicht versagen konnte, so erregte der andere das vollste Vertrauen; wenn man den einen gern zur Gesellschaft mochte, so wünschte man sich den andern zum Gefährten; und dachte man gar an höhere Teilnahme, an außerordentliche Fälle, so hätte man wohl an dem einen gezweifelt, wenn einem der andere vollkommene Gewißheit gab. Für solche Verhältnisse ist den Weibern ein besonderer Takt angeboren, und sie haben Ursache sowie Gelegenheit, ihn auszubilden.

Je mehr die schöne Braut solche Gesinnungen bei sich ganz heimlich nährte, je weniger nur irgend jemand dasjenige auszusprechen im Fall war, was zugunsten des Bräutigams gelten konnte, was Verhältnisse, was Pflicht anzuraten und zu gebieten, ja was eine unabänderliche Notwendigkeit unwiderruflich zu fordern schien, desto mehr begünstigte das schöne Herz seine Einseitigkeit; und indem sie von der einen Seite durch Welt und Familie, Bräutigam und eigne Zusage unauflöslich gebunden war, von der andern der emporstrebende Jüngling gar kein Geheimnis von seinen Gesinnungen, Planen und Aussichten machte, sich nur als ein treuer und nicht einmal zärtlicher Bruder gegen sie bewies und nun gar von seiner unmittelbaren Abreise die Rede war, so schien es, als ob ihr früher kindischer Geist mit allen seinen Tücken und Gewaltsamkeiten wiedererwachte und sich nun auf einer höheren Lebensstufe mit Unwillen rüstete, bedeutender und verderblicher zu wirken. Sie beschloß zu sterben, um den ehemals Gehaßten und nun so heftig Geliebten für seine Unteilnahme zu strafen und sich, indem sie ihn nicht besitzen sollte, wenigstens mit seiner Einbildungskraft, seiner Reue auf ewig zu vermählen. Er sollte ihr totes Bild nicht loswerden, er sollte nicht aufhören, sich Vorwürfe zu machen, daß er ihre Gesinnungen nicht erkannt, nicht erforscht, nicht geschätzt habe.

Dieser seltsame Wahnsinn begleitete sie überallhin. Sie verbarg ihn unter allerlei Formen; und ob sie den Menschen gleich wunderlich vorkam, so war niemand aufmerksam oder klug genug, die innere, wahre Ursache zu entdecken.

Indessen hatten sich Freunde, Verwandte, Bekannte in Anordnungen von mancherlei Festen erschöpft. Kaum verging ein Tag, daß nicht irgend etwas Neues und Unerwartetes angestellt worden wäre. Kaum war ein schöner Platz der Landschaft, den man nicht ausgeschmückt und zum Empfang vieler froher Gäste bereitet hätte. Auch wollte unser junger Ankömmling noch vor seiner Abreise das Seinige tun und lud das junge Paar mit einem engeren Familienkreise zu einer Wasserlustfahrt. Man bestieg ein großes, schönes, wohlausgeschmücktes Schiff, eine der Jachten, die einen kleinen Saal und einige Zimmer anbieten und auf das Wasser die Bequemlichkeit des Landes überzutragen suchen.

Man fuhr auf dem großen Strome mit Musik dahin; die Gesellschaft hatte sich bei heißer Tageszeit in den untern Räumen versammelt, um sich an Geistes- und Glücksspielen zu ergötzen. Der junge Wirt, der niemals untätig bleiben konnte, hatte sich ans Steuer gesetzt, den alten Schiffsmeister abzulösen, der an seiner Seite eingeschlafen war; und eben brauchte der Wachende alle seine Vorsicht, da er sich einer Stelle nahte, wo zwei Inseln das Flußbette verengten und, indem sie ihre flachen Kiesufer bald an der einen, bald an der andern Seite hereinstreckten, ein gefährliches Fahrwasser zubereiteten. Fast war der sorgsame und scharfblickende Steurer in Versuchung, den Meister zu wecken, aber er getraute sichs zu und fuhr gegen die Enge. In dem Augenblick erschien auf dem Verdeck seine schöne Feindin mit einem Blumenkranz in den Haaren. Sie nahm ihn ab und warf ihn auf den Steuernden. »Nimm dies zum Andenken!« rief sie aus. »Störe mich nicht!« rief er ihr entgegen, indem er den Kranz auffing; »ich bedarf aller meiner Kräfte und meiner Aufmerksamkeit.« – »Ich störe dich nicht weiter«, rief sie; »du siehst mich nicht wieder!« Sie sprachs und eilte nach dem Vorderteil des Schiffs, von da sie ins Wasser sprang. Einige Stimmen riefen: »Rettet! rettet! sie ertrinkt.« Er war in der entsetzlichsten Verlegenheit. Über dem Lärm erwacht der alte Schiffsmeister, will das Ruder ergreifen, der jüngere es ihm übergeben, aber es ist keine Zeit, die Herrschaft zu wechseln: das Schiff strandet, und in eben dem Augenblick, die lästigsten Kleidungsstücke wegwerfend, stürzte er sich ins Wasser und schwamm der schönen Feindin nach.

Das Wasser ist ein freundliches Element für den, der damit bekannt ist und es zu behandeln weiß. Es trug ihn, und der geschickte Schwimmer beherrschte es. Bald hatte er die vor ihm fortgerissene Schöne erreicht; er faßte sie, wußte sie zu heben und zu tragen; beide wurden vom Strom gewaltsam fortgerissen, bis sie die Inseln, die Werder weit hinter sich hatten und der Fluß wieder breit und gemächlich zu fließen anfing. Nun erst ermannte, nun erholte er sich aus der ersten zudringenden Not, in der er ohne Besinnung nur mechanisch gehandelt; er blickte mit emporstrebendem Haupt umher und ruderte nach Vermögen einer flachen, buschichten Stelle zu, die sich angenehm und gelegen in den Fluß verlief. Dort brachte er seine schöne Beute aufs Trockne; aber kein Lebenshauch war in ihr zu spüren. Er war in Verzweiflung, als ihm ein betretener Pfad, der durchs Gebüsch lief, in die Augen leuchtete. Er belud sich aufs neue mit der teuren Last, er erblickte bald eine einsame Wohnung und erreichte sie. Dort fand er gute Leute, ein junges Ehepaar. Das Unglück, die Not sprach sich geschwind aus. Was er nach einiger Besinnung forderte, ward geleistet. Ein lichtes Feuer brannte, wollne Decken wurden über ein Lager gebreitet, Pelze, Felle und was Erwärmendes vorrätig war, schnell herbeigetragen. Hier überwand die Begierde zu retten jede andre Betrachtung. Nichts ward versäumt, den schönen, halbstarren, nackten Körper wieder ins Leben zu rufen. Es gelang. Sie schlug die Augen auf, sie erblickte den Freund, umschlang seinen Hals mit ihren himmlischen Armen. So blieb sie lange; ein Tränenstrom stürzte aus ihren Augen und vollendete ihre Genesung. »Willst du mich verlassen«, rief sie aus, »da ich dich so wiederfinde?« – »Niemals«, rief er, »niemals!« und wußte nicht, was er sagte noch was er tat. »Nur schone dich«, rief er hinzu, »schone dich! denke an dich um deinet- und meinetwillen.«

Sie dachte nun an sich und bemerkte jetzt erst den Zustand, in dem sie war. Sie konnte sich vor ihrem Liebling, ihrem Retter nicht schämen; aber sie entließ ihn gern, damit er für sich sorgen möge; denn noch war, was ihn umgab, naß und triefend.

Die jungen Eheleute beredeten sich; er bot dem Jüngling und sie der Schönen das Hochzeitskleid an, das noch vollständig dahing, um ein Paar von Kopf zu Fuß und von innen heraus zu bekleiden. In kurzer Zeit waren die beiden Abenteurer nicht nur angezogen, sondern ganz geputzt. Sie sahen allerliebst aus, staunten einander an, als sie zusammentrafen, und fielen sich mit unmäßiger Leidenschaft, und doch halb lächelnd über die Vermummung, gewaltsam in die Arme. Die Kraft der Jugend und die Regsamkeit der Liebe stellten sie in wenigen Augenblicken völlig wieder her, und es fehlte nur die Musik, um sie zum Tanz aufzufordern.

Sich vom Wasser zur Erde, vom Tode zum Leben, aus dem Familienkreise in eine Wildnis, aus der Verzweiflung zum Entzücken, aus der Gleichgültigkeit zur Neigung, zur Leidenschaft gefunden zu haben, alles in einem Augenblick – der Kopf wäre nicht hinreichend, das zu fassen; er würde zerspringen oder sich verwirren. Hiebei muß das Herz das Beste tun, wenn eine solche Überraschung ertragen werden soll.

Ganz verloren eins ins andere, konnten sie erst nach einiger Zeit an die Angst, an die Sorgen der Zurückgelassenen denken, und fast konnten sie selbst nicht ohne Angst, ohne Sorge daran denken, wie sie jenen wiederbegegnen wollten. »Sollen wir fliehen? sollen wir uns verbergen?« sagte der Jüngling. »Wir wollen zusammenbleiben«, sagte sie, indem sie an seinem Hals hing.

Der Landmann, der von ihnen die Geschichte des gestrandeten Schiffs vernommen hatte, eilte, ohne weiter zu fragen, nach dem Ufer. Das Fahrzeug kam glücklich einhergeschwommen; es war mit vieler Mühe losgebracht worden. Man fuhr aufs ungewisse fort, in Hoffnung, die Verlornen wiederzufinden. Als daher der Landmann mit Rufen und Winken die Schiffenden aufmerksam machte, an eine Stelle lief, wo ein vorteilhafter Landungsplatz sich zeigte, und mit Winken und Rufen nicht aufhörte, wandte sich das Schiff nach dem Ufer, und welch ein Schauspiel ward es, da sie landeten! Die Eltern der beiden Verlobten drängten sich zuerst ans Ufer; den liebenden Bräutigam hatte fast die Besinnung verlassen. Kaum hatten sie vernommen, daß die lieben Kinder gerettet seien, so traten diese in ihrer sonderbaren Verkleidung aus dem Busch hervor. Man erkannte sie nicht eher, als bis sie ganz herangetreten waren. »Wen seh ich?« riefen die Mütter. »Was seh ich?« riefen die Väter. Die Geretteten warfen sich vor ihnen nieder. »Eure Kinder!« riefen sie aus, »ein Paar.« – »Verzeiht!« rief das Mädchen. »Gebt uns Euren Segen!« rief der Jüngling. »Gebt uns Euren Segen!« riefen beide, da alle Welt staunend verstummte. »Euren Segen!« ertönte es zum drittenmal, und wer hätte den versagen können!