de-en  Brennendes Geheimnis, Novelle von Stefan Zweig, Teil 1
This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with almost no restrictions whatsoever. The Partner
The locomotive shrieked out hoarsely: Semmering was reached. The black wagons rested for a moment in the silvery light of the hill, spitting out some colorful/motley people, swallowing others, irritated voices going back and forth; then the hoarse engine in front shieked again and pulled the black chain rattling down into the hollow of the tunnel. The landscape was lying purely spread out again, with clear backgrounds, cleanly swept by the wind.
One of those who had arrived, young, pleasantly conspicuous by good clothes and a natural springiness of step, quickly took a cab to the hotel ahead of the others. Without any haste the horses trotted along the rising path. Spring was in the air. Those white, restless clouds that only May and June have fluttered in the sky; those white, even still young and fluttering companions who playfully race across the blue skyway in order to suddenly hide behind high mountains, who embrace and flee, one moment crumbling up like handkerchiefs, the next moment shredding into strips, and finally putting white caps on the mountains as a practical joke. The wind above was also restless, shaking the thin trees, still wet from the rain, so wildly that they quietly cracked in the limbs and sprayed a thousand drops away from them like sparks. Sometimes even the scent of snow seemed to come cold from the mountains, then one felt in the breath something that was sweet and sharp at the same time. Everything in the air and in the earth was in motion and fermenting impatience. Quietly snorting, the horses now ran down the descending path, their bells jingled far ahead of them.
The first route of the young man in the hotel was to the registry of present guests which he – soon disappointed – skimmed through. "Why I'm actually here," something in him began to ask uneasily. "To be alone on the mountain without compagnionship is worse than the bureau. Apparently, I have come too early or too late. I'm never lucky with my holidays. I can't find a single familiar name among all these people. If there were at least a couple of women, some small flirtation, in a pinch even an innocent one, in order to not spend this week too dismally." The young man, a baron of not very illustrious Austrian civil servant nobility, employed in the governor's office, had taken this little vacation without any need, actually just because all his colleagues had pressed for a spring week holiday and he did not want to give his week off to his employer as a present. He was, although not lacking an inner aptitude, of a throughly social nature, popular as such, gladly seen in all circles and fully aware of his incapacity for loneliness. He had no inclination to confront himself when alone, and he avoided these encounters as much as possible because he did not want at all a more intimate acquaintance with himself. He knew that he needed the friction surface of people in order to have his talents and the warmth and the exuberance of his heart flare up, and he was frosty and useless himself when alone, like a match in the matchbox.
Disgruntled he went back and forth in the empty hall, soon hesitantly skimming through the newspapers, then again hitting some keys of a waltz at the piano in turn, yet the rhythm did not inspire his fingers to play. Finally he morosely sat down, watching the darkness slowly falling down, and fog bursting out of the spruces as grey vapor. One hour he waited, useless and nervous. Then he escaped into the dining-hall.
Only a few of the tables were taken there, which he hastily glanced over. ... In vain! No acquaintances, only a trainer - he returned a casual greeting - over there, and there again a face he knew from Ringstreet, nothing else. No woman, nobody that promised even a fleeting adventure His sulk became more impatient. He was one of those young people, whose pretty face has been very successful, and in which everything is constantly ready for a new encounter, a new experience, who are always eager to hurry into the unknown of an adventure, who are not surprised because they have calculated everything slyly, who overlook nothing erotic, because even their first glance reaches into the sensual, scrutinizing and indiscriminate, whether it is the wife of his friends or the chambermaid, who opens the door for them. If one calls such people with a certain contempt womanizers, it happens without knowing how much observed truth is implied in the word, for, as a matter of fact, in In their watchful alertness all the passionate instincts of the hunt are afire, the stalking, the excitement, the emotional cruelty burn in the restless attention of such people. They are constantly waiting in their raised hide, always ready and determined to follow the trail of an adventure till they have achieved their kill. They are always full of passion, but not the one of the lover, but of the cold calculating and dangerous player. There are those among them who are persistent, to whom, far beyond their youth, their whole life becomes an eternal adventure because of this expectation, to whom a single day dissolves into a hundred small, sensual experiences - a glance in passing, a scurrying smile, a knee touched when sitting across - and the year again in a hundred such days, for whom the sensory experience is the eternally flowing, nourishing and inspiring source of life.
Here there were no partners for a game, the seeker saw this immediately. And no irritation is more annoying than the one of the player who knowing about his superiority sits with a hand of cards at the green table waiting in vain for the partner, The Baron called for a newspaper. Sullenly, he let his eyes run over the lines, but his thoughts were sluggish and stumbled drunkenly after the words.
Then he heard a dress rustling behind him and a voice, slightly annoying and with a pronounced accent, saying: "Mais tais toi donc, Edgar!" At his table a silk dress rustled in passing, high and lush, a shadowy figure brushed past and behind her in a black velvet suit was a small, pale boy, who had his eyes fixed on him curiously. Both sat down opposite each other at the reserved table, the child conspicuously trying to behave correctly, which the black turmoil in his eyes seemed to contradict. The lady - and only the young baron had been watchful of her - was very stylish and dressed with visible elegance, moreover, a type he loved very much, one of those somewhat voluptuous Jewish women in old age just before being overripe, apparently also passionate, but proficient in hiding her temperament behind a distinguished melancholy. Initially he was not able to look into her eyes and just admired the beautiful contours of her eyebrows, perfectly rounded over a dainty nose, that indeed revealed her race, but through its noble form, made her profile keen and interesting. Her hair, like everything feminine to this full body, was of a conspicuous opulence, her beauty seemed to have become lush and boastful in the sure self-awareness of many admirers. She ordered in a very quiet voice, rebuking the boy clinking his fork playfully - all this with apparent indifference to the cautiously creeping gaze of the baron, whom she did not seem to notice, while in reality it was only his watchfulness that forced this restrained diligence upon her.
The darkness in the baron's face suddenly brightened up, the nerves running down below were enervated, the wrinkles tightened up, the muscles were torn open causing his figure to snap open and the lights in his eyes were flashing. He himself was not unlike those women who need the presence of a man first before they are able to reveal their full power. Only a sensual stimulus stretched his energy to full strength. The hunter in him smelled a prey here. Provocatively, his eye sought to meet her gaze, which sometimes looked past him with a glancing vagueness, but never offered a clear response. Also around her mouth he sometimes thought he sensed the flicker of the start of a smile, but this was all uncertain, and it was precisely this uncertainty that excited him. The only thing that seemed promising to him were those constant passing glances, because it was reluctance and interest at the same time, and then the strangely meticulous, awareness of being watched kind of conversation with the child. It was precisely the intrusive reproachfulness of this calmness that he secretly felt signified a first concern. He was excited,too: The game had begun. He prolonged his dinner, keeping his eyes on this woman almost incessantly for half an hour until he had traced every line of her face and had invisibly touched every part of her voluptuous body. Darkness fell heavily outside, the forests groaned in childish fear as the large rainclouds now stretched their gray hands after them, the shadows pressed more sinisterly into the room, the people seemed more and more constrained by the silence. The mother's conversation with her child, he noticed, became more and more forced under the threat of this silence, more and more artificial, soon, he felt, it would end. Then he decided to test her. He stood up first, went slowly to the door, overlooking her with a long view on the landscape. There he quickly whirled his head around as if he had forgotten something. And caught her vividly gazing after him.
That encouraged him. He was waiting in the hall. Soon she followed, the boy by the hand, scrolling magazines in passing, showing the child some pictures. But when, as if by chance, the baron came to the table, apparently looking for a magazine, in truth, to penetrate deeper into the moist glint of her eyes, perhaps even to start a conversation, she turned away, patting her son lightly on the shoulder: "Viens, Edgar! (Come, Edgar! Au lit!" (to bed!) and swept coolly past him.
The Baron looked after her a little disappointed. He had actually reckoned with becoming acquainted this evening, and this brusqueness disappointed him. But, in the long run, this resistance held a certain allure, and precisely this uncertainty served to inflame his desire. Anyway: he had his partner and a game could start.
unit 3
Die Lokomotive schrie heiser auf: der Semmering war erreicht.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
Ohne Hast trappten die Pferde den ansteigenden Weg.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 8
Es lag Frühling in der Luft.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 12
Alles in Luft und Erde war Bewegung und gärende Ungeduld.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 15
„Wozu bin ich eigentlich hier“, begann es unruhig in ihm zu fragen.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 16
„Allein hier auf dem Berg zu sein, ohne Gesellschaft, ist ärger als das Bureau.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 17
Offenbar bin ich zu früh gekommen oder zu spät.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 18
Ich habe nie Glück mit meinem Urlaub.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
Keinen einzigen bekannten Namen finde ich unter all den Leuten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 26
Eine Stunde zerbröselte er so, nutzlos und nervös.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 27
Dann flüchtete er in den Speisesaal.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 28
Dort waren erst ein paar Tische besetzt, die er alle mit eiligem Blick überflog.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 29
Vergeblich!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 31
Keine Frau, nichts, was ein auch flüchtiges Abenteuer versprach.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 32
Sein Mißmut wurde ungeduldiger.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
Hier waren keine Partner zu einem Spiele, das übersah der Suchende sofort.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 40
Der Baron rief nach einer Zeitung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
Erst ein sinnlicher Reiz spannte seine Energie zu voller Kraft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 51
Der Jäger in ihm witterte hier eine Beute.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 56
Auch er war erregt: das Spiel hatte begonnen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 60
Da beschloß er eine Probe.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 62
Dort zuckte er rasch, als hätte er etwas vergessen, mit dem Kopf herum.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 63
Und ertappte sie, wie sie ihm lebhaften Blickes nachsah.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 64
Das reizte ihn.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 65
Er wartete in der Hall.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 68
Au lit!“ und rauschte kühl an ihm vorbei.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 69
Ein wenig enttäuscht, sah ihr der Baron nach.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 71
Aber schließlich, in diesem Widerstand war Reiz, und gerade das Unsichere entzündete seine Begier.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 72
Immerhin: er hatte seinen Partner, und ein Spiel konnte beginnen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 41  8 months, 2 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 25  8 months, 2 weeks ago
Scharing7 • 1781  commented on  unit 25  8 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 72  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 60  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 63  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 70  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 68  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 11  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 53  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 9  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 10  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 21  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 31  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 43  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 33  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 30  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 3  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 16  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 17  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 15  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 2  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 8  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3447  translated  unit 29  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 2  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented  8 months, 3 weeks ago

Wikipedia:
Rezeption
Die Novelle fand sehr schnell ihr Leserpublikum; bereits im ersten Jahr der Veröffentlichung erreichte die Einzelausgabe eine Auflage von 10.000 Exemplaren. Die zeitgenössische Kritik lobte die Novelle. Auch Dichterkollegen wie Hermann Hesse zollten ihm Anerkennung.
Zweigs Blickwinkel auf die psychologischen Veränderungen und die feinfühligen Schilderungen von Edgars Schritten in die Welt der Erwachsenen zwischen Traum und Realität waren damals neu. Er traf die Zeitströmung, wie sie damals im Wien seiner Zeitgenossen Sigmund Freud und Arthur Schnitzler herrschte. Die Situation des Jungen im Generationenkonflikt mit den Spielregeln der Erwachsenen, die bis zur körperlichen Auseinandersetzung geht, kann als Metapher für den Übergang der etablierten Gesellschaftsordnung des Fin de siècle in ein neues Jahrhundert am Vorabend des Ersten Weltkriegs gedeutet werden.
Auch in den folgenden Jahren gewann die Novelle zunehmend an Verbreitung und erreichte eine Auflage von 170.000 Exemplaren,[6] bis seine Werke 1933 auf die Listen für die Bücherverbrennungen der Nazis gesetzt wurden. Brennendes Geheimnis musste danach von Wien aus verlegt werden. Ab 1938 war auch dies nicht mehr möglich.

by Siri 8 months, 3 weeks ago

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever. You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.org

Der Partner.
Die Lokomotive schrie heiser auf: der Semmering war erreicht. Eine Minute rasteten die schwarzen Wagen im silbrigen Licht der Höhe, warfen paar bunte Menschen aus, schluckten andere ein, Stimmen gingen geärgert hin und her, dann schrie vorne wieder die heisere Maschine und riß die schwarze Kette rasselnd in die Höhle des Tunnels hinab. Rein ausgespannt, mit klaren, vom nassen Wind reingefegten Hintergründen lag wieder die hingebreitete Landschaft.
Einer der Angekommenen, jung, durch gute Kleidung und eine natürliche Elastizität des Schrittes sympathisch auffallend, nahm den andern rasch voraus einen Fiaker zum Hotel. Ohne Hast trappten die Pferde den ansteigenden Weg. Es lag Frühling in der Luft. Jene weißen, unruhigen Wolken flatterten am Himmel, die nur der Mai und der Juni hat, jene weißen, selbst noch jungen und flattrigen Gesellen, die spielend über die blaue Bahn rennen, um sich plötzlich hinter hohen Bergen zu verstecken, die sich umarmen und fliehen, sich bald wie Taschentücher zerknüllen, bald in Streifen zerfasern und schließlich im Schabernack den Bergen weiße Mützen aufsetzen. Unruhe war auch oben im Wind, der die mageren, noch vom Regen feuchten Bäume so unbändig schüttelte, daß sie leise in den Gelenken krachten und tausend Tropfen wie Funken von sich wegsprühten. Manchmal schien auch Duft von Schnee kühl aus den Bergen herüberzukommen, dann spürte man im Atem etwas, das süß und scharf war zugleich. Alles in Luft und Erde war Bewegung und gärende Ungeduld. Leise schnaubend liefen die Pferde den jetzt niedersteigenden Weg, die Schellen klirrten ihnen weit voraus.
Im Hotel war der erste Weg des jungen Mannes zu der Liste der anwesenden Gäste, die er – bald enttäuscht – durchflog. „Wozu bin ich eigentlich hier“, begann es unruhig in ihm zu fragen. „Allein hier auf dem Berg zu sein, ohne Gesellschaft, ist ärger als das Bureau. Offenbar bin ich zu früh gekommen oder zu spät. Ich habe nie Glück mit meinem Urlaub. Keinen einzigen bekannten Namen finde ich unter all den Leuten. Wenn wenigstens ein paar Frauen da wären, irgendein kleiner, im Notfall sogar argloser Flirt, um diese Woche nicht gar zu trostlos zu verbringen.“ Der junge Mann, ein Baron von nicht sehr klangvollem österreichischen Beamtenadel, in der Statthalterei angestellt, hatte sich diesen kleinen Urlaub ohne jegliches Bedürfnis genommen, eigentlich nur, weil sich alle seine Kollegen eine Frühjahrswoche durchgesetzt hatten und er die seine dem Dienst nicht schenken wollte. Er war, obwohl innerer Befähigung nicht entbehrend, eine durchaus gesellschaftliche Natur, als solche beliebt, in allen Kreisen gern gesehen und sich seiner Unfähigkeit zur Einsamkeit voll bewußt. In ihm war keine Neigung, sich selber allein gegenüberzustehen, und er vermied möglichst diese Begegnungen, weil er intimere Bekanntschaft mit sich selbst gar nicht wollte. Er wußte, daß er die Reibfläche von Menschen brauchte, um seine Talente, die Wärme und den Übermut seines Herzens aufflammen zu lassen, und er allein frostig und sich selber nutzlos war, wie ein Zündholz in der Schachtel.
Verstimmt ging er in der leeren Hall auf und ab, bald unschlüssig in den Zeitungen blätternd, bald wieder im Musikzimmer am Klavier einen Walzer antastend, bei dem ihm aber der Rhythmus nicht recht in die Finger sprang. Schließlich setzte er sich verdrossen hin, sah hinaus, wie das Dunkel langsam niederfiel, der Nebel als Dampf grau aus den Fichten brach. Eine Stunde zerbröselte er so, nutzlos und nervös. Dann flüchtete er in den Speisesaal.
Dort waren erst ein paar Tische besetzt, die er alle mit eiligem Blick überflog. Vergeblich! Keine Bekannten, nur dort – er gab lässig einen Gruß zurück – ein Trainer, dort wieder ein Gesicht von der Ringstraße her, sonst nichts. Keine Frau, nichts, was ein auch flüchtiges Abenteuer versprach. Sein Mißmut wurde ungeduldiger. Er war einer jener jungen Menschen, deren hübschem Gesicht viel geglückt ist und in denen nun beständig alles für eine neue Begegnung, ein neues Erlebnis bereit ist, die immer gespannt sind, sich ins Unbekannte eines Abenteuers zu schnellen, die nichts überrascht, weil sie alles lauernd berechnet haben, die nichts Erotisches übersehen, weil schon ihr erster Blick jeder Frau in das Sinnliche greift, prüfend und ohne Unterschied, ob es die Gattin ihres Freundes ist oder das Stubenmädchen, das die Türe zu ihr öffnet. Wenn man solche Menschen mit einer gewissen leichtfertigen Verächtlichkeit Frauenjäger nennt, so geschieht es, ohne zu wissen, wieviel beobachtende Wahrheit in dem Worte versteinert ist, denn tatsächlich, alle leidenschaftlichen Instinkte der Jagd, das Aufspüren, die Erregtheit und die seelische Grausamkeit flackern in dem rastlosen Wachsein solcher Menschen. Sie sind beständig auf dem Anstand, immer bereit und entschlossen, die Spur eines Abenteuers bis hart an den Abgrund zu verfolgen. Sie sind immer geladen mit Leidenschaft, aber nicht der des Liebenden, sondern der des Spielers, der kalten, berechnenden und gefährlichen. Es gibt unter ihnen Beharrliche, denen weit über die Jugend hinaus das ganze Leben durch diese Erwartung zum ewigen Abenteuer wird, denen sich der einzelne Tag in hundert kleine, sinnliche Erlebnisse auflöst – ein Blick im Vorübergehen, ein weghuschendes Lächeln, ein im Gegenübersitzen gestreiftes Knie – und das Jahr wieder in hundert solcher Tage, für die das sinnliche Erlebnis ewig fließende, nährende und anfeuernde Quelle des Lebens ist.
Hier waren keine Partner zu einem Spiele, das übersah der Suchende sofort. Und keine Gereiztheit ist ärgerlicher als die des Spielers, der mit den Karten in der Hand im Bewußtsein seiner Überlegenheit vor dem grünen Tisch sitzt und vergeblich den Partner erwartet. Der Baron rief nach einer Zeitung. Mürrisch ließ er die Blicke über die Zeilen rinnen, aber seine Gedanken waren lahm und stolperten wie betrunken den Worten nach.
Da hörte er hinter sich ein Kleid rauschen und eine Stimme, leicht ärgerlich und mit affektiertem Akzent, sagen: „Mais tais toi donc, Edgar!“
An seinem Tisch knisterte im Vorüberschreiten ein seidenes Kleid, hoch und üppig schattete eine Gestalt vorbei und hinter ihr in einem schwarzen Samtanzug ein kleiner, blasser Bub, der ihn neugierig mit dem Blick anstreifte. Die beiden setzten sich gegenüber an den reservierten Tisch, das Kind sichtbar um eine Korrektheit bemüht, die der schwarzen Unruhe in seinen Augen zu widersprechen schien. Die Dame – und nur auf sie hatte der junge Baron acht – war sehr soigniert und mit sichtbarer Eleganz gekleidet, ein Typus überdies, den er sehr liebte, eine jener leicht üppigen Jüdinnen im Alter knapp vor der Überreife, offenbar auch leidenschaftlich, aber erfahren, ihr Temperament hinter einer vornehmen Melancholie zu verbergen. Er vermochte zunächst noch nicht in ihre Augen zu sehen und bewunderte nur die schön geschwungene Linie der Augenbrauen, rein über einer zarten Nase gerundet, die ihre Rasse zwar verriet, aber durch edle Form das Profil scharf und interessant machte. Die Haare waren, wie alles Weibliche an diesem vollen Körper, von einer auffallenden Üppigkeit, ihre Schönheit schien im sichern Selbstgefühl vieler Bewunderungen satt und prahlerisch geworden zu sein. Sie bestellte mit sehr leiser Stimme, wies den Buben, der mit der Gabel spielend klirrte, zurecht – all dies mit anscheinender Gleichgültigkeit gegen den vorsichtig anschleichenden Blick des Barons, den sie nicht zu bemerken schien, während es doch in Wirklichkeit nur seine rege Wachsamkeit war, die ihr diese gebändigte Sorgfalt aufzwang.
Das Dunkel im Gesichte des Barons war mit einem Male aufgehellt, unterirdisch belebend liefen die Nerven hin, strafften die Falten, rissen die Muskeln auf, daß seine Gestalt aufschnellte und Lichter in den Augen flackerten. Er war selber den Frauen nicht unähnlich, die erst die Gegenwart eines Mannes brauchen, um aus sich ihre ganze Gewalt herauszuholen. Erst ein sinnlicher Reiz spannte seine Energie zu voller Kraft. Der Jäger in ihm witterte hier eine Beute. Herausfordernd suchte sein Auge ihrem Blick zu begegnen, der ihn manchmal mit einer glitzernden Unbestimmtheit des Vorbeisehens kreuzte, nie aber blank eine klare Antwort bot. Auch um den Mund glaubte er manchmal ein Fließen wie von beginnendem Lächeln zu spüren, aber all dies war unsicher, und eben diese Unsicherheit erregte ihn. Das einzige, was ihm versprechend schien, war dieses stete Vorbeischauen, weil es Widerstand war und Befangenheit zugleich, und dann die merkwürdig sorgfältige, auf einen Zuschauer sichtlich eingestellte Art der Konversation mit dem Kinde. Eben das aufdringlich Vorgehaltene dieser Ruhe bedeutete, das fühlte er, heimlich ein erstes Beunruhigtsein. Auch er war erregt: das Spiel hatte begonnen. Er verzögerte sein Diner, hielt diese Frau eine halbe Stunde fast unablässig mit dem Blick fest, bis er jede Linie ihres Gesichtes nachgezeichnet, an jede Stelle ihres üppigen Körpers unsichtbar gerührt hatte. Draußen fiel drückend das Dunkel nieder, die Wälder seufzten in kindischer Furcht, als jetzt die großen Regenwolken graue Hände nach ihnen reckten, immer finstrer drängten die Schatten ins Zimmer hinein, immer mehr schienen die Menschen hier zusammengepreßt durch das Schweigen. Das Gespräch der Mutter mit ihrem Kinde wurde, das merkte er, unter der Drohung dieser Stille immer gezwungener, immer künstlicher, bald, fühlte er, würde es zu Ende sein. Da beschloß er eine Probe. Er stand als erster auf, ging langsam, mit einem langen Blick auf die Landschaft an ihr vorbeisehend, zur Türe. Dort zuckte er rasch, als hätte er etwas vergessen, mit dem Kopf herum. Und ertappte sie, wie sie ihm lebhaften Blickes nachsah.
Das reizte ihn. Er wartete in der Hall. Sie kam bald nach, den Buben an der Hand, blätterte im Vorübergehen unter den Zeitschriften, zeigte dem Kind ein paar Bilder. Aber als der Baron, wie zufällig, an den Tisch trat, anscheinend um auch eine Zeitschrift zu suchen, in Wahrheit, um tiefer in das feuchte Glitzern ihrer Augen zu dringen, vielleicht sogar ein Gespräch zu beginnen, wandte sie sich weg, klopfte ihrem Sohn leicht auf die Schulter: „Viens, Edgar! Au lit!“ und rauschte kühl an ihm vorbei.
Ein wenig enttäuscht, sah ihr der Baron nach. Er hatte eigentlich auf ein Bekanntwerden noch an diesem Abend gerechnet, und diese schroffe Art enttäuschte ihn. Aber schließlich, in diesem Widerstand war Reiz, und gerade das Unsichere entzündete seine Begier. Immerhin: er hatte seinen Partner, und ein Spiel konnte beginnen.