de-en  Dt. Lausbub in Amerika, Kap. 15
Scallywag finds his meaning in life.
Of new found pride. - The Scallywag Wants to Become an American Newspaperman. - At the editorial office. - The Youngest Reporter. - Halleluja! The First Interview. - The Life Line.
Overnight the foolish boy became a man. Above all: he earned lots of money! For the first time in these childishly naive years of travel he had more money than a day demanded. That gave backbone and self-confidence. Then there were the young American women in whose company he learned to move freely (the awkwardness towards women vanished remarkably quickly!) – there was Frank Reddington, whose fresh, cheerful optimistic outlook on life was so akin to the German youth's nature and yet pointed again to a completely new path. This happy-go-lucky American chap did not let himself drive forward blindly, unthinkingly or unconsciously, but rather he was thinking clearly and acutely. He had not only an excellent opinion of himself but also knew to behave in his brisk, concise American way so that his self-esteem was visible and affected other people. Backbone! Man's pride!
That's how the scallywag learned. He put on the elegant American suits, which a good tailor copied from Frank's wardrobe for him, and so he took on something of Frank's nature. ... No longer did he bow deeply to everyone! ... No more boyishly babbling of everything that was in his head ... When the female students gradually disappeared because the charm of the novelty had faded, I got the notion to become a journalist at all costs. ... Spontaneously I decided to go to the editorial staff of the San Francisco Examiner. I contacted the managing editor, the deputy editor-in-chief, who is the actual head of the editorial staff at American newspapers. (I knew that from St. Louis.)
"And what can I do for you?" " I want to be a journalist." "Hello! Slowly-always slowly..." I'll only take three minutes of your time." "Go ahead!" "I want to become a journalist. In particular I want to know, whether my knowledge is sufficient enough for the work if an American newspaper. I am a German. At the Western Post I was temporarily employed for two months -" "Aha! At the Western Post- I already know. Go ahead!" "I'm asking you to make an attempt with me, and I'm suggesting that you work for the newspaper for two months free of charge." "Hello - do you have money to live on?" "Yes, sir." "Where from"? "Earned with German language teaching." "Like this? I remember having received a letter from the editors of the Western Post, in which you were recommended to me. You could work, says Doctor Pretorius. Could you show me something, you've written? In English of course." When I talked about the manuscripts I had sent, he phoned the city editor, asking him whether he could bother to come over and to bring the manuscripts with him.
"Mr. Mc. Grady - Mr. Carle. McGrady, did you read these things?" "We have no need of that," growled the editor of the town.
"Let me see at once, please." The big man read my works carefully through and I trembled inwardly - despite my brand-new self-confidence.
"Well," he said finally, "but for us it's nothing. It's too sketchy. Descriptions we only tie in with interesting events. But the style isn't bad and even this bit of foreigness looks quite good. By the way, here is a gross grammatical mistake. Mc Grady, this young man is German and wants to be an American journalist. He told me he wanted to know if he was qualified for the job and would work free for two months. What do you think? He's recommended by the Western Post, German newspaper in St. Louis. "Can I say something difficult," said Mr. McGrady. "The fishermen's island thing is very nice. It must be in your blood to work as a journalist. We can give it a try. Besides, I am short of journalists after Jameson had to be dismissed." "All right. Mr. Carlé, I'm hiring you on the Examiner with a fixed weekly salary of five dollars. For your work you will receive money per line." "Congratulations," said Mc. Grady and laughed. "I'll be giving you a hard time. We don't have time to talk here. Let me tell you briefly, then, that the job is everything and the man is nothing in my opinion. Do your work." The chief of the editorial staff nodded. "All that counts for us is work. So you're the greenest reporter. Mr. Mc. Grady will assign you your duties. One more hint: I hired you because the minor details are well observed in your stuff. You have to observe. In carrying out your respective reporter task, you will do everything you can to explore all conceivable facts and observe everything, large and small. I need facts. Stylish remarks we can make up by ourselves. Facts! Pray for facts! The way you do that will show us whether you are worth our while to bother with you. Good Morning!" "Be exactly at 5 o'clock in the afternoon in the reporters room!" ordered Mc.Grady. "Have your evening dress and clothes sent here, so you can change here when necessary. Good morning! Give me good work and I'll be your good friend - good morning!" So I became the youngest reporter of the San Francisco newspaper of the newspaper king Hearst.

As if possessed, I stormed home and ran - hoopla, always three steps at a time - up to Frank's room.
"Frank - Franky - -" I shouted, still half in the door, "I got a job as a reporter at the Examiner! Glory Hallelujah – Frank – we have to drink a glass of beer quickly, otherwise I am going to come apart at the seams from delight and –." Only then did I see that sitting on the only rickety chair in the room was a portly older gentleman who was looking at me with a smile. Frank sat on the bed and grinned. Frank looked very similar to the elderly gentleman - "Well, is that another one of them, Frank?" said the gentleman.
"Exactly, sir. Right sort. Old boy, I congratulate you a zillion times on your job at the Examiner. Whoa, knock 'em dead at the old paper! ... Father, may I introduce you to Mr. Carlé - from the Examiner. Ex-worker of damn salty cods and in addition a professor of the German language!" Mr. Reddington roared with laughter.
"You guys are almost a little too fast for me. A shameless company! Is it also customary for you in Germany that the father comes to his son and not the son to his father, heh? Well, at least you‘ve got guts. Now, come to the hotel, you good-for-nothings, and have a good feed!" A quarter of an hour later the three of us were sitting in the elegant lunch room of the Globe Hotel. It grabbed me like an unbearable homesickness when I saw how proud the old man was of his rascal of a son, despite all the superficial terseness and ostensible indifference, and how his eyes lit up in a flash when Frank declared that in December he would report to his father in New York for orders. Until the final exam he wanted to take care of his own existence. Although the old gentleman muttered that this was damn nonsense, one noticed the joy in him when Frank dryly stated that the work at the University of California was his private affair and he intended to keep up what he had begun.
"But you could do a good deed, Governor!" "Hey? Pay off the debt?" "Nonsense. I don't have any. No - look, Carlé here is allright and has become a brand-new reporter today - " "Yes! Becomes such a boy, suddenly, just reporter! What riddles are you posing to an old man to solve!" "– and you could be kind to explain to him something that he can use for the newspaper. You always know something." "Well..." "Please, pater!" And again the old man laughed. It was actually twenty-four hours too early to let the cat out of the bag, but for once and because it was a coincidence - - he dictated. Concise, sharp, like a general dictating his combat decisions. Even my inexperience comprehended that this was a very big deal. The Illinois Central Railway (whose shares were controlled by Franks's father) had bought up an unprofitable railway line in Missouri and Arkansas, some of which had not yet been completely built. The connection line between Chicago, this railway and the deep South was to be built immediately. Then came financial details. And a masterful presentation, concise but of complete clarity, of the cities that the railroad would touch, of the economic regions through which it would run, of the development opportunities the consortium would envisage.
"As a personal note, you can write Cyrus F. Reddington has been to San Francisco for a few days to visit his son, who is studying at the University of California!" And he smiled at Frank.
But I ran to the Examiner's editorial office. ...
"At five o' clock, I told you!" growled Mc. Grady frowning.
"I have an interview with Cyrus F. Reddington from New York." "Hey? What?" "Reddington. President of the National Bank - " "Every child knows him. How do you know him? Where did he go?" "In the Globe. ... I'm friends with his son." "Come with me." He dragged me to the editor-in-chief, and then hurried himself to the Globe Hotel (probably to verify my statements).
But Mr. Lascelles, the managing editor, went back and forth with the red and blue pencil between the lines of my manuscript, underlining and emphasizing.
"Excellent," he said. ... "It's a big deal. Keep this connection alive. Did the old Reddington give the message to others as well? Other newspapers? The stock exchange?" "No, just me." "What?" he screamed. "That's great!" He added even more blatant headlines and introduced the sensation with the words:"Special Message from the Examiner." And among the two huge columns he put the initial letters of my name underneath: E. C. "You've earned your stripes," he smiled. "Even if it was a coincidence." Then I was sent to a big fire alarm. A large building in the business district burned down. I just happened to be passing by when the chief of the fire brigade was interrogating the stoker of the boiler plant of the building, who laboriously explained how flames suddenly came out of the basement and that a few days ago he had already warned of the danger of spontaneous combustion of the type of bituminous coal newly purchased. That was something very pretty again, and another lucky coincidence!
McGrady nodded happily..."We'll make a good Examiner man out of you yet!" That was a sleepless night. I stared out of the window of my little room at the glittering lights in the bay, and dream chased after dream. Like you seldom dream. Only after great experience. When you stand there and feel the pounding blood in your temples and a tremendous feeling of happiness rises above your achieved goal; when you want to shout out your cheer into the world... God, I was now a newspaper man! I would have liked to scream, shouting with joy. A newspaperman in one of the world's big newspapers! Pride stirred in me: you alone have found the way to the newspaper! How ridiculously small things were the experiences of these first three years in America far behind me - far, indescribably far. And all of a sudden it came over me like quiet clarity, like a feeling of steadfastly security, not to be shaken by anything: my life - the life I wanted to live - lay clearly in front of me. No more searching. No groping about. No wandering from job to job. The newspaper and I, me and the newspaper: that was the lifeline. Whatever might come, stick to one thing: You are a man of the pen now because you want to be, and with the work which now begins, you must stand or fall!
The scallywag had found the lifeline.

End of the first part - footnote: Not quite two years later I met Billy again, on Cuba, in the Spanish-American war - Mr. Billy van Straaten, lieutenant in a volunteer regiment. The episode is described in the second part of my American memories and impressions. E. R.
unit 1
Der Lausbub findet die Lebenslinie.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Von neuem Stolz.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 3
– Der Lausbub will amerikanischer Journalist werden.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 4
– Auf der Redaktion.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
– Jüngster Reporter.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 6
– Hallelujah!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
Das erste Interview.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 8
– Die Lebenslinie.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
Über Nacht fast wurde der törichte Junge zum Mann.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 10
Vor allem: Er verdiente viel Geld!
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 12
Das gab Rückgrat und Selbstbewußtsein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 17
Rückgrat!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 18
Männerstolz!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 19
So lernte der Lausbub.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
Machte nicht mehr die tiefen Verbeugungen vor allen Menschen!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 23
Kurz entschlossen ging ich auf die Redaktion des San Franzisko Examiners.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 25
(Das wußte ich von St. Louis her.)
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 26
»Und was kann ich für Sie tun?« »Ich will Journalist werden.« »Halloh!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 28
unit 29
Ich bin Deutscher.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 30
An der Westlichen Post war ich zwei Monate lang aushilfsweise angestellt –« »Aha!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 31
An der Westlichen Post – weiß schon.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 34
Sie könnten arbeiten, sagt Doktor Pretorius.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 35
Können Sie mir etwas zeigen, das Sie geschrieben haben?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 37
»Mr.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 38
Mc.Grady – Mr. Carlé.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 39
unit 41
»Nun,« sagte er endlich, »für uns ist das allerdings nichts.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 42
Zu sehr skizzenhaft.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 43
Wir knüpfen Beschreibungen nur an interessante Ereignisse an.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 44
Aber der Stil ist nicht übel, und das bißchen Fremdartige macht sich sogar ganz gut.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 45
Hier ist übrigens ein grober grammatikalischer Fehler.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 46
Mc.Grady, dieser junge Mann ist Deutscher und will amerikanischer Journalist werden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 47
Er hat mir gesagt, er wolle wissen, ob er fürs Metier taugt und zwei Monate umsonst arbeiten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Was meinenSie?
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
»Die Fischerinselsache ist ganz nett.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 51
Zum Journalisten muß man geboren sein.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 52
Können's ja mal probieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 53
Im übrigen bin ich kurz an Reportern, seit Jameson entlassen werden mußte.« »Allright.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 54
Mr. Carlé, ich stelle Sie beim Examiner mit einem festen Wochengehalt von fünf Dollars an.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 55
Für Ihre Arbeiten erhalten Sie Zeilengeld.« »Gratuliere,« sagte Mc.Grady und lachte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 56
»Ich werde Sie zwiebeln.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 57
Wir haben hier keine Zeit zum reden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 58
Ich will Ihnen also nur kurz sagen, daß bei mir die Arbeit alles und der Mann gar nichts gilt.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 59
Arbeiten Sie.« Der Chef des Redaktionsstabs nickte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 60
»Bei uns gilt nur die Arbeit.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 61
Sie sind also jüngster Reporter.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 62
Mr. Mc.Grady wird Ihnen Ihre Aufgaben zuweisen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 64
Sie haben zu beobachten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 66
Tatsachen brauche ich.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 67
Elegante Bemerkungen können wir uns selbst aus den Fingern saugen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 68
Tatsachen!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
Beten Sie um Tatsachen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 70
Wie Sie das machen, wird uns zeigen, ob es der Mühe wert ist, sich mit Ihnen zu plagen.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 71
Good morning!« »Prompt um 5 Uhr nachmittags im Reporterzimmer!« befahl Mc.Grady.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 73
Good morning!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 78
Frank saß auf dem Bett und grinste.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 80
»Exactly, sir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 81
Richtige Sorte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 82
Alter Junge, ich gratulier' dir hunderttausendmal zum Examiner.
5 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 83
Hoh, hau' dich dran an die alte Zeitung!
5 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 84
Vater, darf ich dir Mr. Carlé vorstellen – vom Examiner.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 86
»Ihr Jungens seid mir fast ein wenig zu fix.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 87
Eine unverschämte Gesellschaft!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Na, ihr habt wenigstens Schneid.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 92
Bis zur Schlußprüfung aber wolle er selbst für seine Existenz sorgen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 94
»Aber ein gutes Werk könntest du tun, Gouverneur!« »Heh?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 95
Schulden bezahlen?« »Ach wo.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
Hab' keine.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 97
Nein – sieh' mal an, Carlé hier ist allright und heute nagelneuer Reporter geworden –« »Ja!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
Wird solch' ein Junge, bumps, einfach Reporter!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 100
Du weißt ja immer etwas.« »Na …« »Bitte, pater!« Und wieder lachte der alte Herr.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 102
Knapp, scharf, wie ein General, der seine Schlachtdispositionen diktiert.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 103
Selbst meine Unerfahrenheit begriff, daß es sich hier um ganz Großes handelte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 106
Dann kamen finanzielle Details.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 109
Ich aber rannte auf die Redaktion des Examiner.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 110
»Um fünf Uhr sagte ich doch!« brummte Mc.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 111
Grady stirnrunzelnd.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 112
»Ich habe ein Interview mit Cyrus F. Reddington aus New York.« »Heh?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 113
Was?« »Reddington.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 114
Präsident der Nationalbank –« »Jedes Kind kennt ihn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 115
Wie kommen Sie zu ihm?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 116
Wo ist er abgestiegen?« »Im Globe.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 119
»Famos,« sagte er.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 120
»Ganz große Sache.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
Halten Sie sich diese Verbindung warm.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 122
Hat der alte Reddington die Nachricht auch anderen gegeben?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 123
Anderen Zeitungen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 124
Der Börse?« »Nein, nur mir.« »Was?« schrie er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 126
»Wenn's auch ein Zufall war.« Dann wurde ich auf einen Großfeueralarm geschickt.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 127
Ein großes Gebäude im Geschäftsviertel brannte nieder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
Das war wieder etwas sehr Hübsches, und wieder ein Glückszufall!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 132
So wie man selten träumt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 133
Nur nach großem Erleben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 135
Schreien hätte ich mögen, jubelnd schreien.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 136
Zeitungsmann an einer der großen Zeitungen der Welt!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 137
Der Stolz regte sich: allein hast du den Weg zur Zeitung gefunden!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 140
Kein Suchen mehr.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 141
Kein Tasten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 142
Kein Umherirren von Beruf zu Beruf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 143
Die Zeitung und ich, ich und die Zeitung: das war die Lebenslinie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 145
Der Lausbub hatte die Lebenslinie gefunden.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 147
Die Episode wird in dem zweiten Teil meiner amerikanischen Erinnerungen und Eindrücke geschildert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 148
E. R.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 85  8 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 48  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 17  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 48  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 70  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 36  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 33  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 3  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 73  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 17  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 88  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 37  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 3  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 2  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 72  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 10  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 7  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 9  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 1  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 3  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 10  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 51  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 56  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 136  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 135  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 68  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 56  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 51  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 48  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 39  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 37  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 29  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 2  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 10  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 3  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 89  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 71  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 53  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 148  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 89  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 86  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 48  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 29  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 13  8 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 5  8 months, 3 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 68  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Maria-Helene • 2285  translated  unit 37  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 17  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 10  8 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 5  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 8  8 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 6  8 months, 3 weeks ago

Der Lausbub findet die Lebenslinie.
Von neuem Stolz. – Der Lausbub will amerikanischer Journalist werden. – Auf der Redaktion. – Jüngster Reporter. – Hallelujah! Das erste Interview. – Die Lebenslinie.
Über Nacht fast wurde der törichte Junge zum Mann. Vor allem: Er verdiente viel Geld! Zum erstenmal in diesen kindlich einfältigen Wanderjahren verfügte er über mehr Geld, als der Tag erforderte. Das gab Rückgrat und Selbstbewußtsein. Dann waren da die jungen Amerikanerinnen, in deren Gesellschaft er sich frei bewegen lernte (das Linkischsein Frauen gegenüber verflog merkwürdig rasch!) – da war Frank Reddington, dessen frischer froher Lebensoptimismus der Art des deutschen Jungen so verwandt war und doch wieder auf ganz neue Wege hinwies. Dieser amerikanische Bruder Leichtfuß ließ sich nicht blind, gedankenlos, ohnmächtig vorwärtstreiben, sondern dachte klar und scharf. Er hatte nicht nur eine ausgezeichnete Meinung von sich selbst, sondern wußte auch in seiner flotten, knappen amerikanischen Manier so aufzutreten, daß sein Selbstrespekt sichtbar war und auf andere Menschen wirkte. Rückgrat! Männerstolz!
So lernte der Lausbub. Zog mit den eleganten amerikanischen Anzügen, die ihm ein guter Schneider nach Franks Garderobe kopierte, auch ein wenig von Franks Wesen an. Machte nicht mehr die tiefen Verbeugungen vor allen Menschen! Plapperte nicht mehr jungenhaft alles heraus, was ihm gerade im Kopfe steckte …
Als die Schülerinnen nach und nach wegblieben, weil der Reiz der Neuheit verblaßt war, da setzte ich es mir in den Kopf, um jeden Preis Journalist zu werden. Kurz entschlossen ging ich auf die Redaktion des San Franzisko Examiners. Melden ließ ich mich bei dem managing editor, dem stellvertretenden Chefredakteur, der an amerikanischen Zeitungen der eigentliche Chef des Redaktionsstabs ist. (Das wußte ich von St. Louis her.)
»Und was kann ich für Sie tun?«
»Ich will Journalist werden.«
»Halloh! Langsam – immer langsam …«
»Ich nehme Ihre Zeit nur drei Minuten in Anspruch –«
»Go ahead!«
»Ich will Journalist werden. Vor allem will ich wissen, ob meine Kenntnisse für die Arbeit einer amerikanischen Zeitung genügen. Ich bin Deutscher. An der Westlichen Post war ich zwei Monate lang aushilfsweise angestellt –«
»Aha! An der Westlichen Post – weiß schon. Go ahead!«
»Ich bitte Sie, einen Versuch mit mir zu machen und schlage vor, zwei Monate lang umsonst für die Zeitung zu arbeiten.«
»Halloh – haben Sie denn Geld zum Leben?«
»Jawohl.«
»Woher?«
»Mit deutschem Sprachunterricht verdient.«
»So? Ich erinnere mich, einen Brief von der Redaktion der Westlichen Post erhalten zu haben, in dem Sie empfohlen wurden. Sie könnten arbeiten, sagt Doktor Pretorius. Können Sie mir etwas zeigen, das Sie geschrieben haben? In Englisch natürlich.«
Als ich von den eingesandten Manuskripten sprach, bat er telephonisch den city editor, den Stadtredakteur, sich zu ihm zu bemühen und die Manuskripte mitzubringen.
»Mr. Mc.Grady – Mr. Carlé. Mc.Grady, haben Sie die Sachen gelesen?«
»Können wir nicht gebrauchen,« brummte der Stadtredakteur.
»Lassen Sie einmal sehen, bitte.«
Der große Mann las meine Arbeiten sorgfältig durch, und ich zitterte innerlich – trotz meines nagelneuen Selbstbewußtseins.
»Nun,« sagte er endlich, »für uns ist das allerdings nichts. Zu sehr skizzenhaft. Wir knüpfen Beschreibungen nur an interessante Ereignisse an. Aber der Stil ist nicht übel, und das bißchen Fremdartige macht sich sogar ganz gut. Hier ist übrigens ein grober grammatikalischer Fehler. Mc.Grady, dieser junge Mann ist Deutscher und will amerikanischer Journalist werden. Er hat mir gesagt, er wolle wissen, ob er fürs Metier taugt und zwei Monate umsonst arbeiten. Was meinenSie? Ist von der Westlichen Post, deutsche Zeitung in St. Louis, empfohlen.«
»Kann ich schwer etwas sagen,« meinte Mister Mc.Grady. »Die Fischerinselsache ist ganz nett. Zum Journalisten muß man geboren sein. Können's ja mal probieren. Im übrigen bin ich kurz an Reportern, seit Jameson entlassen werden mußte.«
»Allright. Mr. Carlé, ich stelle Sie beim Examiner mit einem festen Wochengehalt von fünf Dollars an. Für Ihre Arbeiten erhalten Sie Zeilengeld.«
»Gratuliere,« sagte Mc.Grady und lachte. »Ich werde Sie zwiebeln. Wir haben hier keine Zeit zum reden. Ich will Ihnen also nur kurz sagen, daß bei mir die Arbeit alles und der Mann gar nichts gilt. Arbeiten Sie.«
Der Chef des Redaktionsstabs nickte. »Bei uns gilt nur die Arbeit. Sie sind also jüngster Reporter. Mr. Mc.Grady wird Ihnen Ihre Aufgaben zuweisen. Noch einen Wink: Ich habe Sie deshalb engagiert, weil in Ihrem Zeugs da die Kleinigkeiten gut beobachtet sind. Sie haben zu beobachten. In Ausführung Ihrer jeweiligen Reporteraufgabe werden Sie alles tun, um alle nur erdenklichen Tatsachen zu erforschen und alles, Großes und Kleines, zu beobachten. Tatsachen brauche ich. Elegante Bemerkungen können wir uns selbst aus den Fingern saugen. Tatsachen! Beten Sie um Tatsachen! Wie Sie das machen, wird uns zeigen, ob es der Mühe wert ist, sich mit Ihnen zu plagen. Good morning!«
»Prompt um 5 Uhr nachmittags im Reporterzimmer!« befahl Mc.Grady. »Lassen Sie Ihren Frackanzug und Wäsche herschicken, damit Sie sich im Bedarfsfalle hier umkleiden können. Good morning! Geben Sie mir gute Arbeit, und ich bin Ihr guter Freund – good morning!«
So wurde ich jüngster Reporter der San Franziskoer Zeitung des Zeitungskönigs Hearst.

Wie besessen stürmte ich nach Hause und rannte – hopla, immer drei Stufen auf einmal – zu Franks Zimmer empor.
»Frank – Franky – –« schrie ich, noch halb in der Türe, »ich bin als Reporter beim Examiner angestellt! Glory hallelujah – Frank – wir müssen schnell ein Glas Bier trinken, sonst geh' ich aus dem Leim vor Vergnügen und –«
Da sah ich erst, daß auf dem einzigen wackeligen Stuhl des Zimmers ein beleibter älterer Herr saß, der mich lächelnd musterte. Frank saß auf dem Bett und grinste. Frank sah dem älteren Herrn sehr ähnlich – –
»Well, ist das noch so einer, Frank?« sagte der Herr.
»Exactly, sir. Richtige Sorte. Alter Junge, ich gratulier' dir hunderttausendmal zum Examiner. Hoh, hau' dich dran an die alte Zeitung! Vater, darf ich dir Mr. Carlé vorstellen – vom Examiner. Exbearbeiter von verdammt salzigen cods und nebenbei Professor der deutschen Sprache!«
Mr. Reddington lachte schallend auf.
»Ihr Jungens seid mir fast ein wenig zu fix. Eine unverschämte Gesellschaft! Ist das bei Ihnen in Deutschland auch Sitte, daß der Vater zum Sohn kommt und nicht der Sohn zum Vater, heh? Na, ihr habt wenigstens Schneid. Nun kommt mit ins Hotel, ihr Taugenichtse, und laßt euch abfüttern!«
In einer Viertelstunde saßen wir drei im eleganten Lunchroom des Globe Hotel. Mich packte es wie unerträgliches Heimweh, als ich sah, wie stolz trotz aller oberflächlichen Kürze und anscheinender Gleichgültigkeit der alte Herr auf seinen Strick von Sohn war, und wie seine Augen blitzartig aufleuchteten, als Frank erklärte, im Dezember werde er sich bei seinem Vater in New York für Ordres melden. Bis zur Schlußprüfung aber wolle er selbst für seine Existenz sorgen. Der alte Herr murmelte zwar, das sei verdammter Blödsinn, aber man merkte ihm die Freude an, als Frank trocken erklärte, die Arbeit an der Universität von Kalifornien sei seine Privataffäre und er gedenke das durchzuhalten, was er begonnen.
»Aber ein gutes Werk könntest du tun, Gouverneur!«
»Heh? Schulden bezahlen?«
»Ach wo. Hab' keine. Nein – sieh' mal an, Carlé hier ist allright und heute nagelneuer Reporter geworden –«
»Ja! Wird solch' ein Junge, bumps, einfach Reporter! Welche Rätsel Ihr einem alten Mann zum Lösen aufgebt!«
»– und du könntest nett sein, sir, und ihm etwas erzählen, das er für die Zeitung gebrauchen kann. Du weißt ja immer etwas.«
»Na …«
»Bitte, pater!«
Und wieder lachte der alte Herr. Eigentlich sei es noch vierundzwanzig Stunden zu früh, die Katze aus dem Sack zu lassen, aber ausnahmsweise und weil es der Zufall so wolle – –
Er diktierte. Knapp, scharf, wie ein General, der seine Schlachtdispositionen diktiert. Selbst meine Unerfahrenheit begriff, daß es sich hier um ganz Großes handelte. Die Illinois Central Eisenbahn (deren Aktien der Vater Franks kontrollierte) hatte eine unrentable und zum Teil noch gar nicht völlig gebaute Eisenbahnlinie in Missouri und Arkansas aufgekauft. Die Verbindungslinie zwischen Chicago, dieser Bahn, und dem tiefen Süden sollte sofort in Bau genommen werden. Dann kamen finanzielle Details. Und eine meisterhafte Darstellung, kurz, aber von vollendeter Klarheit, der Städte, die die Bahn berühren sollte, der Wirtschaftsgebiete, durch die sie führte, der Erschließungsmöglichkeiten, mit denen das Konsortium rechnete.
»Als Personalnotiz können Sie bringen, Cyrus F. Reddington sei auf einige Tage in San Franzisko, um seinen Sohn zu besuchen, der auf der Universität von Kalifornien studiert!«
Und er lächelte Frank zu.
Ich aber rannte auf die Redaktion des Examiner.
»Um fünf Uhr sagte ich doch!« brummte Mc. Grady stirnrunzelnd.
»Ich habe ein Interview mit Cyrus F. Reddington aus New York.«
»Heh? Was?«
»Reddington. Präsident der Nationalbank –«
»Jedes Kind kennt ihn. Wie kommen Sie zu ihm? Wo ist er abgestiegen?«
»Im Globe. Ich bin mit seinem Sohn befreundet.«
»Kommen Sie mit.«
Er zerrte mich zum Chefredakteur, und eilte dann selbst nach dem Globe Hotel (wahrscheinlich, um meine Angaben zu verifizieren).
Mr. Lascelles aber, der Managing Editor, fuhr mit dem Rot- und Blaustift zwischen den Zeilen meines Manuskripts hin und her, unterstreichend, hervorhebend.
»Famos,« sagte er. »Ganz große Sache. Halten Sie sich diese Verbindung warm. Hat der alte Reddington die Nachricht auch anderen gegeben? Anderen Zeitungen? Der Börse?«
»Nein, nur mir.«
»Was?« schrie er. »Das ist großartig!«
Noch krassere Überschriften setzte er darüber und leitete die Sensation mit den Worten ein: »Spezialmeldung des Examiner.« Und unter die zwei Riesenspalten setzte er die Anfangsbuchstaben meines Namens: E. C.
»Sie haben sich die Sporen verdient,« lächelte er. »Wenn's auch ein Zufall war.«
Dann wurde ich auf einen Großfeueralarm geschickt. Ein großes Gebäude im Geschäftsviertel brannte nieder. Zufällig kam ich gerade dazu, als der Leiter der Feuerwehr den Heizer der Kesselanlage des Gebäudes verhörte, der umständlich schilderte, wie aus dem Keller mit einemmal Flammen geschlagen seien, und daß er schon vor einigen Tagen vor der Selbstentzündungsgefahr der neugekauften bituminösen Kohlensorte gewarnt habe. Das war wieder etwas sehr Hübsches, und wieder ein Glückszufall!
Mc.Grady aber nickte vergnügt …
»Wir werden noch einen guten Examinermann aus Ihnen machen!«

Das war eine schlaflose Nacht. Ich starrte aus dem Fenster meines Zimmerchens hinaus auf die glitzernden Lichter in der Bai, und Traum jagte sich auf Traum. So wie man selten träumt. Nur nach großem Erleben. Wenn man dasteht und das hämmernde Blut in den Schläfen fühlt, und ein ungeheures Glücksgefühl aufsteigt über das erreichte Ziel; wenn man seinen Jubel hinausschreien möchte in die Welt … Herrgott, so war ich nun Zeitungsmann! Schreien hätte ich mögen, jubelnd schreien. Zeitungsmann an einer der großen Zeitungen der Welt! Der Stolz regte sich: allein hast du den Weg zur Zeitung gefunden! Wie lächerlich kleine Dinge lagen die Erlebnisse dieser ersten drei Jahre in Amerika weit hinter mir – weit, unbeschreiblich weit. Und mit einemmal kam es über mich wie ruhige Klarheit, wie ein Gefühl felsenfester Sicherheit, durch nichts zu erschüttern:
Mein Leben – das Leben, das ich leben wollte – lag klar vor mir. Kein Suchen mehr. Kein Tasten. Kein Umherirren von Beruf zu Beruf. Die Zeitung und ich, ich und die Zeitung: das war die Lebenslinie. Wie es auch kommen mochte, festhalten an dem Einen: Du gehörst zur Feder, weil du zu ihr gehören willst, und mit der Arbeit, die jetzt beginnt, mußt du stehen oder fallen!
Der Lausbub hatte die Lebenslinie gefunden.

Ende des ersten Teils -
Fußnote:
Nicht ganz zwei Jahre später traf ich Billy wieder, auf Kuba, im spanisch-amerikanischen Krieg – Mr. Billy van Straaten, Leutnant in einem Freiwilligen-Regiment. Die Episode wird in dem zweiten Teil meiner amerikanischen Erinnerungen und Eindrücke geschildert. E. R.