de-en  Dt. Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.14
The City of the Golden Gate.
The Heritage of the Gold Diggers. - The Merry Queen of the West. - About Reasonable Black Sheep. - The Town of the Seven Hills top the bill! - Climbing Tramways. In Golden Gate Park. - The Dark Spot of the Sun City. - In the Chinese Quarter. - The Streets of the Living Showcases. - How the Rascal Became a Professor. - About Teachers Learning German. - The American Woman. - Smart Girl Education and Foolish Female Rule. - The American Woman in Art and Living. - Longing for the Newspaper.
The men of California call themselves proud, in contrast to those living in the Land of the Sun but born in other states of the Union, the Native Sons of California. They are proud of their ancestors, the gold diggers. Those tough gold diggers hard as iron from days gone by, who had to deal with men and nature until only the strongest survived, passed down the power of their muscles into generations. Tall, slender, wiry are the men of California in this day and age; proud, curvaceous are its women. In sharp contrast to the lean American women of the Eastern states. But something else the gold diggers' ancestors passed on: These beautiful people have laughing recklessness in their blood; the same carelessness of life, the same hedonism, the same will to suck in the happiness like their grandfathers. The men of gold, who were poor today and rich tomorrow, scratching a fortune from the soil today, only to gamble it away tomorrow.
The Queen of the West was a really fun-loving lady. Of course, the native sons of California wanted to become wealthy too, just like the dollar hunters in Chicago or St. Louis or New York, but no one forgot the pleasure of chasing the dollar. Market Street shone at night in a sea of flames full of light. Right and left, nearly side by side, screamed theaters, variety shows, French restaurants, stylish bars: Enjoy yourselves, sons of California! ...
A funny world. Day after day and night after night, Frank Reddington and I roamed the city for a week because we owed it to our hands to play the loafers for a few days at least. After all they went through, these hands had to serve as an excuse! If we wanted to once dine in a French restaurant, or if a bar was enticing or a roulette table beckoned, one of them laughingly admonished the other: "It's a indeed a pity about the hard earned money - but just think of our hands!" The Puritans of the East would have rolled over in their graves in horror! In the funny variety shows we went to, painstakingly ignoring no one, giggling soubrettes sat down at the tables and out of the men's pockets conjured up quarter-dollars for themselves for sweet Manhattan cocktails and brandy flips; in the elegant bars there was always a side door, over which stood a sign in golden letters: For club members only! Behind this door poker was played, there little faro boxes opened and closed and roulettes sped. However, a club member was anyone who wore a proper suit and looked as if he had the dollars needed to gamble away! The inscription was simply nothing more than a obligatory, nice, cozy formality vis-à-vis the police. A few times we tried our luck at roulette, lost a little bit, and then on a single evening, together we won about seventy dollars. ... Strangely enough, we also stopped at the right time! In Frank's room we danced a true Indian dance of joy that night and solemnly decided to put aside most of the money for new suits and never again risk more than three dollars on the roulette table.
"Otherwise we'll lose the story again," grinned Frank. "By the way, my dear boy, I think we are damned reasonable for black sheep and prodigal sons! Heh?" And during the day we scoured in the city around for hours. Rome has the classical name as the city of the seven hills. Well, a Roman would, if he wandered through San Francisco, only remember the seven hills of his native city with a sense of shame and hopeless defeat! Measly seven hills! ... San Francisco is overrun with hills. Eight, nine -twelve- or even more. Flat is one side of the enormous Market street, which cut the town into two, flat towards the harbour. But on the other side, hills soar upwards far off to the Pacific Ocean beyond, to the Golden Gate; hills with fashionable residential houses on wood-cobbled streets that go up and down in sharp angles, one moment rising, the next moment falling.
And a jumble of trams kept climbing up and down these eternal hills. It was an odd feeling to stand at the bottom of a hill and see a cable car come rattling one's way from high above. They were called cable cars. In the middle between their two rails ran a third, split rail, under which an endless wire cable buzzed along in a hollow space directly underneath the pavement. A kind of gigantic pliers, controlled by the gripman's handle, grabbed onto the cable through the gap, which then pulled the car along with it, while at stops the pliers were released, and a strong air brake was activated. As if in a surging wave, one found oneself in particularly bad places - thrown forward - pushed backwards - jolted and shaken ... The quiet streets of the most elegant part of San Francisco stretched far out towards the sea, and far out stood the palaces of the railway kings of the Southern Pacific and Union Pacific Railways, of the Spreckel's sugar king, of the German engineer Sutro. Then came a deserted lonely stretch of sand that led northwest to the Golden Gate, southwest to the Presidio. A strange little railroad rumbled over the sand, to one of the most beautiful park creations in the world. A German, the engineer Sutro, created this miracle. In the midst of the monotonous sandy areas sprout magnificent trees and green grass, flowerbeds and palms. Then groups of rocks, palm groves again, and suddenly, emerging like a magical world, the vast beauty of the ocean. Here, pushing into a rocky gate of rugged cliffs, there, blending into the eternity between heaven and earth. Golden Gate. The Golden Gate, the rock gate from the Western world to the Eastern world.
But there were also dark spots in the funny sun city.
Dark, full of nooks and crannies, dirty, down in the east, close to the harbor, out of the middle of the gleaming shopping street called Kearney Street, a bizarre jumble of houses rose up on two small knolls. With a few steps, one stepped from the glow of bright arc lamps and opulent shop windows into a world of dark shadows – into San Francisco's Chinatown. Narrow alleyways. Tiny little houses. Mysterious dark corridors. Bright red placards with Chinese inscriptions stretch across the alleyways, shop bordered on shop, pigtailed little men with yellow faces scurried to and fro. But more than the eye, the nose was amazed, for an indescribable scent settled over the Chinese district like a thick cloud; exceedingly exotic; one moment enticing, the next moment repulsive. One moment it smelled sweet and powerful like from a blooming Jasmine; the next moment, oppressive, like a heavy fog, then tangy, like spices – strange people had carried the smells of their country with themselves across the ocean. Policemen stood in every alleyway (later on, my friend the police lieutenant very often guided me through Chinatown); for in the little houses deep down in the alleys which connected house to house underground, criminals resided and vice lived. There were opium dens and Chinese gambling houses and burglar's pubs.
"If I were one of the leaders of San Francisco's public opinion," Frank said when we were ransacking Chinatown again one evening," I would agitate until such time that the rat's nest was swept away from the earth!" The thought was not exactly new. Hardly a day passed without the "Chinese city question" being ventilated in the Frisco newspapers. 1 But the Chinese possessed money and knew how to invest mighty dollars where they earned good interest in the form of influential political protection. For example, the police have just claimed that the Chinese quarter is the nicest mouse trap in which they catch criminals every day, and the city authorities have declared that coexistence of the Chinese makes surveillance easier. Moreover, San Francisco's public opinion was not at all sensitive to grotesque conditions: it tolerated the street of living shop windows!
At the top of the hill in the Chinatown, half hidden in angular masses of houses, lay a small alleyway from which the bright light of the night twinkled, and to which idlers pilgrimaged in droves. Night after night, two Salvation Army Officers stood to the left and right of its entrance. They greeted the passers-by with serious faces and pointed to a poster in silence that they held between them and illuminated sharply with hooded-lanterns. It was written in red writing on the white shreds of canvas:"Brother, dear brother! Look at the shame! Help us as a man and as an American with your opinion and with your vote in the election to defeat the shame! Help the poorest of women, dear brother!" Inside in the alleyway people crowded, kept in constant forward motion by half a dozen policemen, whose half-loud call move on-move on.... do not stop! - the only noises that were heard from the strange silence, for the world looked and stared into the illuminated windows of the small houses on both sides of the alleyway. What you saw there soon seemed to be cruel tragedy, soon to be overly grotesque ridiculousness.
The windows were shop windows with living goods. ... There were three windows in each cottage, going down to the floor, and in each one sat on an elevated podium, lighted by the glow of a light bulb, a woman. Powdered, made-up, artificially styled, dressed in a silk costume; a stereotypical, forced smile, as if frozen on the lips... Like a doll. ... Almost like a wax figure. So shop window lay on shop window. Soon one would have preferred to laugh out loud, because the thought of this living commodity seemed unspeakably grotesque; soon one should have been ashamed. Women of all countries and races squatted in the long store window line; Americans, French women, mulatto women. A tiny Chinese girl there - a girl in a Japanese kimono here. And everyone smiled the same frozen smile and stared at the street. That had method. There was a good reason behind it. For the good police councils of the good city of San Francisco tolerated this alleyway of the grotesque, but issued special protective regulations. ... They gave the living shop windows the seal of official approval, so to speak. But the small lights in the windows were allowed to have only a certain candle power so that no window glowed more than the other, and the merchandise in the display window was not allowed to move, to smile at anyone, to nod to any man, so that no one was seduced. That's how the Friscopolice kept the decorum. A rigid secondary role played gravely in the tragicomedy. ...
The two of us, Frank and I, on the same impulse gave a silver coin to the odd guardians of the Salvation Army at the entrance to the alleyway when we left the alley. Even merry young imprudence became thoughtfully tempered in the alleyway of the living display window.
"Bad taste," said Frank with a shrug. "Distasteful!" And that was a very reasonable judgement.

Together we read the Examiner's advertisement section, especially two advertisements. Friend Frank shook worryingly his wise head. "Worse than salted cod the little rascal can't be?" he murmured. "I'll try it. It isn't very nice, indeed, but my father's son needs money. "Yes - I try it!" "Me, too!" I said, although this thing seemed very crazy to me.
So we started out on the way together; he went to the father, who was looking for private lessons in mathematics for his son, and I went to the family longing for solid German language instruction for their "two children, aged nine and eleven years old". ... When we met again an hour later, we etablished with a resounding laughter that we had both become respectful people - teachers of youth!
The mother of my pupils - her gods! ... - was an elegant, slender American who had treated the engagement of a German language teacher as something terribly insignificant.
"The doctor desires it," she yawned,"that my children learn German. He has no time to teach them himself. I don't think that German education is very important, but the doctor -" The doctor who then came to the salon was her husband, a doctor, born as a child of German parents in San Francisco. He spoke to me in a German horribly corrupted by broken English and seemed very satisfied with my high school education. ... That would be excellent. He wanted his children to learn German for the sake of his parents, and then he also intended to have his son educated in Germany later on.
"Let's say an hour a day, "into the day," Doctor Sanders instructed me, "and say a fee of one dollar. The plan of learning you wanted to make - and you think it's the best - just practical, so that you'll soon be able to speak." The children, the eleven-year-old girl and the nine-year-old boy, were very precocious and very uninhibited.
"We don't like German!" they explained to me at once.
"We do not like German at all!" I was not surprised, because I soon found out that their German language lessons had until now consisted in rewriting words that Daddy had written down for them before. Then a happy thought came to me, on the detour over a glass of water that was on the table - "Kids, we only want to speak German! So, this is a glass of water..." "This is a glass of water," repeat both thoroughly happy
So that was found to be the way to the children's interest. ... In English, the words were almost identical - this is a glass of water - so similar sounding that these American children suddenly got the appetite to speak German. ... It was so easy! So I desperately clung to my glass of water during the entire first lesson and varied off on it – in this glass of water is a rose – the rose is white – we drink water – up to the last possibilities. My children rejoiced! And since there are probably about a thousand words that are pronounced almost the same in German and English, the "method" was happy. One day the mother came to the lesson and listened in amazement, to immediately bring along to the next lesson the next day a friend, the head teacher of a girls' school.
"Excellent, Professor!" she said.
I laughed out loud. "But I'm not a professor!" "It does not matter, Professor. Do you want to give us classes?" "To whom? To you, Madame?" "Listen. The large Californian Teachers' Association wants to make a trip to Europe and of course to Germany in fall. With your practical style, we can still learn a little German quickly. ... I'll arrange everything, professor. It shouldn't cost much!" And she arranged!
I think the teachers at the high school of Burghausen would all have gone off the deep end in horrified disbelief if they couldl have seen me stand at the lectern of a big classroom of a secondary girl's school in San Francisco. In front of a crowd of over fifty charming young teachers! Boldness, stand by my side, I thought in a desperate gallows-humor, and launched a pseudo-scientific explanation (made completely out of thin air) in which I called my working capital of homonymous words the "common Anglo-Saxon vocabulary" and did so very importantly. Then the inhibition loosened itself. The teaching lesson became an amusing question and answer game - "Uasser, Professor?" "No, "W-asser!" Until the Professor stepped down to the school desks and pronounced the difficult German words for his schoolgirls. Those students were lovely! One prettier than the other - one funnier than the other. Typical in their way of being Americans. Of course - the newly-baked professor didn't see anything typical in them, only the funny nice women!
But even in this gaiety lay the entirely free nature of the American woman, who, from childhood on, was accustomed to interacting with the opposite sex in informal camaraderie and did not bring the problem of interactions between a man and a woman into every harmless conversation. Not as if they had not completely been women, these young American women, of all sizes and pettiness, having all of the virtues and vices of womanhood! They masterfully controlled the system of wireless telegraphy with their beautiful eyes and shamelessly flirted with the rascal of a professor! But in the nature of these young teachers, most of whom weren't yet twenty years old, something enormously self-confident emerged. Not the self-confidence of the independent woman who earns her own money. They laughed about that. They shrugged and said it was grinding work - grinding work, and they would rather be married. No, a woman's self-confidence was implanted in them, well aware of its power over a man - and proud of it - and graciously they accepted the chivalry of a man as a self-evident tribute.
The woman of America, if it pleases her, gives a hint of feminine amiability with cheerful winking eyes. She dances gracefully on the tightrope of flirtation, but she certainly doesn't fall down to do serious damage to her womanhood; for she, who has never been carefully guarded and sheltered in anxious family protection like a frail commodity, knows the world and men quite well and knows how to avoid dangers, because she knows the dangers. Her knowledge of the world serves the American woman as a balancing pole on the dangerous tightrope of flirtation, treading upon which, she is a master. She's protecting herself. What a difference between the American young girl and that of the old world, running after whom, clucking like nervous hens, are protective moms and anxious aunts, so that the sheep of a daughter or niece won't get bitten by the sharp teeth of the rapacious wolf of a man - while the sheltered little lamb gets more and more curious about this legendary bad wolf.
The American girl, however, looks at the brute, laughs and tames it to be a loyally obedient dog, which is not allowed to move a muscle and is punished with the whip of sharp mockery should it be naughty. The American woman is subject to the tragedies and comedies of love like all of God's children. But then she experiences with her eyes open, knowingly obeying a strong power ... In this way, the American type of woman has developed, which distinguishes itself in strong individuality from the women of other countries, above all, the women of Europe. The free woman who has overcome the wall of century-old traditions and who does what she likes. She enjoys the same rights and education as the lad. She exercises her right to enjoy life like the young man with whom she studies side by side. She engages in sports like he does. She assumes the right to come and go in the parental home as she wishes and wouldn't dream of asking her mum for permission to go to the theatre with Mr X or Mr Y. She simply does it. She is emancipated in the very best sense - artless - a human being. As a young adolescent, at least. The bugaboo of guarding her sexuality is ridiculous nonsense for her parents.
But weird. The same people who solve the problem of emotional as well as physical education for girls with such a healthy practical sense and who give their daughters reasonable humanity and magnificent spontaneity as a wonderful good, transgress further against women's true worth ​​through a grotesque overestimation of women, which cuts deeply into all social, indeed, into the economic conditions of the country. The same girl who is so proud of her, one might almost say "sexless" humanity and romps in good camaraderie with her male friends, becomes in an imperceptible transition the discerning queen, the ruling power, the more the woman in her stirs. The balance between the sexes, which want to establish custom and education, shifts incredibly far in favor of the woman. She marries. ... The American wife is a good mate, smart, experienced, well fit to discuss with the husband his plans, his work; to advise him. In sharp contrast to the housewife's existence, which banishes the woman to the kitchen and house, the man into a life of work. The American woman would be shocked if one would like to talk to her about housewife duties. She is a terrible cook and is helpless without servants. Her tendency to waste things in the household is unprecedented. She demands that the man give her the opportunity to satisfy all her desires - and slowly the typical relationship between American spouses develops: The man works day and night to bring in the dollars! The woman enjoys herself in luxury and extravagance!
If she gives birth to children for her husband, she does not do so to fulfill her natural wifely duty, but instead she is a poor martyr to marriage and her husband; with the children she gives her husband a gift of grace, which imposes on him the duty to deny himself pleasure and to chase dollars tirelessly in order to lay them at the feet of the martyr, the queen.
Petticoat government. Petticoat government, which draws an iron girdle around the country, is responsible for ridiculous exaggerations in the fight against alcohol and tobacco, for the closure of all amusements on Sundays and for a strange bigotry that does not fit in the free natural character of the American people. The circle of the petticoat government stretches a long way. ... Literature and art must bow to the will of women, for it is the woman who has time for art and beauty alone, while the man hunts the dollars for his queen and has no time for anything else. The women are the ones under whose empire the New York Opera flourishes and pays tenors fairytale fees like no other opera in the world. ... But it was also the women who shockingly demanded and enforced the dismissal of the "immoral" Salome from the repertoire - and it is the women who make the American spectacle the pitifully grotesque of sentimental melodrama, which it is. Because great art, which portrays true life, does not fit into the little morality brain of the average American woman. Through the petticoat government the sentimental novel, in which angelic women in the end tolerate and suffer, reigns and must be irreversibly victorious over the whitewashed, freshly-bred virtue à la America - the petticoat government has ruined the artist Gibson, forcing his great art to its knees, making him create the world-famous American woman type: tall, slender, soft, falling shoulders, not to say majestic, features like reigning princesses during their coronations ... It has penetrated into the laws. An American woman is permitted to shoot down a man: in nine cases out of ten, the jury will absolve her. She is allowed to steal: the jury will only be appalled that in her glorious country it is possible for a woman, Her Majesty the Woman, to be driven to steal. She may cheat men for even the biggest sums of money: the jurors assign the blame to the man.
So arises one of the oddest travesties in the modern world – a perfectly healthy little child of a girl, whose nature and upbringing can calmly be held up as a model to the countries of the Old World and who is unfailingly spoiled as a woman in a national epidemic of feminine megalomania. A travesty...Mr. Professor earned a lot of money with his merry teachers and found life beautiful when he went with that pupil to Golden Gate Park today and might dine with her tomorrow in the midst of dangerous flirting in a French restaurant. Until once Frank said,"The story won't take long, amice!" "Do you think so?" "But that is a given. One fine day they will get tired of the game (I know my people) and then - goodbye, professor. Poor Professor!" Here, the rascal of a Professor became thoughtful; yes, he himself had already felt more than once that his German lessons were, after all, just a kind of humorous charlatanry and all hell would break loose once the limit was reached where history had to fail without grammatical rigor.
And one evening I dreamt of the newspaper in St. Louis, and it came over me like an indescribable yearning; that yearning that seizes and shakes man and eats into his innermost thoughts like an obsession. I dreamed and dreamt.
Finally, in the glorious optimism of youth, to which nothing seems impossible, came a presumptuous decision. ... The rascal sat down and wrote for days on end, hurrying, changing..."It is excellent, professor. Your English is much better than mine!" Frank said.
The two manuscripts, one about the fishery island and the other portraying the harbor, went to the San Francisco Examiner. At the same time, a long letter to the dear old Saxon doctor with the request as to whether he or one of the men of the editorial staff would recommend me to the San Francisco Examiner. The professor began to become worldly-wise. ..
unit 1
Die Stadt des Goldenen Tors.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 2
Das Erbe der Goldgräber.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 3
– Die lustige Königin des Westens.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 4
– Von vernünftigen schwarzen Schafen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 5
– Die Stadt der Sieben Hügel übertrumpft!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 6
– Kletternde Straßenbahnen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 7
– Im Park des Goldenen Tors.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 8
– Der dunkle Flecken der Sonnenstadt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 9
– Im Chinesenviertel.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 10
– Die Straße der lebenden Schaufenster.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 11
– Wie der Lausbub zum Professor wurde.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 12
– Von Deutsch lernenden Lehrerinnen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 13
– Die amerikanische Frau.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 14
– Kluge Mädchenerziehung und törichte Weiberherrschaft.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 15
– Die Amerikanerin in Kunst und Leben.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 16
– Die Sehnsucht nach der Zeitung.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 18
Stolz sind sie auf ihre Ahnen, die Goldgräber.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 21
Im scharfen Gegensatz zu den überschlanken Amerikanerinnen der Oststaaten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 24
Die Königin des Westens war eine gar lebenslustige Dame.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 26
Die Marketstraße strahlte des Nachts in einem Flammenmeer von Licht.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 28
Eine lustige Welt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 30
Für was alles diese Hände als Ausrede herhalten mußten!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 33
Hinter dieser Tür wurde Poker gespielt, dort klappten Farokästchen und sausten Rouletten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 37
Merkwürdigerweise hörten wir auch zur richtigen Zeit auf!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 39
»Sonst verlieren wir die Geschichte wieder,« grinste Frank.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 41
Heh?« Und des Tages streiften wir stundenlang in der Stadt umher.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 42
Rom hat den klassischen Namen der Stadt der sieben Hügel.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 44
Lumpige sieben Hügel!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 45
In San Franzisko wimmelt es von Hügeln.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 46
Acht, neun – zwölf – oder gar noch mehr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 51
Cable Cars wurden sie genannt, Kabelwagen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 57
Ein Deutscher, der Ingenieur Sutro, hat das Wunderwerk geschaffen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 61
Golden Gate.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 62
Das goldene Tor, die Felsenpforte von der Welt des Westens zur Welt des Ostens.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 63
Doch auch der dunklen Flecken gab es in der lustigen Sonnenstadt.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 66
Enge Gäßchen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 67
Winzige Häuserchen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 68
Geheimnisvolle dunkle Gänge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 73
Da waren Opiumhöhlen und chinesische Spielhöllen und Diebskneipen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 75
Kaum ein Tag verging, ohne daß in den Friscoer Zeitungen die "Chinesenstadtfrage" ventiliert wurde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 80
An seinem Eingang, links und rechts, standen Nacht für Nacht zwei Offiziere der Heilsarmee.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 83
Sieh dir die Schande an!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 87
Was man da sah, schien bald grausame Tragik, bald übergroteske Lächerlichkeit.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 88
Die Fenster waren Schaufenster mit lebendigen Waren.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 91
Wie eine Wachsfigur fast.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 92
So lag Schaufenster an Schaufenster.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 95
Eine winzige Chinesin dort – ein Mädel im japanischen Kimono hier.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 97
Darin lag Methode.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
Dahinter steckte ein guter Grund.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 100
unit 102
So wahrte die Friscopolizei das Dekorum.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 103
Spielte gravitätisch eine steife Statistenrolle in der Tragikomödie.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 105
»Bad taste,« sagte Frank achselzuckend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 106
»Geschmacklos!« Und das war ein sehr vernünftiges Urteil.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 107
Zusammen studierten wir den Anzeigenteil des Examiner, zwei Inserate im besonderen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 108
Freund Frank schüttelte bedenklich sein weises Haupt.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 109
»Schlimmer als gesalzener cod kann der Bengel ja auch nicht sein?« murmelte er.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 110
»Ich probier' es.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 111
Schön ist es zwar nicht, aber der Sohn meines Vaters braucht Geld.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 115
Die Mama meiner Zöglinge – ihr Götter!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 117
»Der Doktor wünscht es,« gähnte sie, »daß meine Kinder deutsch lernen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 118
Er selbst hat keine Zeit, sie zu unterrichten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 121
Das sei ja vortrefflich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 125
»We don't like German!« erklärten sie mir sofort.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 129
Damit war der Weg zu dem Interesse der Kinder gefunden.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 131
Es war ja so leicht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 133
Meine Kinder jubelten!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 136
»Ausgezeichnet, Professor!« sagte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 137
Ich lachte laut auf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 138
»Aber ich bin doch kein Professor!« »Das macht nichts, Professor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 139
Wollen Sie uns Stunden geben?« »Wem?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 140
Ihnen, Madame?« »Hören Sie.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 142
Mit Ihrer praktischen Art können wir schnell noch ein wenig Deutsch lernen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 143
Ich arrangiere alles, Professor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 144
Es darf aber nicht viel kosten!« Und sie arrangierte!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 146
Vor einer Hörerschar von über fünfzig reizenden jungen Lehrerinnen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 148
Dann löste sich die Befangenheit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 150
Diese Schülerinnen waren ja reizend!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 151
Eine hübscher als die andere – eine lustiger als die andere.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 152
Typisch in ihrer Art als Amerikanerinnen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 158
Nicht das Selbstbewußtsein der selbständigen Frau, die ihr eigenes Geld verdient.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 159
Darüber lachten sie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 165
Sie schützt sich selbst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 168
unit 171
Sie genießt die gleichen Rechte und die gleiche Erziehung wie der Bub.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 173
Sie treibt Sport wie er.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 175
Sie geht einfach.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 176
Sie ist emanzipiert im besten Sinn – natürlich – Mensch.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 177
Als junger heranwachsender Mensch wenigstens.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 179
Doch sonderbar.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 183
Sie heiratet.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 186
Die Amerikanerin würde entsetzt sein, wollte man ihr von Hausfrauenpflichten reden.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 187
Sie kocht miserabel und ist hilflos ohne Dienstboten.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 188
Sie treibt beispiellose Verschwendung im Haushalt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 190
Die Frau amüsiert sich in Luxus und Verschwendung!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 192
Weiberherrschaft.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 194
Weithin dehnt sich der Kreis der Weiberherrschaft.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 209
Ich träumte und träumte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 211
Der Lausbub setzte sich hin und schrieb tagelang, eilend, ändernd … »Famos ist's, Professor.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 212
Du kannst mehr Englisch als ich!« sagte Frank.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 215
Der Professor fing an, lebensklug zu werden …
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 8 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 18  8 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 193  8 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 191  8 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 53  8 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 215  8 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented  9 months ago
Siri • 1143  commented  9 months ago

Danke schön!! :-)

by lollo1a 9 months ago

happy translating ;-)

by Siri 9 months ago

Die Stadt des Goldenen Tors.
Das Erbe der Goldgräber. – Die lustige Königin des Westens. – Von vernünftigen schwarzen Schafen. – Die Stadt der Sieben Hügel übertrumpft! – Kletternde Straßenbahnen. – Im Park des Goldenen Tors. – Der dunkle Flecken der Sonnenstadt. – Im Chinesenviertel. – Die Straße der lebenden Schaufenster. – Wie der Lausbub zum Professor wurde. – Von Deutsch lernenden Lehrerinnen. – Die amerikanische Frau. – Kluge Mädchenerziehung und törichte Weiberherrschaft. – Die Amerikanerin in Kunst und Leben. – Die Sehnsucht nach der Zeitung.
Stolz nennen sich die Männer Kaliforniens zum Unterschied von den im Land der Sonne wohnenden, aber in anderen Staaten der Union geborenen Amerikanern the Native sons of California, die eingeborenen Söhne von Kalifornien. Stolz sind sie auf ihre Ahnen, die Goldgräber. Diese zähen, eisenharten Goldgräber von anno dazumal, die sich mit Mensch und Natur herumschlugen, bis nur der Starke überlebte, haben die Kraft ihrer Muskeln in Generationen hinein vererbt. Groß, schlank, sehnig sind die Männer des Kalifornien von heutzutage; stolz, üppig seine Frauen. Im scharfen Gegensatz zu den überschlanken Amerikanerinnen der Oststaaten. Noch etwas anderes aber vererbten die Goldgräberahnen: Lachender Übermut steckt diesen schönen Menschen im Blut; der gleiche Lebensleichtsinn, dieselbe Genußsucht, das gleiche Eintrinkenwollen der Freude wie ihren Urgroßvätern. Den Männern des Goldes, die heute arm waren und morgen reich; heute sich ein Vermögen aus der Erde kratzten, um es morgen zu verspielen.
Die Königin des Westens war eine gar lebenslustige Dame. Reich wollten die eingeborenen Söhne von Kalifornien freilich auch werden, gerade so wie die Dollarjäger in Chicago oder St. Louis oder New York, aber keiner vergaß über der Hetzjagd des Dollars das Vergnügen. Die Marketstraße strahlte des Nachts in einem Flammenmeer von Licht. Rechts und links, Seite an Seite fast, schrien Theater, Varietés, französische Restaurants, elegante Bars: Amüsiert euch, Söhne Kaliforniens!
Eine lustige Welt. Tag für Tag und Abend für Abend durchstreiften Frank Reddington und ich die Stadt, eine Woche lang, denn wir waren es ja unseren Händen schuldig, wenigstens ein paar Tage hindurch die Nichtstuer zu spielen. Für was alles diese Hände als Ausrede herhalten mußten! Wenn wir einmal in einem französischen Restaurant speisen wollten, oder wenn eine Bar lockte oder ein Roulettetisch winkte, da mahnte lachend einer den andern:
»Es ist ja eigentlich schade um das sauer verdiente Geld – aber denken Sie nur an unsere Hände!«
Die Puritaner des Ostens hätten sich hier auf den Kopf gestellt vor Entsetzen! In den lustigen Varietés, in die wir gingen, gewissenhaft keines übersehend, setzten sich kichernde Soubretten zu den Gästen an die Tische und zauberten ihnen Vierteldollars für süße Manhattan Cocktails und Brandy Flips aus den Taschen; in den eleganten Bars war stets eine Seitentüre, über der in goldenen Lettern stand: Nur für Klubmitglieder! Hinter dieser Tür wurde Poker gespielt, dort klappten Farokästchen und sausten Rouletten. Klubmitglied jedoch war ein jeder, der einen anständigen Anzug trug und so aussah, als ob er die nötigen Dollars zum Verspielen besitze! Die Aufschrift war eben weiter nichts als eine verbindliche, nette, gemütliche Formsache der Polizei gegenüber. Wir versuchten einige Male unser Glück an der Roulette, verloren eine Kleinigkeit und gewannen dann an einem Abend zusammen über siebzig Dollars! Merkwürdigerweise hörten wir auch zur richtigen Zeit auf! In Franks Zimmer tanzten wir einen wahren Indianertanz der Freude in jener Nacht und beschlossen feierlich, den größten Teil des Geldes in neuen Anzügen anzulegen und niemals mehr als drei Dollars auf dem Roulettetisch zu riskieren.
»Sonst verlieren wir die Geschichte wieder,« grinste Frank. »Ich finde übrigens, mein lieber Junge, daß wir für schwarze Schafe und verlorene Söhne verdammt vernünftig sind! Heh?«
Und des Tages streiften wir stundenlang in der Stadt umher. Rom hat den klassischen Namen der Stadt der sieben Hügel. Nun, ein Römer würde sich, wanderte er durch San Franzisko, nur in einem Gefühl der Beschämung und des hoffnungslosen Übertrumpftseins der sieben Hügel seiner Vaterstadt erinnern! Lumpige sieben Hügel! In San Franzisko wimmelt es von Hügeln. Acht, neun – zwölf – oder gar noch mehr. Flach ist die eine Seite der ungeheuren Marketstraße, die die Stadt entzweischneidet, flach dem Hafen zu. Auf der anderen Seite aber streben Hügel empor bis weit hinaus zum Stillen Meer, zur Golden Gate; Hügel mit eleganten Wohnhäusern an holzgepflasterten Straßen, die auf und nieder gehen in scharfen Winkeln, bald steigend, bald fallend.
Und diese ewigen Hügel hinauf und hinab kletterte fortwährend ein Gewirr von Straßenbahnen. Es war ein sonderbares Gefühl, unten zu stehen und von hoch oben einen Straßenbahnzug rasselnd auf sich zukommen zu sehen. Cable Cars wurden sie genannt, Kabelwagen. In der Mitte zwischen ihren beiden Schienen lief eine dritte, gespaltene Schiene, unter der in einem hohlen Raum unmittelbar unter dem Straßenpflaster ein endloses Drahtseil dahinsurrte. Eine Art Riesenzange packte auf einen Handgriff des Führers hin durch den Spalt hindurch das Seil, das dann den Wagen mit sich weiterriß, während bei Haltestellen die Zange ausgelöst und eine starke Luftbremse in Tätigkeit gesetzt wurde. Wie in einer Wellenschaukel kam man sich an besonders schlimmen Stellen vor – vorwärtsgeworfen – rückwärts gestoßen – geschüttelt, gerüttelt …
Weit hinaus gegen das Meer zu streckten sich die stillen Straßen des elegantesten San Franzisko, und weit draußen standen die Paläste der Eisenbahnkönige der Southern Pazific und Union Pazific Eisenbahnen, des Zuckerkönigs Spreckels, des deutschen Ingenieurs Sutro. Dann kam eine wüste einsame Sandstrecke, die nach Nordwesten zum Goldenen Tor, nach Südwesten zum Presidio führte. Eine komische kleine Eisenbahn rumpelte über den Sand dahin, zu einer der schönsten Parkschöpfungen der Welt. Ein Deutscher, der Ingenieur Sutro, hat das Wunderwerk geschaffen. Mitten aus der eintönigen Sandfläche heraus sprießen prachtvolle Baumgruppen und grünende Grasflächen, Blumenbeete und Palmen. Dann Felsengruppen, wieder Palmenhaine, und plötzlich, auftauchend wie eine Zauberwelt, die gewaltige Schönheit des Ozeans. Da eingedrängt in ein Felsentor schroffer Klippen, dort zwischen Himmel und Erde verfließend in die Unendlichkeit. Golden Gate. Das goldene Tor, die Felsenpforte von der Welt des Westens zur Welt des Ostens.
Doch auch der dunklen Flecken gab es in der lustigen Sonnenstadt.
Düster, winkelig, schmutzig stieg unten im Osten, dicht beim Hafen, mitten aus der glänzenden Geschäftsstraße Kearney Street ein bizarres Häusergewirr auf zwei Hügelchen empor. Mit wenigen Schritten trat man aus dem Schein strahlender Bogenlampen und reicher Schaufenster in eine Welt dunkler Schatten – in die Chinesenstadt San Franziskos. Enge Gäßchen. Winzige Häuserchen. Geheimnisvolle dunkle Gänge. Über die Gassen spannen sich leuchtendrote Plakate mit chinesischen Inschriften, Laden lag an Laden, bezopfte kleine Männer mit gelben Gesichtern huschten hin und her. Mehr als das Auge jedoch staunte die Nase, denn wie eine dichte Wolke lagerte ein unbeschreiblicher Geruch über dem Viertel der Chinesen; fremdartig über alle Maßen; jetzt lockend, nun abstoßend. Bald duftete es süß und schwer wie von blühendem Jasmin, bald bedrückend wie schwerer Nebel, bald würzig wie Spezereien – fremde Menschen hatten die Gerüche ihres Landes mit sich getragen über den Ozean. In jedem Gäßchen standen Polizisten (später hat mich mein Freund der Polizeileutnant gar oft durch die Chinesenstadt geführt); denn in den kleinen Häuserchen tief unten in den Gängen, die unterirdisch Haus mit Haus verbanden, hausten Verbrecher und wohnte das Laster. Da waren Opiumhöhlen und chinesische Spielhöllen und Diebskneipen.
»Wär' ich einer der Führer der öffentlichen Meinung von San Franzisko,« sagte Frank, als wir eines Abends wieder die Chinesenstadt durchstöberten, »so würde ich so lange agitieren, bis das Rattennest weggefegt würde vom Erdboden!«
Der Gedanke war nicht eben neu. Kaum ein Tag verging, ohne daß in den Friscoer Zeitungen die "Chinesenstadtfrage" ventiliert wurde. Doch die Chinesen besaßen Geld und wußten gewichtige Dollars da anzulegen, wo sie in Form von einflußreichem politischem Schutz gute Zinsen trugen. So behauptete eben die Polizei, das Chinesenviertel sei ja die schönste Mäusefalle, in der sie Tag für Tag Verbrecher erwische, und die Stadtbehörden erklärten, ein Zusammenleben der Chinesen erleichtere ihre Überwachung. Im übrigen war die öffentliche Meinung von San Franzisko gar nicht empfindlich gegen groteske Zustände:
Sie duldete ja die Straße der lebenden Schaufenster!
Oben auf dem Hügel der Chinesenstadt lag, halb versteckt in winkeligen Häusermassen, ein Gäßchen, aus dem des Nachts heller Lichtschein funkelte, und dem die Müßiggänger in Scharen zupilgerten. An seinem Eingang, links und rechts, standen Nacht für Nacht zwei Offiziere der Heilsarmee. Mit ernsten Gesichtern grüßten sie die Vorbeigehenden und deuteten schweigend auf ein Plakat, das sie zwischen sich ausgespannt hielten und mit Blendlaternen scharf beleuchteten. Auf dem weißen Fetzen Leinwand stand in roter Schrift geschrieben:
»Bruder, lieber Bruder! Sieh dir die Schande an! Hilf uns als Mann und als Amerikaner, mit deiner Meinung und mit deiner Stimme bei den Wahlen, die Schande zu besiegen! Hilf den Ärmsten der Frauen, lieber Bruder!«
Innen im Gäßchen drängten sich die Menschen, in steter Vorwärtsbewegung gehalten durch ein halbes Dutzend von Polizisten, deren halblauter Ruf move on–move on … nicht stehen bleiben! – die einzigen Laute waren, die aus der sonderbaren Stille hervorklangen, denn alle Welt starrte und starrte in die beleuchteten Fenster in den winzigen Häuserchen der beiden Seiten des Gäßchens. Was man da sah, schien bald grausame Tragik, bald übergroteske Lächerlichkeit.
Die Fenster waren Schaufenster mit lebendigen Waren. Drei Fenster gab es in jedem Häuschen, bis auf den Boden gehend, und in einem jeden saß auf erhöhtem Podium, lichtübergossen vom Schein einer Glühbirne, ein Weib. Gepudert, geschminkt, künstlich frisiert, angetan mit seidenem Kostüm; ein stereotypes, gemachtes Lächeln wie angefroren auf den Lippen … Wie eine Puppe. Wie eine Wachsfigur fast. So lag Schaufenster an Schaufenster. Bald hätte man am liebsten laut hinausgelacht, denn der Gedanke dieser lebendigen Ware wirkte unsäglich grotesk; bald hätte man sich schämen müssen. Frauen aller Länder und aller Rassen hockten in der langen Schaufensterlinie; Amerikanerinnen, Französinnen, Mulattinnen. Eine winzige Chinesin dort – ein Mädel im japanischen Kimono hier. Und alle lächelten das gleiche gefrorene Lächeln und sahen starr vor sich hin auf die Straße. Darin lag Methode. Dahinter steckte ein guter Grund. Denn die guten Polizeiräte der guten Stadt von San Franzisko duldeten zwar diese Gasse der Groteske, erließen aber fürsorglich besondere Vorschriften. Sie gaben sozusagen den lebendigen Schaufenstern das Siegel behördlicher Approbation. Aber die Glühlämpchen in den Fenstern durften nur eine gewisse Kerzenstärke haben, auf daß kein Fenster mehr leuchte als das andere, und die Ware im Schaufenster durfte sich nicht rühren, niemandem zulächeln, keinem Mann zunicken, auf daß niemand verführt wurde. So wahrte die Friscopolizei das Dekorum. Spielte gravitätisch eine steife Statistenrolle in der Tragikomödie.
Wir beide, Frank und ich, gaben im gleichen Impuls den sonderbaren Wächtern der Heilsarmee am Gasseneingang ein Silberstück, als wir die Gasse verließen.Selbst lustiger junger Leichtsinn wurde nachdenklich gestimmt in der Gasse der lebenden Schaufenster.
»Bad taste,« sagte Frank achselzuckend. »Geschmacklos!«
Und das war ein sehr vernünftiges Urteil.

Zusammen studierten wir den Anzeigenteil des Examiner, zwei Inserate im besonderen. Freund Frank schüttelte bedenklich sein weises Haupt. »Schlimmer als gesalzener cod kann der Bengel ja auch nicht sein?« murmelte er. »Ich probier' es. Schön ist es zwar nicht, aber der Sohn meines Vaters braucht Geld. Jawohl – ich probier' es!«
»Ich auch!« sagte ich, obwohl mir die Sache sehr verrückt vorkam.
So machten wir uns selbander auf den Weg; er zu dem Vater, der Privatstunden in Mathematik für seinen Sohn suchte, ich zu der Familie, die für »zwei Kinder im Alter von neun und elf Jahren gediegenen deutschen Sprachunterricht« ersehnte. Als wir uns eine Stunde später wieder trafen, konstatierten wir unter schallendem Gelächter, daß wir alle beide Respektspersonen geworden waren – Lehrer der Jugend!
Die Mama meiner Zöglinge – ihr Götter! – war eine elegante schlanke Amerikanerin, die das Engagieren eines deutschen Sprachlehrers als etwas furchtbar Nebensächliches behandelt hatte.
»Der Doktor wünscht es,« gähnte sie, »daß meine Kinder deutsch lernen. Er selbst hat keine Zeit, sie zu unterrichten. Ich finde nicht, daß deutscher Unterricht sehr wichtig ist, aber der Doktor –«
Der Doktor, der dann in den Salon kam, war ihr Mann, ein Arzt, als Kind deutscher Eltern in San Franzisko geboren. Er sprach mit mir in einem durch englische Brocken entsetzlich verballhornten Deutsch und schien sehr zufrieden mit meiner Gymnasialbildung. Das sei ja vortrefflich. Er wünsche schon um seiner Eltern willen, daß seine Kinder Deutsch lernten, und dann gedenke er auch, später seinen Sohn in Deutschland erziehen zu lassen.
»Sagen wir eine Stunde daily, in die Tag,« so instruierte mich Doktor Sanders, »und sagen uir eine Honorar von eine Dollar. Den Plan vom Lernen uollen Sie machen as you think best – ui Sie halten es für die Beste – nur praktisch, damit sie bald etwas spreken können.«
Die Kinder, das elfjährige Mädel und der neunjährige Bub, waren sehr altklug und sehr ungeniert.
»We don't like German!« erklärten sie mir sofort.
»Deutsch gefällt uns gar nicht!« Das wunderte mich nicht, denn ich bekam bald heraus, daß ihr deutscher Sprachunterricht bis jetzt darin bestanden hatte, Worte nachzuschreiben, die der Papa ihnen vorschrieb. Da kam mir ein glücklicher Gedanke, auf dem Umweg über ein Glas Wasser, das auf dem Tisch stand –
»Kinder, wir wollen nur Deutsch sprechen! Also: Dies ist ein Glas Wasser …«
»Diß is' ain Glas Wass'r,« sprachen beide seelenvergnügt nach.
Damit war der Weg zu dem Interesse der Kinder gefunden. Im Englischen waren die Worte ja fast gleichlautend – this is a glass of water –, so gleichlautend, daß diesen amerikanischen Kindern auf einmal der Appetit zum Deutschsprechen kam. Es war ja so leicht! So klebte ich denn während der ganzen ersten Unterrichtsstunde verzweifelt an meinem Glas Wasser und variierte darauf los – in diesem Glas Wasser ist eine Rose – die Rose ist weiß – wir trinken Wasser – bis zu den letzten Möglichkeiten. Meine Kinder jubelten! Und da es wohl an die Tausend Worte gibt, die im Deutschen und Englischen fast gleich ausgesprochen werden, so war die "Methode" glücklich da. Eines Tages kam die Mama in die Stunde und hörte erstaunt zu, um gleich in der nächsten Unterrichtsstunde am andern Tag eine Freundin mitzubringen, die Oberlehrerin einer Mädchenschule.
»Ausgezeichnet, Professor!« sagte sie.
Ich lachte laut auf. »Aber ich bin doch kein Professor!«
»Das macht nichts, Professor. Wollen Sie uns Stunden geben?«
»Wem? Ihnen, Madame?«
»Hören Sie. Der große kalifornische Lehrerinnenverein will im Herbst eine Europareise machen und natürlich auch Deutschland besuchen. Mit Ihrer praktischen Art können wir schnell noch ein wenig Deutsch lernen. Ich arrangiere alles, Professor. Es darf aber nicht viel kosten!«
Und sie arrangierte!
Ich glaube, die Professoren des Gymnasiums von Burghausen wären in corpore aus der Haut gefahren vor entsetzt ungläubigem Staunen, hätten sie mich abends auf dem Katheder eines großen Schulzimmers der höheren Mädchenschule von San Franzisko stehen sehen können! Vor einer Hörerschar von über fünfzig reizenden jungen Lehrerinnen! Frechheit, steh' mir bei, dachte ich in verzweifeltem Galgenhumor und ließ eine pseudowissenschaftliche (ganz und gar aus den Fingern gesogene) Erklärung vom Stapel, in der ich mein Betriebskapital von gleichlautenden Worten den "gemeinsamen anglosächsischen Sprachschatz" nannte und sehr wichtig tat. Dann löste sich die Befangenheit. Aus der Unterrichtsstunde wurde ein lustiges Frage- und Antwortspiel –
»Uasser, Professor?«
»Nein, W–asser!«
Bis der Professor zu den Bänken hinabstieg und die schweren deutschen Worte seinen Schülerinnen vorsprach. Diese Schülerinnen waren ja reizend! Eine hübscher als die andere – eine lustiger als die andere. Typisch in ihrer Art als Amerikanerinnen. Freilich – der neugebackene Herr Professor sah in ihnen gar nichts Typisches, sondern nur die lustigen netten Frauen!
Aber schon in dieser Lustigkeit lag die ganze freie Art der Amerikanerin, die von Kindesbeinen an daran gewöhnt wird, mit dem andern Geschlecht in formloserKameradschaftlichkeit zu verkehren und das Problem von den Wechselbeziehungen zwischen Mann und Frau nicht in jedes harmlose Gespräch hineinzutragen. Nicht als ob sie nicht ganz Frauen gewesen wären, diese jungen Amerikanerinnen, mit allen Größen und allen Kleinlichkeiten, allen Tugenden und Untugenden des Frauentums! Sie beherrschten das System der drahtlosen Telegraphie mit schönen Augen meisterhaft und flirteten schändlich mit dem Lausbub von Professor! Doch in dem Wesen dieser jungen Lehrerinnen, von denen die meisten keine zwanzig Jahre zählten, prägte sich etwas gewaltig Selbstbewußtes aus. Nicht das Selbstbewußtsein der selbständigen Frau, die ihr eigenes Geld verdient. Darüber lachten sie. Zuckten die Achseln und meinten, es sei grinding work – aufreibende Arbeit und sie wären viel lieber verheiratet. Nein, das Selbstbewußtsein des Weibes steckte in ihnen, das sich seiner Macht über den Mann wohl bewußt – stolz darauf ist – und die Ritterlichkeit des Mannes als einen selbstverständlichen Tribut gnädig in Empfang nimmt.
Die Frau Amerikas gibt, wenn es ihr gefällt, mit vergnügt zwinkernden Äuglein einen Zipfel von weiblicher Liebenswürdigkeit her. Sie tanzt graziös auf dem Drahtseil der Liebelei, aber sie plumpst ganz gewiß nicht hinunter in ernsthafte Beschädigungen ihres Frauentums; denn sie, die man niemals sorgfältig behütet und in ängstlichem Familienschutz eingekapselt hat wie gebrechliche Ware, kennt die Welt und die Männer recht gut und weiß Gefahren aus dem Weg zu gehen, weil sie die Gefahren eben kennt. Ihre Weltkenntnis dient der Amerikanerin als Balanzierstange auf dem gefährlichen Drahtseil des Flirts, in dessen Beschreiten sie Meisterin ist. Sie schützt sich selbst. Welch' ein Unterschied zwischen dem amerikanischen jungen Mädchen und dem der alten Welt, hinter dem glucksend wie ängstliche Hennen fürsorgliche Mamas und ängstliche Tanten dreinrennen, damit das Schaf von Tochter oder Nichte dem reißenden Wolf von Mann nicht in die scharfen Zähne gerate – während das behütete Schäflein immer neugieriger wird auf diesen sagenhaften bösen Wolf.
Das amerikanische Mädel aber guckt sich das Untier an, lacht und zähmt es zu einem treugehorsamen Hündlein, das sich nicht mucksen darf und mit der Peitsche scharfen Spotts gezüchtigt wird, sollte es ungezogen werden. Den Tragödien und Komödien der Liebe ist ja auch die Amerikanerin untertan wie alle Menschenkinder. Dann aber erlebt sie mit offenen Augen, wissend, einer starken Macht gehorchend …
So hat sich der amerikanische Frauentyp herausgebildet, der sich in starker Eigenart von den Frauen anderer Länder, den Frauen Europas vor allem, unterscheidet. Die freie Frau, die über den Wall Jahrtausende alter Überlieferung hinübergeklettert ist und tut, was ihr gefällt. Sie genießt die gleichen Rechte und die gleiche Erziehung wie der Bub. Sie nimmt sich das Recht des Vergnügens wie der junge Mann, mit dem sie Seite an Seite studiert. Sie treibt Sport wie er. Sie nimmt sich das Recht, im Vaterhaus zu kommen und zu gehen, wie es ihr beliebt, und es fällt ihr nicht im Traum ein, die Mama um Erlaubnis zu bitten, ob sie mit Herrn X oder mit Herrn Y ins Theater gehen darf. Sie geht einfach. Sie ist emanzipiert im besten Sinn – natürlich – Mensch. Als junger heranwachsender Mensch wenigstens. Das Schreckgespenst zu behütender Geschlechtlichkeit ist ihren Eltern ein lächerlicher Unsinn.
Doch sonderbar. Die gleichen Menschen, die mit so gesundem praktischem Sinn das Problem psychischer wie physischer Mädchenerziehung lösen und als wundervolles Gut ihren Töchtern ein vernünftiges Menschentum und eine prachtvolle Unbefangenheit mit ins Leben geben, sündigen wieder gegen wahre Frauenwerte durch eine groteske Frauenüberschätzung, die tief in alle gesellschaftlichen, ja in die wirtschaftlichen Verhältnisse des Landes hineinschneidet. Das gleiche Mädel, das so stolz auf ihr, man möchte fast sagen: geschlechtsloses Menschentum ist und en bon camerade mit ihren männlichen Freunden tollt, wird in unmerklichem Übergang zur anspruchsvollen Königin, zur herrschenden Macht, je mehr das Weib in ihr sich regt. Das Gleichgewicht zwischen den Geschlechtern, das Sitte und Erziehung herstellen wollen, verschiebt sich unbeschreiblich weit zugunsten des Weibes. Sie heiratet. Ein guter Kamerad ist die amerikanische Gattin, klug, erfahren, vorzüglich dazu geeignet, mit dem Mann seine Pläne, seine Arbeit zu besprechen; ihn zu beraten. Im scharfen Gegensatz zu dem Hausfrauentum, das die Frau in Küche und Haus, den Mann ins Erwerbsleben verweist. Die Amerikanerin würde entsetzt sein, wollte man ihr von Hausfrauenpflichten reden. Sie kocht miserabel und ist hilflos ohne Dienstboten. Sie treibt beispiellose Verschwendung im Haushalt. Sie fordert, daß der Mann ihr die Möglichkeiten schaffe, alle ihre Wünsche zu befriedigen – und langsam entwickelt sich das typische Verhältnis zwischen amerikanischen Ehegatten:
Der Mann arbeitet Tag und Nacht, um die Dollars herbeizuschaffen! Die Frau amüsiert sich in Luxus und Verschwendung!
Gebärt sie ihrem Mann Kinder, so erfüllt sie damit nicht natürliche Weibesbestimmung, sondern ist eine arme Märtyrerin der Ehe und des Mannes; sie gibt dem Mann mit den Kindern ein Gnadengeschenk, das ihm die Pflicht auferlegt, sich Genüsse zu versagen und rastlos Dollars zu jagen, um sie der Märtyrerin, der Königin, zu Füßen zu legen.
Weiberherrschaft. Weiberherrschaft, die einen eisernen Gürtel um das Land zieht und verantwortlich ist für lächerliche Übertreibungen im Kampf gegen Alkohol und Tabak, für die Schließung aller Vergnügungsstätten an den Sonntagen, für ein sonderbares Muckertum, das gar nicht hineinpaßt in den freien natürlichen Charakter der amerikanischen Menschen. Weithin dehnt sich der Kreis der Weiberherrschaft. Literatur und Kunst muß sich dem Weiberwillen beugen, denn die Frau ist es ja, die allein für Kunst und Schönheit Zeit übrig hat, während der Mann die Dollars jagt für seine Königin und zu nichts sonst Zeit hat. Die Frauen sind es, unter deren Reich die New Yorker Oper blüht und Tenören Märchenhonorare bezahlt wie keine andere Oper der Welt. Die Frauen waren es aber auch, die entsetzt die Absetzung der "unsittlichen" Salome vom Spielplan forderten und durchsetzten – und die Frauen sind es, die das amerikanische Schauspiel zu der jämmerlichen Groteske von sentimentalem Melodrama machen, die es ist. Weil große Kunst, die das Leben wahr schildert, nicht hineinpaßt in das kleine Sittlichkeitshirn der Durchschnittsamerikanerin. Durch die Weiberherrschaft regiert der sentimentale Roman, in denen engelhafte Frauen dulden und leiden und endlich die weißgewaschene, frischgestärkte Tugend à la Amerika unwiderruflich siegen muß – die Weiberherrschaft hat den Künstler Gibson verhunzt, seine große Kunst auf die Knie gezwungen, ihn den weltbekannten amerikanischen Frauentyp schaffen lassen: Groß, schlankgliedrig, weiche, fallende Schultern, majestätisch nicht zum sagen, Gesichtszüge wie regierende Fürstinnen während ihrer Krönung …
In die Gesetze hinein ist sie gedrungen. Eine amerikanische Frau darf einen Mann niederschießen: in neun Fällen aus zehn werden die Geschworenen sie freisprechen. Sie darf stehlen: die Geschworenen werden nur entsetzt sein, daß in ihrem glorreichen Land es möglich ist, daß eine Frau, Ihre Majestät die Frau, zum Stehlen getrieben werden kann. Sie darf Männer betrügen um noch so hohe Summen: die Geschworenen geben dem Mann die Schuld.
So ergibt sich eines der wunderlichsten Zerrbilder der modernen Welt – ein kerngesundes Menschenkindlein von Mädchen, dessen Art und Erziehung man geruhig den Ländern der alten Welt zum Vorbild hinstellen kann und das als Weib in einer nationalen Epidemie von weiblichem Größenwahn unfehlbar verdorben wird. Ein Zerrbild …

Der Herr Professor verdiente viel Geld mit seinen lustigen Lehrerinnen und fand das Leben wunderschön, wenn er mit jener Schülerin heute in den Golden Gate Park ging und mit dieser morgen unter gefährlichem Flirten in einem französischen Restaurant dinierte. Bis einmal Frank sagte:
»Die Geschichte wird nicht lange dauern, amice!«
»Meinst du?«
»Aber das ist doch selbstverständlich. Eines schönen Tages werden sie des Spiels überdrüssig werden (ich kenne meine Leute) und dann – adieu, Professor. Armer Professor!«
Da wurde der Lausbub von Professor nachdenklich; hatte er ja selbst schon mehr als einmal empfunden, daß sein deutscher Unterricht schließlich nur eine Art lustiger Charlatanerie war und der Teufel los sein würde, wenn einmal die Grenze erreicht war, wo die Geschichte ohne grammatikalische Gründlichkeit versagen mußte!
Und eines Abends träumte ich von der Zeitung in St. Louis, und wie unbeschreibliche Sehnsucht kam es über mich; jene Sehnsucht, die den Menschen packt und schüttelt und sich hineinfrißt in sein innerstes Denken wie eine fixe Idee. Ich träumte und träumte.
Endlich kam, in dem prachtvollen Optimismus der Jugend, dem kein Ding unmöglich scheint, ein vermessener Entschluß. Der Lausbub setzte sich hin und schrieb tagelang, eilend, ändernd …
»Famos ist's, Professor. Du kannst mehr Englisch als ich!« sagte Frank.
So gingen die beiden Manuskripte, über die Fischerinsel das eine, ein Hafenbild das andere, an den San Francisko Examiner ab. Gleichzeitig ein langer Brief an den lieben alten sächsischen Doktor mit der Bitte, ob nicht er oder einer der Herren der Redaktion mich an den San Francisko Examiner empfehlen könne. Der Professor fing an, lebensklug zu werden …