de-en  DIE WILDEN SCHWÄNE: Märchen von Andersen
In a place far away, to where the swallows fly when it is winter here, lived a king who had eleven sons and a daughter, Elisa. The eleven brothers were princes, and went to school with a star on their chest and a sabre at their side. They wrote on gold slates with diamond pencils and learned by heart as well as they read; you could immediately hear that they were princes. Their sister Elisa sat on a little stool of mirror-glass and had a picture book that had been purchased for the price of half the kingdom.
Oh, the children had it so good; but it was not to remain so forever.
Their father, who was king of the whole land, married a wicked queen, who was not at all good to the poor children. They already noticed this on the first day. The castle was filled with great splendour and the children played 'Visitors Are Coming', however instead of receiving all the cake and baked apples that they normally would, the queen merely gave them sand in a teacup and said that they should just pretend that there was something in it.
The following week she took the little sister to a peasant couple in the country, and it wasn't long before she complained so much to the king about the unfortunate princes that he paid no more attention to them.
"Fly out into the world and feed yourselves!" said the wicked queen. "Fly like the great birds without a voice!" However she could not make it as terrible as she wanted to; the brothers turned into eleven magnificent wild swans. With a strange cry they flew out of the castle windows, out over the park and the woods beyond.
It was still very early morning when they passed the place where their sister Elisa was lying asleep in the peasant's room. Here they hovered above the roof, twisting their long necks and beating their wings, but no one heard or saw it. They must fly on, higher towards the clouds, out into the wide world. They flew on to a great, dark forest, which stretched as far as the sea.
The poor little Elisa stood in the peasant's cottage and played with a green leaf; she had no other toys. She poked a hole in the leaf, looking through it up towards the sun, and it was as if she saw her brothers' clear eyes. Every time she felt the sun's warm rays on her cheeks, she remembered her brother's kisses.
One day passed like the other. When the wind blew through the great rose hedge in front of the house, it whispered to the roses: "Who can be more beautiful than you?" But the roses shook their heads and sang: "Elisa is!" And on Sunday when the old woman sat in front of the door and read her hymn book, the wind turned the pages and said to the book: "Who could be more pious than you?" - "Elisa is!" said the hymn book. And it was the pure truth what the roses and the hymnbook said.
When she was fifteen years old, she was supposed to go home. And when the queen saw how beautiful she was, she bore her ill will and was filled with hatred. The queen would have liked to turn her into a wild swan like her brothers, but didn't dare to right away because the king wanted to see his daughter.
Early in the morning, the queen went into the bathroom which was built out of marble, and was decorated with soft cushions and most splendid quilts. And she took three toads, kissed them, and told the one of them: "Sit upon on Elisa's head when she comes into the bathroom, so that she'll become as stupid as you are!" "Sit down on her forehead and thus she'll become as ugly as you, thus her father won't recognize her!" "Rest on her heart," she whispered to the third one; "to give her an evil sense, so that she will suffer from that!" Then she put the toads into the clear water, whereupon they immediately got a green color, called for Elisa, took off her clothes, and let her descend into the water. ... And while Elisa dived, one of the toads sat down in her hair, the other one on her forehead, and the third one took seat on her breast. But she didn't seem to notice. As soon as she righted herself, three red poppies floated on the water. ... If the animals had not been poisonous and had been kissed by the witch, they would have turned into red roses. But, nevertheless, they became flowers because they had rested on her head and heart. She was too chaste and innocent for sorcery to have power over her!
When the evil queen saw this, she rubbed walnut juice on Elisa so that she became quite blackish-brown, she smeared a stinking ointment on her pretty face and let her magnificent hair become tangled. It was impossible to recognize the beautiful Elisa.
When the father saw her, he was very shocked and said, it wasn't his daughter. Nobody but the watchdog and the swallows wanted to recognize her; but these were poor animals, which had nothing to say.
Then poor Elisa cried and thought of her eleven brothers, who had all gone. Saddened, she stole out of the castle and walked for the whole day across fields and moor and into the great forest. She didn't know, where she wanted to go, but she felt so saddened and longed for her brothers. Surely they also were like her driven into the world, she wanted to look for and find them. She had only been in the forest a short time before night fell. She completely left the path and footbridge, so she lay down on the soft moss, said her evening prayer and leaned her head against a tree stump. It was so still there, the air was so mild, and all around it in the grass and the moss, like a green fire, hundreds of fireflies shone. When she lightly touched one of the twigs with her hand, bright beetles fell down to her like falling stars.
All night she dreamed of her brothers. Again they played as children, wrote with diamond pens on the gold board and looked at the wonderful storybook, which had cost half of the kingdom. But on the board they didn't write zeros and lines, as in former times, but the brave acts, which they had done, everything that they had experienced and seen. And in the storybook everything was alive, the birds sang and the people went out of the book and talked to Elisa and her brothers. But when the page was turned, they immediately jumped back in, so that the order would not be confused.
When she woke up, the sun was up already. Indeed, she couldn't see it, because the high trees spread their branches tightly and firmly above her. But up there the rays played like a swaying pile. There was a fragance of green and the birds almost landed on her shoulders. She heard the water rippling. These were many great springs, all of them flowing into a lake with the most beautiful sandy soil. Of course, thick bushes grew all around, but in one place the deer had made a great clearing, and it was there that Elisa went to the water. This was so clear, that if the wind did not cause the bushes and branches to move, one could have thought the leaves were painted on the ground beneath the water, so clearly was every leaf reflected there, those illuminated by the sun as well as those that were in the shade.
As soon as Elisa saw her own face, she was frightened, so brown and ugly it was. But as she moistened her little hand and rubbed her eyes and forehead, the white skin glistened again. Then she undressed and went into the fresh water. A royal child, more beautiful than she, was not to be found in this world.
When she had dressed herself again and braided her long hair, she went to the bubbling spring and drank from her cupped hands, then wandered deep into the forest without knowing to where she was going. She thought of her brothers, thought of the good God who would certainly not leave her. God made the wild forest apples grow to fill the hungry. He showed her such an area, the branches bent under the weight of its fruit. Here she partook of her midday meal, put supports under the branches and then went into the darkest part of the forest. It was so quiet that she heard her own footsteps and every tiny dried up leaf that bent under her feet. There was not a bird to be seen, not a ray of sunlight could pass through the large, dark branches of the tree. The tall trunks stood so close together that when she looked into them, it seemed completely as if a latticework of bars close to one another was enclosing her. 'Oh, here was a loneliness such as she had never known before.
The night became quite dark. Not a single, little firefly shined out of the moss. ... Saddened she lay down to sleep. It seemed to her as if the branches above her moved to the side, and the good God looked down upon her with gentle eyes and little angels looked out over his head and under his arms.
When she woke up in the morning, she didn't know whether she had dreamt it or if it had really been so.
She went a few steps forward and met an old woman with berries in her basket. The old woman gave her some of them. Elisa asks if she did not see eleven princes riding through the forest.
"No!" said the old woman; "but yesterday I saw eleven swans with gold crowns on their heads swimming down the river near here!" And she led Elisa a little further to a slope. At the foot of the river meandered a creek. The trees on its banks stretched out their long, leafy branches towards each other, and where their natural growth prevented them from reaching each other, the roots were ripped out of the earth and they hung, with branches entwined, out over the water.
Elisa said goodbye to the old woman and walked along the creek until it flowed out into the big, open sea.
The whole wonderful sea lay in front of the young girl, but not a sail showed upon it, not a boat was there to be seen. How should she get further from there? She looked at the countless small stones on the shore, the water had polished them all round. Glass, iron, stones, everything that lay there washed together had got its shape through the water, which was much softer than her delicate hand. "It rolls on tirelessly, and thus what is hard becomes smooth. I want to be tireless as well. Thanks for your teaching, you clear, rolling waves; once my heart said to me, you will carry me to my dear brothers!" On the washed up seaweed there lay eleven white swan feathers! She collected them into a bunch. There were drops of water on top of it - you couldn't tell whether it was dew or tears. It was lonely there on the beach, but she did not feel it because the sea provided continual diversion, more in just a few hours than lakes could show in a whole year. When a big, black cloud came along, it was as if the sea wanted to say, "I can also look gloomy." And then the wind blew, and the waves turned the white outward. But if the clouds appeared red and the wind was still, the sea was like a rose petal; one moment it was green, one moment it was white. But however quiet it rested, there was a silent movement on the bank, the water lifted up weakly like the breast of a sleeping child.
When the sun goes down, Elisa saw eleven wild swans flying towards the countryside with gold crowns on their heads. They hovered one behind the other, looking like a long white band. Then Elisa climbed up the slope and she hid behind a bush. The swans settled close to her and flapped their big white wings.
As soon as the sun was behind the water, the swan plumage suddenly fell and eleven beautiful princes, her brothers, stood there. She let out a loud cry; although she had changed a lot, she knew nevertheless that it was them, she felt that it must be them. She sprang into their arms and called them by name. And the princes felt so happy when they saw and recognised their little sister, who was now tall and beautiful. They laughed and cried, and soon they understood how evil their stepmother had been against them all.
"We brothers," said the eldest, "fly as wild swans while the sun is still in the sky; as soon as it has set, we regain our human form. Therefore, we must always be careful to have a resting place for our feet at sunset, for at this time if we were flying up towards the clouds, then we would have to fall down into the depths as men. We don't live here; there is a country as beautiful as this beyond the sea. But the way there is long. We have to cross the great sea, and there is no island along our way where we could spend the night; only a solitary, small cliff protrudes in the middle, it is no larger than that upon which we can rest, even close to one another. If the sea is very rough, water splashes high above us; but we thank God for this cliff. We spend the night in our human form; without it we would never be able to visit our beloved fatherland, for we need two of the longest days of the year for our flight. Only once a year are we granted a visit to our homeland. For eleven days we can stay there and fly over the big forest from which we can see the castle where we were born and where our father lives, and see the high church tower where Mother is buried. Here it seems to us that trees and bushes are related to us; here the wild horses run across the steppes, just as we have seen in our childhood; here the coal burner sings the old songs we danced to as children; here is our fatherland; we feel drawn hither, and here we have found you, dear little sister! We can stay here for two more days, then we have to go across the sea to a beautiful country which is not our fatherland! How do we bring you with us? We have neither ship nor boat!'' In what way can I release you?" asked the sister.
And they talked almost all night, sleeping only for a few hours.
Elisa awoke to the rustling sound of swan wings as flew overhead, the brothers were transformed again. And they flew in great circles and finally far away, but one of them, the youngest, remained behind. And the swan put its head in her lap, and she stroked his wings, they were together the whole day. As evening approached, the others returned, and when the sun had set, they assumed their natural form.
"Tomorrow we will fly away from here and cannot return for a whole year. But we can't abandon you like this! Do you have the courage to come with us? My arm is strong enough to carry you through the forest. Oughtn't all our wings be strong enough to fly with you over the sea?” "Yes, take me with you!" said Elisa.
They spent the whole night weaving a net from supple willow bark and the tough reeds, and it became big and strong. Elisa lay on this net, and when the sun came out and the brothers were turned into wild swans, they seized the net with their beaks and flew up high toward the clouds with their dear sister, who was still asleep. The rays of sunlight were falling directly on her face, so one of the swans flew over her head so that his broad wings could shade her.
They were far from land when Elisa awoke. She thought she was still dreaming, it seemed so peculiar to her to be carried high in the air over the sea. At her side lay a branch with splendid ripe berries and a bundle of delicious roots, which the youngest of the brothers had collected and laid down for her. She smiled gratefully at him, for she recognized him, it was he who flew over her and shaded her with his wings.
They were so high that the largest ship they saw seemed like a white seagull on the water. A big cloud stood behind them, that was a whole mountain. And on it Elisa saw her own shadow and that of the eleven swans, so vast they were flying there. That was a painting, more magnificent than any they had ever seen before. However, as the sun rose higher and the cloud remained behind, the floating shadow disappeared.
They flew all day long like an arrow rushing through the air; but still it was slower than usual because now they had to carry their sister. The weather was turning bad as evening was approaching. Fearfully Elisa watched the sun sinking, and yet the solitary cliff in the sea was not to be seen. It seemed to her that the swans were beating their wings more strongly. Oh, she was to blame for not getting there fast enough. If the sun were to set, they would have to become human, plunge into the sea and drown. Then she prayed from her innermost heart a prayer to dear God; but still she saw no cliff. The black cloud came closer, strong gusts of wind announced a storm. The clouds stood there in a single, large, threatening wave, which shot forward almost like lead, flashing lightning bolt upon lightning bolt.
Now the sun was right on the edge of the sea. Elisa's heart quaked. The swans were shooting down so fast that she thought she was about to fall. But now they were gliding again. The sun was half under the water when she first saw the small cliff below. It did not look any bigger, than a seal stretching its head out of the water. The sun was sinking so fast, now it just seemed just like a star. Then her foot touched the firm ground! The sun went out like the last spark of burning paper. She saw the brothers standing around her arm in arm; but there was not even any more space than just for her and them. The sea pounded against the cliff and went over them like a rain of dust. The sky lit up in continuous fire, and the thunder resounded in peal after peal. But the sister and brothers held each other's hands and sang psalms, from which they drew comfort and courage.
At dawn the air was pure and quiet. As soon as the sun rose, the swans flew away from the island with Elisa. The sea was still coming up. From where they were, high in the air, it looked as if the white foam on the black-green sea were millions of swans who were swimming on the water.
As the sun rose higher, Elisa saw before her, half floating in the air, a mountainous area with glittering masses of ice on the rocks. And in the middle of it arose a mile-long castle with one bold colonnade above the other; down below palm trees and luxuriant flowers swayed, as large as mill-wheels. She asked whether this was the country where they wanted to go. But the swans shook their heads, for what she saw was the glorious, ever changing castle-in-the-clouds of the Fata Morgana mirage, into which they not allowed to bring any human. Elisa stared at it, then mountains, forests and castle collapsed, and twenty lofty churches, each like the other, stood before them with tall towers and peaked windows. She thought she could hear the sounds of the organ playing, but it was the sea she heard. Now she was very close to the churches, and they became a whole fleet sailing under her; but when she looked down, it was only sea mist that was slipping over the water. So she had a perpetual change before her eyes, and then she saw the actual land where they wanted to go. The most beautiful blue mountains arose there with cedar forests, towns and castles. Long before the sun went down, she sat on the rock in front of a large cave covered with fine green creepers that looked like embroidered carpets.
"Now let's see what you'll dream here tonight," said the youngest brother, showing her the bedchamber.
"Heaven grant that I may dream of how I can save you!" she said. And this thought engaged her lively. She prayed quite fervently to God for his help, yes, even in her sleep she continued to pray. It seemed to her as if she was flying high into the air, to the Fata Morgana cloud castle. And the fairy approached her beautifully and brilliantly, and yet she resembled the old woman who had given her berries in the forest and told her about the swans with gold crowns on her head.
"Your brothers can be redeemed!" she said: "But do you have courage and perseverance? The water is softer than your fine hands, and yet it forms the stones; but it does not feel the pain that your fingers will feel, it has no heart, it does not suffer the fear and anguish that you have to endure. Do you see the stinging nettle I'm holding in my hand? Of the same species, many grow around the cave where you sleep; only the ones that grow there and those that grow on churchyards are fit, remember that. You'll have to pick them, although they will burn your hand full of blisters. Break the nettles with your feet and you will get a flax, from which you will have to weave and bind eleven coats of mail with long sleeves. Throw them over the eleven swans and the spell is undone. But bear in mind that you from the moment you start this work until it is finished, even if years pass, you may not speak. The first word you speak goes as a killing dagger in your brother's heart! Their lives depend on your tongue. Remember all this." And she touched her hand with the nettle at the same time. It was like a burning fire; Elisa woke up because of it. It was bright daylight, and close to where she had slept there was a nettle, like the one she had seen in her dream. With that she fell upon her knees, thanking the good God, then went out of the cave to begin her work.
With her delicate hands she reached down into the hideous nettles, which were like fire. Big blisters burned on her hands and arms; but she was glad to suffer, if only she could free her dear brothers. She broke every nettle with her bare feet and braided the green flax.
When the sun had gone down, the brothers came and they were startled to find her so silent. They thought it was a new spell of the wicked stepmother. But when they saw her hands, they understood what she was doing for their sake. And the youngest brother wept, and where his tears fell, she felt no pain, and the burning blisters disappeared
She spent the night with her work because she couldn't relax before having saved her beloved brothers. The whole following day, while the swans were away, she sat in her solitude; but never before had time fled from her so quickly. A coat of mail was already finished. Now she began the second one.
Then a hunting horn reverberated among the mountains; she was stricken with fear. The sound came closer and closer. She heard dogs barking. Terrified, she fled into the cave, tied together into a bundle the nettles that she had gathered and hackled, and sat down on them.
Immediately a large dog came leaping out of the gorge, and a moment later, another one and another. They barked loudly, ran back and came forward again. It lasted only a few minutes, then all the hunters were standing before the cave, and the most handsome of all was the king of the land. He approached Elisa, he had never before seen a more beautiful maiden.
"How did you get here, you wonderful child?" he asked. Elisa shook her head, she was not allowed to speak at all; it meant her brothers' release and life. And she hid her hands under her apron, lest the king should see what she had suffered.
"Come with me!" he said, "you may not stay here. You are as good as you are beautiful, and so I will dress you in silk and velvet, put a gold crown on your head, and you shall live and make your home in my richest castle!" And then he raised her onto his horse. She cried and wrung her hands, but the king said, "I only want your happiness! One day you'll thank me for this." Then he galloped off through the mountains, holding her before him on the horse, and the hunters chased after them.
When the sun went down, the beautiful royal city with its churches and domes lay before them. And the king led her into the castle, where large fountains splashed in high marble halls, where the walls and ceilings were resplendent with paintings. But she had no interest in that, she cried and grieved. Willingly, she let the women put royal dresses on her, braid pearls in her hair and pull elegant gloves over her burned fingers.
When she stood in her splendor, she was so beautiful that the court bowed even lower. And the king chose her as his bride, although the archbishop shook his head and whispered that the beautiful maiden of the forest was surely a witch; she blinded his eyes and bewitched the king's heart.
But the king would not hear it, let the music play, had the most delicious dishes served and had the most charming maidens dance around them. And she was led through fragrant gardens into splendid rooms, but ne'er a smile came to her lips or spoke from her eyes. Like a picture of mourning she stood there. Then the king opened a small chamber close to where she was supposed to sleep; it was adorned with exquisite green carpets and resembled the cave where she had been. On the floor lay the bundle of flax, which she had spun from the nettles, and under the ceiling hung the mail shirt, which she finished knitting. A hunter had taken all of this as a curiosity.
"In here you can dream yourself back to your former home!" said the king. "Here is the work that was occupying you there. Now, in the midst of all of your splendor, it will delight you to look back upon that time." When Elisa saw what lay so close to her heart, a smile played about her mouth, and the color returned to her cheeks. She thought of the release of her brothers, kissed the king's hand, and he pressed it to his heart and let the wedding feast be proclaimed through all the church bells. The beautiful, mute maiden of the forest became the queen of the land.
Then the archbishop whispered wicked words in the king's ears, but they did not penetrate to his heart. The wedding was to take place; the archbishop himself had to put the crown upon her head, and he squeezed the tight ring firmly against her forehead with an evil intention, so that it hurt. But a heavier ring lay around her heart, the grief for her brothers. She did not feel the physical distress. Her mouth was silent, a single word would indeed cost her brothers' lives. But her eyes proclaimed her intense love for the good, handsome king, who did everything to please her. With all her heart she grew more fond of him day by day; oh, that she would only be permitted to confide in him and complain of her suffering! But she had to be mute, and had to do her work in silence. ... Therefore, she crept from his side at night, went into the little chamber decorated like the cave and finished one mail shirt after the other. . But when she started the seventh, she had no flax left.
She knew that there were nettles growing in the churchyard that she could use, but she had to pick them herself. How was she supposed to get out there!
"Oh, what is the pain in my fingers compared with the torment my heart endures?" she thought. "I have to risk it! ... His Lord will not take his hand away from me!" With deep anxiety, as if it were an evil act that she intended to do, in the moonlit night she crept down into the garden and went forth through the avenues and through lonely streets to the churchyard. There she saw a cirle of lamias sitting on one of the widest gravestones. These ugly witches took off their rags as if they were going to bathe, and then with their long, thin fingers they dug up the fresh graves, took out the bodies and ate their flesh. Elisa had to pass near them, and they fixed their evil glances on her; but she prayed silently, gathered the burning nettles and carried them home to the castle.
Only one person had seen her: the archbishop. He was awake while the others slept. Now he was certainly right in his opinion that with the queen it was not as it should be; she was a witch, thus she had beguiled the king and all the people.
In the confessional he told the king what he had seen and what he feared. And when the harsh words left his tongue, the pictures of the saints shook their heads as if they were saying, "It is not so! Elisa is innocent!" But the archbishop put it differently, he said that they testified against her, that they were shaking their heads over her sins. Two heavy tears rolled down the King's cheeks. He went home with doubt in his heart and pretended to be asleep during the night. But no restful sleep came to his eyes, he noticed that Elisha had gotten up. Every night, she repeated this, and each time he followed her gently and saw her disappear into her chamber.
Day by day his face grew darker; Elisa saw it but did not understand why. But it frightened her, and what she did not suffer in her heart for her brothers. Her hot tears flowed upon the royal state and magenta; they lay there like glistening diamonds, and everyone who saw the rich splendor wished to be queen. In the meantime, she was soon finished with her work, only one mail shirt was yet lacking. But she no longer had any flax, not a single nettle. Once, only this last time, she therefore had to go the churchyard and pick a few handfuls. Fearfully, she thought about this lonely walk and the terrible lamais; but her will stood fast as well as her trust in the Lord.
Elisa departed, but the king and the archbishop followed her. They saw her disappear into the graveyard though the wrought iron gate, and as they drew closer, the lamias were sitting on the tombstone as Elisha had seen them. And the king turned away, for among them he thought of her whose head had rested on his breast that evening.
"The people must condemn her!" he said. And the people sentenced her to be burned in the red flames.
From the magnificent royal halls, she was led into a dark, damp hole where the wind whistled through the grate. Instead of velvet and silk, she was given the bundle of nettles that she had collected, and upon it she could lay her head. The hard, burning mail shirts she had knitted were to be her blankets. But nothing better could have been given her; she resumed her work and prayed to her God. Outside, street urchins sang mocking songs to her; not a soul consoled her with a kind word.
In the evening a swan's wing flapped close to the grill. That was the youngest of the brothers. He had found his sister and she sobbed loudly for joy, even though she knew the night to come would probably be her last. But now the work was nearly finished and her brothers were here.
The archbishop came now to be with her in the last hour, he had promised it to the king. But she shook her head and asked with looks and expressions that he may go. She had to finish her work this night, otherwise everything had been in vain, everything, pain, tears and the sleepless nights. The archbishop went away with harsh words against her, but the poor Elisa knew that she was innocent, and continued her work.
The little mice ran on the floor, dragging nettles to her feet, to help out a little bit. And the thrush sat herself down on the window grate and sang as cheerfully as she could the whole night, so that Elisa would not lose heart.
It was still dawn, only an hour before the sun would rise. The eleven brothers stood there at the gate of the castle and insisted on being led before the King. That could not happen was the answer, it was still night; the king is sleeping and may not be awakened. They pleaded, they threatened, the guard came, indeed even the king stepped out and asked what was the meaning of that. Just then the sun was rising, and there were no brothers to be seen; but over the castle flew eleven wild swans.
The entire population poured out of the city gate; they wanted to see the witch being burned. An old horse was pulling the cart she was sitting on. She had been dressed in a sackcloth of rough burlap; her beautiful hair hung loose about her beautiful head; her cheeks were deathly pale, her lips moved silently while her fingers were still working on the green flax. Even on the way to her death she did not interrupt the work she had started. The ten mail shirts lay at her feet, she was working on the eleventh. The mob was jeering at her.
"See the red witch, the way she is mumbling! She doesn't have a hymnal in her hands, no, she sits there with her ugly deception. Tear them into a thousand pieces!" And they crowded around her and wanted to rip the chainmail shirts to shreds. Then eleven wild swans came flying that sat down around her on the cart and flapped with their large wings. Now the mob gave way startled to the side.
"It's a sign from Heaven! She is surely innocent!" many people whispered. But they did not dare to say this aloud.
Now the hangman seized her by the hand. Then she hastily threw the eleven chainmail shirts over the swans. And immediately there stood eleven handsome princes. But the youngest had a swan's wing in place of an arm, as there was an arm was missing from his chain mail; the one she had not managed to finish.
"Now I may speak!" she said. "I am innocent!" And the populace, who saw what had happened, bowed low before her as they would before a saint. But she sank seemingly lifeless into her brothers' arms, so had the tension and pain affected her.
"Yes, she is innocent," said the eldest brother, and now he related all that had happened. And as he spoke, a scent like from a million roses spread, for every piece of firewood at the stake had taken root and formed branches. A perfumed hedge stood there, large and high with red roses; right on top was a brilliant white flower, which shone like a star. Then the king plucked it and pinned it to Elisa’s breast. Then she awoke with peace and happiness in her heart.
And all the church bells started ringing, and the birds came in great numbers. It turned into a wedding procession back to the castle like no king had as yet seen!
END
unit 5
Oh, die Kinder hatten es so gut; aber so sollte es nicht immer bleiben!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 7
Schon am ersten Tag konnten sie es merken.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 10
“Fliegt hinaus in die Welt und ernährt euch selbst!” sagte die böse Königin.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 15
Sie mußten wieder weiter, hoch gegen die Wolken empor, hinaus in die weiter Welt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 16
Da flogen sie hin zu einem großen dunklen Wald, der sich bis an den Strand erstreckte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 19
Jedesmal, wenn die warmen Sonnenstrahlen auf ihre Wangen schienen, gedachte sie aller ihrer Küsse.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 20
Ein Tag verging ebenso wie der andere.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 22
Und es war die reine Wahrheit, was die Rosen und das Gesangbuch sagten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 23
Als sie fünfzehn Jahre alt war, sollte sie nach Hause.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 24
Und als die Königin sah, wie schön sie war, wurde sie ihr gram und voll Haß.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 29
Aber sie schien es gar nicht zu merken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 30
Sobald sie sich emporrichtete, schwammen drei rote Mohnblumen auf dem Wasser.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 32
Aber Blumen wurden sie doch, weil sie auf ihrem Haupt und an ihrem Herzen geruht hatten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 33
Sie war zu fromm und unschuldig, als daß die Zauberei Macht über sie haben konnte!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 35
Es war unmöglich, die schöne Elisa wiederzuerkennen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 36
Als sie der Vater sah, erschrak er sehr und sagte, es sei nicht seine Tochter.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 38
Da weinte die arme Elisa und dachte an ihre elf Brüder, die alle weg waren.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 41
Die waren sicher auch, gleich ihr, in die Welt hinausgejagt, die wollte sie suchen und finden.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 42
Nur kurze Zeit war sie im Wald gewesen, da brach die Nacht an.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 46
Die ganze Nacht träumte sie von ihren Brüdern.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 51
Als sie erwachte, stand die Sonne schon hoch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 53
Aber die Strahlen spielten dort oben gerade wie ein wehender Goldflor.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 54
Da war ein Duft von Grünem, und die Vögel setzten sich fast auf ihre Schultern.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 55
Sie hörte Wasser plätschern.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 56
unit 59
Sobald Elisa ihr eigenes Gesicht erblickte, erschrak sie, so braun und häßlich war es.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 60
unit 61
Da entkleidete sie sich und ging in das frische Wasser hinein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 62
Ein schöneres Königskind, als sie war, wurde in dieser Welt nicht gefunden.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 64
Sie dachte an ihre Brüder, dachte an den lieben Gott, der sie sicher nicht verlassen würde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 65
Gott ließ die wilden Waldäpfel wachsen, um die Hungrigen zu sättigen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 66
Er zeigte ihr einen solchen Raum, die Zweige bogen sich unter der Last der Früchte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 71
Oh, hier war eine Einsamkeit, wie sie solche früher nie gekannt!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 72
Die Nacht wurde ganz dunkel.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 73
Nicht ein einziger kleiner Johanniswurm leuchtete aus dem Moos.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 74
Betrübt legte sie sich nieder, um zu schlafen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 76
unit 77
Sie ging einige Schritte vorwärts, da begegneten sie einer alten Frau mit Beeren in ihrem Korb.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 78
Die Alte gab ihr einige davon.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 79
Elisa frage, ob sie nicht elf Prinzen durch den Wald habe reiten sehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 81
Am Fuße desselben schlängelte sich ein Flüßchen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 85
Wie sollte sie nun dort weiter fort kommen?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 86
Sie betrachtete die unzähligen kleinen Steine am Ufer, das Wasser hatte sie alle rund geschliffen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 88
“Das rollt unermüdlich fort, und so ebnet sich das Harte.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 89
Ich will ebenso unermüdlich sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 91
Sie sammelte sie zu einem Strauß.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 92
Es lagen Wassertropfen darauf — ob es Tau oder Tränen waren, konnte man nicht sehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 98
Sie schwebten einer hinter dem anderen, es sah aus wie ein langes, weißes Band.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 99
Da stieg Elisa den Abhang hinauf und verbarg sich hinter einem Busch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 100
Die Schwäne ließen sich nahe bei ihr nieder und schlugen mit ihren großen, weißen Schwingen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 103
Und sie sprang in ihre Arme und nannte sie bei Namen.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 108
Hier wohnen wir nicht; es liegt ein ebenso schönes Land wie dieses jenseits der See.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 109
Aber der Weg dahin ist weit.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 111
Ist die See stark bewegt, so spritzt das Wasser hoch über uns; aber doch danken wir Gott für sie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 113
Nur einmal im Jahr ist es uns vergönnt, unsere Heimat zu besuchen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 117
Wie bringen wir dich fort?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 118
unit 119
Und sie unterhielten sich fast die ganze Nacht, es wurde nur einige Stunden geschlummert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 124
“Morgen fliegen wir von hier weg und können vor Ablauf eines ganzen Jahres nicht zurückkehren.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 125
Aber dich können wir nicht so verlassen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 126
Hast du Mut, mitzukommen?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 6 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 127
Mein Arm ist stark genug, dich durch den Wald zu tragen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 132
Sie waren weit vom Land entfernt, als Elisa erwachte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 137
Eine große Wolke stand hinter ihnen, das war ein ganzer Berg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 139
Das war ein Gemälde, prächtiger, als sie früher je eins gesehen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 142
Es zog ein böses Wetter auf, der Abend brach herein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 143
Ängstlich sah Elisa die Sonne sinken, und noch war die einsame Klippe im Meere nicht zu erblicken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 144
Es kam ihr vor, als machten die Schwäne stärkere Schläge mit den Flügeln.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 145
Ach, sie war Schuld daran, daß sie nicht rasch genug fortkamen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 146
unit 148
Die schwarze Wolke kam näher, die starken Windstöße verkündeten einen Sturm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 150
Jetzt war die Sonne gerade am Rande des Meeres.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 151
Elisas Herz bebte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 152
Da schossen die Schwäne hinab, so schnell, daß sie zu fallen glaubte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 153
Aber nun schwebten sie wieder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 154
Die Sonne war halb unter dem Wasser, da erblickte sie erst die kleine Klippe unter sich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 155
Sie sah nicht größer aus, als ob es ein Seehund sei, der den Kopf aus de Wasser streckte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 156
Die Sonne sank so schnell, jetzt erschien sie nur noch wie ein Stern.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 157
Da berührte ihr Fuß den festen Grund!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 158
Die Sonne erlosch gleich dem letzten Funken im brennenden Papier.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 160
Die See schlug gegen die Klippe und ging wie Staubregen über sie hin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 161
Der Himmel leuchtete in einem fortwährenden Feuer, und Schlag auf Schlag rollte der Donner.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 169
Sie glaubte die Orgeln ertönen zu hören, aber es war das Meer, welches sie hörte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 172
Dort erhoben sich die herrlichsten blauen Berge mit Zedernwäldern, Städten und Schlössern.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 175
“Gebe der Himmel, daß ich träumen möge, wie ich euch erretten kann!” sagte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 176
Und dieser Gedanke beschäftigte sie lebhaft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 177
Sie betete recht inbrünstig zu Gott um seine Hilfe, ja, selbst im Schlafe fuhr sie fort zu beten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 178
Da kam es ihr vor, als ob sie hoch in die Luft fliege, zu der Fata Morgana Wolkenschloß.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 180
“Deine Brüder können erlöst werden!” sagte sie; “Aber hast du Mut und Ausdauer?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 182
Siehst du die Brennessel, die ich in meiner Hand halte?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 184
Die mußt du pflücken, obgleich sie deine Hand voll Blasen brennen werden.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 186
Wirf diese über die elf Schwäne, so ist der Zauber gelöst.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 188
Das erste Wort, welches du sprichst, geht als tötender Dolch in deiner Brüder Herz!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 189
An deiner Zunge hängt ihr Leben.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 190
Merke dir das alles.” Und sie berührte zugleich ihre Hand mit der Nessel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 191
Es war einem brennenden Feuer gleich; Elisa erwachte dadurch.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 194
Mit den feinen Händen griff sie hinunter in die häßlichen Nesseln, diese waren wie Feuer.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 196
Sie brach jede Nessel mit ihren bloßen Füßen und flocht den grünen Flachs.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 197
Als die Sonne untergegangen war, kamen die Brüder, und sie erschraken, sie so stumm zu finden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 198
Sie glaubten, es sei ein neuer Zauber der bösen Stiefmutter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 199
Aber als sie ihre Hände erblickten, begriffen sie, was sie ihrethalben tat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 203
Ein Panzerhemd war schon fertig, nun fing sie das zweite an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 204
Da ertönte ein Jagdhorn zwischen den Bergen; sie wurde von Furcht ergriffen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 208
Er trat auf Elisa zu, nie hatte er ein schöneres Mädchen gesehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 209
“Wie bist du hierher gekommen, du herrliches Kind?” frage er.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 210
unit 212
“Kommt mit mir!” sagte er, “hier darfst du nicht bleiben.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 214
Sie weinte und rang die Hände, aber der König sagte: “Ich will nur dein Glück!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 215
Einst wirst du mir dafür danken”.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 216
unit 217
Als die Sonne unterging, lag die schöne Königsstadt mit Kirchen und Kuppeln vor ihnen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 219
Aber sie hatte keine Augen dafür, sie weinte und trauerte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 221
unit 225
Wie ein Bild der Trauer stand sie da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 228
Alles dieses hatte ein Jäger als Kuriosität mitgenommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 229
“Hier kannst du dich in deine frühere Heimat zurückträumen!” sagte der König.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 230
“Hier ist die Arbeit, die dich dort beschäftigte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 233
Das schöne, stumme Mädchen aus dem Walde ward des Landes Königin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 236
Doch ein schwererer Ring lag um ihr Herz, die Trauer um ihre Brüder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 237
Sie fühlte nicht die körperlichen Leiden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 238
Ihr Mund war stumm, ein einziges Wort würde ja ihren Brüdern das Leben kosten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 241
Doch stumm mußte sie sein, stumm mußte sie ihr Werk vollbringen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 243
Aber als sie das siebente begann, hatte sie keinen Flachs mehr.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 245
Wie sollte sie da hinaus gelangen!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 246
“Oh, was ist der Schmerz in meinen Fingern gegen die Qual, die mein Herz erduldet!” dachte sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 247
“Ich muß es wagen!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 249
Da sah sie auf einem der breitesten Grabsteine einen Kreis Lamien sitzen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 1 week ago
unit 252
Nur ein einziger Mensch hatte sie gesehen: der Erzbischof.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 253
Er war munter, wenn die andern schliefen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 255
Im Beichtstuhl sagte er dem König, was er gesehen hatte und was er fürchtete.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 258
Da rollten zwei schwere Tränen über des Königs Wangen herab.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 259
Er ging nach Hause mit Zweifel in seinem Herzen und stellte sich, als ob er in der Nacht schlafe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 260
Aber es kam kein ruhiger Schlaf in seine Augen, er merkte, wie Elisa aufstand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 262
Tag für Tag wurde seine Miene finsterer; Elisa sah es, begriff aber nicht, weshalb.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 263
Allein es ängstigte sie, und was litt sie nicht im Herzen für die Brüder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 265
Inzwischen war sie bald mit ihrer Arbeit fertig, nur ein Panzerhemd fehlte noch.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 266
Aber Flachs hatte sie auch nicht mehr, nicht eine einzige Nessel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 267
Einmal, nur dieses letzte Mal mußte sie deshalb zum Kirchhof und einige Handvoll pflücken.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 269
Elisa ging, aber der König und der Erzbischof folgten ihr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 272
“Das Volk muß sie verurteilen!” sagte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 273
Und das Volk verurteilte sie, in den roten Flammen verbrannt zu werden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 276
Die harten, brennenden Panzerhemden, die sie gestrickt hatte, sollten ihre Decken sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 279
Da schwirrte gegen Abend dicht am Gitter ein Schwanenflügel.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 280
Das war der jüngste der Brüder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 282
Aber nun war ja auch die Arbeit fast beendigt, und ihre Brüder waren hier.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 283
unit 284
Aber sie schüttelte das Haupt und bat mit Blicken und Mienen, er möge gehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 289
Es dämmerte noch, erst nach einer Stunde ging die Sonne auf.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 290
unit 292
unit 294
Aus dem Stadttor strömte das ganze Volk; es wollte die Hexe verbrennen sehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 295
Ein alter Gaul zog den Karren, auf dem sie saß.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 297
Selbst auf dem Weg zu ihrem Tode unterbrach sie die angefangene Arbeit nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 298
Die zehn Panzerhemden lagen zu ihren Füßen, an dem elften arbeitete sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 299
Der Pöbel verhöhnte sie.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 300
“Sieh die rote Hexe, wie sie murmelt!
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 301
Kein Gesangbuch hat sie in der Hand, nein, mit ihrer häßlichen Gaukelei sitzt sie da.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 304
Nun wich der Haufe erschrocken zur Seite.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 305
“Das ist ein Zeichen des Himmels!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 306
Sie ist sicher unschuldig!” flüsterten viele.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 307
Aber sie wagten nicht, es laut zu sagen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 308
Jetzt ergriff der Henker sie bei der Hand.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 309
Da warf sie hastig die elf Panzerhemden über die Schwäne.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 310
Und sogleich standen elf schöne Prinzen da.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 1 week ago
unit 312
“Jetzt darf ich sprechen!” sagte sie.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 314
unit 315
unit 318
Die pflückte der König und steckte sie an Elisas Brust.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 319
Da erwachte sie mit Frieden und Glückseligkeit im Herzen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 320
Und alle Kirchenglocken läuteten von selbst, und die Vögel kamen in großen Zügen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 7 months, 1 week ago
unit 321
Es wurde ein Hochzeitszug zurück zum Schloß, wie ihn noch kein König gesehen hatte!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 322
ENDE
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 25  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 1  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 1  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 286  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 285  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 250  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 295  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 254  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 70  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 116  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 151  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 139  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 90  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 90  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 80  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 291  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 287  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 281  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  translated  unit 322  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 223  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 207  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 211  9 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3749  commented on  unit 211  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 250  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 214  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 210  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 189  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 174  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 180  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 200  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 19  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 193  9 months, 1 week ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 19  9 months, 1 week ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 21  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 197  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 137  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 156  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 170  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 198  9 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 87  9 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3749  commented on  unit 166  9 months, 1 week ago
Merlin57 • 3749  commented on  unit 69  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 13  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 104  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 127  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 132  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 11  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 104  9 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 106  9 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3408  commented on  unit 32  9 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 24  9 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4788  commented on  unit 23  9 months, 1 week ago