de-en  Dt. Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.13
The Small Island of the Fish in San Francisco Bay.
Where concerns about the future belong. - Reasoning in a soliloquy. - The land of the sun. - Blossoming fruit orchards. - Arrival in San Francisco. - Mr. Frank Reddington, black sheep and prodigal son. - The story of the strict governor. - The tragicomical dog's tail. ... - How the millionaire son became energetic. - The god of work is whistling. - At the cods. - A stockfish cannery. - Who laughs last, laughs best!
My beautiful talent for banishing the cares of the future to where by rights they belong – to the future – proved itself again brilliantly. To be sure, the thought briefly came to me that it would have been far more beautiful and pleasant if I had had more money. I still had about fifteen dollars left after I had paid for the ticket. ...
"Can you change it?" I asked myself. "No!" "But do want to go to San Francisco?" "Yes!" "There you go." "And what do you want to do in San Francisco?" asked a little voice inside me.
"How can I already know that right now!" another inner little voice answered seemingly logically.
Thus the matter was finished to my best self-satisfaction. Peacefully I slept all night long in the soft upholstered chairs and the next morning I squinted cheerfully out at the vast Kansas plains. In Colorado I nodded happily to well-known stations. Billy and Joe and I had hurriedly driven through there on our drive to the east. I found the Rocky Mountains (from the dining car) magnificent – I had an excellent conversation about the Mormons during the trip through Utah with a young woman who spoke with great indignation about their polygamous marriage habits, flirting energetically while doing so – I slept through Nevada for the most part. Then we rode for hours in tunnels, the enormous snow sheds of the Sierra Nevada mountains, which cover the stretch of track for many miles in order to protect it from snowdrifts and avalanches. And then, as if by a stroke of magic, a bright sunny spring countryside emerged out of the darkness. Lush green everywhere. Woodlands of fruit trees under dark blue skies, dotted in incredible splendor with soft and delicate blossoms, shimmering from snowy white to silvery and light pink colors, shining in the warm sunshine. California, the fairytale land of gold. The land of sunshine and beauty.
Hours of a fairy tale journey in the land of sunshine. Villages, cities. And finally the boom and the noise of the Queen of the West, an emergence of deep-blue sea tides, a swim on an enormous ferryboat that takes on the entire train in the little city of Oakland, the little brother of the sparkling sister-city there across the Bay, and carries it across the water to San Francisco; an enormous train station – a bustle of people.

Then I laughed happily at myself, laughing like someone who had succeeded in his will, and stepped into the confusion. ... I was still not very interested in the life and activity around me. After all, brother happy-go-lucky had become practical and intended to secure his own four walls, as he had done in St. Louis. It didn't occur to me at all to ask for the way and directions. ... There where the noise was greatest, where the shops were concentrated, where biggest crowds of people were, there one could only turn right or left and was certain to find the cardboard signs in the side streets with the laconic legend of room for rent. In the busiest part of the city there, indeed, the bachelors always live. So it was in St. Louis, so it is all over the world, so it also was here. On a small street, wedged between the harbor area and the glamorous main street, Market Street, I soon found a room, small and shabby, but with a magnificent view of the bay. I immediately paid in advance the seven dollars that it was to cost a month, and patiently listened to Madame Legrange, the lady of the house, tell me that San Francisco was a pearl (not exactly as beautiful as Paris), and she was a Frenchwoman ("ah, la belle France, monsieur!") and tenants who paid in advance each month could count on her special égards, and she had once been young and beautiful. But that had to be long time ago!
And now out to the Queen of West! Taking four steps at a time in haste and curiosity (it had gotten to be evening over unpacking and bathing), I ran down the steep stairs and - - "Oops - confound it!" I said.
"Oops - oh, the devil!" he said.
At the same time, we were staring dumbfounded at a tin can that was rolling down the stairs in the apparent effort to get rid of the few drops of beer that were still in it. He sat downstairs on a step, I upstairs. There between us a tiny lake of beer and foam was spreading. "He" was an elegant young man with a magnificent energetic face.
„The devil!“ I said.
„ Confound it!“ he said
"Excuse my awkwardness," I begged.
"But it's not worth mentioning," he assured.
Eventually, we agreed to get fresh beer together at the corner and drink up together - truly a Solomon solution. I liked "he" from the first moment on with his fresh and lively kind and his childlike laugh. As we sat in his little room upstairs, I on the only wobbly chair, he on a beautiful, heavy leather suitcase, we became, almost in the blink of an eye, as cheerful and open-hearted as old friends.
"The suitcase is great, huh?" he laughed when he saw my admiring glances. "I feel sorry for it!" "What for?" "Because sooner or later I'm going to chew it up!" The ice was broken with resounding laughter. ... In fifteen minutes we were in the middle of a conversation. My new friend was called Frank Reddington. Reddington Junior, actually ... Just how he sat, slim, sinewy, dashing in every line, hands clasped around his knees, laugh-lines around the corners of his mouth, laughter in his eyes, any girl would have fallen in love with him.
"Step by step!" he smiled. Me first. So the thing is like this: At first, the governor (governor or also pater he called his father) began to hum melodically. After receiving certain bills - admittedly, they were sinful, as I have to attest to the governor's apology - he began a shrill Indian war song and telegraphed me such outrageous telegrams that I was embarrassed for the telegraph messengers. They smelled like sulfur. Finally, when the College of Professors at Harvard University drove me out of the temple (these learned gentlemen have so little sense of humor), the governor became raving mad. Well, I got thrown out and went to my dear parents' house in New York. Mater was heartbroken - "You shall come to the bank immediately. Oh, Franky dear, what a bad boy you are!" That started well. I felt awful, I can tell you that. In the bank (the governor is president of First National Bank of New York), the cashier made a face as though I were a despicable garden spider and led me to the private office.
"Take a seat," said the governor According to my information from Harvard, you've acted like a buffoon. Well, sir, what do you have to tell us in your favour?" I hmm - hmm. What to say in such cases!
„Nothing - nothing - nothing worked at all. Played soccer. (For the amount of your sporting company's bills a worker feeds his family!) Debts made left and right! Stupid boyish pranks! ... What was it actually about that last story?" Yes, that last story!
The final scandal was based on a dog's tail to which a certain Franky-dear had tied a clever selection of firecrackers. Now I ask you: Could I help it that the attached dog belonged to the physics professor and had the insane idea of running to his master in the physics class – along with tail, jumping jacks and thunderclaps! In the course of this, the pooch was nervous, understandably so, and knocked down several hundred dollars worth of physics equipment in three and a half seconds. It should not have taken long. But as long as it lasted, the pace of this performance was unusually snappy! And at the same time I had pursued purely educational intentions, for if Moppelinus maliciously creeps into a student's room and defiles a brand-new flannel suit, then Moppelinus must be punished. Well, the governor didn't even laugh. I am the eyesore of an otherwise honorable family. From the individual items of laziness, recklessness and impertinence, the overall score is a hopeless good-for-nothing. ... I should go to the devil, right now, instantly, without wasting time. (Probably some of pater's favorite shares on the stock exchange had been badly tweaked, because he seemed in a wicked mood.)
"I find it decidedly tedious to be the father of a son!" he then said rather comfortably. "This - this stuff," [he said,] pointing to a pile of bills, "I will settle." In fact, we are not talking about money but a principle. You are going to work, sir. My private secretary will tell you your instructions. For the moment, I do not wish to see you anymore." The private secretary in the outer office smirked and handed me typewritten instructions. Very accurate ones. Travel immediately to Chicago and report to the president of the Illinois Central Railroad (on whose board of directors the father sat). To be employed in main office - salary 8 dollars per week.
Then anger raced through every limb in my body. "Do you know what?" I said. Report to the governor that I think his viewpoint is absolutely correct and I intend to work. But without his damn patronage! I will have notifications as to my whereabouts sent to you from time to time and you will report them to the governor. „And a good morning to you, Sir!“ The private secretary almost passed out.
You triple fool! I said to myself when I was on the street. But mind, you must finish what you started to say. To make a long story short - in six days I was in Frisco (the gold watch and jewelry items and superfluous wardrobe had brought a nice penny) and moved to the University of California. To finish studying at all costs, precisely because the governor didn't want it that way! The money was adequate for the current semester. Well, and during the holidays, I became a waiter - a hideous business - and then I lived inexpensively and copied college notebooks for little sons who had superfluous money and gave private boxing lessons. I worked like a beaver and I had a lot of fun. The final exam comes in the next semester, which I will undoubtedly pass, and then I'll telegraph the governor that he can now have the calf slaughtered for the prodigal son. Yes - after the first six months, Higgins, that's the private secretary, wired me, I was a fool, and the cashier was instructed to pay my checks. I gave thanks, though. First, the governor must have the necessary respect for me, so that we have a pleasant basis for conversation!" Then my own experience occurred to me to be pale and shabby - But I, too, started to talk, and Frank Reddington was convulsing with never-ending laughter at the family resemblance between the professors of his Harvard University and the schoolmasters of my high schools. You were so lacking in humour! On either side!! As I talked about Billy and the madness of the railroad, he murmured over and over, "By Jove; I'll try that too!" - and his eyes opened up wide at the Western Post ... "The Devil! "You managed to do that stupidly, my dear boy! You should have stayed there! You should have hung yourself up on the blessed newspaper like a hungry flea on a fat little doggy! !" We sat together until late into the night. And when we separated after one last cigarette, Frank said: "You and I - me and you... we fit together like twins. What a foolish fellow the coincidence is. Black sheep and lost sons all of them - but still very much alive. Hey - oh! You don't have any money and I don't have money! And yesterday the holidays have begun ... That's a good thing! Do you know what? - Let's drive tandem! Let's stretch together in the yoke! Let's collectively chase after the crazy little round things called dollars in this blessed country - do you want?" You better believe it!!!
Early in the morning someone opened my room door wide and a voice cried. "Go in and win, torero! "Out with you, brother - the god of work is whistling to the lost sons!" I rubbed my eyes sleepily.
"Dress in prestissimo!" was the order of Frank. "This morning's examiner has a laconic advertisement: "Men wanted - men are wanted. 21 Broad Street. "We're men, aren't we? Well, then, hurry up - quickly, quickly ..." 21 Broad Street proved to be an elegant office (Johnson & Komp., Canning stood on the company signboard), shabby figures were standing in front of the door in long rows. ... Frank grinned. Are there still more men in San Francisco, aren't they ? Don't seem to be the only ones! What a blessing that we look stylish enough to be allowed to be brazen!" We forced ourselves past the waiting people and asked to be announced to the director. ...
"What can I do for you, gentlemen?" the manager asked.
" What's with the advertisment?" Frank inquired.
"Oh- we need people for our factory of fish preserves in the bay." " On what terms?" " Two dollars per day and free meals. But excuse me, I don't understand -" " Incredibly easy!" Frank grinned. "We need money - work- and- do you want to employ us?" " Eh?" the manager said and made a dumbfounded face. ...
"Accept - hire!" "The work is hard, though ..." "Well, it doesn't matter!" And with funny laughing and doubtful jokes we were promptly accepted.
"Occasionally, I'll do you a favor! Thank you!" thanked Frank.
The manager laughed and laughed, and we ran home to set up everything. On the way, we bought some cheap work clothes. In one hour we should return to the office to go on a cutter to the workplace.
It was a wonderful journey across the deep-blue waters of the bay, between the cities springing up that surrounded the shores like a wreath of flowers; at first along quays with gigantic ocean steamers, past little islets, between fishing flotillas. And when the Queen of the West, in spider-webbed, delicate outlines, lay back far to the west, we landed with the two dozen people besides us, whom the cutter ferried out, at the jetty of a tiny rocky island with simple wooden buildings. That was the small island of fish. .... And in half an hour Frank and I stood side by side behind a wide wooden table, long, sharp knives in our hands; peeling skin off sun-dried cod and cutting the meaty, yellow-white flesh into long strips ... On the island His Majesty Cod ruled as the sole ruler, the cod. Millions of fish were stored in coarse salt in dozens of enormous vats on a beamed platform between the factory building and the dwelling house. Each morning, men in long boots carried them out of the depths of the vats and spread them out to dry in the sun. Ripe, sun-cured, sun-dried, they were in two or three days. Then they went to our factory, were skinned, deburred, cut and packed in pretty little wooden boxes; the back meat as extra prime quality, the side meat as a second quality product: Dried cod! So we stood and disassembled and cut from six o' clock in the morning to six in the evening.
"It's just what I thought, there had to be a catch somewhere", said Frank smiling ironically the very first day. ... "Two dollars a day is not being paid for nothing. And now we have a mess!" The catch was there - the state of affairs was particularly unpleasant! The cod skin and its flesh were so saturated with hot brine that when skinning and cutting, our hands became raw after the first hours. Then, of course, one cut oneself in the rush work, and also the sharp fish bones ripped wounds. Even the most painstaking caution could not avoid this. Corrosive and biting the brine penetrated into these sores! It was a type of martyrdom; a fairly harmless and safe martyrdom, but painful enough for my modest taste.
"The dickens!" Frank said surprised at the first evening and rubbed his maltreated hands tenderly.
"Awful!" I grumbled and did the same.
My hands were pretty red like a boiled crab and bled in twenty places, especially under the nails. But we consoled ourselves with petrolatum and philosophy and chatted for hours with the island's Chinese chef, who raved on at us in his gruesome pidgin English about Frisco's Chinatown. About the gambling dens in which the children of the heavenly kingdom played fan-fan night and day and occasionally mutually struck each other dead; about the "Six Societies", the secret societies that ruled the Chinese empire and monopolized the import and repatriation of Chinese. They were so powerful that no steamer company accepted a coolie as a steerage passenger for return passage unless he had a permit from the "Six Companies" as a sign that he had fulfilled his obligations to the secret society. Like dictators, the six societies ruled; advancing money, lauding, punishing, building schools for the Chinese youth, temples for the adults. Sam Ling always made a fearful face when he spoke of this secret society ... He was a mercurial little fellow who cooked famously and performed the most incredible feat in his kitchen shack on the rock wall. I still find it puzzling today how he managed to deliver pancakes for breakfast at six o'clock in the morning for forty men (that's how many we were). Delicate, tiny little pancakes, barely the size of a saucer, which we buttered and sugared, always folding one on top of the other. Everyone ate at least a dozen. A dozen times forty - that was five hundred pancakes that poor Sam Ling had conjured up - before six in the morning. However he did it, they were there; fresh, hot, crispy The catering was excellent and the bedrooms were bright and clean. If only the salt had not been - the damn salt!
Frank and I were almost always with each other and didn't care much for the other men. In the evening we always bandaged each other's sore hands. ... In the course of this, we got accustomed to the strange pleasure of grabbing one another quite vigorously and staring one another in the face, to see if perhaps a painful characteristic couldn't be discovered.
"Good God," Frank said regularly every night when he looked at his hands. "Stockfish! Cod! Innocent stockfish! .... You shouldn't believe that such an innocent stockfish can maltreat you like that! If the governor saw me now, he might be satisfied! Huh?" Then we went to the top of the cliff and stared out silently into the sea, into the blazing sapphire wave surging with the brown and brown-red fishermen's sailboats and the shapeless steamers in between. Then, when the ball of the sun went down far in the west and it blended into the blue like sparkling rubies, we laughed and nodded to one another. Over there was San Francisco. The weak red shimmer on the horizon there was a reflection of his nocturnal light splendour. How we wanted to poke around in the glow there, once the time was fulfilled, and how we wanted to take care of our hands!
Day after day passed, and finally a month passed. One morning, the foreman in the workroom asked loudly: "Who wants to cease to work and go back to San Francisco? The cutter's coming tomorrow." Strangely enough (at least it seemed odd to me) nobody answered. Frank and I looked at each other - looked at each other again - until we finally began shouting, "Me!" "Me too!" Yelled Frank, smiling, "And why not! Yes, we are here (we say thank you to all the gods of Homer) not increased, nor married to the three times confounded cods. Oh, I'm so glad! Hands - rejoice!" It was a summer's morning when we saw the rocky island for the last time and solemnly promised each other that, no matter what happened to us and however we may fare in this merry life, we would never, ever: Eat cod!
During the trip, we figured we'd both skinned, scaled and prepared about seven thousand stockfish together, approximately ten pounds each. With our poor hands! Ten pieces per hour approximately, and ten working hours a day, and for thirty-two long days we had been working. Seven thousand pieces!
"You could weep!" said Frank Reddington. "Weep! You can never look a cod in the face again! If ever in my life anyone mentions the word "cod" to me, I'll pummel him. ... Yeah! !" And when we had changed our clothes and (especially) put on gloves, we presented ourselves in the office with our payment orders.
"How did you like it," the manager asked and grinned.
"Famos," said Frank sour-sweet.
"I'm very happy about that. Let me see your hands!" The Managing Director looked at our gloves with a wink.
"Man," Frank said seriously, "don't mock my venerable age." (The whole office laughed.) "Or else I will curse you and appear to you three times a night after my death as a stockfish! !" (The whole office bellowed.)
But each of us got sixty-four dollars and laughed, too.
unit 1
Das Inselchen der Fische in der San Franzisko-Bai.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 2
Wohin Zukunftssorgen gehören.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 3
– Ein logisches Selbstgespräch.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 4
– Das Land der Sonne.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 5
– Blühende Obstwälder.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 6
– Ankunft in San Franzisko.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 7
– Mr. Frank Reddington, schwarzes Schaf und verlorener Sohn.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 8
– Die Geschichte vom strengen Gouverneur.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 9
– Der tragikomische Hundeschwanz.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 10
– Wie der Millionärssohn energisch wurde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 11
– Der Gott der Arbeit pfeift.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 12
– Bei den Kabeljaus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 13
– Eine Stockfischfabrik.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 14
– Wer zuletzt lacht, lacht am besten!
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 17
Fünfzehn Dollar etwa besaß ich noch, als ich den Fahrschein bezahlt hatte.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 20
Somit war die Angelegenheit zur schönsten Selbstzufriedenheit erledigt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 22
In Colorado nickte ich bekannten Stationen vergnügt zu.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 23
Billy und Joe und ich waren da auf der Fahrt nach Osten durchgesaust.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 27
Saftiges Grün überall.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 29
Kalifornien, das Märchenland des Goldes.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 30
Das Land der Sonne und der Schönheit.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 31
Stunden einer Märchenfahrt im Sonnenland.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 32
Dörfer, Städte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 35
Noch interessierte mich das Leben und Treiben um mich her wenig.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 37
Es fiel ihm gar nicht ein, nach Weg und Richtung zu fragen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 39
Im geschäftigsten Teil der Stadt hausen ja immer die Junggesellen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 40
So war es in St. Louis, so ist es überall auf der Welt, so war es auch hier.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 43
Das mußte aber schon lange her sein!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 44
Und jetzt hinaus zur Königin des Westens!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 46
»Hopla – oh, the devil!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 48
Er saß unten auf einer Treppenstufe, ich oben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 49
Zwischen uns breitete sich ein Miniatursee von Bier und Schaum.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 50
"Er" war ein eleganter junger Mensch mit einem prachtvoll energischen Gesicht.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 51
»The devil!« sagte ich.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 52
»Confound it!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 53
»Entschuldigen Sie meine Ungeschicklichkeit,« bat ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 54
»Aber es ist ja nicht der Rede wert,« versicherte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 58
»Der Koffer ist famos, heh?« lachte er, als er meine bewundernden Blicke sah.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 60
Mitten im Erzählen waren wir in einer Viertelstunde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 61
Mein neuer Freund hieß Frank Reddington.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 63
»Zug um Zug!« lächelte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 64
»Zuerst ich.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 67
Sie rochen direkt nach Schwefel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 69
unit 70
Die mater war todunglücklich – »Du sollst sofort nach der Bank kommen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 71
Ach, Franky dear, was bist du für ein schlimmer Junge!« Das fing gut an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 72
Mir war elend zumute, das kann ich Ihnen sagen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 74
»Nimm Platz,« sagte der Gouverneur.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 75
»Nach meinen Informationen aus Harvard hast du dich betragen wie ein Hanswurst!
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 76
Well, sir, was hast du zu deinen Gunsten anzuführen?« Ich hm – hmte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 77
Was soll man auch in solchen Fällen sagen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 78
»Nichts – nichts – gar nichts gearbeitet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 79
Fußball gespielt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 80
(Für den Betrag deiner Rechnungen der Sportfirma ernährt ein Arbeiter seine Familie!)
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 81
Schulden gemacht links und rechts!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 82
Dumme Jungenstreiche!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 83
Was war das eigentlich mit dieser letzten Geschichte?« Ja, diese letzte Geschichte!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 87
Lange soll es nicht gedauert haben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 88
Aber so lange es dauerte, war das Tempo dieser Vorstellung ungewöhnlich flott!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 90
Well, der Gouverneur lachte nicht einmal.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 91
Ich sei der Schandfleck einer sonst ehrbaren Familie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 95
»Ich finde es entschieden langweilig, Vater eines Sohnes zu sein!« sagte er dann ganz gemütlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 96
»Dieses – dieses Zeug,« dabei deutete er auf einen Stapel Rechnungen, »werde ich regulieren.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 97
Im übrigen handelt es sich nicht um Geld, sondern um ein Prinzip.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 98
Du wirst arbeiten, sir.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 99
Mein Privatsekretär wird dir deine Instruktionen erteilen.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 101
Sehr präzise.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 103
Dort angestellt werden im Hauptbureau – mit acht Dollars Wochengehalt.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 104
Da fuhr mir der Ärger in die Glieder: »Wissen Sie, was?« sagte ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 106
Aber ohne seine verdammte Protektion!
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 108
Good morning, sir!« Der Privatsekretär fiel beinahe in Ohnmacht.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 109
Du dreifacher Narr!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 110
sagte ich mir, als ich auf der Straße stand.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 111
Aber nun hast du einmal A gesagt und mußt auch B sagen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 113
Um jeden Preis fertig studieren, gerade weil der Gouverneur es anders wollte!
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 114
Für das laufende Semester reichte das Geld.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 116
Gearbeitet hab' ich wie ein Pferd, und Spaß hat es mir gemacht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 119
Ich hab' aber gedankt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 121
Sie ermangelten ja so gänzlich des Humors!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 122
Hüben wie drüben!!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 124
Das haben Sie aber dumm angestellt, my dear boy!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 125
Dort bleiben hätten Sie sollen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 127
!« Bis spät in die Nacht hinein saßen wir zusammen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 129
Was für ein närrischer Geselle der Zufall doch ist!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 130
Schwarze Schafe und verlorene Söhne alle beide – aber noch immer sehr lebendig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 131
Hei – oh!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 132
Sie kein Geld und ich kein Geld!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 133
Und gestern haben die Ferien angefangen!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 134
That's a good thing!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 135
Wissen Sie was?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 136
– Fahren wir Tandem!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 137
Spannen wir uns zusammen ins Joch!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 139
Frühmorgens riß jemand meine Zimmertür auf und eine Stimme schrie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 140
»Auf in den Kampf, Torero!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 142
»Man kleide sich prestissimo an!« befahl Frank.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 144
Broad Street 21.« Männer sind wir, nicht wahr?
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 146
Frank grinste.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 147
»Gibt noch mehr Männer in San Franzisko, heh?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 148
Scheinen nicht die einzigen zu sein!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 150
»Und womit kann ich Ihnen dienen, gentlemen?« fragte der Manager.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 151
»Was ist das für ein Inserat?« fragte Frank zurück.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 153
Aber verzeihen Sie, ich begreife nicht recht –« »Bodenlos einfach!« grinste Frank.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 156
»Ich tu' Ihnen gelegentlich auch einmal einen Gefallen!
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 157
Thank you!« bedankte sich Frank.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 159
Aus dem Weg kauften wir uns billige Arbeitskleider.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 163
Das war das Inselchen der Fische.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 166
Reif, sun-cured, sonnengetrocknet, waren sie in zwei, drei Tagen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 168
So standen wir und zerlegten und schnitten von sechs Uhr morgens bis sechs Uhr abends.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 170
»Zwei Dollars im Tag werden nicht umsonst gezahlt.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 174
Selbst die peinlichste Vorsicht konnte das nicht vermeiden.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 175
In diese wunden Stellen drang ätzend und beißend die Salzlauge!
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 178
»Scheußlich!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 179
!« brummte ich und tat desgleichen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 188
Ein Dutzend mindestens aß ein jeder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 190
Wie er es auch machte – sie waren da; frisch, heiß, knusprig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 191
Die Verpflegung war vorzüglich und die Schlafräume hell und sauber.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 192
Wenn nur das Salz nicht gewesen wäre – das verdammte Salz!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 193
unit 194
Abends verbanden wir uns immer gegenseitig die wunden Hände.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 196
»Good God,« sagte Frank regelmäßig jeden Abend, wenn er seine Hände betrachtete.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 197
»Stockfisch!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 198
Cod!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 199
Unschuldiger Stockfisch!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 201
Wenn der Gouverneur mich jetzt sehen würde, wäre er vielleicht zufrieden!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 204
Da drüben lag San Franzisko.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 207
Tag um Tag verging, und endlich war ein Monat vorbei.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 211
Wir sind ja hier (sämtlichen Göttern Homers sei dafür gedankt!)
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 212
nicht angewachsen, noch mit den dreimal vermaledeiten cods verheiratet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 213
Mann, ich bin froh!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 216
Mit unseren armen Händen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 218
Siebentausend Stück!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 219
»Weinen könnte man!« sagte Frank Reddington.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 220
»Weinen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 221
Man kann ja nie wieder einem Kabeljau ins Gesicht schauen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 222
Wer je im Leben mir gegenüber das Wort "cod" erwähnt, den boxe ich über den Haufen.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 223
So!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 225
»Wie hat's Ihnen gefallen,« fragte der Manager und grinste.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 226
»Famos,« meinte Frank sauersüß.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 227
»Das freut mich sehr.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 231
!« (Das ganze Kontor brüllte.)
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 232
Wir aber strichen ein jeder vierundsechzig Dollars ein und lachten auch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 111  9 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 101  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 101  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 103  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 100  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 108  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 114  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 106  9 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 112  9 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 110  9 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 107  9 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 96  9 months, 4 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 11  9 months, 4 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented  10 months, 1 week ago

enjoy everybody ;-)

by Siri 10 months, 1 week ago

Das Inselchen der Fische in der San Franzisko-Bai.
Wohin Zukunftssorgen gehören. – Ein logisches Selbstgespräch. – Das Land der Sonne. – Blühende Obstwälder. – Ankunft in San Franzisko. – Mr. Frank Reddington, schwarzes Schaf und verlorener Sohn. – Die Geschichte vom strengen Gouverneur. – Der tragikomische Hundeschwanz. – Wie der Millionärssohn energisch wurde. – Der Gott der Arbeit pfeift. – Bei den Kabeljaus. – Eine Stockfischfabrik. – Wer zuletzt lacht, lacht am besten!
Wieder bewährte sich glänzend mein schönes Talent, die Sorgen der Zukunft dorthin zu verweisen, wohin sie von Rechts wegen gehörten – in die Zukunft! Flüchtig drängte sich mir zwar der Gedanke auf, daß es weit schöner und angenehmer gewesen wäre, hätte ich mehr Geld gehabt. Fünfzehn Dollar etwa besaß ich noch, als ich den Fahrschein bezahlt hatte.
»Kannst du es ändern?« fragte ich mich.
»Nein!«
»Nach San Franzisko willst du aber?«
»Ja!«
»Na, also.«
»Und was willst du in San Franzisko anfangen?« fragte ein inneres Stimmchen.
»Wie kann ich das jetzt schon wissen!« gab ein anderes inneres Stimmchen anscheinend logisch zur Antwort.
Somit war die Angelegenheit zur schönsten Selbstzufriedenheit erledigt. Friedlich schlief ich in den weichen Polstern die ganze Nacht hindurch und blinzelte am nächsten Morgen vergnügt in die weiten Kansasebenen hinaus. In Colorado nickte ich bekannten Stationen vergnügt zu. Billy und Joe und ich waren da auf der Fahrt nach Osten durchgesaust. Das Felsengebirge fand ich prachtvoll (vom Speisewagen aus) – über die Mormonen unterhielt ich mich während der Fahrt durch Utah ausgezeichnet mit einer jungen Dame, die sich sehr entrüstet über die umfassende Heiraterei des Mormonentums aussprach und dabei energisch flirtete – Nevada verschlief ich zum größten Teil. Dann fuhren wir stundenlang in Tunnels, den riesigen Schneehütten der Sierra Nevada, die viele Meilen lang den Schienenstrang überdecken, um ihn vor Schneewehen und Lawinen zu schützen. Und dann tauchte wie durch Zauberschlag ein sonnenglänzendes Frühlingsland aus dem Dunkel auf. Saftiges Grün überall. Wälder von Obstbäumen unter tiefblauem Himmel, übersät in unbeschreiblicher Pracht mit feinzarten Blüten, schimmernd von schneeigem Weiß zu silberigen und hellrosa Tönen, strahlend in warmem Sonnenschein. Kalifornien, das Märchenland des Goldes. Das Land der Sonne und der Schönheit.
Stunden einer Märchenfahrt im Sonnenland. Dörfer, Städte. Und endlich das Brausen und der Lärm der Königin des Westens, ein Auftauchen von tiefblauen Meeresfluten, ein Dahinschwimmen auf riesigem Fährboot, das im Städtchen Oakland, dem kleinen Bruder der glänzenden Schwesterstadt drüben über der Bai, den ganzen Eisenbahnzug aufnimmt und über die Wasser hinüberträgt nach San Franzisko; eine gewaltige Bahnhofshalle – ein Gewühl von Menschen.

Da lachte ich vergnügt vor mich hin, wie einer lacht, der seinen Willen durchgesetzt hat, und schritt in den Wirrwarr hinein. Noch interessierte mich das Leben und Treiben um mich her wenig. Denn Bruder Leichtfuß war praktisch geworden und gedachte sich, so wie er's in St. Louis getan hatte, vor allem die vier eigenen Wände zu sichern. Es fiel ihm gar nicht ein, nach Weg und Richtung zu fragen. Da wo der Lärm am größten war, wo die Geschäfte sich häuften, wo die Menschen sich am meisten drängten, da durfte man nur rechts oder links abbiegen und fand sicherlich in Nebengäßchen die Pappschilder mit der lakonischen Legende vom zu vermietenden Zimmer. Im geschäftigsten Teil der Stadt hausen ja immer die Junggesellen. So war es in St. Louis, so ist es überall auf der Welt, so war es auch hier. In einem Sträßchen, eingekeilt zwischen der Hafengegend und der glanzvollen Hauptstraße, der Market Street, fand ich bald ein Zimmer, klein, schäbig, aber mit prachtvollem Blick auf die Bai. Die sieben Dollars, die es im Monat kosten sollte, zahlte ich sofort im voraus und hörte geduldig zu, wie Madame Legrange, die Dame des Hauses, mir erzählte, San Franzisko sei eine Perle (so schön freilich nicht wie Paris), und sie sei eine Französin (»ah, la belle France, monsieur!«) und Mieter, die monatlich im voraus bezahlten, könnten auf ihre besonderen égards zählen, und sie sei auch einmal jung und schön gewesen. Das mußte aber schon lange her sein!
Und jetzt hinaus zur Königin des Westens! Vier Stufen auf einmal nehmend in Eile und Neugierde (es war Abend geworden über dem Auspacken und dem Baden) rannte ich die steile Treppe hinab und – –
»Hopla – confound it!« sagte ich.
»Hopla – oh, the devil!« sagte er.
Gleichzeitig betrachteten wir verblüfft eine Blechkanne, die polternd die Treppe hinabrollte, in dem offenbaren Bestreben, auch die wenigen Tropfen Bier, die noch in ihr waren, im Rollen loszuwerden. Er saß unten auf einer Treppenstufe, ich oben. Zwischen uns breitete sich ein Miniatursee von Bier und Schaum. "Er" war ein eleganter junger Mensch mit einem prachtvoll energischen Gesicht.
»The devil!« sagte ich.
»Confound it!« sagte er.
»Entschuldigen Sie meine Ungeschicklichkeit,« bat ich.
»Aber es ist ja nicht der Rede wert,« versicherte er.
Endlich einigten wir uns dahin, zusammen frisches Bier zu holen an der Ecke und es zusammen auszutrinken – eine wahrhaft salomonische Lösung. "Er" gefiel mir vom ersten Augenblick an mit seiner frischen flotten Art und seinem kinderlustigen Lachen. Während wir oben auf seinem Zimmerchen saßen, ich auf dem einzigen wackeligen Stuhl, er auf einem wunderschönen schweren Lederkoffer, wurden wir, im Handumdrehen fast, vergnügt und offenherzig wie alte Freunde.
»Der Koffer ist famos, heh?« lachte er, als er meine bewundernden Blicke sah. »Er tut mir leid!«
»Weshalb denn?«
»Weil ich ihn über kurz oder lang einmal aufessen werde!«
Da war unter schallendem Gelächter das Eis gebrochen. Mitten im Erzählen waren wir in einer Viertelstunde. Mein neuer Freund hieß Frank Reddington. Reddington Junior eigentlich …
Wie er so dasaß, schlank, sehnig, Rasse in jeder Linie, die Hände um die Knie verschränkt, ein Lachen um die Mundwinkel, Lachen in den Augen, hätte sich jedes Mädel in ihn verliebt.
»Zug um Zug!« lächelte er. »Zuerst ich. Also die Sache ist so: Zuerst fing der Gouverneur (governor oder auch pater nannte er seinen Vater) melodisch an zu brummen. Nach dem Empfang gewisser Rechnungen – sie waren allerdings sündhaft, wie ich zu des Gouverneurs Entschuldigung bemerken muß – stimmte er einen gellenden indianischen Kriegsgesang an und telegraphierte mir so unerhört grobe Telegramme, daß ich mich vor den Telegraphenboten genierte. Sie rochen direkt nach Schwefel. Endlich, als das Professorenkollegium der Universität Harvard mich aus dem Tempel hinausjagte (diese gelehrten Herren haben so wenig Humor), wurde der Gouverneur tobsüchtig. Well, ich wurde also 'rausgeschmissen und fuhr prompt ins liebe Vaterhaus nach New York. Die mater war todunglücklich –
»Du sollst sofort nach der Bank kommen. Ach, Franky dear, was bist du für ein schlimmer Junge!«
Das fing gut an. Mir war elend zumute, das kann ich Ihnen sagen. In der Bank (der Gouverneur ist Präsident der First National Bank von New York) machte der Kassier ein Gesicht, als sei ich eine verabscheuungswürdige Kreuzspinne, und führte mich ins Privatkontor.
»Nimm Platz,« sagte der Gouverneur. »Nach meinen Informationen aus Harvard hast du dich betragen wie ein Hanswurst! Well, sir, was hast du zu deinen Gunsten anzuführen?«
Ich hm – hmte. Was soll man auch in solchen Fällen sagen!
»Nichts – nichts – gar nichts gearbeitet. Fußball gespielt. (Für den Betrag deiner Rechnungen der Sportfirma ernährt ein Arbeiter seine Familie!) Schulden gemacht links und rechts! Dumme Jungenstreiche! Was war das eigentlich mit dieser letzten Geschichte?«
Ja, diese letzte Geschichte!
Der Schlußkladderadatsch basierte auf einem Hundeschwanz, an den ein gewisser Franky dear eine geschickte Auswahl von Feuerwerkskörpern angebunden hatte. Nun frage ich Sie: Was konnte ich dafür, daß der dazugehörige Hund dem Professor der Physik gehörte und die wahnsinnige Idee hatte, zu seinem Herrn in die Physikklasse zu rennen – mitsamt Schwanz, Knallfröschen und Donnerschlägen! Dabei war das Hündchen nervös, begreiflicherweise, und rannte in dreieinhalb Sekunden für mehrere hundert Dollars physikalische Instrumente über den Haufen. Lange soll es nicht gedauert haben. Aber so lange es dauerte, war das Tempo dieser Vorstellung ungewöhnlich flott! Und dabei hatte ich doch rein erzieherische Absichten verfolgt, denn wenn Moppelinus sich heimtückisch in ein Studentenzimmer schleicht und einen nagelneuen Flanellanzug schändet, so muß Moppelinus bestraft werden! Well, der Gouverneur lachte nicht einmal. Ich sei der Schandfleck einer sonst ehrbaren Familie. Aus den einzelnen Posten von Faulheit, Leichtsinn und Frechheit ergebe sich als Gesamtbilanz ein hoffnungsloser Taugenichts. Ich solle mich gefälligst zum Teufel scheren, und zwar sofort, augenblicklich, ohne Zeitverlust. (Wahrscheinlich war irgend eine Lieblingsaktie des pater auf der Börse bös gezwickt geworden, denn er schien in einer Schandlaune.)
»Ich finde es entschieden langweilig, Vater eines Sohnes zu sein!« sagte er dann ganz gemütlich. »Dieses – dieses Zeug,« dabei deutete er auf einen Stapel Rechnungen, »werde ich regulieren. Im übrigen handelt es sich nicht um Geld, sondern um ein Prinzip. Du wirst arbeiten, sir. Mein Privatsekretär wird dir deine Instruktionen erteilen. Vorläufig wünsche ich dich nicht mehr zu sehen.«
Der Privatsekretär im Vorzimmer grinste und überreichte mir maschinengeschriebene Befehle. Sehr präzise. Sofort nach Chicago fahren und sich bei dem Präsidenten der Illinois Central Eisenbahn melden (in deren Aufsichtsrat der pater saß). Dort angestellt werden im Hauptbureau – mit acht Dollars Wochengehalt.
Da fuhr mir der Ärger in die Glieder: »Wissen Sie, was?« sagte ich. »Melden Sie dem Gouverneur, daß ich seinen Standpunkt für durchaus richtig hielte und zu arbeiten gedächte. Aber ohne seine verdammte Protektion! Mitteilungen über meinen Aufenthaltsort werde ich Ihnen von Zeit zu Zeit zugehen lassen, und Sie werden dem Gouverneur darüber berichten. Good morning, sir!«
Der Privatsekretär fiel beinahe in Ohnmacht.
Du dreifacher Narr! sagte ich mir, als ich auf der Straße stand. Aber nun hast du einmal A gesagt und mußt auch B sagen. Um eine lange Geschichte kurz zu machen – in sechs Tagen war ich in Frisco (die goldene Uhr und die Schmucksachen und die überflüssige Garderobe hatten ein nettes Sümmchen gebracht) und bezog die Universität von Kalifornien. Um jeden Preis fertig studieren, gerade weil der Gouverneur es anders wollte! Für das laufende Semester reichte das Geld. Well, und in den Ferien wurde ich Kellner – ein scheußliches Geschäft – und dann wohnte ich billig und schrieb Kolleghefte ab für Söhnchen, die überflüssiges Geld hatten, und gab Privatstunden im Boxen. Gearbeitet hab' ich wie ein Pferd, und Spaß hat es mir gemacht. Im nächsten Semester kommt das Schlußexamen, das ich zweifellos bestehen werde, und dann telegraphiere ich dem Gouverneur, er könne jetzt das Kalb schlachten lassen für den verlorenen Sohn. Jawohl – nach den ersten sechs Monaten hat mir Higgins, das ist der Privatsekretär, gedrahtet, ich sei ein Narr, und der Kassier sei angewiesen, meine Schecks zu honorieren. Ich hab' aber gedankt. Zuerst muß der Gouverneur den nötigen Respekt vor mir bekommen, damit wir eine gemütliche Verkehrsbasis haben!«
Da kam mir mein eigenes Erleben blaß und ärmlich vor –
Aber auch ich fing an zu erzählen, und Frank Reddington wollte sich ausschütten vor nimmerendendem Gelächter über die Familienähnlichkeit zwischen den Professoren seiner Harvard Universität und den Schulmeistern meiner Gymnasien. Sie ermangelten ja so gänzlich des Humors! Hüben wie drüben!! Als ich von Billy und den Tollheiten des Schienenstrangs berichtete, murmelte er ein über das andere Mal: »By Jove; das probier' ich auch noch!« – und über die Westliche Post riß er die Augen weit auf …
»The devil! Das haben Sie aber dumm angestellt, my dear boy! Dort bleiben hätten Sie sollen! Hinhängen hätten Sie sich müssen an die gesegnete Zeitung wie ein hungriger Floh an ein fettes Hündlein!!«
Bis spät in die Nacht hinein saßen wir zusammen. Und als wir uns nach einer letzten Zigarette trennten, sagte Frank:
»Sie und ich – ich und Sie … wir passen zusammen wie Zwillinge. Was für ein närrischer Geselle der Zufall doch ist! Schwarze Schafe und verlorene Söhne alle beide – aber noch immer sehr lebendig. Hei – oh! Sie kein Geld und ich kein Geld! Und gestern haben die Ferien angefangen! That's a good thing! Wissen Sie was? – Fahren wir Tandem! Spannen wir uns zusammen ins Joch! Jagen wir gemeinschaftlich den verrückten runden Dingerchen nach, die man in diesem gesegneten Land Dollars nennt – wollen Sie?«
Ob ich wollte!!!
Frühmorgens riß jemand meine Zimmertür auf und eine Stimme schrie. »Auf in den Kampf, Torero! 'raus mit Ihnen, Bruder – der Gott der Arbeit pfeift den verlorenen Söhnen!«
Schläfrig rieb ich mir die Augen.
»Man kleide sich prestissimo an!« befahl Frank. »Im Examiner von heute morgen steht ein lakonisches Inserat: »Men wanted – Männer werden gesucht. Broad Street 21.« Männer sind wir, nicht wahr? Well, dann, hurry up – fix schnell …«
Broad Street 21. erwies sich als elegantes Kontor (Johnson & Komp., Konserven, stand auf dem Firmenschild), vor dessen Türe in langen Reihen schäbige Gestalten standen. Frank grinste. »Gibt noch mehr Männer in San Franzisko, heh? Scheinen nicht die einzigen zu sein! Welch' ein Segen, daß wir elegant genug aussehen, um frech sein zu dürfen!« Wir schoben uns an den Wartenden vorbei und ließen uns beim Geschäftsführer melden.
»Und womit kann ich Ihnen dienen, gentlemen?« fragte der Manager.
»Was ist das für ein Inserat?« fragte Frank zurück.
»Oh – wir brauchen Leute für unsere Fabrik von Fischkonserven in der Bai.«
»Zu welchen Bedingungen?«
»Zwei Dollars im Tag und freie Verpflegung. Aber verzeihen Sie, ich begreife nicht recht –«
»Bodenlos einfach!« grinste Frank. »Wir brauchen Geld – Arbeit – und – wollen Sie uns nehmen?«
»Eh?« sagte der Manager und machte ein verblüfftes Gesicht.
»Annehmen – engagieren!«
»Die Arbeit ist aber schwer …«
»Well, das macht nichts!«
Und unter lustigem Lachen und zweifelhaften Witzen wurden wir prompt angenommen.
»Ich tu' Ihnen gelegentlich auch einmal einen Gefallen! Thank you!« bedankte sich Frank.
Der Geschäftsführer lachte und lachte, und wir liefen schleunigst nach Hause, um alles einzurichten. Aus dem Weg kauften wir uns billige Arbeitskleider. In einer Stunde sollten wir uns wieder im Kontor einfinden, um auf einem Kutter nach der Arbeitsstätte zu fahren.
Eine wundervolle Fahrt war es über die tiefblauen Wasser der Bai hin, zwischen den blühenden Städten, die wie ein Kranz von Blumen die Gestade umsäumten; an Kais mit gigantischen Ozeandampfern entlang zuerst, an Inselchen vorbei, zwischen Fischerflottillen hindurch. Und als die Königin des Westens in spinngewebigen, feinen Umrissen weit zurück im Westen lag, landeten wir mit den zwei Dutzend Menschen, die außer uns der Kutter trug, an der Landungsbrücke einer winzigen Felseninsel mit simplen Holzgebäuden. Das war das Inselchen der Fische. Und in einer halben Stunde standen Frank und ich nebeneinander hinter einem breiten Holztisch, lange, scharfe Messer in den Händen; zogen sonngedörrtem Kabeljau die Haut ab und schnitten das kernige, gelbweiße Fleisch in lange Streifen …
Auf der Insel regierte als Alleinherrscher Seine Majestät Cod, der Kabeljau. In Dutzenden von ungeheuren Bottichen auf einer Balkenplattform zwischen Fabrikgebäude und Wohnhaus waren in grobem Salz Millionen von Fischen eingespeichert, die allmorgendlich von uns Männern in langschäftigen Stiefeln aus der Tiefe der Bottiche herausbefördert und zum Dörren in die Sonne gebreitet wurden. Reif, sun-cured, sonnengetrocknet, waren sie in zwei, drei Tagen. Dann wanderten sie zu uns in die Fabrik, wurden abgehäutet, entgrätet, zerschnitten und in hübsche kleine Holzschachteln gepackt; das Rückenfleisch als extra prime quality, das Seitenfleisch als Ware zweiter Güte: Stockfisch! So standen wir und zerlegten und schnitten von sechs Uhr morgens bis sechs Uhr abends.
»Hab' ich es mir doch gleich gedacht, daß die Geschichte irgend einen Haken haben mußte,« sagte Frank ironisch lächelnd schon am ersten Tag. »Zwei Dollars im Tag werden nicht umsonst gezahlt. Und nun haben wir die Bescherung!«
Der Haken war da – die Bescherung ganz besonders unangenehm! Die Haut der cods und ihr Fleisch waren von scharfer Salzlauge so durchtränkt, daß bei dem Häuten und Zerlegen schon in den ersten Stunden uns Arbeitern die Hände wund wurden. Dann schnitt man sich natürlich in der Hetzarbeit, und auch die scharfen Gräten rissen Wunden. Selbst die peinlichste Vorsicht konnte das nicht vermeiden. In diese wunden Stellen drang ätzend und beißend die Salzlauge! Es war eine Art Martyrium; eine recht harmlose und ungefährliche Märtyrerschaft zwar, aber gerade schmerzhaft genug für meinen bescheidenen Geschmack.
»The dickens!« sagte Frank erstaunt am ersten Abend und rieb sich zärtlich die geschundenen Hände.
»Scheußlich!!« brummte ich und tat desgleichen.
Meine Hände waren schön rot wie ein gesottener Krebs und bluteten an zwanzig Stellen, besonders unter den Nägeln. Doch wir trösteten uns mit Vaseline und Philosophie und schwatzten stundenlang mit dem chinesischen Koch der Insel, der uns in seinem schauderhaften Pidgin-Englisch von der Chinesenstadt Frisco's vorschwärmte. Von den Spielhöllen, in denen die Kinder des himmlischen Reichs Tag und Nacht Fan-Fan spielten und sich gelegentlich dabei gegenseitig totstachen; von den "Sechs Gesellschaften", den geheimen Vereinen, die unumschränkt in der Chinesenschaft herrschten und die Einfuhr und Rückbeförderung von Chinesen als Monopol betrieben. So mächtig waren sie, daß keine Dampfergesellschaft einen Kuli als Zwischendeckspassagier zur Rückreise annahm, wenn er nicht einen Erlaubnisschein der "Sechs Gesellschaften" vorweisen konnte, als Zeichen, daß er seinen Verpflichtungen dem Geheimbund gegenüber nachgekommen war. Wie Diktatoren herrschten die sechs Gesellschaften; schossen Geld vor, belobten, bestraften, errichteten Schulen für die chinesische Jugend, Tempel für die Erwachsenen. Sam Ling machte immer ein ängstliches Gesicht, wenn er von diesem Geheimbund sprach …
Er war ein quecksilberiger kleiner Kerl, der famos kochte und die unglaublichsten Leistungen in seiner Bretterbude von Küche an der Felsenwand vollbrachte. Es ist mir heute noch ein Rätsel, wie er es fertig brachte, um sechs Uhr morgens für vierzig Mann (soviele waren wir) Pfannkuchen zum Frühstück zu liefern. Delikate, winzig kleine Pfannkuchen, kaum so groß wie eine Untertasse, die man bebutterte und bezuckerte, immer einen auf den andern klappend. Ein Dutzend mindestens aß ein jeder. Ein Dutzend mal vierzig – das waren fünfhundert Pfannkuchen, die der arme Sam Ling herzauberte – vor sechs Uhr morgens. Wie er es auch machte – sie waren da; frisch, heiß, knusprig. Die Verpflegung war vorzüglich und die Schlafräume hell und sauber. Wenn nur das Salz nicht gewesen wäre – das verdammte Salz!
Frank und ich waren fast immer zusammen und kümmerten uns wenig um die anderen Männer. Abends verbanden wir uns immer gegenseitig die wunden Hände. Dabei gewöhnten wir uns das sonderbare Vergnügen an, recht kräftig zuzupacken und einer dem andern ins Gesicht zu starren, ob sich nicht vielleicht doch ein Schmerzenszug entdecken ließ.
»Good God,« sagte Frank regelmäßig jeden Abend, wenn er seine Hände betrachtete. »Stockfisch! Cod! Unschuldiger Stockfisch! Man sollte es doch nicht glauben, daß solch' ein unschuldiger Stockfisch einen so schinden kann! Wenn der Gouverneur mich jetzt sehen würde, wäre er vielleicht zufrieden! Heh?«
Dann gingen wir zur Felsenspitze und starrten wortlos ins Meer hinaus, in das saphirblitzende Gewoge mit den braunen und braunroten Fischersegeln und den unförmigen Dampfern dazwischen. Wenn dann weit im Westen der Sonnenball niederging und es sich wie Rubinengefunkel in das Blau mischte, lachten wir uns nickend zu. Da drüben lag San Franzisko. Der schwache rote Schimmer am Horizont dort war ein Widerschein seiner nächtlichen Lichterpracht. Wie wollten wir herumstöbern in dem Lichtschein dort, wenn einmal die Zeit erfüllet war und – wie wollten wir unsere Hände pflegen!
Tag um Tag verging, und endlich war ein Monat vorbei. Eines Morgens fragte der Vorarbeiter im Arbeitssaal laut:
»Wer will aufhören und nach San Franzisko zurück? Morgen kommt der Kutter.«
Merkwürdigerweise (mir wenigstens kam es merkwürdig vor) meldete sich niemand. Frank und ich sahen uns an – sahen uns wieder an – genierten uns gegenseitig, bis ich endlich den Anfang machte und rief:
»Ich!«
»Ich auch!« schrie Frank dazwischen und lächelte: »Und warum denn nicht! Wir sind ja hier (sämtlichen Göttern Homers sei dafür gedankt!) nicht angewachsen, noch mit den dreimal vermaledeiten cods verheiratet. Mann, ich bin froh! Hände – freut euch!«
Ein Sommermorgen war es, an dem wir das Felseninselchen zum letztenmal sahen und einander feierlich versprachen, wir würden, wie es auch kommen und wie es uns noch ergehen möge in diesem lustigen Leben, eines niemals, aber auch niemals tun: Stockfisch essen!
Während der Fahrt rechneten wir uns aus, daß wir beide zusammen wohl siebentausend Stockfische, zehn Pfund schwer das Stück ungefähr, abgehäutet, entgrätet und präpariert hatten. Mit unseren armen Händen! Zehn Stück in der Stunde etwa, und zehn Arbeitsstunden waren es im Tag, und zweiunddreißig Tage lang hatten wir gearbeitet. Siebentausend Stück!
»Weinen könnte man!« sagte Frank Reddington. »Weinen! Man kann ja nie wieder einem Kabeljau ins Gesicht schauen! Wer je im Leben mir gegenüber das Wort "cod" erwähnt, den boxe ich über den Haufen. So!!«
Und als wir uns umgekleidet und (vor allem) Handschuhe angezogen hatten, präsentierten wir uns im Kontor mit unseren Zahlungsanweisungen.
»Wie hat's Ihnen gefallen,« fragte der Manager und grinste.
»Famos,« meinte Frank sauersüß.
»Das freut mich sehr. Zeigen Sie mir doch einmal Ihre Hände!« Dabei betrachtete der Geschäftsführer augenzwinkernd unsere Handschuhe.
»Mann,« sagte Frank ernst, »spotten Sie nicht meines ehrwürdigen Alters.« (Das ganze Kontor lachte.) »Sonst gebe ich Ihnen meinen Fluch und erscheine Ihnen nach meinem Tode dreimal jede Nacht als Stockfisch!!« (Das ganze Kontor brüllte.)
Wir aber strichen ein jeder vierundsechzig Dollars ein und lachten auch.