de-en  Von_Verschuer: Die Hessen_Kap4
Chapter 4: The Soldiers.

The soldiers, who the German princes rented out to England to suppress the American revolution, were mustered in different ways.

In Hessen-Cassel the country had been divided into districts, of which each had to supply a certain number of recruits for a certain regiment.

In the meantime, the officers had been ordered to bring into the army as many strangers as possible in order to conserve their own districts, whose inhabitants would always be on hand if needed in an emergency.

It was in the army regulations that those regimental commanders or captains would best suggest themselves if they sought to install foreign recruits.

Forced recruitment was forbidden, but this regulation probably would only apply to the natives of the country.

In any case, it does not appear to have reduced the activity of recruiting officers, and in the smaller states such a law probably did not exist at all.

In Anspach nobody was allowed to leave the country or get married without permission. It must be mentioned here that in this instance country did not mean Germany but the territories of the markgrave, and that the foreigners the landgrave wanted to have recruited were the subjects of smaller neighboring princes.

Recruiting officers were active all over Germany. Dissolute characters, drunkards, vagabonds, and people who performed forbidden or secret political activities were forcibly recruited if they were not over 60 years of age, were healthy and well-off.

With the gift of a big, robust man, a prince recommended himself to the other in the most agreeable manner; in each regiment were many deserters from other states.

The honest German swain served among this mixed company.

It must also be mentioned that the regiments which were sent to America were in better shape than the regiments at the time. - Johann Gottfried Seume, who later gained some importance as a writer, was victim to the advertising system and left a description of his experiences.

Seume was a student of theology in Leipzig, but after religious doubts arose, which he knew would upset his friends, he set out on foot for Paris, with a saber at his side, a few shirts and volumes of the classics in a travel bag and about 9 thalers.

However, his journey would take a different direction.

"The third night I spent in Vach," he writes, "and here, in spite of all the protest, the Landgrave of Kassel, the great human trafficker of the time, through his recruiters, took care of my future nightly quarters in Ziegenhain-Kassel and from there into the new world.

I was taken to the Ziegenhain fortress as a semi-prisoner, where the miserable companions from all the regions, already many in number, were located, in order to go to America the next spring after Faucitt's inspection.

I resigned myself to my fate and tried to make the most of it, now matter how bad it was.

We were stationed in Ziegenhain for a long time until the required number of recruits of people taken from the farms and from soldiers already recruited and the recruiting towns were mustered. ...

The history of this period is well enough known: no one at that time was safe from the henchmen of the seller of souls; cajolery, subterfuge, fraud, violence, everything applied.

You didn't ask for the means for that damn purpose. All kinds of strangers were stopped, conscripted, sent away.

My academic enrollment papers, the only means of proof of my identity, were torn up.

In the end, I stopped being angry. You have to live wherever you are. Where so many survive, you will as well. Sailing across the ocean was inviting enough for a young fellow and there was also something to get to see on the other side.

So I thought. During our stay in Ziegenhain, the old General Gore needed me for writing and treated me with much kindness.

Here then was a true quodlibet of human souls stacked together, good and bad, and others who by turns were both.

My companions included a runaway poet from Jena, a bankrupt merchant from Vienna, a loop maker from Hanover, a deposed postal clerk from Gotha, a monk from Würzburg, a chief official from Meiningen, a Prussian hussar sergeant, a captured Hessian major from the fortress and others of similar ilk.

One can imagine that there could not be anything lacking in conversation, and a mere draft of the life of the masters had to be an entertaining, instructive reading.

Since most of them had suffered a fate similar to, or worse than mine, a huge conspiracy to free us all soon unfolded. Seume was asked to be the ringleader of the conspirators, but on the advice of an old sergeant , turned down this honourable position.

They wanted to set out at a signal at midnight, charge and disarm the guard, stabbing any who resisted , break open the arsenal, spike the cannons, lock the government house, and march out the gate 1,500 men strong.

In three hours we would have been across the border." However, the conspiracy was betrayed, the ringleaders were arrested, including Seume. He was soon released again, however, as no one was able to testify anything against him and especially because there would have been too many who would have to be punished.

"The trial began", he said, " two were sentenced to the gallows, where I would have been without fail, had the old Prussian sergeant not saved me.

The others had to run the gauntlet plenty of times, from thirty-six down to twelve times.

It was a hideous massacre. Although after the mortal fear, those destined for the gallows were subject to "gallows mercy"; they had to run the gauntlet thirty-six times and, at the Prince's mercy, went to Cassel in irons.

For an indefinite time, and for mercy in irons were synonymous expressions and meant "forever without release". Leastwise, the Prince's mercy was an instance which no one wanted to experience.

More than thirty were brutally punished in this manner, and many, including me, simply came through unscathed, because too many accomplices would have had to be punished.

Some got away at the decampment for reasons which can be easily guessed: since a guy who goes to Cassel in irons is not being paid by the Englishmen." With troops such as these desertions were naturally something commonplace.

Military service was feared, and in smaller states, a successful escape would have taken a successful deserter across the border after a few miles.

The people sympathized with him and would have helped him if there had not been severe punishment for this.

However, this was not necessary. When in Württemberg the alarm was sounded, the whole community had to move out immediately and occupy the streets, footpaths and bridges for 24 hours until the fugitive was caught.

If he got away, then the municipality had to provide a substitute who was about as tall as the deserter, and the sons of the elders of the community were taken first and foremost. ...

This command had to be read from the pulpit once a month. The one who assisted a deserter lost his civil rights, was sentenced to forced labor, and whipped in jail.

The laws in Hesse-Cassel seem to have been a little less cruel.

Farmers who arrested a deserter were given a ducat; but if it happened that a deserter passed by a village without being arrested, the village had to pay for him.

Every soldier who distanced himself more than a mile from his garrison had to be provided with a passport, and anyone who saw him at a greater distance from home was to ask him for it.

A characteristic case happened in 1738. A Prussian recruiting officer and the wife of a Prussian soldier tempted an Anspach soldier to desert in order to join the Prussian army.

They got caught by the Anspach authority. The woman was hanged; the officer had to watch the execution and then he was imprisoned in the fortress.

The deserter appears to have escaped with his life because he was a valuable sales object.

When the recruit was enrolled, the officer or sergeant had to take him to the military base.

This, of course, gave the opportunity for escape; from a book printed in Berlin in 1805, Kapp gives the precautionary measures which were to be applied against this danger.

The sergeant, who accompagnies the recruit, has to wear sword and pistols. He must march the recruit in front of him, but never let him approach too close to him and announce that any suspicious move can cost him his life.

He has to avoid big cities, as well as places, where the recruit has served before. It is also desirable, to avoid the place, where the recruit is born.

They have to spend their night in an inn , whose owner is sympathetic to recruiting officers.

The recruit and the officer must both undress and the host must take them to safety. ... Taverns where recruits are quartered must have special rooms for the purpose, preferably one flight of stairs and barred windows.

There must be a light burning all night long, and the corporal must hand over his weapons to the innkeeper so that the recruit cannot take them and use them during the night.

In the morning he gets them back, inspects the load and the powder on the pan, gets dressed and is ready to leave before the recruit gets his clothes.

The recruit is the first to enter a house or parlour, the last to leave it. During the meals he sits with his back against the wall. If he appears suspiciously of wanting to flee, his suspenders and buttons have to be cut off so that he has to hold his trousers with his hand.

A good dog trained for this job will be very appropriate for the non-commissioned officer.

If a corporal is unfortunately forced to kill or wound a recruit, he must provide a certificate from the local authority.

But no document can excuse the escape of a recruiter, an incident that is completely impossible and not worth mentioning in Prussia.

The people who were brought together for service in America were of very different value from a military point of view.

They were all received by an English commission in the seaports and mustered before embarkation, usually by Colonel Faucitt, who had signed the contracts.

While some of the regiments were found to be excellent, it turned out that others were partly made up of old people and boys who could not cope with the exertions.

Some of the soldiers were rejected as a result, especially in the last years of the war, when it became more difficult to get good people in many cities.

According to the source materials it is difficult to assess which chances to rise in the ranks a common soldier had. ...

Seume writes that he had a chance for promotion but that was ruined by the ending of the war because in peacetime anyone who was not titled could not advance past sergeant.

Kapp claims that most of the officers belonged to the lower nobility.

The ranking of Hessian officers of 1779 does not show this. It turns out that at that time more than half of the officers did not belong to nobility.

Finally, we come to the characterization of the officers.

Their education was generally limited to a certain amount of writing skills and a little barbaric French.

They understood neither the reason for the Americans' struggle nor, above all, the language in which the various statesmen asserted their claims.

Yet even if they had comprehended much more than they did, they would still have favored royal prerogatives instead of the people's rights.

I do not remember a case where only an officer involved in this war would have used an expression that would have been consistent with the 18th century spiritual liberty movement.

Once we heard them talk about the despotism of Congress.

This absurd idea had probably been instilled in them by the English and had been taken up by the anti-American press in Germany.

It is hard to doubt that many of the officers and soldiers enjoyed their work in America to escape the monotony of garrison service.

It still remains to be mentioned that many of the soldiers, mostly those who were taken prisoner, became citizens of the Republic that they were supposed to help subdue.
unit 1
Kapitel 4: Die Soldaten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 8
In Anspach durfte Niemand ohne Erlaubnis das Land verlassen oder heiraten.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 10
Werbeoffiziere waren über ganz Deutschland hin thätig.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 13
Zusammen mit dieser gemischten Gesellschaft diente der ehrliche deutsche Bauernbursche.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 17
Seine Reise sollte indessen eine andere Richtung nehmen.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months ago
unit 20
Ich ergab mich in mein Schicksal und suchte das Beste daraus zu machen, so schlecht es auch war.
1 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 23
Man fragte nicht nach den Mitteln zu dem verdammlichen Zwecke.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 24
Fremde aller Art wurden angehalten, eingesteckt, fortgeschickt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 25
Mir zerriss man meine akademische Inskription, als das einzige Instrument meiner Legitimierung.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 27
So dachte ich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 38
Es war eine grässliche Schlächterei.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 45
Dies war indess nicht nötig.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 48
Dieser Befehl musste jeden Monat einmal von der Kanzel verlesen werden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 50
Die Gesetze in Hessen-Cassel scheinen etwas weniger grausam gewesen zu sein.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 53
Ein charakteristischer Fall ereignete sich 1738.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 55
Sie wurden durch die Anspacher Behörde aufgefangen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 57
Der Deserteur scheint mit dem Leben davongekommen zu sein, da er ein wertvolles Verkaufsobject war.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 60
Der Unteroffizier, der den Rekruten begleitet, muss Säbel und Pistolen tragen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 62
Grosse Städte muss er vermeiden, ebenso Orte, wo der Rekrut vorher gedient hat.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 63
Es ist auch wünschenswert, den Ort zu vermeiden, wo der Rekrut geboren ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 64
Sie müssen die Nacht in einem Wirtshaus zubringen, dessen Besitzer Werbeoffizieren gut gesinnt ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 65
Der Rekrut und Offizier müssen sich beide auskleiden, und ihre Kleider sind vom Wirt aufzuheben.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 69
Der Rekrut betritt ein Haus oder eine Stube zuerst; er verlässt es zuletzt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 70
Bei den Mahlzeiten sitzt er mit dem Rücken an der Wand.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 81
Kapp behauptet, die Offiziere gehörten meistens dem niederen Adel an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 82
Die Rangliste der hessischen Offiziere von 1779 weist dies nicht aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 83
Es zeigt sich, dass zu dieser Zeit mehr als die Hälfte der Offiziere nicht adelig war.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 84
Wir kommen zum Schluss zur Charakterisierung der Offiziere.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 89
Jahrhunderts gezeigt hätte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 90
Einmal finden wir sie von dem Despotismus des Kongresses sprechend.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 80  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 76  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 62  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 59  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 55  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 53  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 50  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 49  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 45  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 37  10 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 33  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 34  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 26  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 28  10 months, 1 week ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 29  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 57  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 73  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 67  10 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 49  10 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 60  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 47  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 43  10 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 48  10 months, 1 week ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 17  10 months, 1 week ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 14  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 13  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 10  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 6  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 4  10 months, 1 week ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 14  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 8  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 1  10 months, 1 week ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 3  10 months, 1 week ago

Kapitel 4: Die Soldaten.

Die Soldaten, welche die deutschen Fürsten an England vermieteten zur Unterdrückung der amerikanischen Revolution wurden auf verschiedene Weise zusammengebracht.

In Hessen-Cassel war das Land in Distrikte eingeteilt gewesen, von welchen jeder eine bestimmte Anzahl Rekruten für ein bestimmtes Regiment zu stellen hatte.

Die Offiziere waren indessen angehalten worden, soviel Fremde wie möglich der Armee zuzuführen, um die eigenen Distrikte zu schonen, deren Einwohner immer bei der Hand sein würden, wenn man ihrer im Notfall bedürfte.

Es stand in den Armee-Vorschriften, dass diejenigen Regiments-Kommandeure oder Hauptleute sich am besten empfehlen würden, wenn sie versuchten, fremde Rekruten einzureihen.

Die zwangsweise Rekruten-Aushebung war verboten, doch diese Bestimmung sollte wahrscheinlich nur auf die Eingeborenen Anwendung finden.

Jedenfalls scheint es nicht die Thätigkeit der Werbeoffiziere vermindert zu haben, und in den kleineren Staaten hat wahrscheinlich ein solches Gesetz überhaupt nicht existiert.

In Anspach durfte Niemand ohne Erlaubnis das Land verlassen oder heiraten. Es muss dabei erwähnt werden, dass in diesem Fall mit Land nicht Deutschland, sondern die Territorien des Markgrafen gemeint waren, und dass die Fremden, die der Landgraf angeworben haben wollte, die Unterthanen der benachbarten kleinen Fürsten waren.

Werbeoffiziere waren über ganz Deutschland hin thätig. Lüderliche Kerle, Trunkenbolde, Vagabunden und Leute, die politische Umtriebe machten, wurden, wenn sie nicht über 60 Jahre alt, gesund und gut gewachsen waren, zwangsweise eingestellt.

Mit dem Geschenk eines grossen, robusten Mannes empfahl sich ein Fürst dem andern in der angenehmsten Weise; in jedem Regiment waren viele Deserteure von anderen Staaten.

Zusammen mit dieser gemischten Gesellschaft diente der ehrliche deutsche Bauernbursche.

Es muss noch erwähnt werden, dass die Regimenter, die nach Amerika geschickt wurden, aus einem bessern Material bestanden, wie die Regimenter zu gewöhnlicher Zeit. —

Johann Gottfried Seume, welcher später einige Bedeutung als Schriftsteller erlangte, war ein Opfer des Werbesystems und hat eine Beschreibung seiner Erlebnisse hinterlassen.

Seume war Student der Theologie in Leipzig, doch nachdem ihm religiöse Zweifel gekommen waren, welche seine Freunde — wie er wusste — verletzen würden, machte er sich zu Fuss auf den Weg nach Paris, mit einem Säbel an der Seite, mit einigen Hemden und Bänden der Klassiker in der Reisetasche und ungefähr 9 Thalern.

Seine Reise sollte indessen eine andere Richtung nehmen.

»Den dritten Abend übernachtete ich in Vach,« schreibt er, »und hier übernahm trotz allen Protest der Landgraf von Kassel, der damalige grosse Menschenmakler, durch seine Werber die Besorgung meiner ferneren Nachtquartiere nach Ziegenhain-Kassel und weiter nach der neuen Welt.

Man brachte mich als Halbarrestanten nach der Festung Ziegenhain, wo der Jammergefährten aus allen Gegenden schon viele lagen, um mit dem nächsten Frühjahr nach Faucitts Besichtigung nach Amerika zu gehen.

Ich ergab mich in mein Schicksal und suchte das Beste daraus zu machen, so schlecht es auch war.

Wir lagen lange in Ziegenhain, ehe die gehörige Anzahl der Rekruten vom Pfluge und dem Heerwege und aus den Werbestädten zusammengebracht wurde.

Die Geschichte dieser Periode ist bekannt genug: niemand war damals vor den Handlangern des Seelenverkäufers sicher; Überredung, List, Betrug, Gewalt, alles galt.

Man fragte nicht nach den Mitteln zu dem verdammlichen Zwecke. Fremde aller Art wurden angehalten, eingesteckt, fortgeschickt.

Mir zerriss man meine akademische Inskription, als das einzige Instrument meiner Legitimierung.

Am Ende ärgerte ich mich weiter nicht; leben muss man überall: wo so viele durchkommen, wirst du es auch: über den Ozean zu schwimmen war für einen jungen Kerl einladend genug und zu sehen gab es jenseits auch etwas.

So dachte ich. Während unseres Aufenthalts in Ziegenhain brauchte mich der alte General Gore zum Schreiben und behandelte mich mit vieler Freundlichkeit.

Hier war denn ein wahres Quodlibet von Menschenseelen zusammengeschichtet, gute und schlechte, und andere, die abwechselnd beides waren.

Meine Kameraden waren noch ein verlaufener Musensohn aus Jena, ein bankerotter Kaufmann aus Wien, ein Posamentierer aus Hannover, ein abgesetzter Postschreiber aus Gotha, ein Mönch aus Würzburg, ein Oberamtmann aus Meiningen, ein preussischer Husarenwachtmeister, ein kassierter hessischer Major von der Festung und andere von ähnlichem Stempel.

Man kann denken, dass es an Unterhaltung nicht fehlen konnte; und eine blosse Skizze von dem Leben der Herren müsste eine unterhaltende, lehrreiche Lektüre sein.

Da es den meisten gegangen war wie mir, oder noch schlimmer, entspann sich bald ein grosses Komplott zu unser aller Befreiung.«

Es wurde Seume angeboten, Rädelsführer der Verschwörer zu sein, doch auf den Rat eines alten Feldwebels hin schlug er dies ehrenvolle Amt aus.

»Man wollte um Mitternacht auf ein Zeichen ausziehen, der Wache stürmend die Gewehre wegnehmen, was sich widersetzte niederstechen, das Zeughaus erbrechen, die Kanonen vernageln, das Gouvernementshaus verriegeln und 1500 Mann stark zum Thore hinaus marschieren.

In drei Stunden wären wir über der Grenze gewesen.«

Jedoch das Komplott wurde verraten, die Rädelsführer wurden verhaftet, unter ihnen Seume. Er wurde aber bald wieder freigelassen, da niemand etwas gegen ihn aussagen konnte und besonders weil es zu viele geworden wären, die hätten bestraft werden müssen.

»Der Prozess begann,« sagt er, »zwei wurden zum Galgen verurteilt, worunter ich unfehlbar gewesen sein würde, hätte mich nicht der alte preussische Feldwebel gerettet.

Die Übrigen mussten in grosser Anzahl Gassen laufen, von sechsunddreissig Malen herab bis zu zwölfen.

Es war eine grässliche Schlächterei. Die Galgenkandidaten erhielten zwar nach der Todesangst unter dem Galgen Gnade, mussten aber sechsunddreissig Mal Gassen laufen und kamen auf Gnade des Fürsten nach Cassel in die Eisen.

Auf unbestimmte Zeit und auf Gnade in die Eisen waren damals gleichbedeutende Ausdrücke und hiessen so viel als »ewig ohne Erlösung.« Wenigstens war die Gnade des Fürsten ein Fall, von dem niemand etwas wissen wollte.

Mehr als dreissig wurden auf diese Weise grausam gezüchtigt, und Viele, unter denen auch ich war, kamen bloss deswegen durch, weil eine zu grosse Menge von Mitwissern hätte bestraft werden müssen.

Einige kamen beim Abmarsch wieder los, aus Gründen, die sich leicht erraten lassen: denn ein Kerl, der in Cassel in den Eisen geht, wird von den Engländern nicht bezahlt.«

Bei Truppen, wie diese es waren, waren Desertionen natürlicherweise etwas gewöhnliches.

Der Militärdienst war gefürchtet, und in kleineren Staaten hätte eine gelungene Flucht den Deserteur nach wenigen Meilen über die Grenze gebracht.

Das Volk sympathisierte mit ihm und würde ihm geholfen haben, wenn hierauf nicht schwere Bestrafung gestanden hätte.

Dies war indess nicht nötig. Wenn in Württemberg Allarm geschlagen wurde, musste sofort die ganze Gemeinde ausrücken und 24 Stunden lang die Strassen, Fusspfade und Brücken besetzen, bis der Flüchtling gefangen war.

Wenn er entschlüpfte, so musste der Ort einen Ersatzmann stellen, der ebenso gross war wie der Deserteur, und die Söhne der ersten Männer des Ortes wurden in erster Linie genommen.

Dieser Befehl musste jeden Monat einmal von der Kanzel verlesen werden. Wer einem Deserteur behülflich war, verlor die Bürgerrechte, wurde zu Zwangsarbeit verurteilt und im Gefängnis gepeitscht.

Die Gesetze in Hessen-Cassel scheinen etwas weniger grausam gewesen zu sein.

Bauern, die einen Deserteur festnahmen, bekamen einen Dukaten; aber wenn ein Deserteur ein Dorf passierte, ohne festgenommen zu werden, so musste das Dorf für ihn bezahlen.

Jeder Soldat, der sich über eine Meile von seiner Garnison entfernte, musste mit einem Pass versehen sein, und alle Personen, welche ihm auf eine grössere Entfernung von zu Hause begegneten, sollten ihn danach fragen.

Ein charakteristischer Fall ereignete sich 1738. Ein preussischer Werbeoffizier und die Frau eines preussischen Soldaten verleiteten einen Anspacher Soldaten zu desertieren um sich in die preussische Armee einreihen zu lassen.

Sie wurden durch die Anspacher Behörde aufgefangen. Die Frau wurde gehängt; der Offizier musste bei der Exekution zugegen sein und wurde dann in die Festung eingesperrt.

Der Deserteur scheint mit dem Leben davongekommen zu sein, da er ein wertvolles Verkaufsobject war.

Wenn der Rekrut in die Liste eingeschrieben war, musste der Offizier oder Unteroffizier ihn in die Garnison bringen.

Dies gab natürlich Gelegenheit zum Entfliehen; Kapp führt aus einem Buch, das 1805 in Berlin gedruckt ist, die Vorsichtsmassregeln an, welche gegen diese Gefahr anzuwenden waren.

Der Unteroffizier, der den Rekruten begleitet, muss Säbel und Pistolen tragen. Er muss den Rekruten vor sich her marschieren, ihn aber niemals zu nahe an sich herankommen lassen und ihm ankündigen, dass jeder verdächtige Schritt ihm das Leben kosten kann.

Grosse Städte muss er vermeiden, ebenso Orte, wo der Rekrut vorher gedient hat. Es ist auch wünschenswert, den Ort zu vermeiden, wo der Rekrut geboren ist.

Sie müssen die Nacht in einem Wirtshaus zubringen, dessen Besitzer Werbeoffizieren gut gesinnt ist.

Der Rekrut und Offizier müssen sich beide auskleiden, und ihre Kleider sind vom Wirt aufzuheben. Wirtshäuser, wo Rekruten einquartiert werden, müssen besondere Räume dafür haben, möglichst eine Treppe hoch und mit vergitterten Fenstern.

Die ganze Nacht muss ein Licht brennen, und der Unteroffizier muss seine Waffen dem Wirt abgeben, damit sie der Rekrut nicht wegnehmen und gegen ihn gebrauchen kann in der Nacht.

Des Morgens bekommt er sie zurück, sieht nach der Ladung und dem Pulver auf der Pfanne, zieht sich an und ist reisefertig, bevor der Rekrut seine Kleider bekommt.

Der Rekrut betritt ein Haus oder eine Stube zuerst; er verlässt es zuletzt. Bei den Mahlzeiten sitzt er mit dem Rücken an der Wand. Erscheint er verdächtig, fliehen zu wollen, so müssen ihm die Hosenträger und -knöpfe abgeschnitten werden, so dass er die Hosen mit der Hand halten muss.

Ein guter Hund, der für dies Geschäft dressiert ist, wird für den Unteroffizier sehr zweckmässig sein.

Wenn ein Unteroffizier unglücklicherweise gezwungen ist, einen Rekruten zu töten oder zu verwunden, so muss er eine Bescheinigung von der Ortsbehörde beibringen.

Aber kein Dokument kann die Flucht eines Rekruten entschuldigen, ein Vorfall, der in Preussen als ganz unmöglich gar nicht der Erwähnung wert gehalten wird.

Die Leute, die zusammengebracht waren für den Dienst in Amerika, waren vom militärischen Standpunkt aus von sehr verschiedenem Wert.

Sie wurden alle von einer englischen Kommission in den Seehäfen in Empfang genommen und vor der Einschiffung gemustert, gewöhnlich durch Oberst Faucitt, welcher die Verträge abgeschlossen hatte.

Während einige der Regimenter als vorzüglich befunden wurden, zeigte es sich, dass andere zum Teil aus alten Leuten und aus Knaben bestanden, die den Strapazen nicht gewachsen waren.

Einige von den Soldaten wurden infolge dessen verworfen, besonders in den letzten Jahren des Krieges, als es in vielen Städten schwieriger wurde, gute Leute zu bekommen.

Es ist nach dem Quellenmaterial schwer zu beurteilen, welche Chancen ein gemeiner Soldat hatte zu avancieren.

Seume schreibt, dass er Aussicht auf Avancement hatte, die aber durch die Beendigung des Krieges zerstört wurde, da in Friedenszeiten einer, der nicht adelig war, es nicht weiter als bis zum Feldwebel bringen konnte.

Kapp behauptet, die Offiziere gehörten meistens dem niederen Adel an.

Die Rangliste der hessischen Offiziere von 1779 weist dies nicht aus. Es zeigt sich, dass zu dieser Zeit mehr als die Hälfte der Offiziere nicht adelig war.

Wir kommen zum Schluss zur Charakterisierung der Offiziere.

Ihre Bildung beschränkte sich im Allgemeinen auf ein gewisses Mass von Fertigkeit im Schreiben und auf ein wenig barbarisches Französisch.

Sie verstanden weder die Ursache, aus welcher die Amerikaner kämpften, noch vor allen Dingen die Sprache, in welcher die verschiedenen Staatsmänner ihre Ansprüche geltend machten.

Doch, wenn sie viel mehr verstanden hätten, als es der Fall war, sie wären auf der Seite königlicher Vorrechte den Rechten des Volkes gegenüber gewesen.

Ich weiss mich keines Falles zu erinnern, in dem nur ein an diesem Krieg beteiligter Offizier einen Ausdruck gebraucht hätte, der eine Übereinstimmung mit der geistigen freiheitlichen Bewegung des 18. Jahrhunderts gezeigt hätte.

Einmal finden wir sie von dem Despotismus des Kongresses sprechend.

Diese absurde Idee war ihnen wahrscheinlich durch die Engländer eingeflösst worden und war von der anti-amerikanischen Presse in Deutschland aufgenommen worden.

Es lässt sich schwerlich bezweifeln, dass viele der Offiziere sowohl als Soldaten mit Vergnügen ihrer Thätigkeit in Amerika entgegensahen, schon um die Eintönigkeit des Garnisondienstes zu unterbrechen.

Es bleibt noch zu erwähnen, dass viele der Soldaten, meist solche, die in Gefangenschaft geraten waren, Bürger der Republik wurden, welche sie helfen sollten zu unterdrücken.