de-en  Stefan Zweig. Die Entdeckung Eldorados.
http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/sternstunden-der-menschheit-6863/8

Stefan Zweig: Great moments of humanity - Chapter 8.

The discovery of El Dorado

J. A. Suter, California. January 1848.

The tired European. ...

1834. An American steamship is on the way from Le Hâvre to New York. Central among the desperadoes, one of hundreds, Johann August Suter, living at Rynenberg near Basel, 31 years of age and highly energetic, having an ocean between himself and the Law Enforcement Authorities of Europe, bankrupt, thief [and] fraudster, he simply abandoned his wife and three children. In Paris, he made some money under a false identity and is presently searching for a new life.

On the 7th of July he lands in New York and manages all kinds of possible and impossible deals there for two years, becoming a packer, druggist, dentist, pharmacist and tavern owner. Finally, having become resonably established, he acquired a tavern, sold it again and, following the allure of the time, moved to Missouri. ...

There he became a Landowner, in a short time he acquired a small property and he could live in peace. But people always hastened past his house, fur-traders, hunters, adventurers and soldiers came from the West, they traveled to the West and this word, the West, gradually took on a magical sound. At first, as you know, come the plains - plains with enormous herds of buffalo and for days and for weeks devoid of people, merely hunted through by Redskins. Then come the mountains, mighty and unconquered. And then finally that land California, of which nobody knows much and whose fabulous riches are renown and which is still to be explored.

A land of milk and honey, freely available to anyone who wants it - only vast, endlessly vast and dangerous to reach.

But Johann August Suter was thirsting for adventure, sitting still and working his rich farmland held no appeal to him. ... One day in 1837, he sold his belongings, equipped an expedition with wagons and horses and buffalo herds, and traveled from Fort Independence into the unknown. ...

The march to California.

1838. Two officers, five missionaries and three women departed in oxen wagons into the vast emptiness. Across plains and more plains, finally over the mountains, towards the Pacific Ocean. They travel for three months to arrive in Fort Van Couver at the end of October. Both officers had previously deserted Suter, the missionaries baulked at continuing the journey, [and] the three women had died from hardship during the journey.

Suter is on his own, in vain they try to keep him in Van Couver, he is offered a job - he rejects everything, the lure of the magical West is in his blood. On a wretched sailing ship he crossed the Pacific, at first to the Sandwich Islands, and after endless difficulties on the coasts of Alaska, landed at a forlorn place by the name of San Francisco.

San Francisco – not the city of today that shot up with redoubled growth to millions after the earthquake – no, only a wretched fishing village , so named after the Franciscan mission, not even the capital of that obscure Mexican province of California, which lies dormant, lies fallow without cattle and blossoms in the lushest area of the new continent.

Spanish disorganization, increased by the absence of any authority, revolts, lack of working animals and people, lack of a "can-do" energy. Suter rented a horse, riding it down to the fertile Sacramento Valley: one day was enough to show him that here was not only a place for a farm, for a large estate, but room for a kingdom. The next day he rode to Monterey, to the pathetic capital, introduced himself to Governor Alvarado and told him of his intention of cultivating the land.

He had brought along members of the Kanak people from the islands, wanting to have these diligent and hardworking colored people from there join him on a regular basis, and undertook to build settlements and to establish a small empire, a colony, New Helvetia. “Why New Helvetia?” asks the Governor. “I am Swiss and a Republican,” answers Suter.

"Well, do whatever you want, I grant you the use of the land for ten years.“

You see: Deals are closed there quickly. A thousand miles from any civilization, a single person's energy has a different price than at home.

New Helvetia.

1839. A caravan slowly carts up along the banks of the Sacramento. Suter on horseback upfront, his rifle buckled on, behind him two or three Europeans, next 150 Kanakens in shirt-sleeves, then 30 buffalo wagons with food, seeds and ammunition, 50 horses, 65 mules, cows and sheep, then a small rearguard – this was the entire army that intended to conquer New Helvetia for itself.

In front of them rolls a gigantic conflagration. They set the woods on fire a much easier method than uprooting them. And just as the enormous fire, still on the smoking tree trunks, raced across the countryside, they began their work. Magazines were built and wells were dug. The soil, not requiring any ploughing, was sown. Pens were made for the endless herds. Growth gradually flowed from the nearby villages and the abandoned mission colonies.

The result is staggering. The crops immediately produce five hundred percent. The barns were bursting full, the herds soon numbered in the thousands, and despite the continual troubles in the countryside, the expeditions against the natives who repeatedly tried to burglarize the flourishing colony, New Helvetia developed in a tropical manner to a gigantic size.

Canals, mills and factories were created. Ships traveled upstream and downstream on the rivers. Suter supplied not only Vancouver and the Sandwich Islands but also all the ships that tied up in California. He planted fruit, today the such famous and much admired fruit of California. Look! it thrives, and therefore he has vines imported from France and the Rhine valley, and after a few years they cover wide areas.

For himself he builds houses and rich farms, has a Pleyel piano sent in one hundred and eighty days from Paris and a steam engine with sixty buffaloes from New York over the whole continent. He had loans and deposits with the biggest banks in England and France, and now, forty-five years old, at the height of his triumph, he remembered having left behind a wife and three children somewhere in the world fourteen years before.

He writes and invites them into his principality. For he now feels as if he is the king of the mountain, he is the Master of New Helvetia, one of the world's richest men, and he will remain so. At long last the United States wrest the desolate colony from Mexico. Now everything is safe and secure. Another few years, and Suter will be the richest man of the world.

The fateful hole in the ground. ...

1848, in January. Suddenly, James W. Marshall, his carpenter, excitedly rushed into Johann August Suter's house, he definitely had to talk to him. Suter was astonished, for just yesterday he had sent Marshall up to his farm in Coloma to lay the groundwork for a new sawmill there.

And now the man had returned without asking permission, trembling with excitement in front of him. He pushed Suter into his room, closed the door and pulled out of his pocket a handful of sand that had a couple yellow kernels in it. Yesterday whilst he was digging, he noticed this strange metal, he believed it was gold, but the others just laughed at him. Suter became grave, took the nuggets and conducted an acid test: it was gold. He decided to ride up immediately the next day with Marshall to the farm, but the master carpenter was one of the first to be stricken by the awful fever that would soon shake the world. Still in the night, in the middle of a storm, he rode back, eager for certainty.

The next morning Colonel Suter was in Coloma. They dammed up the canal and tested the sand. One only needs to take a strainer to shake back and forth a little , and the gold kernels will rest shining on the black mesh.

Suter called together a couple of white people around himself and took their word of honor to keep quiet until the sawmill was completed. He then rode earnestly and determinedly back to his farm again. Tremendous thoughts stirred him: as far as one could recall, gold had never been so easy to grasp, so open on the ground, and this ground was his, was Suter's property. A decade seemed to have disappeared overnight: He is the richest man in the world.

The rush.

The richest man? No - the poorest, the most miserable, the most disappointed beggar on this Earth. After eight days the secret is out, a woman - always a woman! - had told some passer-by and given him a couple of gold nuggets. And what happened next - is without precedent. All of Suter's men immediately leave their jobs: the locksmiths run from the smithy, the shepherds from the herds, the wine growers from the vines, the soldiers leave their guns; everyone is obsessed and races with hastily acquired sieves and pans to the sawmill, to shake the gold out of the sand.

Overnight the whole land is abandoned, the milking cows, that no-one milks, bellow and die a miserable death, the herds of buffalo break down their fences and stamp into the fields where the harvest is rotting on its stalks, the dairies are not working, the barns collapse, the enormous machinery of a gigantic enterprise comes to a standstill. Telegraphs spread the golden promise across countries and oceans.

And people are already coming up from the cities, from the ports sailors are leaving their ships, government officials are leaving their posts, in long, endless columns they are coming from the east, from the west, on foot, on horseback and by carriage, the rush, the human locust swarm, the gold diggers. An unrestrained, brutal horde, knowing no law other than their fists, no commandment other than their revolver, spills over the thriving colony.

They recognize no authority, no one dares to oppose these desperadoes. They slaughter Suter's cows, they tear down his barn to build houses, they trample his fields, they steal his machines - overnight Johann August Suter has become as destitute as King Midas, choking on his own gold.

And more and more powerful, this unprecedented rush for gold had become; the news had permeated the world, from New York alone a hundred ships had sailed off, in 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851 huge hordes of adventurers from Germany, from England, from France, from Spain had relocated. Some sailed around Cape Horn, but this took too long for the most restless, so they chose the most dangerous trail via the Isthmus of Panama. ...

A company decided on the spur of the moment to swiftly build a railsway across the isthmus, thereby causing thousands of workers to perish from fever just for the sake of reducing the journey for impatient people by three or four weeks and allowing them to get to the gold sooner. Huge caravans, people of all races and languages move across the continent, and everyone digs on the property of Johann August Suter as if it were their own land. ... On San Francisco's ground, which belongs to him through the sealed act of government, a city grows at a fantastic speed, strangers sell each other's land, and the name of New Helvetia, its realm, disappears behind the magical word: Eldorado, California.

Johann August Suter, again bankrupt, stares as if paralyzed at this gigantic dragon's seed. At first he tries to dig in and even to take advantage of his wealth with his servants and companions, but they all leave him. So he retires completely from the gold district to a secluded farm near the mountains, away from the cursed river and the unholy sand, to his farm hermitage.

There his wife finally reaches him with their three grown-up children, but as soon as she arrives, she dies as a result of exhaustion from the journey. But his three sons are now there, eight arms in all, and with them Johann August Suter begins farming; once again, now with his three sons, he works his way up, quiet, tough, and takes advantage of the fantastic fertility of this soil. Once again, he conceals and hides a grand plan. ...

The process.

1850. California has been admitted to the Union of the United States. Under its strict discipline, after the wealth order finally comes to the gold-obsessed land. The anarchy is subdued, the law regains its right.

And now Johann August Suter suddenly appears with his claims. He claims that all of the land on which the city of San Francisco is built belongs to him rightly so. The state is obliged to make good the damage he suffered through the theft of his property; he claims his share of all the gold extracted from his ground. A litigation begins on a scale such as humanity never knew before.

Johann August Suter sued 221 farmers who had settled on his estate and demanded them to clear off of the stolen ground, he demanded $25 million from the State of California for taking the roads, canals, bridges, and dams and mills that he had built, he demanded $25 million from the Union to pay for the destroyed property and additionally for his share of the gold that was mined. He had his elder son, Emil, study the rights in Washington in order to prosecute the lawsuit and used the enormous revenues from his new farms solely to fund this costly litigation. For four years, he has pushed it through all official channels.

On March 15, 1855, the judgement was finally pronounced. The incorruptible Judge Thompson, the highest public official in California, recognized the rights of Johann August Suter to the land as completely valid and inviolable.
On this day Johann August Suter is at his goal. He is the richest man in the world.

The end.

The richest man in the world? No, once again, no, the poorest beggar, the unhappiest, most defeated man. Fate again administered one of those terrible blows against him, but now one that took him down forever. At the news of the verdict, a storm broke out in San Francisco and across the country. Tens of thousands band together, all of the threatened proprietors, the mob in the streets, the riffraff that has always plundered, they storm the Palace of Justice and burn it down, they look for the judge in order to lynch him, and they set out, a tremendous crowd, to plunder the entire property of Johann August Suter.

His eldest son shoots himself, oppressed by the bandits, the second is murdered, the third fled and drowns on his homecoming. A wave of fire travels over New Helvetia, Suter's farms are burned down, his vines trampled, his furniture, his collections, his money stolen and with relentless rage his immense property is made into a desert. Suter saves himself by a narrow margin.
Johann August Suter never recovered from this setback. His work is destroyed, his wife, his children are dead, his mind is confused: only an idea still flickers incoherently in his dulled brain: the right, the litigation.

Twenty-five years later, an old, insane, badly dressed man is still wandering about the Palace of Justice in Washington. In all the offices there people know the "general" in a dirty overcoat and tattered shoes who is demanding his billions. And time and again there are lawyers, adventurers and scoundrels, who extract the last of his pension from him and recently thrust him into litigation. He himself doesn't want money, he hates the gold that has made him poor, which has killed three children and destroyed his life.

He only wants his right and defends it with the querulant bitterness of the monomaniac. He complains to the Senate, he complains to the congress, he entrusts himself to all sorts of assistants, who then pompously bridle the affair, putting him a ridiculous general's uniform and dragging the unfortunate like a bum from office to office, from deputy to deputy. This lasts for twenty years, from 1860 to 1880, twenty miserable beggar years.

Day in and day out he hangs around the congressional palace, the ridicule of all officials, the game of all the street urchins, he, to whom belongs the richest land on earth and on whose land stands the second capital of the giant empire and is growing hour by hour. But one keeps the uncomfortable waiting. And there, on the stairs of the Congress Palace, he will finally meet him on the 17th. In the afternoon of July 1880, the redemptive heartbeat - one carries away a dead beggar. A dead beggar, but one with a written polemic in his pocket, which protects his claim and that of his heirs to the biggest property in world history according to all earthly rights.

No one has so far claimed Suter's legacy, no descendant has asserted his claim. San Francisco, all of the country, is still standing on private property. Justice has still not spoken here, and only one artist, Blaise Cendrars, has given the forgotten Johann August Suter at least the only right of great destiny, the right of amazing memory for future generations.
unit 1
http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/sternstunden-der-menschheit-6863/8.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 2
Stefan Zweig: Sternstunden der Menschheit - Kapitel 8.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 3
Die Entdeckung Eldorados.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 4
J.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 5
A. Suter, Kalifornien.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 6
Januar 1848.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 7
Der Europamüde.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 8
1834.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 9
Ein Amerikadampfer steuert von Le Hâvre nach Neuyork.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 11
Am 7.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 14
Dort wird er Landmann, schafft sich in kurzer Zeit ein kleines Eigentum und könnte ruhig leben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 20
Der Marsch nach Kalifornien.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 21
1838.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 22
Zwei Offiziere, fünf Missionare, drei Frauen ziehen aus in Büffelwagen ins unendliche Leere.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 23
Durch Steppen und Steppen, schließlich über die Berge, dem Pazifischen Ozean entgegen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 24
Drei Monate lang reisen sie, um Ende Oktober in Fort Van Couver anzukommen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
»Warum Neu-Helvetien?« fragt der Gouverneur.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 34
»Ich bin Schweizer und Republikaner«, antwortet Suter.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 35
»Gut, tun Sie, was Sie wollen, ich gebe Ihnen eine Konzession auf zehn Jahre.«.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 36
Man sieht: Geschäfte werden dort rasch abgeschlossen.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 38
Neu-Helvetien.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 39
1839.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 40
Eine Karawane karrt langsam längs der Ufer des Sakramento hinauf.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 42
Vor ihnen rollt eine gigantische Feuerwoge.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 43
Sie zünden die Wälder an, bequemere Methode, als sie auszuroden.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 46
Der Erfolg ist gigantisch.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 47
Die Saaten tragen sofort fünfhundert Prozent.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 1 week ago
unit 50
Sieh da!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 54
Er schreibt ihnen und ladet sie zu sich, in sein Fürstentum.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 56
Endlich reißen auch die Vereinigten Staaten die verwahrloste Kolonie aus Mexikos Händen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 57
Nun ist alles gesichert und geborgen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 58
Ein paar Jahre noch, und Suter ist der reichste Mann der Welt.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 59
Der verhängnisvolle Spatenstich.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 60
1848, im Januar.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 65
Suter wird ernst, nimmt die Körner, macht die Scheideprobe: es ist Gold.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 67
Am nächsten Morgen ist Colonel Suter in Coloma, sie dämmen den Kanal ab und untersuchen den Sand.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 71
Ein Jahrzehnt scheint übersprungen in einer Nacht: Er ist der reichste Mann der Welt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 72
Der Rush.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 73
Der reichste Mann?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 74
Nein – der ärmste, der jämmerlichste, der enttäuschteste Bettler dieser Erde.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 75
Nach acht Tagen ist das Geheimnis verraten, eine Frau – immer eine Frau!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 76
– hat es irgendeinem Vorübergehenden erzählt und ihm ein paar Goldkörner gegeben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 77
Und was nun geschieht, ist ohne Beispiel.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 80
Telegraphen sprühen die goldene Verheißung über Länder und Meere.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 83
Alles ist für sie herrenlos, niemand wagt diesen Desperados entgegenzutreten.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 90
Johann August Suter, noch einmal bankerott, starrt wie gelähmt auf diese gigantische Drachensaat.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 95
Noch einmal birgt und verbirgt er einen großen Plan.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 96
Der Prozeß.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 97
1850.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 98
Kalifornien ist in die Union der Vereinigten Staaten aufgenommen worden.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 99
Unter ihrer strengen Zucht kommt nach dem Reichtum endlich Ordnung in das goldbesessene Land.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 100
Die Anarchie ist gebändigt, das Gesetz gewinnt wieder sein Recht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 101
Und nun tritt Johann August Suter plötzlich vor mit seinen Ansprüchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 102
unit 104
Ein Prozeß beginnt, in Dimensionen, wie sie die Menschheit vor ihm nie gekannt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 107
Vier Jahre lang treibt er ihn durch alle Instanzen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 108
Am 15.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 109
März 1855 wird endlich das Urteil gefällt.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 111
An diesem Tage ist Johann August Suter am Ziel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 112
Er ist der reichste Mann der Welt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 113
Das Ende.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 114
Der reichste Mann der Welt?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 115
Nein, abermals nein, der ärmste Bettler, der unglücklichste, geschlagenste Mann.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 117
Auf die Nachricht von dem Urteil bricht ein Sturm in San Franzisko und im ganzen Lande los.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 121
Suter selbst rettet sich mit knapper Not.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 122
Von diesem Schlage hat sich Johann August Suter nie mehr erholt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 128
Er will nur sein Recht und verficht es mit der querulantischen Erbitterung des Monomanen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 130
Das geht zwanzig Jahre lang, von 1860 bis 1880, zwanzig erbärmliche Bettlerjahre.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 132
Aber man läßt den Unbequemen warten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 133
Und dort, auf der Treppe des Kongreßpalastes, trifft ihn endlich am 17.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 134
Juli 1880 am Nachmittag der erlösende Herzschlag – man trägt einen toten Bettler weg.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 136
Niemand hat Suters Erbe bislang angefordert, kein Nachfahr hat seinen Anspruch angemeldet.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 137
Noch immer steht San Franzisko, steht ein ganzes Land auf fremdem Boden.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 10 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 22  10 months, 1 week ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 129  10 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 125  10 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 130  10 months, 2 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 57  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 102  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 84  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 74  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 62  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 63  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 65  10 months, 2 weeks ago
3Bn37Arty • 2765  commented on  unit 27  10 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 98  10 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 96  10 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 83  10 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 2  10 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 19  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 66  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 64  10 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 55  10 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 56  10 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 58  10 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 55  10 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 53  10 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 46  10 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  explained a translation in  unit 56  10 months, 3 weeks ago
"?"
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 31  10 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 15  10 months, 3 weeks ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 10  10 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 9  10 months, 3 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 96  10 months, 4 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 39  10 months, 4 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 50  10 months, 4 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 72  10 months, 4 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 21  10 months, 4 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 97  10 months, 4 weeks ago
Maughanster • 80  translated  unit 4  10 months, 4 weeks ago

http://gutenberg.spiegel.de/buch/sternstunden-der-menschheit-6863/8.

Stefan Zweig: Sternstunden der Menschheit - Kapitel 8.

Die Entdeckung Eldorados.

J. A. Suter, Kalifornien. Januar 1848.

Der Europamüde.

1834. Ein Amerikadampfer steuert von Le Hâvre nach Neuyork. Mitten unter den Desperados, einer unter Hunderten, Johann August Suter, heimisch zu Rynenberg bei Basel, 31 Jahre alt und höchst eilig, das Weltmeer zwischen sich und den europäischen Gerichten zu haben, Bankerotteur, Dieb, Wechselfälscher, hat er seine Frau und drei Kinder einfach im Stich gelassen, in Paris sich mit einem betrügerischen Ausweis etwas Geld verschafft und ist nun auf der Suche nach neuer Existenz.

Am 7. Juli landet er in Neuyork und treibt dort zwei Jahre lang alle möglichen und unmöglichen Geschäfte, wird Packer, Drogist, Zahnarzt, Arzneiverkäufer, Tavernenhälter. Schließlich, einigermaßen gesettlet, siedelt er sich in einem Wirtshaus an, verkauft es wieder und zieht, dem magischen Zug der Zeit folgend, nach Missouri.

Dort wird er Landmann, schafft sich in kurzer Zeit ein kleines Eigentum und könnte ruhig leben. Aber immer hasten Menschen an seinem Hause vorbei, Pelzhändler, Jäger, Abenteurer und Soldaten, sie kommen vom Westen, sie ziehen nach Westen, und dieses Wort Westen bekommt allmählich einen magischen Klang. Zuerst, so weiß man, sind Steppen, Steppen mit ungeheuren Büffelherden, tageweit, wochenweit menschenleer, nur durchjagt von den Rothäuten, dann kommen Gebirge, hoch, unerstiegen, dann endlich jenes andere Land, von dem niemand Genaues weiß und dessen sagenhafter Reichtum gerühmt wird, Kalifornien, das noch unerforschte.

Ein Land, wo Milch und Honig fließt, frei jedem, der es nehmen will – nur weit, unendlich weit und lebensgefährlich zu erreichen.

Aber Johann August Suter hat Abenteurerblut, ihn lockt es nicht, stillzusitzen und seinen guten Grund zu bebauen. Eines Tages, im Jahre 1837, verkauft er sein Hab und Gut, rüstet eine Expedition mit Wagen und Pferden und Büffelherden aus und zieht vom Fort Independence ins Unbekannte.

Der Marsch nach Kalifornien.

1838. Zwei Offiziere, fünf Missionare, drei Frauen ziehen aus in Büffelwagen ins unendliche Leere. Durch Steppen und Steppen, schließlich über die Berge, dem Pazifischen Ozean entgegen. Drei Monate lang reisen sie, um Ende Oktober in Fort Van Couver anzukommen. Die beiden Offiziere haben Suter schon vorher verlassen, die Missionare gehen nicht weiter, die drei Frauen sind unterwegs an den Entbehrungen gestorben.

Suter ist allein, vergebens sucht man ihn zurückzuhalten in Van Couver, bietet ihm eine Stellung an – er lehnt alles ab, die Lockung des magischen Namens sitzt ihm im Blut. Mit einem erbärmlichen Segler durchkreuzt er den Pazifik zuerst zu den Sandwichinseln und landet, nach unendlichen Schwierigkeiten an den Küsten von Alaska vorbei, an einem verlassenen Platz, namens San Franzisko.

San Franzisko – nicht die Stadt von heute, nach dem Erdbeben mit verdoppeltem Wachstum zu Millionenzahlen emporgeschossen – nein, nur ein elendes Fischerdorf, so nach der Mission der Franziskaner genannt, nicht einmal Hauptstadt jener unbekannten mexikanischen Provinz Kalifornien, die verwahrlost, ohne Zucht und Blüte, in der üppigsten Zone des neuen Kontinents brachliegt.

Spanische Unordnung, gesteigert durch Abwesenheit jeder Autorität, Revolten, Mangel an Arbeitstieren und Menschen, Mangel an zupackender Energie. Suter mietet ein Pferd, treibt es hinab in das fruchtbare Tal des Sakramento: ein Tag genügt, um ihm zu zeigen, daß hier nicht nur Platz ist für eine Farm, für ein großes Gut, sondern Raum für ein Königreich. Am nächsten Tag reitet er nach Monte Rey, in die klägliche Hauptstadt, stellt sich dem Gouverneur Alverado vor, erklärt ihm seine Absicht, das Land urbar zu machen.

Er hat Kanaken mitgebracht von den Inseln, will regelmäßig diese fleißigen und arbeitsamen Farbigen von dort sich nachkommen lassen und macht sich anheischig, Ansiedlungen zu bauen und ein kleines Reich, eine Kolonie, Neu-Helvetien, zu gründen. »Warum Neu-Helvetien?« fragt der Gouverneur. »Ich bin Schweizer und Republikaner«, antwortet Suter.

»Gut, tun Sie, was Sie wollen, ich gebe Ihnen eine Konzession auf zehn Jahre.«.

Man sieht: Geschäfte werden dort rasch abgeschlossen. Tausend Meilen von jeder Zivilisation hat Energie eines einzelnen Menschen einen anderen Preis als zu Hause.

Neu-Helvetien.

1839. Eine Karawane karrt langsam längs der Ufer des Sakramento hinauf. Voran Suter zu Pferd, das Gewehr umgeschnallt, hinter ihm zwei, drei Europäer, dann hundertfünfzig Kanaken in kurzem Hemd, dann dreißig Büffelwagen mit Lebensmitteln, Samen und Munition, fünfzig Pferde, fünfundsiebzig Maulesel, Kühe und Schafe, dann eine kurze Nachhut – das ist die ganze Armee, die sich Neu-Helvetien erobern will.

Vor ihnen rollt eine gigantische Feuerwoge. Sie zünden die Wälder an, bequemere Methode, als sie auszuroden. Und kaum, daß die riesige Lohe über das Land gerannt ist, noch auf den rauchenden Baumstrünken, beginnen sie ihre Arbeit. Magazine werden gebaut, Brunnen gegraben, der Boden, der keiner Pflügung bedarf, besät, Hürden geschaffen für die unendlichen Herden; allmählich strömt von den Nachbarorten Zuwachs aus den verlassenen Missionskolonien.

Der Erfolg ist gigantisch. Die Saaten tragen sofort fünfhundert Prozent. Die Scheuern bersten, bald zählen die Herden nach Tausenden, und ungeachtet der fortwährenden Schwierigkeiten im Lande, der Expeditionen gegen die Eingeborenen, die immer wieder Einbrüche in die aufblühende Kolonie wagen, entfaltet sich Neu-Helvetien zu tropisch gigantischer Größe.

Kanäle, Mühlen, Faktoreien werden geschaffen, auf den Flüssen fahren Schiffe stromauf und stromab, Suter versorgt nicht nur Van Couver und die Sandwichinseln, sondern auch alle Segler, die in Kalifornien anlegen, er pflanzt Obst, das heute so berühmte und vielbewunderte Obst Kaliforniens. Sieh da! es gedeiht, und so läßt er Weinreben kommen aus Frankreich und vom Rhein, und nach wenigen Jahren bedecken sie weite Gelände.

Sich selbst baut er Häuser und üppige Farmen, läßt ein Klavier von Pleyel hundertachtzig Tagereisen weit aus Paris kommen und eine Dampfmaschine mit sechzig Büffeln von Neuyork her über den ganzen Kontinent. Er hat Kredite und Guthaben bei den größten Bankhäusern Englands und Frankreichs, und nun, fünfundvierzig Jahre alt, auf der Höhe seines Triumphes, erinnert er sich, vor vierzehn Jahren eine Frau und drei Kinder irgendwo in der Welt gelassen zu haben.

Er schreibt ihnen und ladet sie zu sich, in sein Fürstentum. Denn jetzt fühlt er die Fülle in den Fäusten, er ist Herr von Neu-Helvetien, einer der reichsten Männer der Welt, und wird es bleiben. Endlich reißen auch die Vereinigten Staaten die verwahrloste Kolonie aus Mexikos Händen. Nun ist alles gesichert und geborgen. Ein paar Jahre noch, und Suter ist der reichste Mann der Welt.

Der verhängnisvolle Spatenstich.

1848, im Januar. Plötzlich kommt James W. Marshall, sein Schreiner, aufgeregt zu Johann August Suter ins Haus gestürzt, er müsse ihn unbedingt sprechen. Suter ist erstaunt, hat er doch noch gestern Marshall hinauf geschickt in seine Farm nach Coloma, dort ein neues Sägewerk anzulegen.

Und nun ist der Mann ohne Erlaubnis zurückgekehrt, steht zitternd vor Aufregung vor ihm, drängt ihn in sein Zimmer, schließt die Tür ab und zieht aus der Tasche eine Handvoll Sand mit ein paar gelben Körnern darin. Gestern beim Graben sei ihm dieses sonderbare Metall aufgefallen, er glaube, es sei Gold, aber die anderen hätten ihn ausgelacht. Suter wird ernst, nimmt die Körner, macht die Scheideprobe: es ist Gold. Er entschließt sich, sofort am nächsten Tage mit Marshall zur Farm hinaufzureiten, aber der Zimmermeister ist als erster von dem furchtbaren Fieber ergriffen, das bald die Welt durchschütteln wird: noch in der Nacht, mitten im Sturm reitet er zurück, ungeduldig nach Gewißheit.

Am nächsten Morgen ist Colonel Suter in Coloma, sie dämmen den Kanal ab und untersuchen den Sand. Man braucht nur ein Sieb zu nehmen, ein wenig hin und her zu schütteln, und die Goldkörner bleiben blank auf dem schwarzen Geflecht.

Suter versammelt die paar weißen Leute um sich, nimmt ihnen das Ehrenwort ab, zu schweigen, bis das Sägewerk vollendet sei, dann reitet er ernst und entschlossen wieder zu seiner Farm zurück. Ungeheure Gedanken bewegen ihn: soweit man sich entsinnen kann, hat niemals das Gold so leicht faßbar, so offen in der Erde gelegen, und diese Erde ist sein, ist Suters Eigentum. Ein Jahrzehnt scheint übersprungen in einer Nacht: Er ist der reichste Mann der Welt.

Der Rush.

Der reichste Mann? Nein – der ärmste, der jämmerlichste, der enttäuschteste Bettler dieser Erde. Nach acht Tagen ist das Geheimnis verraten, eine Frau – immer eine Frau! – hat es irgendeinem Vorübergehenden erzählt und ihm ein paar Goldkörner gegeben. Und was nun geschieht, ist ohne Beispiel. Sofort lassen alle Männer Suters ihre Arbeit, die Schlosser laufen von der Schmiede, die Schäfer von den Herden, die Weinbauern von den Reben, die Soldaten lassen ihre Gewehre, alles ist wie besessen und rennt mit rasch geholten Sieben und Kasserollen hin zum Sägewerk, Gold aus dem Sand zu schütteln.

Über Nacht ist das ganze Land verlassen, die Milchkühe, die niemand melkt, brüllen und verrecken, die Büffelherden zerreißen ihre Hürden, stampfen hinein in die Felder, wo die Frucht am Halme verfault, die Käsereien arbeiten nicht, die Scheunen stürzen ein, das ungeheure Räderwerk des gigantischen Betriebes steht still. Telegraphen sprühen die goldene Verheißung über Länder und Meere.

Und schon kommen die Leute herauf von den Städten, von den Häfen, Matrosen verlassen ihre Schiffe, die Regierungsbeamten ihren Posten, in langen, unendlichen Kolonnen zieht es von Osten, von Westen, zu Fuß, zu Pferd und zu Wagen heran, der Rush, der menschliche Heuschreckenschwarm, die Goldgräber. Eine zügellose, brutale Horde, die kein Gesetz kennt als das der Faust, kein Gebot als das ihres Revolvers, ergießt sich über die blühende Kolonie.

Alles ist für sie herrenlos, niemand wagt diesen Desperados entgegenzutreten. Sie schlachten Suters Kühe, sie reißen seine Scheuern ein, um sich Häuser zu bauen, sie zerstampfen seine Äcker, sie stehlen seine Maschinen – über Nacht ist Johann August Suter bettelarm geworden, wie König Midas, erstickt im eigenen Gold.

Und immer gewaltiger wird dieser beispiellose Sturm nach Gold; die Nachricht ist in die Welt gedrungen, von Neuyork allein gehen hundert Schiffe ab, aus Deutschland, aus England, aus Frankreich, aus Spanien kommen 1848, 1849, 1850, 1851 ungeheure Abenteurerhorden herübergezogen. Einige fahren um das Kap Hoorn, das ist aber den Ungeduldigsten zu lang, so wählen sie den gefährlicheren Weg über den Isthmus von Panama.

Eine rasch entschlossene Kompanie baut flink am Isthmus eine Eisenbahn, bei der Tausende Arbeiter im Fieber zugrunde gehen, nur damit für die Ungeduldigen drei bis vier Wochen erspart würden und sie früher zum Gold gelangen. Quer über den Kontinent ziehen riesige Karawanen, Menschen aller Rassen und Sprachen, und alle wühlen sie in Johann August Suters Eigentum wie auf eigenem Grunde. Auf der Erde von San Franzisko, die ihm durch besiegelten Akt der Regierung zugehört, wächst in traumhafter Geschwindigkeit eine Stadt, fremde Menschen verkaufen sich gegenseitig seinen Grund und Boden, und der Name Neu-Helvetien, sein Reich, verschwindet hinter dem magischen Wort: Eldorado, Kalifornien.

Johann August Suter, noch einmal bankerott, starrt wie gelähmt auf diese gigantische Drachensaat. Zuerst versucht er mitzugraben und selbst mit seinen Dienern und Gefährten den Reichtum auszunützen, aber alle verlassen ihn. So zieht er sich ganz aus dem Golddistrikt zurück, in eine abgesonderte Farm, nahe dem Gebirge, weg von dem verfluchten Fluß und dem unheiligen Sand, in seine Farm Eremitage.

Dort erreicht ihn endlich seine Frau mit den drei herangewachsenen Kindern, aber kaum angelangt, stirbt sie infolge der Erschöpfung der Reise. Doch drei Söhne sind jetzt da, acht Arme, und mit ihnen beginnt Johann August Suter die Landwirtschaft; noch einmal, nun mit seinen drei Söhnen, arbeitet er sich empor, still, zäh, und nützt die phantastische Fruchtbarkeit dieser Erde. Noch einmal birgt und verbirgt er einen großen Plan.

Der Prozeß.

1850. Kalifornien ist in die Union der Vereinigten Staaten aufgenommen worden. Unter ihrer strengen Zucht kommt nach dem Reichtum endlich Ordnung in das goldbesessene Land. Die Anarchie ist gebändigt, das Gesetz gewinnt wieder sein Recht.

Und nun tritt Johann August Suter plötzlich vor mit seinen Ansprüchen. Der ganze Boden, so heischt er, auf dem die Stadt San Franzisko gebaut ist, gehört ihm nach Fug und Recht. Der Staat ist verpflichtet, den Schaden, den er durch Diebstahl seines Eigentums erlitten, gutzumachen, an allem aus seiner Erde geförderten Gold beansprucht er sein Teil. Ein Prozeß beginnt, in Dimensionen, wie sie die Menschheit vor ihm nie gekannt.

Johann August Suter verklagt 221 Farmer, die sich in seinen Pflanzungen angesiedelt haben, und fordert sie auf, den gestohlenen Grund zu räumen, er verlangt 25 Millionen Dollar vom Staate Kalifornien dafür, daß er sich die von ihm gebauten Wege, Kanäle, Brücken, Stauwerke, Mühlen einfach angeeignet habe, er verlangt von der Union 25 Millionen Dollar als Schadenersatz für zerstörtes Gut und außerdem noch seinen Anteil am geförderten Gold. Er hat seinen älteren Sohn, Emil, in Washington die Rechte studieren lassen, um den Prozeß zu führen, und verwendet die ungeheuren Einnahmen aus seinen neuen Farmen einzig dazu, diesen kostspieligen Prozeß zu nähren. Vier Jahre lang treibt er ihn durch alle Instanzen.

Am 15. März 1855 wird endlich das Urteil gefällt. Der unbestechliche Richter Thompson, der höchste Beamte Kaliforniens, erkennt die Rechte Johann August Suters auf den Boden als vollkommen berechtigt und unantastbar an.
An diesem Tage ist Johann August Suter am Ziel. Er ist der reichste Mann der Welt.

Das Ende.

Der reichste Mann der Welt? Nein, abermals nein, der ärmste Bettler, der unglücklichste, geschlagenste Mann. Wieder führt das Schicksal wider ihn einen jener mörderischen Streiche, nun aber einen, der ihn für immer zu Boden streckt. Auf die Nachricht von dem Urteil bricht ein Sturm in San Franzisko und im ganzen Lande los. Zehntausende rotten sich zusammen, alle die bedrohten Eigentümer, der Mob der Straße, das immer plünderungsfrohe Gesindel, sie stürmen den Justizpalast und brennen ihn nieder, sie suchen den Richter, um ihn zu lynchen, und sie machen sich auf, eine ungeheure Schar, um den ganzen Besitz Johann August Suters zu plündern.

Sein ältester Sohn erschießt sich, von den Banditen bedrängt, der zweite wird ermordet, der dritte flieht und ertrinkt auf der Heimkehr. Eine Feuerwoge fährt über Neu-Helvetien hin, Suters Farmen werden niedergebrannt, seine Weinstöcke zertreten, sein Mobiliar, seine Sammlungen, sein Geld geraubt und mit erbarmungsloser Wut der ungeheure Besitz zur Wüstenei gemacht. Suter selbst rettet sich mit knapper Not.
Von diesem Schlage hat sich Johann August Suter nie mehr erholt. Sein Werk ist vernichtet, seine Frau, seine Kinder sind tot, sein Geist verwirrt: nur eine Idee flackert noch wirr in dem dumpf gewordenen Gehirn: das Recht, der Prozeß.

Fünfundzwanzig Jahre irrt dann noch ein alter, geistesschwacher, schlechtgekleideter Mann in Washington um den Justizpalast. In allen Büros kennt man dort den »General« im schmutzigen Überrock und mit den zerfetzten Schuhen, der seine Milliarden fordert. Und immer wieder finden sich Advokaten, Abenteurer und Filous, die ihm das Letzte seiner Pension entlocken und ihn neuerdings zum Prozesse treiben. Er selbst will kein Geld, er haßt das Gold, das ihn arm gemacht, das ihm drei Kinder ermordet, das sein Leben zerstört.

Er will nur sein Recht und verficht es mit der querulantischen Erbitterung des Monomanen. Er reklamiert beim Senat, er reklamiert beim Kongreß, er vertraut sich allerlei Helfern an, die, mit Pomp dann die Affäre aufzäumend, ihm eine lächerliche Generalsuniform anziehen und den Unglücklichen als Popanz von Amt zu Amt, von Abgeordneten zu Abgeordneten schleppen. Das geht zwanzig Jahre lang, von 1860 bis 1880, zwanzig erbärmliche Bettlerjahre.

Tag um Tag umlungert er den Kongreßpalast, Spott aller Beamten, Spiel aller Gassenjungen, er, dem das reichste Land der Erde gehört und auf dessen Grund und Boden die zweite Hauptstadt des Riesenreiches steht und stündlich wächst. Aber man läßt den Unbequemen warten. Und dort, auf der Treppe des Kongreßpalastes, trifft ihn endlich am 17. Juli 1880 am Nachmittag der erlösende Herzschlag – man trägt einen toten Bettler weg. Einen toten Bettler, aber einen mit einer Streitschrift in der Tasche, die ihm und seinen Erben nach allen irdischen Rechten den Anspruch auf das größte Vermögen der Weltgeschichte sichert.

Niemand hat Suters Erbe bislang angefordert, kein Nachfahr hat seinen Anspruch angemeldet. Noch immer steht San Franzisko, steht ein ganzes Land auf fremdem Boden. Noch immer ist hier nicht Recht gesprochen, und nur ein Künstler, Blaise Cendrars, hat dem vergessenen Johann August Suter wenigstens das einzige Recht großen Schicksals gegeben, das Recht auf staunendes Gedenken der Nachwelt.