de-en  Selma Lagerlöf: Nils_Holgersson_Kap6_Regenwetter
Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson_Chapter 6: During the Rainy Weather.

Now the first rainy day came during the trip. ...

As long as the wild geese had stayed near Vomb Lake the weather had been nice; on the very day they continued their journey north it started to rain, and the boy sat for hours on the back of the gander, dripping wet and shivering from the cold.

On the morning they left, it had been bright and warm. Calmly and uniformly, the wild geese had lifted high into the air and flew in strict order, with Akka at the front and the rest in two well defined lines behind her.

They had not taken the time to call snide remarks to the animals on the fields, however because they were not capable of keeping completely quiet, their habitual mating call 'Where are you?' resounded in constant accompaniment to the rhythmical beating of their wings. I am here! Where are you? Here I am!". All of them joined in this monotonous call, only interrupting it now and then to show the tame goose the features that were their signposts, guiding their direction of flight.

The signs on this trip were the isolated elevations of the Sinderöder mountain ridge, the manor Ovesholm, the Kristian town church tower, the Krongut Bäckawald, the narrow headland between the Oppmannasee and the Ivösee and the rugged slope of the Ryßberg.

It had been a monotonous journey; and when the rain clouds appeared bit by bit, the boy thought it was a welcome change. Formerly, when he saw the rain clouds only from the ground, they had always appeared gray and boring to him, but high up among them, it was something completely different.

The boy saw distinctly that the clouds were enormous trucks, which drove through the heavens with sky-high loads; some of them were piled up with huge gray sacks, others with barrels, some were so large that they could hold a whole lake, again others were filled with awfully big boilers and bottles.

And after so many of them had driven forward that they filled the whole space of heaven, it was as if someone had given them a signal, for they began all at once to pour water down on the earth from kettles, barrels, bottles and sacks.

At that moment when the first showers of spring pelted down onto the earth, all the small birds in the woods and in the meadows uttered such shouts of joy that the whole sky reverberated with them and the boy on back of his goose jumped in fright.

"Now we get rain, rain brings us spring, spring gives us flowers and foliage, and the flowers provide us with caterpillars and insects, and caterpillars and insects serve us as food! Lots of food and good food is the best thing there is!“ sang the little birds.

The wild geese were also pleased about the spring rain which woke the plants from their hibernation and broke up the sheet of ice on the lakes. They couldn't keep up their present straight manner any longer and started sending out merry cries to the countryside below.

As they flew over the large potato fields, which are especially productive near Kristianstadt and which still lay black and barren, they shouted, "Wake up and be bountiful!" Spring is here to awaken you! Now you've been idle long enough!" When they saw people who hurried to seek shelter, they admonished them and said: "Why are you in such a hurry? Don't you see that it is raining bread and cake? A large dense cloud moved quickly northwards and seemed to follow the geese. They seemed to think that they dragged the cloud along with them, and, just now, when they saw great gadens beneath them, they called proudly: "Here we come with anemones! We are coming with roses, apple blossoms and cherry buds! We are coming with peas and beans, with wheat and rye! Who has a mind to, grab a bite! Who has a mind to, grab a bite!" That's what it sounded like, while the first rain showers were falling, when all still enjoyed the rain. But when it continued to rain all afternoon, the geese became impatient and shouted to the thirsty woods surrounding Ivö Lake: "Haven't you had your fill yet? Haven't you had enough yet?" The sky became increasingly covered with a blanket of grey and the sun was so well hidden that no one could find it.

The rain fell more heavily, slapping hard against the wings of the geese and penetrating through the oiled outer feathers through to the skin.

The earth was steaming, lakes, mountains and forests merged indistinguishably together, and the features that indicated their direction were no longer discernible. The journey got slower and slower, the merry cries lapsed into silence and the boy felt the cold more and more.

But still he kept up his courage as long as he rode through the air. Even in the evening, when they had settled down under a small pine tree, in the middle of a large moor, where everything was wet and cold, where some mounds of earth were covered with snow and others rose up bare out of a pool of half-melted ice water, he still had not been discouraged but rather had ran around happily and had looked for crowberries and frozen cranberries.

But then it became evening, and the darkness fell so deeply that not even such eyes as the boy then had could penetrate it, and the broad countryside seemed strangely eerie and scary.

Although the boy lay well nestled under the gander's wing, the coldness and the dampness prevented him from falling asleep. He also heard so much rattling and clattering and threatening voices all around, that he was seized by his horror and did not know where to turn.

In order not to be scared to death he had to go to where there was a warming fire and light.

What if I were to venture to go to the humans for just this one night? he thought. ... "Just to be allowed to sit at the fire for a while and to get a bite to eat. Before sunrise, I could well return to the geese." He gently crept out from under the wing and slipped down to the ground. Neither the gander nor one of the other geese woke up and quietly and unnoticed he sneaked away across the marsh.

He didn't quite know in which part of the country he was, whether in Scania, in Småland or in Blekinge.

But just before the geese had settled down on the moor, he had seen the glow of a large town and this is where he now guided his steps. . . .

It did not take him long at all to find a lane and soon he was on the long tree-lined country road with farmsteads next to each other on every side.

The boy had happened upon one of the large parishes that are very common further up in the country but do not exist down in the plain.

The dwellings were made of wood and were built very nicely. Most of them had gables decorated with carved moldings, and the glass verandas were decorated here and there with colorful panes.

The walls were painted with bright oil colors, the doors and window frames shone in blue and green, occasionally in red, too. ... While walking around and viewing the buildings, the boy even heard how the people in the warm rooms were chatting and laughing. ...

He couldn't understand the words, but it seemed very beautiful to him to hear human voices. "I want to know what they would say if I knocked and asked me to come in?" he thought.

That is indeed what he was thinking; but looking at the illuminated windows erased his fear of the darkness. ... On the other hand he felt that shyness, which always overtook him near human beings. " I'll look around in the village for a while," he thought, " before I ask someone for shelter and food." One of the buildings had a balcony. And just as the boy passed by, the balcony doors were opened, and a yellow light streamed through the fine, sheer curtains. Then a beautiful young woman stepped out and bent over the hand rail. "It's raining, spring will be here soon now," she said.

When the boy saw her, a strange feeling of anxiety came over him for the first time. He felt as if he had to cry. For the first time, he felt a certain unease that he had isolated himself from people.

Shortly afterwards he passed a small grocer's shop. In front of the house there stood a red sower. He stopped, looked at it and finally climbed on the box.

When he sat up there, he clicked his tongue and acted as if he was driving. He thought how happy he would be if he were allowed to navigate such a beautiful machine over the field.

For one moment he had completely forgotten what he looked like right now, but he remembered it right away and hurridely jumped down from the machine again. A steadily increasing unrest came over him.

Yes, someone who had to live among animals all the time, certainly missed out in many respects. The humans really were rather strange and efficient creatures.

He went past the post office and thought about all the newspapers which arrive there with news from all four corners of the world every day. He saw the pharmacy and the doctor's residence, and he had to think what a great power men had that they could combat disease and death.

He came to the church and thought of the people who had built it in order to hear of another world in it, a world beyond the one they lived in as well as of God and the Resurrection and an eternal life.

And the further he went the better he liked the humans.

Children ,however, can't see any further than the end of their nose. That which lies nearest them, they want promptly, without caring what is may cost them. ... Nils Holgersson had had no appreciation of what he gave up when he wished to remain a tomte. Now, however, an awful fear seized him that in the end he would never again be able to gain his proper shape.

But what on earth would he have to do to become a human being again? He would have loved to know that.

He crawled up the front steps of a house und sat down there in the middle of the pouring rain to do some thinking. He sat there for an hour, for two hours, and thought and pondered with a deeply furrowed brow.

But he became no wiser; it was as if his thoughts just kept spinning around in circles in his head. And the longer he sat there, the less likely it appeared to him to find a solution at all.

"This is very probably far too difficult for someone who has learned as little as I have,"he finally thought. "In any case, I will have to return to the humans.

Then I must ask the pastor and the doctor and the schoolteacher, and also others who are learned and who know how to help with something like that." Yes, he decided to do this at once; He got up and shook himself, for he was as wet as a dog who had been in a pool of water.

At this very moment, he saw that a large owl flew past him and alighted on one of the trees at the side of the road. Shortly afterwards a long-eared owl which sat under the roof ledge started to move and to call: "Kivitt, kivitt, are you back again, short-eared owl? How have you been abroad?"" Thanks for asking, Forest Owl, I've been fine,"said the marsh owl. "Has anything unusual happened during my absence?" "Not here in Blekinge, Marsh Owl, but in Scania a boy was transformed into a tomte and became as small as a squirrel. Then the boy travelled with a tame goose to Lapland." "That is strange news, a strange piece of news indeed! Can he never become human again, Forest Owl? Say, can he never be human again?" "That's a secret, marsh owl, but you want to know it." The tomte said if the boy guards the domestic goose so that they return home unharmed, and - - -" "And what else, Forest Owl, what else?" "Fly up to the church tower with me, then you shall learn everything. I'm afraid someone here on the street could listen to us." With that the two owls flew away, but the boy threw his cap high into the air. "Only if I watch over the gander so he comes home unharmed, then I will become human again. Hooray! Hooray! Then I will be a human again!" He shouted 'hooray' and it was strange that no one inside the house heard him. But that was not the case and the boy ran back to the wild geese out on the wet moor, as fast as his legs could carry him.
unit 1
Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson_Kap6: Im Regenwetter.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 2
Nun kam der erste Regentag während der Reise.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 4
Am Morgen, als sie fortzogen, war es hell und warm gewesen.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 7
Hier bin ich!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 8
Wo bist du?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 17
Viele und gute Nahrung ist das Beste, was es gibt!“ sangen die Vögelein.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 21
Der Frühling ist da, der euch weckt!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 23
Seht ihr nicht, daß es Brot und Kuchen regnet?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 26
Wir kommen mit Rosen, mit Apfelblüten und Kirschenknospen!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 27
Wir kommen mit Erbsen und Bohnen, mit Weizen und Roggen!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 28
Wer Lust hat, greife zu!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 35
Aber doch hielt er den Mut aufrecht, solange er durch die Luft ritt.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 41
„Wie wärs, wenn ich mich nur diese eine Nacht zu den Menschen hineinwagte?“ dachte er.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 42
„Nur so, daß ich ein Weilchen an einem Feuer sitzen dürfte und einen Mundvoll zu essen bekäme.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 49
Die Wohnhäuser waren aus Holz und sehr hübsch gebaut.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 53
Die Worte konnte er nicht verstehen, aber es kam ihm sehr schön vor, menschliche Stimmen zu hören.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 54
„Ich möchte wissen, was sie sagen würden, wenn ich anklopfte und um Einlaß bäte?“ dachte er.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 56
Dagegen fühlte er jene Scheu, die ihn immer in der Nähe der Menschen überkam.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 59
Dann trat eine schöne junge Frau heraus und beugte sich über das Geländer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 60
„Es regnet, jetzt wird es bald Frühling,“ sagte sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 61
Als der Junge sie sah, überkam ihn zum erstenmal ein merkwürdiges Angstgefühl.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 62
Es war ihm, als müsse er weinen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 64
Kurz nachher kam er an einem Kaufladen vorüber.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 65
Vor dem Hause stand eine rote Sämaschine.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 66
Er blieb stehen und sah sie an und kroch schließlich auf den Bock hinauf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 67
Als er droben saß, schnalzte er mit der Zunge und tat, als fahre er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 68
unit 70
Eine immer größere Unruhe bemächtigte sich seiner.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 71
Ja, wer beständig unter Tieren leben mußte, kam doch in vielem zu kurz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 72
Die Menschen waren wirklich recht merkwürdige und tüchtige Geschöpfe.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 76
Und je weiter er kam, desto besser gefielen ihm die Menschen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 77
Kinder können eben niemals weiter sehen, als ihre Nase lang ist.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 80
Aber wie in aller Welt müßte er es angreifen, um wieder ein Mensch zu werden?
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 81
Das hätte er schrecklich gerne gewußt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 82
unit 83
Er saß eine Stunde da, zwei Stunden, und sann und grübelte mit tiefgefurchter Stirne.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 85
Und je länger er dasaß, desto unmöglicher erschien es ihm, irgend eine Lösung zu finden.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 87
„Ich werde jedenfalls zu den Menschen zurückkehren müssen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 93
Kann er jetzt nie wieder ein Mensch werden, Waldeule?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 98
Hurra!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 99
Hurra!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 19  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 19  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 95  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 90  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 35  11 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 56  11 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  commented on  unit 101  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 92  11 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 93  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 101  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 97  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 101  11 months, 2 weeks ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 96  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 56  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 81  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 76  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 48  11 months, 2 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 40  11 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 99  11 months, 2 weeks ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 98  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 65  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 64  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented on  unit 36  11 months, 2 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 21  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  translated  unit 8  11 months, 2 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4798  translated  unit 7  11 months, 2 weeks ago

Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson_Kap6:

Im Regenwetter.

Nun kam der erste Regentag während der Reise.

Solange sich die Wildgänse in der Nähe des Vombsees aufgehalten hatten, war schönes Wetter gewesen; an demselben Tag, wo sie ihre Reise nach dem Norden fortsetzten, begann es zu regnen, und der Junge saß stundenlang tropfnaß und vor Kälte zitternd auf dem Rücken des Gänserichs.

Am Morgen, als sie fortzogen, war es hell und warm gewesen. Die Wildgänse hatten sich hoch in die Luft erhoben, gleichmäßig und ohne Eile in strenger Ordnung mit Akka an der Spitze, und die übrigen in zwei scharfen Linien hinter ihr, flogen sie dahin.

Sie hatten sich keine Zeit genommen, den Tieren auf den Feldern kleine Bosheiten zuzurufen, aber da sie nicht imstande waren, sich ganz still zu verhalten, ließen sie unaufhörlich im Takt mit ihren Flügelschlägen ihren gewöhnlichen Lockruf ertönen: „Wo bist du? Hier bin ich! Wo bist du? Hier bin ich!“

Alle beteiligten sich an diesem einförmigen Rufen, das sie nur ab und zu unterbrachen, um dem zahmen Gänserich die Wegweiser zu zeigen, nach denen sie sich richteten.

Die Zeichen auf dieser Reise waren die vereinzelten Erhöhungen des Sinderöder Bergrückens, der Herrenhof Ovesholm, der Kristianstädter Kirchturm, das Krongut Bäckawald, die schmale Landspitze zwischen dem Oppmannasee und dem Ivösee und dem schroffen Abhang des Ryßbergs.

Es war eine einförmige Reise gewesen; und als die Regenwolken allmählich auftauchten, dachte der Junge, das sei doch einmal eine Abwechslung. Früher, wo er die Regenwolken nur von unten gesehen hatte, waren sie ihm immer grau und langweilig vorgekommen, aber hoch droben zwischen ihnen zu sein, das war etwas ganz andres.

Der Junge sah deutlich, daß die Wolken ungeheure Lastwagen waren, die berghoch beladen am Himmel hinfuhren; die einen waren mit riesigen grauen Säcken bepackt, andre mit Tonnen, die so groß waren, daß sie einen ganzen See fassen konnten, wieder andre furchtbar hoch mit großen Kesseln und Flaschen.

Und nachdem so viele aufgefahren waren, daß sie den ganzen Himmelsraum füllten, war es, als habe ihnen jemand ein Zeichen gegeben, denn sie begannen alle auf einmal aus Kesseln, Tonnen, Flaschen und Säcken Wasser auf die Erde hinunterzugießen.

In dem Augenblick, wo die ersten Frühlingsgüsse auf die Erde prasselten, stießen alle die kleinen Vögel in den Gehölzen und auf den Wiesen solche Freudenrufe aus, daß die ganze Luft davon widerhallte und der Junge auf seinem Gänserücken erschreckt zusammenfuhr.

„Jetzt bekommen wir Regen, der Regen bringt uns den Frühling, der Frühling gibt uns Blumen und grünes Laub, und die Blumen geben uns Raupen und Insekten, und Raupen und Insekten geben uns Nahrung! Viele und gute Nahrung ist das Beste, was es gibt!“ sangen die Vögelein.

Auch die Wildgänse freuten sich über den Frühlingsregen, der die Pflanzen aus ihrem Winterschlaf weckte und die Eisdecke auf den Seen zerbrach. Es war ihnen nicht möglich, noch länger so ernst zu bleiben wie bisher, und sie fingen an, lustige Rufe auf die Landschaft unter ihnen hinabzuschicken.

Als sie über die großen Kartoffelfelder, die bei Kristianstadt besonders gut sind, und die jetzt noch schwarz und kahl dalagen, hinflogen, riefen sie: „Wachet jetzt auf und bringet Nutzen! Der Frühling ist da, der euch weckt! Nun habt ihr auch lange genug gefaulenzt!“

Wenn sie Menschen sahen, die sich beeilten, unter Dach und Fach zu kommen, ermahnten sie sie und sagten: „Warum habt ihr es denn so eilig? Seht ihr nicht, daß es Brot und Kuchen regnet? Brot und Kuchen!“

Eine große dicke Wolke bewegte sich rasch in nördlicher Richtung vorwärts und schien den Gänsen zu folgen. Sie glaubten wohl, daß sie die Wolke mit sich zögen, denn als sie jetzt gerade große Gärten unter sich sahen, riefen sie ganz stolz:

„Hier kommen wir mit Anemonen! Wir kommen mit Rosen, mit Apfelblüten und Kirschenknospen! Wir kommen mit Erbsen und Bohnen, mit Weizen und Roggen! Wer Lust hat, greife zu! Wer Lust hat, greife zu!“

So hatte es geklungen, während die ersten Regenschauer fielen, wo sich noch alle über den Regen freuten. Als es aber den ganzen Nachmittag fortregnete, wurden die Gänse ungeduldig und riefen den durstigen Wäldern rings um den Ivösee zu: „Habt ihr noch nicht bald genug? Habt ihr noch nicht bald genug?“

Der Himmel überzog sich immer mehr mit einem gleichmäßigen Grau, und die Sonne verbarg sich so gut, daß niemand herausfand, wo sie steckte.

Der Regen fiel dichter, er klatschte schwer auf die Gänseflügel und drang durch die eingeölten Außenfedern bis auf die Haut durch.

Die Erde dampfte, Seen, Gebirge und Wälder flossen zu einem undeutlichen Wirrwarr zusammen, und die Wegzeiger waren nicht mehr zu erkennen. Die Fahrt ging immer langsamer, die lustigen Zurufe verstummten, und der Junge fühlte die Kälte immer mehr.

Aber doch hielt er den Mut aufrecht, solange er durch die Luft ritt. Auch am Abend, als sie sich unter einer kleinen Kiefer niedergelassen hatten, mitten auf einem großen Moor, wo alles naß und kalt war, wo die einen Erdhaufen mit Schnee bedeckt waren und die andern kahl aus einem Tümpel halbgeschmolzenen Eiswassers aufragten, war er noch nicht mutlos gewesen, sondern war fröhlich umhergelaufen und hatte sich Krähenbeeren und gefrorene Preißelbeeren gesucht.

Aber dann wurde es Abend, und die Dunkelheit senkte sich so tief herab, daß nicht einmal solche Augen, wie der Junge jetzt hatte, hindurchdringen konnten, und das weite Land sah merkwürdig unheimlich und schreckenerregend aus.

Unter dem Flügel des Gänserichs lag der Junge zwar wohl eingebettet, aber Kälte und Feuchtigkeit hinderten ihn am Einschlafen. Er hörte auch so viel Gerassel und Geprassel und drohende Stimmen ringsum, daß ihn furchtbares Entsetzen ergriff und er nicht wußte, wohin er sich wenden sollte.

Wenn er sich nicht zu Tode ängstigen sollte, dann mußte er fort, dahin, wo es ein wärmendes Feuer und Licht gab.

„Wie wärs, wenn ich mich nur diese eine Nacht zu den Menschen hineinwagte?“ dachte er. „Nur so, daß ich ein Weilchen an einem Feuer sitzen dürfte und einen Mundvoll zu essen bekäme. Vor Sonnenaufgang könnte ich ja zu den Gänsen zurückkehren.“

Er kroch sachte unter dem Flügel hervor und glitt auf den Boden hinunter. Weder der Gänserich noch eine der andern Gänse erwachte, und leise und unbemerkt schlich er über das Moor weg.

Er wußte nicht recht, in welchem Teil des Landes er sich befand, ob in Schonen, in Småland oder in Blekinge.

Aber gerade, bevor sich die Gänse auf dem Moor niedergelassen hatten, hatte er einen Schein von einer großen Stadt gesehen, und dorthin lenkte er jetzt seine Schritte.

Es dauerte auch nicht lange, bis er einen Weg fand, und bald war er auf der langen mit Bäumen eingefaßten Landstraße, wo auf jeder Seite Hof an Hof lag.

Der Junge war in eines der großen Kirchspiele geraten, die weiter droben im Land sehr allgemein sind, die es aber unten in der Ebene gar nicht gibt.

Die Wohnhäuser waren aus Holz und sehr hübsch gebaut. Die meisten hatten mit geschnitzten Leisten verzierte Giebel, und die Glasveranden waren mit der einen und andern bunten Scheibe versehen.

Die Wände waren mit heller Ölfarbe angestrichen, die Türen und Fensterrahmen leuchteten blau und grün, hin und wieder auch rot. Während der Junge dahinwanderte und die Häuser betrachtete, hörte er sogar, wie die Leute in den warmen Stuben plauderten und lachten.

Die Worte konnte er nicht verstehen, aber es kam ihm sehr schön vor, menschliche Stimmen zu hören. „Ich möchte wissen, was sie sagen würden, wenn ich anklopfte und um Einlaß bäte?“ dachte er.

Das war es ja, was er im Sinn gehabt hatte; aber beim Anblick der erleuchteten Fenster war seine Angst vor der Dunkelheit verschwunden. Dagegen fühlte er jene Scheu, die ihn immer in der Nähe der Menschen überkam. „Ich werde mich eine Weile in dem Dorf umsehen,“ dachte er, „ehe ich bei jemand um Obdach und Speise anhalte.“

An einem Haus war ein Balkon. Und gerade als der Junge vorüberging, wurden die Balkontüren aufgemacht, und durch feine, lichte Vorhänge strömte ein gelber Lichtschein heraus. Dann trat eine schöne junge Frau heraus und beugte sich über das Geländer. „Es regnet, jetzt wird es bald Frühling,“ sagte sie.

Als der Junge sie sah, überkam ihn zum erstenmal ein merkwürdiges Angstgefühl. Es war ihm, als müsse er weinen. Zum erstenmal ergriff ihn eine gewisse Unruhe darüber, daß er sich selbst von den Menschen ausgeschlossen hatte.

Kurz nachher kam er an einem Kaufladen vorüber. Vor dem Hause stand eine rote Sämaschine. Er blieb stehen und sah sie an und kroch schließlich auf den Bock hinauf.

Als er droben saß, schnalzte er mit der Zunge und tat, als fahre er. Er dachte, welches Glück das wäre, wenn er eine so schöne Maschine über einen Acker fahren dürfte.

Einen Augenblick lang hatte er ganz vergessen, wie er jetzt aussah, aber gleich erinnerte er sich wieder daran, und eilig sprang er von der Maschine herunter. Eine immer größere Unruhe bemächtigte sich seiner.

Ja, wer beständig unter Tieren leben mußte, kam doch in vielem zu kurz. Die Menschen waren wirklich recht merkwürdige und tüchtige Geschöpfe.

Er ging an der Post vorbei und dachte da an die Zeitungen, die jeden Tag mit Neuigkeiten von allen vier Enden der Welt kommen. Er sah die Apotheke und die Doktorwohnung, und da mußte er denken, welche große Macht die Menschen doch hatten, daß sie Krankheit und Tod bekämpfen konnten.

Er kam an die Kirche und dachte an die Menschen, die sie erbaut hatten, um in ihr von einer andern Welt zu hören, einer Welt außerhalb der, in der sie lebten, sowie von Gott und Auferstehung und einem ewigen Leben.

Und je weiter er kam, desto besser gefielen ihm die Menschen.

Kinder können eben niemals weiter sehen, als ihre Nase lang ist. Was am nächsten vor ihnen liegt, nach dem strecken sie die Hand aus, ohne sich darum zu kümmern, was es sie kosten könnte. Nils Holgersson hatte kein Verständnis dafür gehabt, was er verloren gab, als er ein Wichtelmännchen zu bleiben wünschte; jetzt aber ergriff ihn eine furchtbare Angst, er würde am Ende nie wieder seine rechte Gestalt erlangen können.

Aber wie in aller Welt müßte er es angreifen, um wieder ein Mensch zu werden? Das hätte er schrecklich gerne gewußt.

Er kroch auf eine Haustreppe hinauf und setzte sich da mitten in den strömenden Regen, um zu überlegen. Er saß eine Stunde da, zwei Stunden, und sann und grübelte mit tiefgefurchter Stirne.

Aber er wurde nicht klüger; es war, als ob sich seine Gedanken nur immer in seinem Kopf im Kreise drehten. Und je länger er dasaß, desto unmöglicher erschien es ihm, irgend eine Lösung zu finden.

„Dies ist sicherlich viel zu schwer für einen, der so wenig gelernt hat wie ich,“ dachte er schließlich. „Ich werde jedenfalls zu den Menschen zurückkehren müssen.

Dann muß ich den Pfarrer und den Doktor und den Schullehrer fragen, und auch noch andre, die gelehrt sind und Hilfe für so etwas wissen.“

Ja, er beschloß, dies sogleich zu tun; er stand auf und schüttelte sich, denn er war so naß wie ein Hund, der in einem Wassertümpel gewesen ist.

In diesem Augenblick sah er, daß eine große Eule daherflog und sich auf einen der Bäume an der Straße niederließ. Gleich darauf begann eine Waldeule, die unter der Dachleiste saß, sich zu bewegen und zu rufen: „Kiwitt, kiwitt, bist du wieder da, Sumpfeule? Wie ist es dir im Ausland gegangen?“

„Danke der Nachfrage, Waldeule, es ist mir gut gegangen,“ sagte die Sumpfeule. „Ist während meiner Abwesenheit irgend etwas Merkwürdiges passiert?“

„Nicht hier in Blekinge, Sumpfeule, aber in Schonen ist ein Junge in ein Wichtelmännchen verwandelt und so klein gemacht worden wie ein Eichhörnchen, und dann ist der Junge mit einer zahmen Gans nach Lappland gereist.“

„Das ist ja eine sonderbare Neuigkeit, eine sonderbare Neuigkeit! Kann er jetzt nie wieder ein Mensch werden, Waldeule? Sag, kann er nie wieder ein Mensch werden?“

„Das ist ein Geheimnis, Sumpfeule, aber du sollst es doch wissen. Das Wichtelmännchen hat gesagt, wenn der Junge die zahme Gans bewacht, daß sie unbeschädigt wieder heimkommen und – – –“

„Und was noch, Waldeule, was noch?“

„Fliege mit mir auf den Kirchturm hinauf, dann sollst du alles erfahren. Ich habe Angst, es könnte uns hier auf der Straße jemand zuhören.“

Damit flogen die beiden Eulen davon, aber der Junge warf seine Mütze hoch in die Luft. „Wenn ich nur über den Gänserich wache, damit er unbeschädigt wieder heimkommt, dann werde ich wieder ein Mensch. Hurra! Hurra! Dann werde ich wieder ein Mensch!“

Er schrie Hurra, und es war merkwürdig, daß man ihn drinnen im Hause nicht hörte. Aber das war nicht der Fall, und der Junge lief zurück zu den Wildgänsen auf das nasse Moor hinaus, so schnell ihn seine Beine tragen konnten.