de-en  Selma Lagerlöf: Nils_Holgersson_Kap5_Kullaberg Medium
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson.

Part 5: The Big Crane Dance on Kulla Mountain.

It must be admitted that in all of Scania, where so many splendid castles have been built, none of them has walls as beautiful as old Kulla Mountain.

Kulla Mountain is low and elongated, it is by no means a large and mighty mountain range. On the broad mountain ridge there are forests and fields, and here and there an area covered with heather. It's neither particularly beautiful nor very unusual up there, and it really looks like any other high ground on Scania.

Those who take the country road that runs over the ridge of the mountain will spontaneously say to themselves: "This mountain does not deserve to be famous at all. There is nothing worth seeing here." But then it might occur that he strays from the path and steps to the edge of the mountain and looks down the rugged slope, and suddenly he discovers so many sights that he hardly knows where to start looking.

For Kulla Mountain is not like other mountains on the peninsula, with plains and valleys all around it, but has plummeted itself into the sea as far as it could. Not the smallest piece of land lies at the foot of the mountain, protecting it from the waves of the sea; these can come right up to the rock walls, wash them out and shape them at will.

That's why the mountain walls there are as richly decorated as the sea and its co-helpers, the winds, have formed it. There are rugged ravines cut deeply into the mountain and jutting, black craggy cliffs, which have been scoured smooth by the whipping action of the wind. There are solitary columns of rock that tower vertically out of the water, and dark grottoes with narrow entrances.

Deep bare mountain sides and gently overgrown slopes are to be found, then rock spurs and coves again, as well as rolling stones, which with every pounding of the waves were rattling washed around.

There are also stately natural arches bulging above the water, and stone blocks rising in a pointed shape, which are constantly splashed by white foam, while others still being reflected in black green, unchanging still waters. There are huge cauldrons carved into the rock, and huge crevasses that entice the wanderer to venture into the heart of the mountain until they reach the cave of the Kulla. ...

And on all these gorges and cliffs, on their tops and on all sides, plants and branches and vines are growing and climbing upwards. Trees are also growing there, but the power of the wind is so strong, that even the trees have to turn into vine-like plants, in order to be able to cling to the slopes. The oak trunks have lowered themselves and are literally creeping along the ground while their leaves form a thick canopy above, and short trunked Beech trees stand like great leafy tents in the gorges.

The unusual faces of the mountain with the expanse of blue ocean before it and the shimmering clear air above; all that is what makes the Kulla Mountain so attractive to people, so that throughout the entire summer they go up there in droves. It would be much harder to say what it is that makes it so attractive to the animals that they assemble there each year for the big Animal Games. ...

But this is a custom kept up since times immemorial, and one would have needed to be there at a time, when the first rolling waves of the ocean broke against Kulla Mountain, to be able to explain why it was chosen as a meeting place before any other one.

When the meeting is to take place, the red deer, the roes, the rabbits, the foxes and the other wild quadrupeds already start their journey to Kulla Mountain the night before because they do not want to be seen by humans. Just before sunrise, they all move to the "Site of the Games", a plain covered with heather on the left side of the trail, not very far from the highest peak of the mountain range.

The Games site is surrounded on all sides by rounded cliff tops, which conceal the animals from everyone who does not just happen by chance upon this place. And in March it is not very likely that any hiker would stray to that place. All the strangers who normally roam around the rocks and climb the mountain faces, have been chased away by the autumn storms months ago. ... And the lighthouse keeper out there on the outermost promontory, the old woman on the Kulla farm and the Kulla farmer and his servants are following their usual paths and don't roam the isolated heathland.

When the animals reach the site of the Games, they settle down on the round cliff tops. Each species of animal keeps to itself, although needless to say, on such a day peace prevails on the mountain and no animal need be afraid of being attacked by another. On this day, a young rabbit could wander over the foxes' hill without fear of losing even one of his long ears. But the animals line up in separate flocks; this is an old tradition.

When everyone has arrived, they look out for the birds. It is usually nice weather on this day. The cranes are good weather prophets, and they would not summon the animals if rain were exprected. Although the air is clear and nothing hinders the view, the animals do not see any birds. That's strange. The sun is already high in the sky, and the birds should be on their way.

However, what the animals on Kulla Mountain notice here and there is a small dark cloud moving slowly over the plain. ...

Lo and behold, one of these clouds suddenly heads for the shore of the Oresund and towards the Kulla Mountain. When the cloud is directly over the Games' site, it stops, and at the same time the entire cloud begins to twitter and to resound, as if it would consist of nothing but sound.

It moves up and down, yet singing and sounding all the time. ... Suddenly the whole cloud fell down onto a hill, the whole cloud all at once, and in the next moment the hill was completely covered with grey larks, beautiful reddish grey and white chaffinches, speckled starlings and grey-green tits.

Immediately after that another cloud moved across the plain. It stops over every farm, over every worker's hut and castle, over market towns and cities, over farmsteads and railway stations, over fishing villages and sugar factories.

As often as it stops, it sucks up a small stirring column of dust particles from the ground. As a result, the cloud grows and grows, and when it is finally completed and moves towards Killa Mountain, it is no longer a single cloud, but an entire cloud bank, which is so big that it casts a shadow on the ground from Höganäs to Mölle. ...

When it stops above the Games site, it blocks the sun, and has to rain sparrows onto one of the hills for a good while until those that had flown right inside the cloud can once again perceive a glimmer of daylight.

But now the largest of all these bird clouds appears. It is formed from flocks which have flown in from all sides and joined together. It has a deep blue-gray coloration and no ray of sun can penetrate it. ...

It drifts along as gloomy and frightening as a thundercloud, full of the most sinister haunting, of hideous, screaming, scornful sounds of laughter and croaking prophesying misfortune. ... The animals on the Games site are happy when it finally dissolves into a stream of wing beating, squawking birds: of Jackdaws, ravens and all the rest of the crow species.

Afterwards, not only clouds appear in the sky, but a lot of other lines and signs. Then straight dotted lines appear in the east and northeast.

These are the forest birds of the Göinger districts, the birch and wood grouses, which fly in long rows with a distance of a few meters between the individual birds. And the marsh birds, which stay in the Måkläppen reserve in front of Falsterbo, are now flying over the Öresund in all kinds of strange formations: in triangles or long squiggles, in crooked hooks or in semicircles.

To the great gathering that took place in the year when Nils Holgersson was wandering around with the wild geese came Akka with her flock, later than all the others, and this was not surprising, for Akka had had to fly over all of Scania in order to reach the Kulla mountain.

In addition, as soon as she had awakened, she had looked around first for Thumbling, who had been gone for many hours, playing the pipe in front of the gray rats and luring them far away from Glimminge Manor.

The male owl had returned with the message that the black rats would arrive home right after sunset, and thus there was no danger if the tower owl's pipe was allowed to fall silent and the gray rats were permitted to go wherever they wanted to go.

But it was not Akka who spotted the boy as he was moving along with his long entourage and who very quickly descended down to him, caught him in his beak and climbed up into the air with him, but rather it was Mr. Ermenrich the stork.

For Mr. Ermenrich had also gone off to search for him, and after he had taken him to the stork's nest, he asked him to forgive him for having treated him so disrespectfully the previous evening.

The boy was very happy about it, and he and the stork became quite good friends.

Akka was also very friendly to him and rubbed her old head on his arm several times. Yet what pleased the boy the most was when Akka asked the stork whether he thought it advisable for her to take Thumbling with her to Kulla Mountain. ...

"I think we can rely on him just as well as on ourselves," she said. ... "Certainly he won't betray us to the human beings." Without further ado, the stork enthusiastically agreed to take the Thumbling there. ... "Certainly you must take Thumbling to Kulla Mountain, Mother Akka," he said. "It is fortunate for us that we can reward him for everything he has endured for us tonight.

And since I am still sorry over my inappropriate behavior of yesterday, I myself will carry him on my back to the gathering place". There is not much that tastes better than to be praised by those who themselves are smart and capable, and the boy had never felt as happy as then when the wild goose and the stork spoke of him in this way.

So, the boy made the journey to Kulla Mountain on the back of the stork, and even though he considered it to be a great honor, it still caused him a lot of anxiety, for Mr. Ermenrich was a master at flying and flew so much faster than the wild geese.

While Akka always flew straight ahead moving her wings steadily up and down, the stork had fun showing a couple of his flying skills. One moment he was lying absolutely still at an incredible height, floating through the air without moving his wings. The next moment he was descending at such a speed that it looked as if he was helplessly plunging down to earth like a rock, then he was having fun flying around Akka in large and small circles like a whirlwind.

The boy had never experienced such a thing, and even though he was constantly imbued with fear, he still had to quietly acknowledge that he had not previously known what one calls good flying.

They only stopped once during the journey, this was when Akka joined with her fellow travellers at Vombsee and shouted out to them, that the gray rats had been defeated. Then all flew together straight to Kulla Mountain.

Here they alighted on the top of the hill that was reserved for the wild geese, and now as the boy let his eye wander from hill to hill, he saw the many-pointed antlers of the red deer protruding above the one and the bushy-necks of the grey hawks above another of the hills.

One hill was red with foxes, another black and white with seabirds, one grey with rats. ... One was occupied by constantly cawing black ravens, one by larks, which were unable to remain calm, but repeatedly flew up into the air, carolling with joy.

As has always been customary on Kulla Mountain, the crows began the games and performances of the day with a flight dance. They split into two flocks which after flying on collision courses, met, then turned around and began anew. This dance had many repetitions, and appeared to the spectators who were not familiar with the dance as altogether too monotonous.

The crows were very proud of their dance, but all the other animals were happy when it ended. It appeared to them as gloomy and meaningless as a winter storm's play with snowflakes. ... It depressed them to watch it, and they waited eagerly for something that should give them a little pleasure.

They didn't have to wait in vain, either, for as soon as the crows had finished, the hares came running. They dashed forward in a long row, without any apparent order. In between, one of them came all alone, then again three or four in a line. All of them had raised up on their hind legs, and they rushed forward so fast that their long ears swayed to all sides.

While jumping, they turned around in a circle, making high leaps and hitting with their front paws against their ribs so that it banged. ... Some of them did numerous somersaults one after the other, others rolled themselves into balls and rolled forward like wheels, another stood on one leg and did a pirouette, another walked on its front paws.

There was definitely no system but a lot of excitement in this performance by the rabbits and the many animals watching began to breathe faster. It was spring now. Pleasure and joy were approaching.... The winter was over, the summer was coming. Soon life was only still a game!

When the rabbits had let off steam, it was the turn of the large birds of the forest to enter the stage. Hundreds of wood grouse with bright red eyebrows and in shiny black attire launched themselves onto a large oak tree which stood in the middle of the Games site.

The wood grouse sitting on the highest branch puffed his feathers up, lowered his wings and extended his tail upward so that his white covert feathers became visible. Then he stretched his neck forward and pushed a few notes out of his thickened neck.

"Tjäck, tjäck, tjäck!" that's what it sounded like. More he could not bring forth, it just gurgled several times deep down in his throat. ... Then he closed his eyes and whispered: "Sis, sis, sis - listen how beautiful! Sis, sis, sis!" And at the same time he fell into such a state of rapture that he no longer knew what was going on around him.

While the wood grouse was still continuing with his "sis, sis," the three who sat the closest beneath him began to croon, and before they had crooned the whole way through, the ten who sat somewhat further below began; and so it went from branch to branch until all the hundreds of wood grouse were crooning and chuckling and sis-ing. They all fell into the same rapture during their singing, and just that affected the other animals like a contagious frenzy.

The blood had flowed lightly and agreeably through their veins a little while ago, now it began to bubble grow heavy and hot. "Yes, it's certainly spring," thought the many animal species. "The cold of winter has disappeared, the fire of spring is lit on the earth." When the black grouse noticed that the wood grouse had such great success, they could no longer be quiet. Since there was no tree that had enough room for them, they stormed down to the Games' site where the heather was so high that only their beautifully curved tail feathers and their thick beaks stuck out and began to sing:"Orr, orr, orr!" Just as the black grouse began to compete with the wood grouse, something outrageous happened. While all animals thought of nothing else but the game of capercaillie, a fox crept quietly towards the hill of the wild geese. He moved very carefully and came far up the hill before anyone noticed him.

But suddenly a goose detected him and since she could not imagine that the fox might have crept in among the geese with good intentions, she quickly shouted: "Wild geese, watch out! Watch out!" The fox seized her by the neck, perhaps mainly to silence her, but the wild geese had already heard her shout and took off into the air.

And when they had taken wing, all the animals saw Smirre the fox standing on the the wild geese's hill, with a dead goose in his mouth.

But because he had thus broken the peace of the day of games, a severe punishment was imposed on Smirre such that he had to repent his entire life long that he had not been able to suppress his revenge but rather had tried in this way to get too near Akka and her flock.

Quickly he was surrounded by a pack of foxes and sentenced according to old custom. But the verdict reads: "Whoever breaks the peace of the great day of games is expelled from the land." No fox wanted to moderate the sentence , for they all knew that as soon as they tried something of that kind, they would be expelled in the same instant from the Games' site and they would not be permitted to ever enter it again.

Thus the sentence to ostracise Smirre was announced, without anyone objecting to it. He was forbidden to remain in Scania. He was forced to leave his mate and relatives, his hunting grounds and lairs which he had called his own, and fend for himself in a foreign country. ... And so that all foxes in Skåne should know that Smirre was free of birds in this landscape, the oldest of the foxes bit off the tip of Smirre's right ear.

As soon as this was done, the young foxes started howling bloody murder and throwing themselves on Smirre. He had no choice but to flee, and with all the young foxes on his heels he ran away from Kulla Mountain.

All this happened while the black grouse and wood grouse were competing with each other. But these birds are so absorbed in their singing that they neither hear nor see, and they woudn't let themselves be disturbed anyway. ...

The contest of the forest birds had barely ended when the red deer of Häckeberga came forward to show their martial game. Several pairs of red deer fought at the same time.

They lunged at each other with great force, smashing their racks with thundering noises so that their antlers intertwined, and one tried to drive back the other. Clumps of heather flew up from under their hooves, their breaths were like smoke in front of their mouths, weird snorts came from their throats, and foam ran down their fronts.

All around on the hills a breathless silence prevailed while the stags were skillfully fighting, and new emotions stirred in all the animals. Each and every individual animal felt brave and strong, full of returning strength, newly born from spring, quickly prepared for any kind of adventure. They felt no anger against each other, but wings were raised up everywhere, neck feathers stood on end and claws were sharpened.

If the deer from Häckeberga had fought on for another instant, a savage fight would have flared up on all the hills because in all the animals a burning fervor had spread to show that they were also full of life, that the impotence of winter was gone, that strength swelled in their veins.

But the red deer broke up their fight at just the right moment, and a whisper went quickly from hill to hill: "Now come the cranes!" And then the gray birds, clad as if shrouded by dusk, came, with their long plumes in their wings and red plumage on their necks. The birds with their long legs, their slender necks and small heads glided down from their hills in mysterious confusion. As they glided forward, they spun around in circles, half flying, half dancing. The wings gracefully raised, they moved with incredible speed.

It was as if grey shadows were playing a game the eye could hardly follow. It was as if they had learned it from the mists that float over the lonely moors. There was enchantment in it, all those who had never before been on Kulla Mountain now understood why the whole assembly got its name from the crane's dance. There was a certain wildness in it, but the feeling it aroused was a pale longing.

Nobody thought about fighting anymore. On the contrary, now everyone, the winged and the wingless, felt an urge in themselves to soar up tremendously high, indeed up over the clouds to see what was above them, an urge to forego their earthly bodies that dragged them down, and to float toward the heavens.

Being hidden behind life, the animals felt such a yearning for the unattainable only once a year, namely on the day they saw the big crane dance.
unit 1
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 2
Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 3
Teil 5: Der große Kranichtanz auf dem Kullaberg.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 5
Der Kullaberg ist niedrig und langgestreckt, er ist durchaus kein großes mächtiges Gebirge.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 27
Und im März ist es nicht sehr wahrscheinlich, daß sich irgend ein Wanderer dorthin verirren sollte.
5 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 33
Aber die Tiere stellen sich doch in abgesonderten Scharen auf; das ist alte Sitte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 34
Wenn alle ihre Plätze eingenommen haben, sehen sie sich nach den Vögeln um.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 35
Es pflegt an diesem Tag immer schönes Wetter zu sein.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 37
unit 38
Das ist merkwürdig.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 39
Die Sonne steht schon hoch am Himmel, und die Vögel sollten doch unterwegs sein.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 43
Sie hebt und senkt sich, aber immerfort singt und klingt sie.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 12 months ago
unit 45
Gleich darauf zieht noch eine Wolke über die Ebne hin.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 47
So oft sie anhält, saugt sie vom Boden eine kleine aufwirbelnde Säule von Staubkörnchen auf.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 50
Aber jetzt taucht doch die größte von allen diesen Vogelwolken auf.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 52
Sie hat eine tief graublaue Färbung, und kein Sonnenstrahl dringt durch sie hindurch.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 55
Hierauf erscheinen am Himmel nicht nur Wolken, sondern eine Menge andrer Striche und Zeichen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 56
Dann zeigen sich im Osten und Nordosten gerade punktierte Linien.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 64
Der Junge freute sich sehr darüber, und er und der Storch wurden recht gute Freunde.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 65
Akka war auch sehr freundlich gegen ihn und rieb ihren alten Kopf mehrere Male an seinem Arm.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 67
„Ich glaube, wir können uns auf ihn ebensogut verlassen wie auf uns selber,“ sagte sie.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 69
„Gewiß müssen Sie Däumling mit nach dem Kullaberg nehmen, Mutter Akka,“ sagte er.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 77
Dann flogen alle miteinander geraden Wegs nach dem Kullaberg.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 79
Ein Hügel war rot von Füchsen, ein andrer schwarz und weiß von Seevögeln, einer grau von Ratten.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 84
Die Krähen waren sehr stolz auf ihren Tanz, aber alle andern Tiere waren froh, als er zu Ende war.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 85
Er kam ihnen ebenso düster und sinnlos vor, wie das Spiel des Wintersturmes mit den Schneeflocken.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 88
In einer langen Reihe, ohne besondre Ordnung strömten sie herbei.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 89
Dazwischen kam einer ganz allein, dann wieder drei oder vier in einer Reihe.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 94
Jetzt war es Frühling.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 95
Lust und Freude waren im Anzug.
5 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 96
Der Winter war vorüber, der Sommer nahte.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 97
Bald war das Leben nur noch ein Spiel!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 98
Als die Hasen ausgetobt hatten, war die Reihe des Auftretens an den großen Vögeln des Waldes.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 101
Hierauf streckte er den Hals vor und stieß ein paar Töne aus dem verdickten Hals heraus.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 102
„Tjäck, tjäck, tjäck!“ klang es.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 103
Mehr konnte er nicht herausbringen, es gluckste nur mehrere Male tief drunten in seiner Kehle.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 104
Dann schloß er die Augen und flüsterte: „Sis, sis, sis – hört wie schön!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 109
„Ja, es ist sicherlich Frühling,“ dachten die vielen Tiervölker.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 113
Er ging sehr vorsichtig und kam weit auf den Hügel hinauf, bevor ihn jemand bemerkte.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 118
Schnell wurde er von einer Schar Füchse umringt und alter Sitte gemäß verurteilt.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 120
Also wurde das Verbannungsurteil ohne Widerspruch Smirre kundgetan.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 121
Es wurde ihm untersagt, in Schonen zu verbleiben.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 124
unit 126
Alles das geschah, während die Birkhühner und die Auerhähne miteinander wetteiferten.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 129
Mehrere Paare Edelhirsche kämpften zu gleicher Zeit.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 138
Während sie vorwärts glitten, drehten sie sich halb fliegend, halb tanzend im Kreise herum.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 139
Die Flügel anmutig erhoben, bewegten sie sich mit unfaßlicher Schnelligkeit.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 140
Es war, als spielten graue Schatten ein Spiel, dem das Auge kaum zu folgen vermochte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 141
Es war, als hätten sie es von den Nebeln gelernt, die über die einsamen Moore hinschweben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 143
Es lag eine gewisse Wildheit darin, aber das Gefühl, das diese erweckte, war eine holde Sehnsucht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 4 weeks ago
unit 144
Niemand dachte jetzt mehr daran, zu kämpfen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 74  11 months, 3 weeks ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 141  11 months, 3 weeks ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 72  11 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 116  11 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 132  11 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 137  11 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 121  11 months, 3 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 86  11 months, 3 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 127  11 months, 4 weeks ago
Maria-Helene • 2289  commented on  unit 69  11 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 118  11 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 114  11 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 81  11 months, 4 weeks ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 77  11 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 67  11 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 65  11 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 64  11 months, 4 weeks ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 61  11 months, 4 weeks ago

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson.

Teil 5: Der große Kranichtanz auf dem Kullaberg.

Es muß zugegeben werden, daß in ganz Schonen, wo doch so viele prächtige Schlösser sich erheben, keines von allen so schöne Mauern hat wie der alte Kullaberg.

Der Kullaberg ist niedrig und langgestreckt, er ist durchaus kein großes mächtiges Gebirge. Auf dem breiten Bergrücken liegen Wälder und Felder, und da und dort eine mit Heidekraut bewachsene Fläche. Es ist da oben weder besonders schön noch besonders merkwürdig, und es sieht da gerade so aus wie auf jeder andern hochgelegenen Gegend in Schonen.

Wer die mitten über den Kamm des Berges hinlaufende Landstraße einschlägt, sagt sich unwillkürlich: „Dieses Gebirge verdient seine Berühmtheit gar nicht. Es gibt hier nichts Sehenswertes.“

Aber dann geschieht es vielleicht, daß er vom Wege abweicht und an den Rand des Berges tritt und über den schroffen Abhang hinabschaut, und da entdeckt er auf einmal so viel Sehenswertes, daß er kaum weiß, wie er alles auf einmal betrachten soll.

Denn der Kullaberg steht nicht wie andre Gebirge auf dem Festlande mit Ebnen und Tälern ringsherum, sondern er hat sich gleichsam so weit ins Meer hineingestürzt, als er überhaupt konnte. Nicht das kleinste Stückchen Land liegt unten am Berg, das ihn gegen die Meereswogen schützte; diese können ganz dicht bis an die Felsenwände heran, können sie auswaschen und nach Belieben formen.

Deshalb stehen die Gebirgswände dort auch so reich verziert da, wie das Meer und dessen Mithelfer, die Winde, sie zugerichtet haben. Da sind schroffe, tief in die Bergseiten hineingeschnittene Schluchten und schwarze hervorspringende Felsen, die unter den beständigen Peitschenschlägen des Windes blankgescheuert sind. Da sind einzelstehende Felsensäulen, die senkrecht aus dem Wasser aufragen, und dunkle Grotten mit engen Zugängen.

Da finden sich steile nackte Felswände und sanfte bewachsene Abhänge, dann wieder kleine Felsenvorsprünge und Buchten, sowie kleine Rollsteine, die mit jedem Wogenschlag rasselnd umhergespült werden.

Da sind auch stattliche Felsentore, die sich über dem Wasser wölben, und spitzig aufragende Steinblöcke, die beständig mit weißem Schaum überspritzt werden, und wieder andre, die sich in schwarzgrünem, unveränderlichem stillem Wasser spiegeln. Da gibt es in den Felsen eingemeißelte Riesenkessel und gewaltige Spalten, die den Wanderer verlocken, sich in die Tiefe des Gebirges bis zur Höhle des Kullamanns hineinzuwagen.

Und an allen diesen Schluchten und Felsen, oben darauf und an allen Seiten hin, wachsen und klettern Pflanzen und Zweige und Ranken empor. Bäume wachsen auch da, aber die Macht des Windes ist so groß, daß auch die Bäume sich in rankenartige Gewächse verwandeln müssen, damit sie sich an den Abhängen halten können. Die Eichenstämme haben sich niedergelegt und kriechen förmlich am Boden hin, während ihr Laub wie ein dichtes Gewölbe über ihnen steht, und kurzstämmige Buchen stehen wie große Laubzelte in den Schluchten.

Die merkwürdigen Bergwände mit dem weiten blauen Meer davor und der schimmernden scharfen Luft darüber, das alles zusammen macht das Kullagebirge den Menschen so lieb, daß den ganzen Sommer hindurch große Scharen von ihnen jeden Tag hinaufziehen. Schwerer wäre zu sagen, wodurch es für die Tiere so anziehend wird, daß sie sich jedes Jahr zu einer großen Spielversammlung da vereinigen.

Aber dies ist eine Sitte, die seit uralten Zeiten beibehalten ist, und man hätte damals dabei sein müssen, als die erste Meereswoge am Kullaberg zu Schaum zerschellte, um erklären zu können, warum gerade er vor allen andern zum Versammlungsort gewählt wurde.

Wenn die Zusammenkunft stattfinden soll, machen die Edelhirsche, die Rehe, die Hasen, die Füchse und die übrigen wilden Vierfüßler die Reise nach dem Kullagebirge schon in der Nacht zuvor, um nicht von den Menschen gesehen zu werden. Gerade vor Sonnenaufgang ziehen sie alle nach dem Spielplatz, einer mit Heidekraut bewachsenen Ebene links vom Wege, nicht besonders weit von dem höchsten Gipfel des Gebirges entfernt.

Der Spielplatz ist von allen Seiten von runden Felskuppen umgeben, die die Tiere vor jedermann verbergen, der nicht gerade zufällig an diesen Platz gerät. Und im März ist es nicht sehr wahrscheinlich, daß sich irgend ein Wanderer dorthin verirren sollte. Alle die Fremden, die sonst auf den Felsen herumstreifen und an den Gebirgswänden hinaufklettern, haben die Herbststürme schon vor vielen Monaten fortgejagt. Und der Leuchtturmwächter draußen auf dem äußersten Vorgebirge, die alte Frau im Kullahof und der Kullabauer und sein Hausgesinde gehen nur ihre gewohnten Wege und laufen nicht auf dem einsamen Heideland herum.

Wenn die Vierfüßler auf dem Spielplatz angelangt sind, lassen sie sich auf den runden Felsenkuppen nieder. Jede Tierart bleibt für sich, obgleich selbstverständlich an einem solchen Tag allgemeiner Burgfriede herrscht und kein Tier Angst zu haben braucht, von einem andern überfallen zu werden. An diesem Tag könnte ein junges Häschen über den Hügel der Füchse hinspazieren, ohne auch nur einen von seinen langen Löffeln einzubüßen. Aber die Tiere stellen sich doch in abgesonderten Scharen auf; das ist alte Sitte.

Wenn alle ihre Plätze eingenommen haben, sehen sie sich nach den Vögeln um. Es pflegt an diesem Tag immer schönes Wetter zu sein. Die Kraniche sind gute Wetterpropheten, und sie würden die Tiere nicht zusammenrufen, wenn Regen zu erwarten wäre. Obgleich aber die Luft klar ist und nichts die Aussicht hemmt, sehen die Vierfüßler doch keine Vögel. Das ist merkwürdig. Die Sonne steht schon hoch am Himmel, und die Vögel sollten doch unterwegs sein.

Was den Tieren auf dem Kullaberg dagegen auffällt, ist die eine oder andre kleine dunkle Wolke, die langsam über dem ebnen Land hinzieht.

Und siehe da, eine dieser Wolken steuert jetzt plötzlich auf das Ufer des Öresund und auf den Kullaberg zu. Als die Wolke mitten über dem Spielplatz ist, hält sie an, und gleichzeitig beginnt die ganze Wolke zu zwitschern und zu klingen, als bestünde sie aus nichts als Tönen.

Sie hebt und senkt sich, aber immerfort singt und klingt sie. Plötzlich fällt die ganze Wolke auf einen Hügel herab, die ganze Wolke auf einmal, und im nächsten Augenblick ist der Hügel vollständig von grauen Lerchen bedeckt, schönen rot-grau-weißen Buchfinken, gesprenkelten Staren und graugrünen Meisen.

Gleich darauf zieht noch eine Wolke über die Ebne hin. Sie hält über jedem Hof an, über jeder Arbeiterhütte und jedem Schloß, über Marktflecken und Städten, über Bauerngütern und Bahnhöfen, über Fischerdörfern und Zuckerfabriken.

So oft sie anhält, saugt sie vom Boden eine kleine aufwirbelnde Säule von Staubkörnchen auf. Dadurch wächst und wächst die Wolke, und als sie endlich vollständig ist und nach dem Kullaberg steuert, ist es nicht mehr eine einzige Wolke, sondern eine ganze Wolkenwand, die so groß ist, daß sie von Höganäs bis Mölle einen Schatten auf die Erde wirft.

Als sie über dem Spielplatz anhält, verdeckt sie die Sonne, und es muß eine gute Weile Sperlinge auf einen der Hügel regnen, bis die, die ganz innen in der Wolke geflogen waren, wieder einen Schimmer vom Tageslicht wahrnehmen können.

Aber jetzt taucht doch die größte von allen diesen Vogelwolken auf. Sie ist aus Scharen gebildet, die von allen Seiten herbeigeflogen kamen und sich miteinander vereinigt haben. Sie hat eine tief graublaue Färbung, und kein Sonnenstrahl dringt durch sie hindurch.

Düster und schreckeneinjagend wie eine Gewitterwolke zieht sie daher, erfüllt von unheimlichstem Spuk, von gräßlichem, schreiendem, verächtlichem Gelächter und unglückprophezeiendem Gekrächze. Die Tiere auf dem Spielplatz sind froh, als sie sich endlich in einen Regen von flügelschlagenden, krächzenden Vögeln: von Dohlen, Raben und dem übrigen Krähenvolk auflöst.

Hierauf erscheinen am Himmel nicht nur Wolken, sondern eine Menge andrer Striche und Zeichen. Dann zeigen sich im Osten und Nordosten gerade punktierte Linien.

Das sind die Waldvögel von den Göinger Bezirken, die Birk- und Auerhühner, die in langen Reihen, mit einem Abstand von ein paar Metern zwischen den einzelnen Vögeln daherfliegen. Und die Sumpfvögel, die sich auf Måkläppen vor Falsterbo aufhalten, kommen jetzt über den Öresund in allerlei sonderbaren Flugordnungen gezogen: in Triangeln oder langen Schnörkeln, in schiefen Haken oder in Halbkreisen.

Bei der großen Versammlung, die in dem Jahre stattfand, wo Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen umherzog, kam Akka mit ihrer Schar später als alle andern, und das war nicht zu verwundern, denn Akka hatte, um den Kullaberg zu erreichen, über ganz Schonen hinfliegen müssen.

Außerdem hatte sie sich, sobald sie erwachte, zuerst nach Däumling umgesehen, der ja viele Stunden lang gegangen war, den grauen Ratten auf der Pfeife vorgeblasen und sie damit weit weg von Glimmingehaus gelockt hatte.

Das Eulenmännchen war mit der Botschaft zurückgekehrt, daß die schwarzen Ratten gleich nach Sonnenuntergang daheim eintreffen würden, und es war also keine Gefahr mehr, wenn man die Pfeife der Turmeule verstummen ließ und den grauen Ratten erlaubte, zu gehen, wohin sie wollten.

Aber nicht Akka war es, die den Jungen entdeckte, wie er mit seinem langen Gefolge dahinzog, und die sich ganz schnell auf ihn herabsenkte, ihn mit dem Schnabel erfaßte und mit ihm in die Luft hinaufstieg, sondern Herr Ermenrich war es, der Storch.

Denn auch Herr Ermenrich hatte sich aufgemacht, ihn zu suchen, und nachdem er ihn ins Storchennest hinaufgebracht hatte, bat er ihn um Verzeihung, daß er ihn am vorhergehenden Abend so unehrerbietig behandelt hätte.

Der Junge freute sich sehr darüber, und er und der Storch wurden recht gute Freunde.

Akka war auch sehr freundlich gegen ihn und rieb ihren alten Kopf mehrere Male an seinem Arm. Aber am vergnügtesten wurde der Junge doch, als Akka den Storch fragte, ob er es für rätlich halte, daß sie Däumling mit auf den Kullaberg nähmen.

„Ich glaube, wir können uns auf ihn ebensogut verlassen wie auf uns selber,“ sagte sie. „Er wird uns den Menschen sicher nicht verraten.“

Der Storch riet sogleich sehr eifrig, Däumling mitzunehmen. „Gewiß müssen Sie Däumling mit nach dem Kullaberg nehmen, Mutter Akka,“ sagte er. „Es ist ein Glück für uns, daß wir ihn für alles, was er heute Nacht unseretwegen ausgestanden hat, belohnen können.

Und da ich mich noch immer über mein gestriges unpassendes Benehmen gräme, werde ich selbst ihn auf meinem Rücken nach dem Versammlungsort tragen.“

Es gibt nicht viel, was besser schmeckt, als von solchen gelobt zu werden, die selbst klug und tüchtig sind, und der Junge hatte sich noch nie so glücklich gefühlt als jetzt, wo die Wildgans und der Storch auf diese Weise von ihm sprachen.

Der Junge machte also die Reise nach dem Kullaberg auf dem Rücken des Storches, und obgleich er das für eine große Ehre hielt, verursachte es ihm doch viel Angst, denn Herr Ermenrich war ein Meister im Fliegen und flog mit ganz andrer Eile davon als die Wildgänse.

Während Akka mit gleichmäßigen Flügelschlägen immer geradeaus flog, vergnügte sich der Storch mit einer Menge Flugkünste. Bald lag er in unermeßlicher Höhe ganz still da und schwebte durch die Luft, ohne die Flügel zu bewegen, bald ließ er sich mit solcher Eile hinabsinken, daß es aussah, als stürze er hilflos wie ein Stein auf die Erde hinunter, bald flog er zu seinem Vergnügen in großen und kleinen Kreisen wie ein Wirbelwind um Akka herum.

Der Junge hatte noch nie so etwas erlebt, und obgleich er beständig von Angst erfüllt war, mußte er im stillen doch anerkennen, daß er früher nicht gewußt hatte, was man gut fliegen heißt.

Nur ein einziges Mal wurde während der Reise angehalten, das war, als Akka sich mit ihren Reisegefährten am Vombsee vereinigte und ihnen zurief, daß die grauen Ratten besiegt worden seien. Dann flogen alle miteinander geraden Wegs nach dem Kullaberg.

Hier ließen sie sich oben auf dem Hügel nieder, der den Wildgänsen aufgehoben war; und als jetzt der Junge die Blicke von Hügel zu Hügel wandern ließ, sah er, daß auf dem einen das vielzackige Geweih der Edelhirsche und auf einem andern die Nackenbüsche der grauen Habichte aufragten.

Ein Hügel war rot von Füchsen, ein andrer schwarz und weiß von Seevögeln, einer grau von Ratten. Einer war mit schwarzen Raben besetzt, die unaufhörlich schrieen, einer mit Lerchen, die nicht imstande waren, sich ruhig zu verhalten, sondern immer wieder in die Luft hinaufstiegen und vor Freude jubilierten.

Wie es von jeher Sitte auf dem Kullaberg ist, begannen die Krähen die Spiele und Vorstellungen des Tages mit einem Flugtanz. Sie teilten sich in zwei Scharen, die aufeinander zuflogen, sich trafen, dann umwendeten und aufs neue begannen. Dieser Tanz hatte viele Runden und kam den Zuschauern, wenn sie die Tanzregeln nicht kannten, etwas zu einförmig vor.

Die Krähen waren sehr stolz auf ihren Tanz, aber alle andern Tiere waren froh, als er zu Ende war. Er kam ihnen ebenso düster und sinnlos vor, wie das Spiel des Wintersturmes mit den Schneeflocken. Sie wurden schon vom Ansehen ganz niedergedrückt und warteten eifrig auf etwas, das sie ein bißchen froh stimmen würde.

Sie brauchten auch nicht vergeblich zu warten, denn sobald die Krähen fertig waren, kamen die Hasen dahergesprungen. In einer langen Reihe, ohne besondre Ordnung strömten sie herbei. Dazwischen kam einer ganz allein, dann wieder drei oder vier in einer Reihe. Alle hatten sich auf die Hinterläufe aufgerichtet, und sie stürmten so schnell vorwärts, daß ihre langen Ohren nach allen Seiten schwankten.

Während des Springens drehten sie sich im Kreise herum, machten hohe Sätze und schlugen sich mit den Vorderpfoten gegen die Rippen, daß es knallte. Einige schlugen viele Purzelbäume hintereinander, andre kugelten sich zusammen und rollten wie Räder vorwärts, einer stand auf einem Lauf und schwang sich im Kreise, ein andrer ging auf den Vorderpfoten.

Es war durchaus keine Ordnung da, aber es war viel Aufregung bei diesem Spiel der Hasen, und die vielen Tiere, die zusahen, begannen schneller zu atmen. Jetzt war es Frühling. Lust und Freude waren im Anzug. Der Winter war vorüber, der Sommer nahte. Bald war das Leben nur noch ein Spiel!

Als die Hasen ausgetobt hatten, war die Reihe des Auftretens an den großen Vögeln des Waldes. Hunderte von Auerhähnen in glänzend schwarzem Staat und mit hellroten Augenbrauen warfen sich auf eine große Eiche, die mitten auf dem Spielplatz stand.

Der Auerhahn, der auf dem obersten Zweig saß, blies die Federn auf, ließ die Flügel hängen und streckte den Schwanz in die Höhe, so daß die weißen Deckfedern sichtbar wurden. Hierauf streckte er den Hals vor und stieß ein paar Töne aus dem verdickten Hals heraus.

„Tjäck, tjäck, tjäck!“ klang es. Mehr konnte er nicht herausbringen, es gluckste nur mehrere Male tief drunten in seiner Kehle. Dann schloß er die Augen und flüsterte: „Sis, sis, sis – hört wie schön! Sis, sis, sis!“ Und zugleich verfiel er in solche Verzückung, daß er nicht mehr wußte, was rings um ihn her geschah.

Während der erste Auerhahn noch mit seinem sis, sis fortfuhr, fingen die drei, die am nächsten unter ihm saßen, zu balzen an, und ehe sie die ganze Weise durchgebalzt hatten, begannen die zehn, die etwas weiter unten saßen; und so ging es von Zweig zu Zweig, bis alle die Hunderte von Auerhähnen balzten und glucksten und sisisten. Sie fielen alle in dieselbe Verzückung während ihres Gesanges, und gerade das wirkte auf die andern Tiere wie ein ansteckender Rausch.

Das Blut war ihnen vorhin lustig und leicht durch die Adern geflossen, jetzt begann es schwer und heiß zu wallen. „Ja, es ist sicherlich Frühling,“ dachten die vielen Tiervölker. „Die Winterkälte ist verschwunden, das Feuer des Frühlings ist auf der Erde angezündet.“

Als die Birkhühner merkten, daß die Auerhähne so großen Erfolg hatten, konnten sie sich nicht mehr still verhalten. Da kein Baum da war, wo sie Platz gehabt hätten, stürmten sie auf den Spielplatz hinunter, wo das Heidekraut so hoch stand, daß nur ihre schön geschwungenen Schwanzfedern und ihre dicken Schnäbel hervorsahen, und begannen zu singen: „Orr, orr, orr!“

Gerade als die Birkhühner mit den Auerhähnen zu wetteifern begannen, geschah etwas Unerhörtes. Während alle Tiere an nichts andres dachten als an das Spiel der Auerhähne, schlich sich ein Fuchs ganz leise an den Hügel der Wildgänse heran. Er ging sehr vorsichtig und kam weit auf den Hügel hinauf, bevor ihn jemand bemerkte.

Plötzlich entdeckte ihn doch eine Gans, und da sie sich nicht denken konnte, daß sich der Fuchs in guter Absicht zwischen die Gänse hineingeschlichen hätte, rief sie schnell: „Wildgänse, nehmt euch in acht! Nehmt euch in acht!“ Der Fuchs packte sie am Halse, vielleicht hauptsächlich um sie zum Schweigen zu bringen, aber die Wildgänse hatten den Ruf schon vernommen und hoben sich in die Luft empor.

Und als sie aufgeflogen waren, sahen alle Tiere den Fuchs Smirre mit einer toten Gans im Maule auf dem Hügel der wilden Gänse stehen.

Aber weil er also den Frieden des Spieltages gebrochen hatte, wurde schwere Strafe über Smirre verhängt, so daß er sein ganzes Leben lang bereuen mußte, daß er seine Rachgier nicht hatte unterdrücken können, sondern es versucht hatte, auf diese Weise Akka und ihrer Schar zu nahe zu kommen.

Schnell wurde er von einer Schar Füchse umringt und alter Sitte gemäß verurteilt. Der Urteilsspruch aber lautet: „Wer immer den Frieden des großen Spieltages bricht, wird des Landes verwiesen.“ Kein Fuchs wollte das Urteil mildern, denn sie wußten alle, sobald sie etwas derartiges versuchten, würden sie in demselben Augenblick vom Spielplatz verjagt und ihnen nicht erlaubt werden, ihn je wieder zu betreten.

Also wurde das Verbannungsurteil ohne Widerspruch Smirre kundgetan. Es wurde ihm untersagt, in Schonen zu verbleiben. Er wurde von seiner Frau und von seinen Verwandten geschieden, von Jagdrevier, Wohnung und von den Schlupfwinkeln, die er bisher zu eigen gehabt hatte, und mußte sein Glück in der Fremde versuchen. Und damit alle Füchse in Schonen wissen sollten, daß Smirre in dieser Landschaft vogelfrei war, biß ihm der älteste von den Füchsen die Spitze seines rechten Ohrs ab.

Sobald dies getan war, begannen die jungen Füchse blutdürstig zu heulen und sich auf Smirre zu werfen. Es blieb ihm nichts andres übrig, als die Flucht zu ergreifen, und mit allen jungen Füchsen an den Fersen rannte er vom Kullaberg fort.

Alles das geschah, während die Birkhühner und die Auerhähne miteinander wetteiferten. Aber diese Vögel vertiefen sich in solchem Grade in ihren Gesang, daß sie weder hören noch sehen, und sie hätten sich auch gar nicht stören lassen.

Kaum war der Wettstreit der Waldvögel beendet, als die Edelhirsche von Häckeberga vortraten, ihr Kampfspiel zu zeigen. Mehrere Paare Edelhirsche kämpften zu gleicher Zeit.

Sie stürzten mit großer Kraft aufeinander los, schlugen donnernd mit den Geweihen zusammen, so daß sich deren Stangen ineinander flochten, und einer versuchte den andern zurückzudrängen. Heidekrautbüschel flogen unter ihren Hufen auf, der Atem stand ihnen wie Rauch vor dem Maule, aus ihrer Kehle drang unheimliches Gebrüll, und der Schaum floß ihnen am Bug hinunter.

Ringsum auf den Hügeln herrschte atemlose Stille, während die streitkundigen Hirsche im Treffen waren, und bei allen Tieren regten sich neue Gefühle. Alle und jedes einzelne fühlten sich mutig und stark, voll wiederkehrender Kraft, vom Frühling neu geboren, hurtig zu jeder Art Abenteuer bereit. Sie fühlten keinen Zorn gegeneinander, doch hoben sich überall Flügel, Nackenfedern sträubten sich und Krallen wurden gewetzt.

Wenn die Hirsche von Häckeberga noch einen Augenblick weitergekämpft hätten, würde auf allen Hügeln ein wilder Kampf entbrannt sein, weil bei allen Tieren ein brennender Eifer um sich gegriffen hatte, zu zeigen, daß auch sie voller Leben seien, daß die Ohnmacht des Winters vorüber sei, daß Kraft ihre Adern schwelle.

Aber die Edelhirsche beendigten ihren Kampf gerade im rechten Augenblick, und schnell ging ein Flüstern von Hügel zu Hügel: „Jetzt kommen die Kraniche!“

Und da kamen die grauen wie in Dämmerung gekleideten Vögel, mit langen Federbüschen in den Flügeln und rotem Federschmuck im Nacken. Die Vögel mit ihren langen Beinen, ihren schlanken Hälsen und ihren kleinen Köpfen glitten in geheimnisvoller Verwirrung von ihrem Hügel herab. Während sie vorwärts glitten, drehten sie sich halb fliegend, halb tanzend im Kreise herum. Die Flügel anmutig erhoben, bewegten sie sich mit unfaßlicher Schnelligkeit.

Es war, als spielten graue Schatten ein Spiel, dem das Auge kaum zu folgen vermochte. Es war, als hätten sie es von den Nebeln gelernt, die über die einsamen Moore hinschweben. Ein Zauber lag darin; alle, die noch nie auf dem Kullaberg gewesen waren, begriffen nun, warum die ganze Versammlung ihren Namen von dem Kranichtanz hat. Es lag eine gewisse Wildheit darin, aber das Gefühl, das diese erweckte, war eine holde Sehnsucht.

Niemand dachte jetzt mehr daran, zu kämpfen. Dagegen fühlten jetzt alle, die Beflügelten und die Flügellosen, einen Drang in sich, ungeheuer hoch hinaufzusteigen, ja bis über die Wolken hinauf, um zu sehen, was sich darüber befinde, einen Drang, den schweren Körper zu verlassen, der sie auf die Erde hinabzog, und nach dem Überirdischen hinzuschweben.

Eine solche Sehnsucht nach dem Unerreichbaren, nach dem hinter dem Leben Verborgenen fühlten die Tiere nur einmal im Jahre, und zwar an dem Tag, wo sie den großen Kranichtanz sahen.