de-en  Dt. Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.11 Medium
The poor and the miserable of St. Louis.


With the good samaritans. - Alone in the giant city. - On the bank of the Mississippi river. - About horror and shame. - An orgy in ugliness. – The human corral. - Searching for employment. - In the realm of the copper pots. - The miniature hell of the Palace Hotel. – The little bell of the inquisitive people.

The express train roared into the broad St. Louis station hall. Very slowly, very carefully, for my limbs were as heavy and sluggish as lead, I climbed off, and was seized and pushed further along by the throng of people flowing to the exits; along the station platform, through a lobby into a wide street. People hurried past, a confusion of cars rolled by. Mechanically, I went forward, peering into the shop windows, looking at the street scene, and turning onto a wide, quiet square. My head was feverish. Walking became difficult for me. I tried to think about what I would have to do first, but was so indifferent and tired that the thought evaporated into thin air. Slowly I sauntered along. First a shudder, ice-cold, and then a scalding hot boiling sensation ran trough me, and now the malaria chills hit me, and my body trembled and was thrown back and forth while I clung onto a lantern pillar. "What's the matter?" Asked a voice, which seemed to come from afar, and a giant blue something appeared next to me.
"Are you sick?" The blue something was a policeman, a head taller than I, gazing down at me in astonishment. I wanted to answer, but I couldn't because I was shaking and my teeth were chattering.
"He's sick," said the policeman. "We'll soon have it. Just hug the old lantern, my boy - hold on tight. I'll be back here in a minute. I'll go to the telephone box." "You're properly caught," he said on returning.
I wanted to smile, but I could not. A rattling of bells sounded, hoofs of galloping horses thundered, helping hands gripped me and pushed me between soft pillows. ... And then suddenly, I found myself in a little room on a soft armchair. A figure in a physician's white linen coat leaned over me, scratching the skin of my upper arm with an ivory pencil.
"There we are, indeed!" the young doctor said. "You exhibit the most splendid case of chills, young man, which has come to me in a long time. But who will faint right away! Have you had these chilling attacks several times before?" "For six weeks, every second day. Where am I exactly?" "Oho!" cried the doctor, whistling through his teeth. "O – ho!! You are in St. Louis public hospital, young man, and you will be vaccinated right now." He stroked the lymph. We'll basically empty you out, my boy, and get rid of this stupid malaria." The next few days were a single long sleep, with images of nurses in between, who administered medication and gave me milk. Just sleeping, sleeping. Then came the days of recovery.
"You are now healthy to the core," the young doctor said smiling when I was discharged in the office of the hospital after three weeks. "Strong and robust! Good luck! One day when you get rich, my boy, send a fat check to us nice people in the public hospital. So! Now, deal with the world out there, you light-hearted Teuton, and enjoy yourself as much as possible. In rebus adversariis – or what is it called? Stop - as a spiritual brother in Latin and Greek, I want to show you something." He took a numbered glass slide out of a cabinet with many compartments, pushed it under the microscope on his desk and let me look through it. "What do you see?" he asked.
"A round circle," I replied;"white, pink on the edges, and rust-brown little dots and dashes in the middle.""That's right. What do you think it is?" "A microscopic specimen." "Of course. The round circle is a drop of blood, namely of your blood my boy, and the points and lines you call exactly rusty brown are malaria parasites which were rumbling inside of you! Which we bumped off!" ... It was a sunny afternoon in the first days of November, clear and cold, when I stepped again out of the hospital's gate into the world. I dolefully looked down myself. The merciful Samaritans in the brick-red building there had sinned a very tiny bit at one point; in a small way, but in an important triviality. My clothes had been disinfected with steam, as had to take place according to regulations, and were in pretty bad shape now; so wrinkled and unironed that I looked as disheveled as the friend Struwwelpeter from the picture book. In addition, my pockets were empty, down to small change - less than a dollar, and thus that meant finding work immediately in the big city.
"A healthy person who does not find work is either grossly stupid, or intent on finding a certain kind of work that doesn't exist at the moment!" Billy had always said.
I was healthy again and I didn't think I was dumb as a bum. It had to happen! Of course, the young man, who had lived out in the wide open country for many months and had only worked for simple people, felt alien among the immense skyscrapers, the elegant shops, the scurrying people. It wasn't easy to find the right opening. The hours passed by.
I had descended a sloping downhill street, a crowded, filthy street, with hundreds of little shops and now was standing at its end in front of a hell of noise and work. "Levee" was on the wide road sign at the corner.
A dirty yellow stream, gigantically wide, its mass of water churned sluggishly in a tumult of steamboats with many decks, one behind the other lining the warf. In the distance the steelwork of bridges stuck up. Thousands upon thousands, millions of bags and barrels and boxes were stacked alongside the steam boats and in between thousands of people were hurrying back and forth with rumbling carts. A noise of wagon traffic filled the levee, which stretched along the river with its row of houses and the smoke-belching line of steamers facing the houses. I was almost staring reverently at the waters of this stream of streams - as a boy its sonorous name was something mysterious to me: Mississippi. I looked and was astonished and floated along in the noise. I forgot all my misery until snowflakes began to fall, and in the onset of darkness, the row of houses lit up in harsh electric light. It was getting colder. In a restaurant that promised to deliver a meal for 10 cents with big red letters in the shop window, I ate a "lamb hash" and drank a cup of coffee - you must have money! You have to find a job! What I wouldn't have given to have Billy sitting next to me now - he, who smiled at difficulties and always knew exactly what to do and how to deal with things. I counted my money stealthily. I had seventy cents. For a moment a paralyzing panic seemed to grip me, then I pulled myself together: I must find work tomorrow. ... At daybreak I had to be up and about and search and ask until I found something.
When I stepped out of the warm room into the swirling snow again, I froze pitifully. It was bitterly cold down there on the shore of the Mississippi. I was about to ask a policeman to inquire about cheap accommodations when I noticed a glaring neon sign over a doorway from which shone: Lodging! 10 cents, 15 cents, 25 cents! For a moment I hesitated. I knew from Billy that the scum of the big city was hanging around in such flophouses where one could sleep for a few cents. But it was only for one night. I entered. In the hallway hung a second neon sign, a hand with a stretched finger out, which pointed to a door alongside.
Smoky fumes struck me in the face when I opened the door, oppressive, breath-robbing, polluted; a hellish exhalation of human effluvium, terribly overheated air and stale tobacco smoke. A man in shirt sleeves was sitting in a chair next to the entrance sat who slammed the door shut behind me as I entered, and annoyed, grumbled about the damn cold air out there.
"Pay!" he said and thrust his hand out to me. "Ten cents!" For my two nickels I got a dirty piece of paper, the receipt, which gave me the right me to stay there overnight.
"You can sit here or go to the rear right away and hit the sack," he murmured. ... "Whatever your damned pleasure is!" A petroleum lamp with a blackened protective glass hung from the ceiling, and its dim light glimmered through the gray masses of smoke and dust with a peculiar, sometimes yellowish, sometimes reddish glow. Two long tables stood in the incredibly big room, and many people were sitting on the benches in front of them. At a bar in the background, an old woman, busily occupied, was pouring beer into gigantic glasses. Everyone was shouting and laughing and cursing pell-mell. I was stunned, horrified, standing still at the entrance, and gazed unthinkingly at a sleazy man who was crouching on the ground next to me, taking off his coat and cursing, unfastening the sling which tightly strapped his left arm to the side of his body.
"What the devil is there to look at here?" he eventually snarled to me. "Huh? Haven't you ever seen a bound up paw?" Then I understood. The man was a sham cripple; a beggar who feigned an ailment.
My first impulse was to turn around again. I wished the ground would open and swallow me up. Then I thought of the cold outside and of the few pennies in my pocket. I had to put up with it – but only for one night. This I swore to myself. In order to avoid attracting all that much attention by standing around, I sat down at the corner of the closest bench where a spot was still open and mechanically lit one of my last cigarettes. If you didn't smoke, you couldn't stand it in this air.
So I was now among the poor and wretched people of the metropolis on the Mississippi, brushing against a man with a puffy face whose coat hung down in tatters on him and who had probably not washed his hands in a long time, as dirty as they were. ... I knew little at the time of poverty and misery, of their causes and effects. I may have been intolerant, as the delicate nose and ears of clean young people are – but it seemed to me as if I had never before seen in my young life anything so awful, anything so pathetic as these men in this room. Everyone was covered with filth. The worn out clothes, the battered-in hats seemed grotesque to me, not to mention unnatural and ugly. A horror grasped me – one has to be older that I was at the time in order to be able to regard the poorest of the poor with understanding eyes. The language I heard was disgusting like a decaying thing.
"Hey – you! – son of a bitch – you got a fucking match?" one man then asked another one there.
The answer cannot be repeated. The expression, "son of a bitch," was used by everybody. It went from mouth to mouth as if it were the pet name of the brotherhood of the wretched. I knew the expression well. In Texas and in the West where swearing and crudeness are at home and it doesn't occur to anyone to take exception to even the strongest expression, this word was regarded as unspeakable, as THE insult. Anyone who said "son of a bitch" wanted to draw blood and reached for his revolver at the same time. The word has certainly caused many a killing. And here it was spoken while grinning and was listened to with laughter. One curse followed another. It was an orgy in ugliness for eyes and ears..."Nothing done today, eh?" the ragamuffin next to me asked me. "Shall I buy you a glass of beer? Yes, it's hard enough in winter in this damn town!" I muttered something about a sick stomach that couldn't take beer and gave him a cigarette, wondering at his kindness. There was no shame here. Here and there I saw a pale, quiet face among the laughing and shouting people; but most of the ten-cent hotel guests made the decision not to worry about their miserable situation. They called a spade a spade. The man across from me grinned and told me about Jewish bakers on a street in the Jewish quarter; if the man was there, then you would get fresh bread, if the woman was there, then a 5-cent piece would be given to boot. Another said you should go to the elegant shops; you would certainly get something there just so that they could get rid of you. Everyone agreed that it was child's play "to get food," only cash money for sleeping and a swig is rare .... ... Their misery and begging were self-evident and necessary things for these poor people. In me, all sorts of sensations were quarreling with one another, and more than once I wanted to go out into the cold and be alone again; but the instinct for warmth and sleep was stronger than revulsion.
Little by little the tables became empty. An indescribable fatigue came over me, and hesitantly I went to the back, there where everyone had gone - to where the sleeping place had to be. ...
And he stood there in startled shock.
The red hot belly of an enormous iron stove glowed in the middle of the room. In one corner hung a dirty lantern. The floor was covered with people who were lying in long rows, seeming to be packed together there in thick clumps; in the middle of the room, along the walls, everywhere. There was only a narrow circle around the red-hot stove which remained free, and the men who were lying packed close to the edge of this circle has stripped themselves half-naked.... Bundles of clothes and boots served them as a pillow. They slept side by side, head to head and heads against feet; in a confusion of bodies, which was horribly dense near the hot stove, and a little less towards the walls. The places near the glowing behemoth were probably the most coveted for their warmth. Newspapers lay all over the floor, the mattresses of this bedroom, and newspapers were what the ones sleeping had used to cover themselves. The men groaned; they snored, they tossed about. One of them cursed about something, a newcomer crawled over the bodies on his hands and feet, searching for a place in the row of people. The glowing stove sent hot air-waves over the poor and miserable, and in its unbearable heat mingled the fumes of men and clothes and the smell of beer and smoke from the outer room. This room was a stable; a human pen whose air penetrated corrosively into the eyes and lungs.
I stood and stared, and more and more new men pushed past me and plopped down like sacks wherever there was still a little space between the bodies. So tired I was - so tired. And then I forgot the night and the weariness over the terrible room and at last fled like one fleeing from infectious plague.
"Hell! Where do you want to go?" asked the man at the door. "Where the devil are you going, in or out?" "Out!" "Is there no room in there?" "Certainly," I said, laughing against my will. " But not for me. I just want to run around all night long than to sleep in there. And now release the door, otherwise - " "Slowly, always slowly!" the man grinned. "For 25 cents more you get a bed, and for 50 cents I'll cover it fresh for you." "First I'll have to see it." "Why not, business is business." He led me up a staircase, into a small shack with an iron camp bed, and brought me fresh sheets and a new pillowcase. I paid the money; my last pennies. When he left, I took off my outer clothes, wrapped myself in the sheets and slept on the floor. ... I didn't trust that bed. It was freezing cold, but still fresh air came through the broken window pane. And I was alone.
"Never again such a night in such a house!" was my last thought. "I would rather jump into the river over there!" All of a sudden I realised that my watch was still in my pocket. I felt as though I were really rich - - it was still pitch-black as I awoke freezing the next morning and looked at my watch by the light of a match. ... Six o'clock. A thick crust of ice had formed on the water in the bowl in the corner and the small piece of soap in the dish was frozen so hard to it, that I had to use my knife to free it. However the ice-cold water was wonderfully refreshing to the body. In the room below with the long tables and numerous benches, the windows were open and the fresh cold air streamed inside. The old woman from yesterday evening stood behind the bar.
"Good morning!" she said. "The early bird catches the worm, heh?" Those inside won't stir before eight o'clock; then they have to get out, because Joe opens the windows and comes with the watering can, ha, ha!" "Good morning!", I answered and wanted to go, but she put a big mug of steaming hot coffee in front of me and muttered: "Bed guests get a free cup of coffee - especially when it's someone stupid enough to pay fifty cents for a bed that only costs twenty-five!" And this fifty cents was my very last bit of money! I laughed out loud and quietly gave thanks to the good gods for the pleasant surprise of the warm coffee.
Look for work!
Outside on the street it was bright and clear and sunny and bitter cold.... A wide wall of snow, five, six feet high, towered, glittering white beside the foot path as far as one could see, and droves of men with snow shovels and brooms were busily engaged in building this wall even higher. One didn't need any particular intelligence to recognise the employment possibilities here.
"Excuse me" I said to the bean pole of a supervisor, who, with a pipe between his teeth and hands in his pockets, directed the multitude of workers with a nod of the head, "excuse me, but is it possible to get work here?" I'm looking for work." "Then you're looking in the wrong place." he answered. "Snow sweepers will be hired in the morning at six o'clock on the dot in the small courtyard of the town hall. "But I need work immediately." "Well - that's your damn business". If it continues to snow today, then I can employ you tomorrow morning. ... Not now." So the long search for work began, the walking and searching the whole day long. Twice I walked up and down the vast Mississippi riverfront, conscientiously asked every workplace, spoke with hundreds of people and lied dreadfully about my work abilities. "the same question-and-answer game was repeated... Job opportunities seemed to be in abundance here: but these mischievous job opportunities were always so peculiar in always wanting to materialize in a few days. Although this gave solace and hope, it was decidedly impractical for a human being who had spent his last cent on a bed for a night. .... I asked and asked. I soon no longer applied to foremen because they immediately asked if I belonged to the "union," the labor union, and became rude when I had to say no. In the bureaus I was either dismissed or was given an appointment for the next Monday (which I gradually began to hate). So I said good-bye to the Mississipi levees, it was almost moon, and slipped starving and freezing to the downtown area. ... As I passed by, I asked a fat policeman, who looked very good-natured, for advice.
"Holy St. Patrick," he said, "other people also have no money, and other people also want to have work. Good advice is hard to find. ... Talk and ask about everything under the sun, and then start over again from the beginning!" And I talked!
In the district of the city that connected the levee to the business center, stood factory after factory, and I searched out factory upon factory with the stereotypical: "I'm looking for work!" Here the people were rude and shook their heads without the effort of uttering a no; there I was quizzed curiously for ten minutes, then to shrug regretfully. You were told there to come back in a week. Wandering the streets and asking questions was heartbreaking. Fatigue came and hunger made itself more and more noticeable. I became so hungry that I almost felt pain when I peeked into the display windows of bakeries and delicatessens while passing by; so hungry that I frantically and repeatedly felt for the watch in my pocket and flirted with the idea that the small ticking thing contained the most enjoyable meal within itself. But I felt that their worth was the last thing that separated from nothing and clenched my teeth. Go on searching! To me, it was as if I was all alone among the enormous buildings, the towering skyscrapers that shouted out the doctrine of the art of chasing dollars; alone in the bustle of people who hastily strove forward as if everyone of them knew quite exactly what he must do. Only I, I alone out of the thousands, didn't know that. The men and the women looked hard, indifferent. But confident above all; so self-assured that every chiseled face and every clear eye seemed to be reproachful to me: Why are you so helpless - why can't you do what we can! I imagined myself to be wretchedly small. And wretchedly hungry.
I went back to the levee. I had nothing to look for in the skyscrapers, in the elegant shops or in the banking district of the city, for I knew the value of money and outward appearance; my crumpled suit, my lack of money limited me; I knew primitive work with my fists quite well. The evening had broken out, and almost instinctively I peered into the lights of the streets for the three gilded balls, which in America meant a pawn shop. Eat - sleep - and then to the town hall very early tomorrow morning for snow-shoveling. Then a little lad in a dark-green bell boy's suit with gold braids and gold buttons came close to me from a side door of a huge building of massive sandstone blocks, a cigarette in his child's mouth, and with great deliberation he nailed a placard to the wall: Man wanted in kitchen.
Wanted, a man for the kitchen ... "What's this?" I asked the child. ...
"This is the side entrance to the Palace Hotel," the bell boy answered. "In the kitchen they need a man for dish-washing. Can't you read?" "I'm the man!" I said. "Just take that thing down again from the wall! And now show me the way, my son!" The activity of dish-washing, indeed, seemed somewhat comical to me. But it was a job and I needed a job.
"Come along," said the child with a condescending nod, because in his view of life a hotel page stood head and shoulders above a prospective dishes washer, of course.
And in five minutes, I was hired by a pompous chef, who spoke English, German, and French, and seemed to be a mercurial bundle of delicate nerves, in all forms, employed as the number 2 pot washer of the Palace Hotel.... Working hours from 6 o'clock in the evening to 6 o'clock in the morning, room and board free, thirty dollars a month, leaving the position only on the 17th of each month ... The kitchen of the gigantic caravanserai, which called itself the Palace Hotel, would be for any average woman the seventh heaven of silver-sparkling and copper-shining kitchen beauty; every woman would have admired the immense stove, the cooks in snow-white suits, the sparkling cleanliness everywhere was amazing. Any average man, however, would have fled horrified from the hustle and bustle of nervous haste in this kitchen! ... At least I have adopted an essential aversion in life to everything that is called cooking from the month of working in that culinary Empire. ... These cooks were vain as peacocks, nervous as hysterical women and impertinent as rich parvenus. They quarreled among themselves in an endless chatter of French and English and German and Italian, and cursing each other into all the depths of hell, until the mighty chef stepped out of his private office. Then they swarmed devoutly around the majesty of the kitchen.
The little room on the side of the kitchen where I had to work, with its eternally wet stone tiles and its marble basin, from the very beginning signified to me a miniature hell, which was cursed in all eternity to be wrapped in hot steam and to accommodate an eternally renewed chaos of sooty copper kettles and casseroles and pots in all dimensions and shapes. One felt like Sisyphus - working against impossibilities. Without respite, fidgety cooks ran in the door as if shot from cannons and threw whole copper mountains before my feet with many "Sapristis" and "Nom de Dieus" and "Hells", while I with sweat in my face, cleaned and washed with hard brushes and strong salt and vinegar solution. It is amusing to remember the ridiculous little things; I still feel the desperate horror today that always crept over me when I happily had the last of the hundreds of pots spick and span, and then suddenly an infernal throng of cooks fired dozens and dozens of dirty casseroles into my miniature hell!
As easy as work might be in itself, no thread remained dry on your body! I was number two. Number one, a South Frenchman, worked from 6:00 a. m. to 6:00 p. m. At one o' clock a.m., the cooks went home and it became quiet in the giant kitchen. But my work really only started, because from the late theater suppers there was still a regiment of pots. But then, every piece of shiny metal in the kitchen should be cleaned. Along the stove, which took up the whole of a longitudinal wall, ran along a solid copper sideboard, about fifteen meters long. It had to be spick and span. The stove had to be blackened, its metal parts cleaned; the pans on the scaffolding above the sideboard should flash and glow and be sorted by size. There were still the brass bands of the dishwashers, enormous vats, in which platforms were rotating by electric power and mechanically cleaned the piled plates and platters. The kitchen tiles had to be washed. Every minute of the twelve working hours had to be used if I wanted to finish. Then, at six o'clock in the morning, I sneaked into the tiny room on the sixth floor, in which a Frenchman from southern France, Number one and I dwelled, without ever seeing us for more than one minute in the morning or in the evening, when we took turns.
Even today I still cannot look at copper pots without dreading the thought of the elegant kitchen of the Palace Hotel and the abysmal work I had to do there! This kitchen was one of the attractions of hotel life of St. Louis, shown with pride - but under precautionary measures. When visitors were led into the kitchen kingdom, then an electric bell sounded shrilly. ... It was called the little bell of the curious monkeys. Their shrill sound was the signal to noble decorum. The cooks, as if spell-bound, stopped the cursing and cackling; the girls at the dishwashers quickly tied fresh aprons around themselves, and made the effort to look quite lovely; I had to close the door to my cleaning realm as quickly as possible. And the curious monkeys flattered the chef about the silent operation.... but I cursed inwardly and counted the days until the 17th on my fingers. ... of December and wondered whether there were any men in this world who could stand cleaning pots at the Palast Hotel for longer than a month. At nine o'clock sharp in the morning, I asked his Majesty the chef for a remittance at the hotel's cash register.
"It is strange," the chef found, "that we have to replace the personnel of the cleaning room so often. It's easy work, isn't it? Well, when you have squandered your money, you can apply again." "Thank you!" I said.
But when I put a bundle of forty-three dollar notes for five weeks work tenderly into my pocket, my strange anger at this hell of copper misery mixed with a quiet gratitude, and glad like someone released from agony, I put on my best suit. At my request, Starkenbach had sent my suitcase to the hotel. A note lay on top of it: "Good luck, dear friend! How do you like my good old St. Louis? Enjoy yourself as best as you can and don't take this strange life too serious!" I laughed out loud then. ... If you clean copper pots, life is not funny at all - and the what I knew about the good old St.Louis, was that it's a miniature hell in the worst slum area of the city and another miniature hell in one of the most noble hotel quarters in the civilized world. ...
unit 1
Die Armen und Elenden von St. Louis.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 2
Bei den guten Samaritern.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 3
– Allein in der Riesenstadt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 4
– Am Ufer des Mississippi.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 5
– Vom Grauen und von der Scham.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 6
– Eine Orgie in der Häßlichkeit.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 7
– Der Menschenpferch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 8
– Auf Arbeitssuche.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 9
– Im Reich der kupfernen Töpfe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 10
– Die Miniaturhölle des Palasthotels.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 11
– Das Glöckchen der Neugierigen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 12
Der Schnellzug brauste in die weite Bahnhofshalle von St. Louis.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 14
Menschen hasteten vorbei, Wagenwirrwarr zog dahin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 16
Mein Kopf fieberte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 17
Das Gehen wurde mir schwer.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 19
Langsam schlenderte ich dahin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 22
unit 23
»Krank is' er!« sagte der Polizist.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 24
»Werden wir gleich haben.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 25
Umarmen Sie nur die alte Laterne, mein Junge – halten Sie sich fest.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 26
In einer Minute bin ich wieder da.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 27
Geh' nur zur Telephonbox.« »Sie hat's ordentlich,« meinte er, als er zurückkam.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 28
Ich wollte lächeln, nicken, aber es ging nicht.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 30
Und dann fand ich mich auf einmal in einem kleinen Zimmerchen, auf weichem Lehnstuhl.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 32
»Da wären wir ja!« sagte der junge Arzt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 34
Aber wer wird denn gleich in Ohnmacht fallen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 35
Schon mehrere Male Schüttelfrost gehabt?« »Seit sechs Wochen – jeden zweiten Tag.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 36
Wo bin ich eigentlich?« »Oho!« rief der Arzt und pfiff durch die Zähne.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 37
»O – ho!!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 40
Nur schlafen, schlafen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 41
Dann kamen die Tage der Genesung.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 43
»Stark und kräftig!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 44
Viel Glück!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 46
So!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 48
In rebus adversariis – oder wie heißt es?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 50
»Was sehen Sie?« fragte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 52
Was ist das wohl?« »Ein mikroskopisches Präparat.« »Natürlich.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 55
Trübselig schaute ich an mir hinunter.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months, 1 week ago
unit 60
Gesund war ich wieder und für bodenlos dumm hielt ich mich nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 61
Es mußte gehen!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 63
Es war nicht gar so einfach, da den Hebel anzusetzen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 64
Die Stunden zerrannen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 66
"Levee" hieß es auf dem breiten Straßenschild an der Ecke.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 68
In der Ferne ragte das Stahlwerk von Brücken empor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 72
Ich schaute und staunte und trieb mich in dem Lärm umher.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 74
Es wurde immer kälter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 76
Du mußt Arbeit finden!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 78
Verstohlen zählte ich mein Geld.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 79
Es waren 70 Cents.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 82
Als ich aus dem warmen Raum wieder hinaustrat in den wirbelnden Schnee, fror ich erbärmlich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 83
Es war bitterkalt da drunten am Mississippiufer.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 85
10 cents, 15 cents, 25 cents!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 86
Einen Augenblick lang zögerte ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 88
Aber es war ja nur für eine Nacht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 89
Ich trat ein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 93
»Zahlen!« sagte er und streckte mir die Hand hin.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 95
»Kannst hier sitzen oder gleich nach hinten gehen un' dich hinschmeißen,« murmelte er.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 99
Alles schrie und lachte und fluchte durcheinander.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 101
»Was beim Teufel gibt's hier zu schauen?« fuhr er mich endlich an.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 102
»Heh?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 103
Hast noch nie 'ne angebundene Pfote gesehen?« Da begriff ich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 104
Der Mann war ein Scheinkrüppel; ein Bettler, der ein Gebrechen heuchelte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 105
Mein erster Impuls war, wieder umzukehren.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 106
In den Boden hinein hätte ich mich schämen mögen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 107
Dann dachte ich an die Kälte draußen und an die wenigen Pfennige in meiner Tasche.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 108
Es mußte ertragen werden – doch eine Nacht nur, das schwor ich mir.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 110
Wenn man nicht rauchte, war es nicht zum aushalten in dieser Luft.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 113
Von Schmutz starrten alle.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 116
Die Sprache, die ich hörte, war widerlich wie ein verfaulendes Ding.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 117
»Eh – du!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 118
– Sohn einer Hündin – hast 'n verfluchtes Zündholz?« fragte da einer den andern.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 119
Die Antwort ist nicht wiederzugeben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year ago
unit 122
unit 123
Das Wort hat schon manchen Todschlag verschuldet.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 124
Und hier wurde es grinsend gesprochen und mit Lachen angehört.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 125
Die Flüche jagten sich.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 127
»Soll ich dir ein Glas Bier bezahlen?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 129
Scham gab es hier nicht.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 131
Sie nahmen auch kein Blatt vor den Mund.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 135
Ihr Elend und ihr Betteln waren diesen Armen selbstverständliche und notwendige Dinge.
6 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 137
Nach und nach wurden die Tische leer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 139
Und blieb entsetzt stehen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 140
Mitten in einem großen Raum leuchtete der rotglühende Bauch eines gewaltigen eisernen Ofens.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 141
In einer Ecke hing eine schmutzige Laterne.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 144
Bündel von Kleidern und Stiefeln dienten ihnen als Kopfkissen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 148
Die Männer stöhnten im Schlaf; sie schnarchten, sie wälzten sich hin und her.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 151
Ein Stall war dieses Zimmer; ein Menschenpferch, dessen Luft beizend in Augen und Lungen drang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 153
So müde war ich – so müde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 155
»Hell!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 156
Wohin willst du?« fragte der Mann an der Türe.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 158
»Aber nicht für mich. Ich will lieber die ganze Nacht herumlaufen, als da drinnen schlafen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 159
Und jetzt geben Sie die Türe frei, sonst –« »Langsam, immer langsam!« grinste der Mann.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 161
Ich zahlte das Geld; meine letzten Pfennige.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 163
Dem Bett traute ich nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 164
Es war eisig kalt, aber durch die zerbrochene Fensterscheibe drang doch frische Luft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 165
Und man war allein.
4 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 166
»Nie wieder eine solche Nacht in einem solchen Haus!« war mein letzter Gedanke.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 169
Sechs Uhr.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 172
Hinter der Bar stand das alte Weib von gestern abend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 173
»Guten Morgen!« sagte sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 174
»Der Vogel, der früh aufsteht, erwischt den Wurm, heh?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 177
Arbeit suchen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 178
Es war hell und klar und sonnig und bitterkalt draußen auf der Straße.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 180
Es bedurfte wahrlich keiner besonderen Intelligenz, um hier die Arbeitsmöglichkeit zu erkennen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 182
Ich suche Arbeit.« »Dann suchen Sie am falschen Platz,« antwortete er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 184
Wenn's heute weiterschneit, kann ich Sie morgen früh anstellen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 185
Jetzt nicht.« So begann die lange Arbeitssuche, das Laufen und Suchen den ganzen Tag hindurch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 190
Ich fragte und fragte.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 194
Im Vorbeigehen bat ich einen dicken Polizisten, der sehr gutmütig aussah, um Rat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 196
Da soll der Kuckuck raten.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 197
unit 199
Dort sollte man in einer Woche wiederkommen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 200
Es war ein Straßenwandern und Fragen zum Herzzerbrechen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 201
Die Müdigkeit kam und der Hunger machte sich immer bemerkbarer.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 203
unit 204
Weiter suchen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 206
Nur ich, ich allein unter den Tausenden, wußte das nicht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 207
Hart sahen die Männer und die Frauen aus, gleichgültig.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 209
Erbärmlich klein kam ich mir vor.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 210
Und erbärmlich hungrig.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 211
Ich wanderte wieder der Levee zu.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 214
Essen – schlafen – und dann aufs Rathaus morgen in aller Frühe zum Schneeschaufeln.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 216
Gesucht ein Mann für die Küche … »Was ist das?« fragte ich das Kind.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 217
»Dies ist der Seiteneingang zum Palacehotel,« antwortete der Pagenjüngling.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 218
»In der Küche brauchen sie einen Mann zum Geschirrwaschen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 219
Können Sie nich' lesen?« »Der Mann bin ich!« sagte ich.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 220
»Nimm das Ding nur wieder herunter von der Wand!
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 222
Aber es war Arbeit, und Arbeit brauchte ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 230
Dann schwenzelten sie devot um die Majestät der Küche herum.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 232
Man kam sich vor wie Sisyphus – gegen Unmöglichkeiten anarbeitend.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 235
So leicht die Arbeit an und für sich sein mochte – kein Faden blieb einem trocken am Leib!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 236
Ich war Nummer zwei.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 237
Nummer eins, ein Südfranzose, arbeitete von 6 Uhr morgens bis 6 Uhr abends.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 238
Um ein Uhr nachts gingen die Köche nach Hause, und es wurde still in der Riesenküche.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 240
Dann aber hieß es, jedes Stückchen Metallglanz in der Küche putzen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 242
Der mußte blitzblank sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 245
Da waren die Küchenfliesen zu waschen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 246
Jede Minute der zwölf Arbeitsstunden mußte ausgenützt werden, wenn ich fertig werden wollte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 250
Wurden Besucher ins Küchenreich geführt, so ertönte schrill eine elektrische Glocke.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 251
Das Glöckchen der neugierigen Affen wurde sie genannt.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 252
Ihr Schrillen war das Signal zu vornehmem Dekorum.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 256
unit 258
Die Arbeit ist doch leicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 259
unit 261
Starkenbach hatte mir auf meine Bitte meinen Koffer ins Hotel geschickt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 262
Ein Zettel lag obenauf: »Viel Glück, lieber Freund!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 263
Wie gefällt Ihnen mein gutes altes St. Louis?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 106  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 94  1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8472  commented on  unit 66  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 23  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 17  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 122  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 120  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 257  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 109  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 133  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3447  commented on  unit 131  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 77  1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8472  translated  unit 102  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3447  translated  unit 46  1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8472  translated  unit 44  1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8472  translated  unit 37  1 year, 1 month ago

Die Armen und Elenden von St. Louis.

Bei den guten Samaritern. – Allein in der Riesenstadt. – Am Ufer des Mississippi. – Vom Grauen und von der Scham. – Eine Orgie in der Häßlichkeit. – Der Menschenpferch. – Auf Arbeitssuche. – Im Reich der kupfernen Töpfe. – Die Miniaturhölle des Palasthotels. – Das Glöckchen der Neugierigen.

Der Schnellzug brauste in die weite Bahnhofshalle von St. Louis. Sehr langsam, sehr vorsichtig, denn die Glieder waren mir schwer und träge wie Blei, stieg ich aus und wurde von der nach den Ausgängen flutenden Menschenmenge erfaßt und weitergeschoben; den Bahnhofssteig entlang, durch eine Vorhalle in eine breite Straße. Menschen hasteten vorbei, Wagenwirrwarr zog dahin. Mechanisch ging ich vorwärts, guckte in Ladenfenster, betrachtete das Straßenbild und bog in einen weiten, ruhigen Platz ein. Mein Kopf fieberte. Das Gehen wurde mir schwer. Ich versuchte, zu überlegen, was ich nun zunächst tun müßte, war aber so gleichgültig und müde, daß der Gedankengang immer wieder in ein Nichts zerfloß. Langsam schlenderte ich dahin. Da überrieselte mich ein Schauer, eiskalt, dann ein siedendheißes Wallen, und nun packte mich der Malariafrost, daß mein Körper zuckte und hin und her geschleudert wurde, während ich mich krampfhaft an einem Laternenpfahl festhielt –
»Was ist denn los?« fragte eine Stimme, die mir von weither zu kommen schien, und ein riesengroßes blaues Etwas tauchte neben mir auf.
»Sind Sie krank?«

Das blaue Etwas war ein Polizist, einen Kopf größer als ich, der erstaunt auf mich niederguckte. Ich wollte antworten, konnte es aber nicht vor Geschütteltwerden und Zähneklappern.
»Krank is' er!« sagte der Polizist. »Werden wir gleich haben. Umarmen Sie nur die alte Laterne, mein Junge – halten Sie sich fest. In einer Minute bin ich wieder da. Geh' nur zur Telephonbox.«
»Sie hat's ordentlich,« meinte er, als er zurückkam.
Ich wollte lächeln, nicken, aber es ging nicht. Glockengerassel ertönte, Hufschläge galoppierender Pferde donnerten, hilfreiche Hände erfaßten mich und schoben mich zwischen weiche Kissen. Und dann fand ich mich auf einmal in einem kleinen Zimmerchen, auf weichem Lehnstuhl. Eine Gestalt im weißen Linnenmantel des Arztes beugte sich über mich, mir mit einem Elfenbeinstäbchen die Haut am Oberarm ritzend.
»Da wären wir ja!« sagte der junge Arzt. »Sie stellen den schönsten Fall von Schüttelfrost dar, junger Mann, der mir seit einiger Zeit vorgekommen ist. Aber wer wird denn gleich in Ohnmacht fallen! Schon mehrere Male Schüttelfrost gehabt?«
»Seit sechs Wochen – jeden zweiten Tag. Wo bin ich eigentlich?«
»Oho!« rief der Arzt und pfiff durch die Zähne. »O – ho!! Sie sind im öffentlichen Hospital von St. Louis, junger Mann, und augenblicklich werden Sie geimpft.« Er strich die Lymphe ein. »Wir werden Sie gründlich ausleeren, mein Junge, und Ihnen diese Malariadummheiten schon austreiben!«
Die nächsten Tage waren ein einziges langes Schlafen, mit Bildern dazwischen von Krankenschwestern, die mir Medikamente einflößten und Milch gaben. Nur schlafen, schlafen. Dann kamen die Tage der Genesung.
»Sie sind nun kerngesund,« lächelte der junge Arzt, als ich nach drei Wochen zur Entlassung in das Bureau des Krankenhauses geführt wurde. »Stark und kräftig! Viel Glück! Wenn Sie einmal reich geworden sind, mein Junge, schicken Sie uns netten Leuten vom öffentlichen Hospital einen fetten Scheck. So! Nun schlagen Sie sich mit der Welt da draußen herum, Sie leichtsinniger Teutone, und lassen Sie es sich möglichst gut gehen. In rebus adversariis – oder wie heißt es? Halt – als einem Geistesbruder in Latein und Griechisch will ich Ihnen noch etwas zeigen.«
Er holte aus einem Schrank mit vielen Fächern eine nummerierte Glasplatte hervor, schob sie unter das Mikroskop auf seinem Arbeitstisch und ließ mich durchgucken. »Was sehen Sie?« fragte er.
»Einen runden Kreis,« antwortete ich; »weiß, rosa an den Rändern, und in der Mitte rostbraune kleine Pünktchen und Striche.«
»Ganz richtig. Was ist das wohl?«
»Ein mikroskopisches Präparat.«

»Natürlich. Der runde Kreis ist ein Blutstropfen, und zwar ein Tröpfchen Ihres Blutes, mein Junge, und die Punkte und Striche, die Sie ganz richtig rostbraun nennen, sind die Malariaparasiten, die in Ihnen rumorten! Denen haben wir den Garaus gemacht!«
… Es war ein sonniger Nachmittag in den ersten Novembertagen, klar und kalt, als ich aus der Pforte des Hospitals wieder in die Welt hinaustrat. Trübselig schaute ich an mir hinunter. Die barmherzigen Samariter in dem ziegelroten Gebäude dort hatten in einem Punkt ein ganz klein wenig gesündigt; in einer Kleinigkeit, aber in einer wichtigen Kleinigkeit. Meine Kleider waren, wie es nach der Vorschrift geschehen mußte, in Dampf desinfiziert worden und sahen nun betrüblich aus; so zerknittert und ungebügelt, daß ich mir zerzaust vorkam wie Freund Struwwelpeter aus dem Bilderbuch. Dazu waren meine Taschen leer, bis auf Kleingeld – weniger als ein Dollar, und so hieß es sofort Arbeit finden in der großen Stadt.
»Ein gesunder Mensch, der keine Arbeit findet, ist entweder bodenlos dumm, oder auf eine bestimmte Art von Arbeit versessen, die es im Augenblick eben nicht gibt!« hatte Billy immer gesagt.
Gesund war ich wieder und für bodenlos dumm hielt ich mich nicht. Es mußte gehen! Freilich, der junge Mensch, der viele Monate lang da draußen im weiten offenen Land gelebt und nur für simple Menschen gearbeitet hatte, fühlte sich fremd zwischen den ungeheuren Wolkenkratzern, den eleganten Läden, den hastenden Leuten. Es war nicht gar so einfach, da den Hebel anzusetzen. Die Stunden zerrannen.
Ich war eine sich senkende abschüssige Straße hinabgegangen, eine menschenwimmelnde, schmutzige Straße, mit Hunderten von kleinen Läden, und stand nun an ihrem Ende, vor einer Hölle von Lärm und Arbeit. "Levee" hieß es auf dem breiten Straßenschild an der Ecke.
Ein schmutzig gelber Strom, riesenbreit, wälzte träge seine Wassermassen dahin, in einem Getümmel von Dampfbooten mit vielen Stockwerken, die eines hinter dem andern den Kai säumten. In der Ferne ragte das Stahlwerk von Brücken empor. Tausende, Abertausende, Millionen von Säcken und Fässern und Kisten waren längs der Dampfer aufgestapelt, und dazwischen huschten mit polternden Karren Tausende von Menschen hin und her. Ein lärmender Wagenverkehr erfüllte die Levee, die sich unübersehbar weit den Fluß entlang hinzog mit ihrer Häuserreihe und der rauchqualmenden Linie von Dampfern den Häusern gegenüber. Ehrfurchtsvoll fast starrte ich auf die Fluten dieses Stromes der Ströme – als Bub schon war mir sein tönender Name etwas Geheimnisvolles gewesen: Mississippi. Ich schaute und staunte und trieb mich in dem Lärm umher. Meine Not vergaß ich ganz, bis Schneeflocken zu fallen anfingen und in beginnender Dunkelheit die Häuserreihe drüben in grellem elektrischem Licht aufflammte. Es wurde immer kälter. In einem Restaurant, das mit großen roten Buchstaben im Schaufenster versprach, für 10 Cents eine Mahlzeit zu liefern, aß ich ein "Lammhaché" und trank eine Tasse Kaffee –
Du mußt Geld haben! Du mußt Arbeit finden! Was hätte ich nicht darum gegeben, wäre nun Billy neben mir gesessen – er, der Schwierigkeiten weglächelte und immer genau wußte, was zu tun war, und wie man die Dinge anpacken mußte. Verstohlen zählte ich mein Geld. Es waren 70 Cents. Einen Augenblick lang wollte es mich überkommen wie lähmender Schrecken, dann gab ich mir einen Ruck: Der morgige Tag mußte Arbeit bringen. Bei Tagesanbruch mußte ich auf den Beinen sein und so lange suchen und so lange fragen, bis ich etwas fand.
Als ich aus dem warmen Raum wieder hinaustrat in den wirbelnden Schnee, fror ich erbärmlich. Es war bitterkalt da drunten am Mississippiufer. Schon wollte ich einen Polizisten aufsuchen, um mich nach billiger Unterkunft zu erkundigen, als mir ein grelles Transparent auffiel, über einem Hauseingang angebracht, aus dem es hervorleuchtete: Lodging! 10 cents, 15 cents, 25 cents! Einen Augenblick lang zögerte ich. Wußte ich doch von Billy, daß in derartigen Logierhäusern, in denen man für wenige Cents schlafen konnte, der Abschaum der Großstadtmenschheit sich herumtrieb. Aber es war ja nur für eine Nacht. Ich trat ein. Im Hausflur hing ein zweites Transparent, eine Hand mit ausgestrecktem Finger, die zu einer Türe an der Seite hinwies.
Rauchiger Qualm schlug mir entgegen, als ich die Türe öffnete, stickig, atemraubend, verpestet; ein Höllenbrodem von Menschenausdünstung, furchtbar überheizter Luft und schalem Tabaksrauch. Auf einem Stuhl neben dem Eingang saß ein Mann in Hemdsärmeln, der krachend die Türe hinter mir zuwarf, als ich eingetreten war; unter ärgerlichem Gebrumm über die verdammte kalte Luft da draußen.
»Zahlen!« sagte er und streckte mir die Hand hin. »Zehn Cents!«
Für meine beiden Nickel bekam ich ein schmutziges Pappstück, die Quittung, die mich berechtigte, über Nacht hier zu hausen.
»Kannst hier sitzen oder gleich nach hinten gehen un' dich hinschmeißen,« murmelte er. »Wie dir's verdammt angenehm ist!«
Eine Petroleumlampe mit rußgeschwärztem Schutzglas hing an der Decke, und ihr trübes Licht schimmerte in sonderbarem, bald gelblichem, bald rötlichem Schein durch die grauen Massen von Rauch und Dunst hindurch. Zwei lange Tische standen in dem mächtig großen Raum, und auf den Bänken vor ihnen saßen viele Menschen. An einer Bar im Hintergrund hantierte ein altes Weib, emsig beschäftigt, in riesengroße Gläser Bier einzuschenken. Alles schrie und lachte und fluchte durcheinander. Erstaunt, entsetzt war ich am Eingang stehengeblieben und sah gedankenlos einem schmierigen Menschen zu, der neben mir am Boden hockte, sich den Rock ausgezogen hatte und fluchend die Riemen losband, mit denen sein linker Arm fest an die Körperseite geschnallt war.
»Was beim Teufel gibt's hier zu schauen?« fuhr er mich endlich an. »Heh? Hast noch nie 'ne angebundene Pfote gesehen?«
Da begriff ich. Der Mann war ein Scheinkrüppel; ein Bettler, der ein Gebrechen heuchelte.
Mein erster Impuls war, wieder umzukehren. In den Boden hinein hätte ich mich schämen mögen. Dann dachte ich an die Kälte draußen und an die wenigen Pfennige in meiner Tasche. Es mußte ertragen werden – doch eine Nacht nur, das schwor ich mir. Um nicht allzusehr aufzufallen durch Stehenbleiben, setzte ich mich auf die Ecke der nächsten Bank, wo noch ein Plätzchen frei war, und zündete mir mechanisch eine meiner letzten Zigaretten an. Wenn man nicht rauchte, war es nicht zum aushalten in dieser Luft.
So war ich nun mitten unter den Armen und Elenden der Riesenstadt am Mississippi, anstreifend an einen Menschen mit aufgedunsenem Gesicht, dessen Rock in Fetzen an ihm herabhing und der sich die Hände wohl lange nicht mehr gewaschen hatte, so schmutzig waren sie. Ich wußte wenig damals von Armut und Elend, von ihren Ursachen und Wirkungen; ich mag unduldsam gewesen sein, wie es die empfindliche Nase und die empfindlichen Ohren reinlicher Jugend sind – aber mir schien es, als hätte ich in meinem jungen Leben noch nie etwas so Furchtbares gesehen, etwas so Erbärmliches wie diese Männer in diesem Raum. Von Schmutz starrten alle. Die zerschlissenen Kleider, die eingebeulten Hüte kamen mir grotesk vor, unnatürlich und häßlich nicht zum sagen. Ein Grauen packte mich – man muß älter sein, als ich es damals war, um die Ärmsten der Armen mit verstehenden Augen betrachten zu können. Die Sprache, die ich hörte, war widerlich wie ein verfaulendes Ding.
»Eh – du! – Sohn einer Hündin – hast 'n verfluchtes Zündholz?« fragte da einer den andern.
Die Antwort ist nicht wiederzugeben. Das Wort vom Sohn einer Hündin wurde von jedermann gebraucht; es ging von Mund zu Mund, als sei es ein Kosename der Brüderschaft der Elenden. Ich kannte den Ausdruck wohl; in Texas und im Westen, wo Fluchen und Derbheit zu Hause sind und es keinem Menschen einfällt, selbst den stärksten Ausdruck übelzunehmen, galt dieses Wort als das Unsagbare, als die Beleidigung. Wer "son of a bitch" sagte, wollte bis aufs Blut weh tun und – griff gleichzeitig nach dem Revolver. Das Wort hat schon manchen Todschlag verschuldet. Und hier wurde es grinsend gesprochen und mit Lachen angehört. Die Flüche jagten sich. Es war eine Orgie in Häßlichkeit für Auge und Ohr …
»Nix gemacht heute, heh?« fragte mich der Zerlumpte neben mir. »Soll ich dir ein Glas Bier bezahlen? Ja – 's ist hart genug im Winter in dieser verdammten Stadt!«
Ich murmelte irgend etwas über einen kranken Magen, der kein Bier vertragen könne, und gab ihm eine Zigarette, staunend über seine Gutmütigkeit. Scham gab es hier nicht. Da und dort sah ich ein bleiches stilles Gesicht unter den lachenden und schreienden Menschen; die meisten aber der Gäste des Zehn-Cent-Hotels machten sich entschieden keine Kopfschmerzen über ihre jämmerliche Lage. Sie nahmen auch kein Blatt vor den Mund. Der Mann mir gegenüber erzählte grinsend von jüdischen Bäckern in einer Straße des Judenviertels; sei der Mann da, so bekomme man frisches Brot, sei die Frau da, so gebe es ein Nickelstück obendrein. Ein anderer meinte, man müsse in die vornehmen Läden gehen; da bekäme man schon etwas, nur, damit sie einen los würden. Daß es ein Kinderspiel sei, sich »'s Futter zu besorgen,« darin stimmten alle überein, nur bares Geld für Schlafen und einen Schluck sei rar…. Ihr Elend und ihr Betteln waren diesen Armen selbstverständliche und notwendige Dinge. In mir stritten sich alle möglichen Empfindungen, und mehr als einmal wollte ich hinauslaufen in die Kälte und wieder allein sein; doch der Trieb nach Wärme und Schlaf war stärker als der Widerwille.
Nach und nach wurden die Tische leer. Eine unbeschreibliche Müdigkeit kam über mich, und zögernd ging ich nach hinten, dorthin, wo alle hingingen – dorthin, wo der Schlafplatz sein mußte.
Und blieb entsetzt stehen.
Mitten in einem großen Raum leuchtete der rotglühende Bauch eines gewaltigen eisernen Ofens. In einer Ecke hing eine schmutzige Laterne. Der Boden war wie übersät mit Menschen, die da in langen Reihen lagen, dort in dichten Klumpen zusammengepackt schienen; in der Mitte des Zimmers, den Wänden entlang, überall. Nur um den glühenden Ofen war ein schmaler Kreis freigeblieben, und die Männer, die dichtgedrängt am Rande dieses Kreises lagen, hatten sich halbnackt ausgezogen. Bündel von Kleidern und Stiefeln dienten ihnen als Kopfkissen. Seite an Seite schliefen sie, Kopf an Kopf und Köpfe gegen Füße; in einem Wirrwarr von Leibern, der grauenhaft dicht war in der Nähe des heißen Ofens und sich ein wenig lichtete gegen die Wände zu. Die Plätze nahe dem glutstrahlenden Ungetüm waren wohl am begehrtesten um ihrer Wärme willen. Überall auf dem Boden lagen Zeitungen herum, die Matrazen dieses Schlafraumes, und Zeitungen waren es, mit denen die Schlafenden sich zugedeckt hatten. Die Männer stöhnten im Schlaf; sie schnarchten, sie wälzten sich hin und her. Da fluchte einer über irgend etwas, hier kroch ein neuer Ankömmling auf Händen und Füßen über die Leiber hinweg, sich ein Plätzchen in der Menschenreihe suchend. Über die Armen und Elenden hin sandte der glühende Ofen heiße Luftwellen, und in seine unerträgliche Hitze mengten sich die Dünste von Menschen und Kleidern und der Geruch von Bier und Rauch des äußeren Raumes. Ein Stall war dieses Zimmer; ein Menschenpferch, dessen Luft beizend in Augen und Lungen drang.
Ich stand und starrte, und immer neue Menschen drängten sich an mir vorbei und plumpsten wie Säcke nieder, wo noch ein bißchen Raum war zwischen den Leibern. So müde war ich – so müde. Und dann vergaß ich Nacht und Müdigkeit über dem entsetzlichen Raum und flüchtete endlich wie einer, der vor ansteckendem Pesthauch flieht.
»Hell! Wohin willst du?« fragte der Mann an der Türe. »Der Teufel soll das 'rein und 'rauslaufen holen!«
»Hinaus!«
»Ist kein Platz mehr drinnen?«
»Doch!« sagte ich, wider Willen lachend. »Aber nicht für mich. Ich will lieber die ganze Nacht herumlaufen, als da drinnen schlafen. Und jetzt geben Sie die Türe frei, sonst –«
»Langsam, immer langsam!« grinste der Mann. »Für 25 Cents mehr kriegst du 'n Bett, und für 50 Cents will ich dir's frisch überziehen.«
»Zuerst muß ich es sehen.«
»Warum denn nicht; Geschäft ist Geschäft.«
Er führte mich eine Treppe empor, in einen kleinen Verschlag mit eisernem Feldbett, und brachte frische Leintücher und einen neuen Kissenbezug. Ich zahlte das Geld; meine letzten Pfennige. Als er gegangen war, zog ich die Oberkleider aus, wickelte mich in die Leintücher und schlief auf dem Boden. Dem Bett traute ich nicht. Es war eisig kalt, aber durch die zerbrochene Fensterscheibe drang doch frische Luft. Und man war allein.
»Nie wieder eine solche Nacht in einem solchen Haus!« war mein letzter Gedanke. »Lieber in den Fluß springen da drüben!«
Auf einmal fiel mir ein, daß in meiner Tasche ja noch meine Uhr steckte. Da kam ich mir förmlich reich vor – –
Stockfinster war's noch, als ich frierend aufwachte am nächsten Morgen und beim Schein eines Zündhölzchens auf die Uhr sah. Sechs Uhr. Auf der wassergefüllten Waschschüssel in der Ecke hatte sich eine dicke Eiskruste gebildet, und das Stückchen Seife in der Schale war so fest angefroren, daß ich es mit dem Messer loslösen mußte, aber das eiskalte Wasser erfrischte den Körper unbeschreiblich. Unten in dem Zimmer mit den langen Tischen und den vielen Bänken waren die Fenster geöffnet und frische kalte Luft strömte herein. Hinter der Bar stand das alte Weib von gestern abend.
»Guten Morgen!« sagte sie. »Der Vogel, der früh aufsteht, erwischt den Wurm, heh? Von denen da drinnen rührt sich keiner vor acht Uhr; dann müssen sie aber 'raus, weil Joe die Fenster aufmacht und mit der Gießkanne kommt, hih, hih!«
»Guten Morgen!« antwortete ich und wollte gehen, aber sie stellt eine große Schale dampfend heißen Kaffees vor mich hin und brummte:
»Bettgäste kriegen 'n Kaffee gratis – besonders, wenn's solche Narren sind, die Joe fünfzig Cents für ein Bett zahlen, das bloß fünfundzwanzig kostet!«
Und diese fünfzig Cents waren mein allerletztes Geld gewesen! Ich lachte laut auf und dankte leise den guten Göttern für die angenehme Überraschung des warmen Kaffeetranks.
Arbeit suchen!
Es war hell und klar und sonnig und bitterkalt draußen auf der Straße. Eine breite Mauer von Schnee, fünf, sechs Fuß hoch, türmte sich weißglitzernd neben dem Fußgängerweg auf, soweit man sehen konnte, und Scharen von Männern mit Schneeschaufeln und Besen waren eifrig dabei, diese winterliche Mauer immer höher zu bauen. Es bedurfte wahrlich keiner besonderen Intelligenz, um hier die Arbeitsmöglichkeit zu erkennen.
»Verzeihen Sie –« sagte ich zu dem baumlangen Aufseher, der, die Pfeife zwischen den Zähnen und die Hände in den Taschen, durch Kopfnicken die Schar leitete, »entschuldigen Sie – aber kann man hier noch ankommen? Ich suche Arbeit.«
»Dann suchen Sie am falschen Platz,« antwortete er. »Schneeschaufler werden punkt sechs Uhr morgens im kleinen Hof des Rathauses angenommen.«
»Ich brauche aber sofort Arbeit.«
»Well – das is' Ihre verdammte Affäre. Wenn's heute weiterschneit, kann ich Sie morgen früh anstellen. Jetzt nicht.«
So begann die lange Arbeitssuche, das Laufen und Suchen den ganzen Tag hindurch. Zweimal lief ich die ungeheure Mississippifront auf und nieder, fragte gewissenhaft jeden Arbeitsplatz ab, sprach mit Hunderten von Menschen und log erschrecklich über meine Arbeitsfähigkeiten. Zwanzig, dreißigmal wiederholte sich das gleiche Frage- und Antwortspiel:
»Können Sie mit schweren Kisten umgehen?«
»Jawohl – ausgezeichnet!«
»Erfahrung gehabt darin?«
»Massenhaft!« (Das war eine eklatante Unwahrheit …)
»Schön – dann melden Sie sich am Montag früh um sieben Uhr!«
Immer wieder erhielt ich diese Antwort. Arbeitsgelegenheit schien in Mengen da zu sein; nur war diese boshafte Arbeitsgelegenheit stets so eigentümlich, sich immer erst in einigen Tagen materialisieren zu wollen. Zwar gab dies Trost und Hoffnung, war aber entschieden unpraktisch für ein Menschenkind, das seinen letzten Pfennig verschlafen hatte. Ich fragte und fragte. An Vorarbeiter wandte ich mich bald nicht mehr, denn die erkundigten sich sofort, ob ich dem "Verbande", der Gewerkschaft, angehöre und wurden grob, wenn ich verneinen mußte. In den Bureaus wurde ich entweder abgewiesen oder auf den Montag (den ich nachgerade zu hassen anfing) bestellt. So gab ich, es war schon fast Mittag, der Mississippilevee meinen Segen und schlich hungernd und frierend hinauf nach dem Stadtzentrum. Im Vorbeigehen bat ich einen dicken Polizisten, der sehr gutmütig aussah, um Rat.
»Heiliger Sankt Patrik,« sagte der, »andere Leute haben auch kein Geld und andere Leute möchten auch Arbeit haben. Da soll der Kuckuck raten. Reden Sie und fragen Sie Gott und die Welt, und dann fangen Sie wieder von vorne an!«
Und ich redete!
In dem Stadtviertel, das die Levee mit dem Geschäftszentrum verband, lag Fabrik an Fabrik, und Fabrik auf Fabrik suchte ich ab mit dem stereotypen: »Ich suche Arbeit!« Hier waren die Leute grob und schüttelten die Köpfe, ohne sich die Mühe eines gesprochenen Nein zu geben; dort fragte man mich zehn Minuten lang neugierig aus, um dann achselzuckend zu bedauern. Dort sollte man in einer Woche wiederkommen. Es war ein Straßenwandern und Fragen zum Herzzerbrechen. Die Müdigkeit kam und der Hunger machte sich immer bemerkbarer. So hungrig wurde ich, daß ich geradezu Schmerz empfand, wenn ich im Vorbeigehen in die Schaufenster von Bäckereien und Delikatessengeschäften guckte; so hungrig, daß ich immer wieder und wieder krampfhaft nach der Uhr in meiner Tasche fühlte und mit dem Gedanken liebäugelte, daß das kleine tickende Ding die schönsten Mahlzeiten in sich barg. Aber ich empfand, daß ihr Wert das letzte war, das vom Nichts trennte, und biß die Zähne zusammen. Weiter suchen! Mir war, als sei ich mutterseelenallein zwischen den ungeheuren Gebäuden, den himmelragenden Wolkenkratzern, die da die Lehre von der Kunst des Dollarjagens hinausschrien in die Welt; allein in dem Gewühl von Menschen, die hastig vorwärtsstrebten, als wisse jeder von ihnen ganz genau, was er tun müsse. Nur ich, ich allein unter den Tausenden, wußte das nicht. Hart sahen die Männer und die Frauen aus, gleichgültig. Selbstbewußt aber vor allem; so selbstbewußt, daß mir jedes scharfgeschnittene Gesicht und jedes klare Auge ein Vorwurf zu sein schien: Weshalb bist du denn so hilflos – warum kannst du nicht was wir können! Erbärmlich klein kam ich mir vor. Und erbärmlich hungrig.
Ich wanderte wieder der Levee zu. In den Wolkenkratzern, in den eleganten Läden, im Stadtviertel der Banken – da hatte ich nichts zu suchen, denn ich kannte den Wert von Geld und äußerer Erscheinung; mein zerknitterter Anzug, meine Geldlosigkeit bedingten, das wußte ich recht gut, primitive Arbeit mit den Fäusten. Der Abend war hereingebrochen, und fast instinktiv spähte ich in dem Lichtermeer der Straßen nach den drei vergoldeten Kugeln, die in Amerika ein Pfandgeschäft bedeuten. Essen – schlafen – und dann aufs Rathaus morgen in aller Frühe zum Schneeschaufeln. Da trat dicht vor mir, aus einer Seitentüre eines riesengroßen Gebäudes aus mächtigen Sandsteinquadern ein Jüngelchen in dunkelgrünem Pagenanzug mit goldigen Borten und goldigen Knöpfen, eine Zigarette in seinem Kindermund, und nagelte mit großer Bedächtigkeit ein Plakat an die Mauer: Man wanted in kitchen.
Gesucht ein Mann für die Küche …
»Was ist das?« fragte ich das Kind.
»Dies ist der Seiteneingang zum Palacehotel,« antwortete der Pagenjüngling. »In der Küche brauchen sie einen Mann zum Geschirrwaschen. Können Sie nich' lesen?«
»Der Mann bin ich!« sagte ich. »Nimm das Ding nur wieder herunter von der Wand! Und nun zeig' mir den Weg, mein Sohn!« Die Tätigkeit des Geschirrwaschens erschien mir zwar einigermaßen komisch. Aber es war Arbeit, und Arbeit brauchte ich.
»Kommen Se mit,« sagte das Kind mit einem herablassenden Kopfnicken, denn in seiner Weltvorstellung stand ein Hotelpage natürlich turmhoch über einem angehenden Geschirrwäscher.
Und in fünf Minuten war ich von einem pompösen Küchenchef, der englisch, deutsch und französisch wirr durcheinander sprach und ein quecksilbernes Bündel von empfindlichen Nerven schien, in aller Form als Töpfeputzer Nummer 2 des Palasthotels angestellt. Arbeitszeit von 6 Uhr abends bis 6 Uhr morgens, Essen und Wohnen frei, dreißig Dollars im Monat, Abgang von der Stelle nur am 17. eines jeden Monats …
Die Küche der Riesenkarawanserei, die sich Palasthotel nannte, wäre jeder Durchschnittsfrau als der siebente Himmel von silberfunkelnder und kupferglänzender Küchenschönheit erschienen; jede Frau hätte den ungeheuren Herd, die Köche in schneeweißen Anzügen, die blitzende Sauberkeit überall staunend bewundert. Jeder Durchschnittsmann aber wäre vor dem Getriebe nervöser Hast in dieser Küche entsetzt geflüchtet! Ich wenigstens hab' mir aus dem Arbeitsmonat in jenem Küchenreich einen unbezwinglichen Widerwillen gegen alles, was Koch heißt, mit hinübergenommen ins Leben. Diese Köche waren eitel wie die Pfauen, nervös wie hysterische Weiber und unverschämt wie reiche Parvenus. Sie zankten sich untereinander in einem endlosen Geschnatter von Französisch und Englisch und Deutsch und Italienisch, und verfluchten sich gegenseitig in alle Tiefen der Hölle, bis der großmächtige Küchenchef aus seinem Privatbureau trat. Dann schwenzelten sie devot um die Majestät der Küche herum.
Mir bedeutete das kleine Gemach an der Küchenseite, in dem ich arbeiten mußte, mit seinen ewig nassen Steinfliesen und seinen marmornen Putzbecken von allem Anfang an eine Miniaturhölle, die in alle Ewigkeit dazu verflucht war, in heißen Dampf gehüllt zu sein und ein immer sich erneuerndes Chaos von rußigen Kupferkesseln und Kasserolen und Töpfen in allen Größen und Formen zu beherbergen. Man kam sich vor wie Sisyphus – gegen Unmöglichkeiten anarbeitend. Ohn' Unterlaß rannten, wie aus Kanonen geschossen, zappelige Köche in die Türe und warfen mit vielen Sapristis und Nom de Dieus und Hells mir ganze Kupferberge vor die Füße, während ich im Schweiße meines Angesichts mit harten Bürsten und scharfer Salz- und Essiglösung putzte und wusch. Es ist lustig, sich an lächerliche Kleinigkeiten zu erinnern; ich verspüre heute noch das verzweifelte Entsetzen, das mich immer überschlich, wenn ich glücklich den letzten von Hunderten von Töpfen blitzsauber hatte, und dann auf einmal eine Höllenschar von Köchen Dutzende und Aberdutzende schmutziger Kasserolen in meine Miniaturhölle feuerte!
So leicht die Arbeit an und für sich sein mochte – kein Faden blieb einem trocken am Leib! Ich war Nummer zwei. Nummer eins, ein Südfranzose, arbeitete von 6 Uhr morgens bis 6 Uhr abends. Um ein Uhr nachts gingen die Köche nach Hause, und es wurde still in der Riesenküche. Meine Arbeit aber begann eigentlich erst, denn von den späten Theatersoupers war immer noch ein Regiment von Töpfen da. Dann aber hieß es, jedes Stückchen Metallglanz in der Küche putzen. Den Herd entlang, der die ganze eine Längswand einnahm, lief ein Anrichtetisch aus solidem Kupfer, an die fünfzehn Meter lang. Der mußte blitzblank sein. Der Herd mußte geschwärzt, seine Metallteile geputzt werden; die Pfannen an dem Gerüst über dem Anrichtetisch sollten blinken und leuchten und genau nach Größe geordnet sein. Da waren noch die Messingbänder der Geschirrwaschmaschinen, ungeheurer Bottiche, in denen Plattformen durch elektrische Kraft rotierten und die aufgestapelten Teller und Platten mechanisch reinigten. Da waren die Küchenfliesen zu waschen. Jede Minute der zwölf Arbeitsstunden mußte ausgenützt werden, wenn ich fertig werden wollte. Um 6 Uhr morgens dann schlich ich mich in das winzige Zimmerchen im sechsten Stockwerk, in dem der Südfranzose, Nummer eins, und ich zusammen hausten, ohne uns jemals zu sehen als eine Minute lang am Morgen und am Abend, wenn wir uns ablösten.
Heute noch kann ich kein Kupfergeschirr sehen, ohne mit Grauen an die elegante Küche des Palasthotels und ihre Höllenarbeit zu denken! Diese Küche war eine der Sehenswürdigkeiten des Hotellebens von St. Louis, mit Stolz gezeigt – aber unter Vorsichtsmaßregeln. Wurden Besucher ins Küchenreich geführt, so ertönte schrill eine elektrische Glocke. Das Glöckchen der neugierigen Affen wurde sie genannt. Ihr Schrillen war das Signal zu vornehmem Dekorum. Die Köche ließen, wie durch Zauberspruch gebannt, ab vom Schimpfen und Schnattern; die Mädels bei den Geschirrmaschinen banden sich rasch frische Schürzen um und gaben sich Mühe, recht niedlich auszusehen; ich mußte die Türe zu meinem Putzreich schleunigst zumachen. Und die neugierigen Affen sagten dem Chef Schmeicheleien über den lautlosen Betrieb … Ich aber fluchte innerlich und zählte mir an den Fingern die Tage bis zum 17. Dezember ab und wunderte mich, ob es denn Männer geben könne auf dieser Welt, die Töpfeputzen im Palasthotel länger als einen Monat aushielten. Prompt um 9 Uhr morgens bat ich Seine Majestät den Küchenchef um eine Anweisung auf die Hotelkasse.
»Es ist merkwürdig,« meinte der Chef, »daß wir mit dem Personal des Putzraumes so häufig wechseln müssen. Die Arbeit ist doch leicht. Nun, wenn Sie das Geld durchgebracht haben, können Sie wieder vorfragen.«
»Thank you!« sagte ich.
Als ich aber für die Arbeit von fünf Wochen ein Bündel von dreiundvierzig Dollarscheinen zärtlich in die Tasche steckte, mischte sich in meine komische Wut auf jene Hölle kupferner Greuel leise Dankbarkeit, und froh wie ein aus Qual Erlöster zog ich meinen besten Anzug an. Starkenbach hatte mir auf meine Bitte meinen Koffer ins Hotel geschickt. Ein Zettel lag obenauf:
»Viel Glück, lieber Freund! Wie gefällt Ihnen mein gutes altes St. Louis? Lassen Sie es sich möglichst gut gehen und nehmen Sie dieses putzige Leben nicht allzu ernst!«
Da hatte ich laut aufgelacht. Wenn man Kupferkessel putzte, hatte das Leben so gar nichts Putziges – und was ich vom guten alten St. Louis kannte, waren – – eine Miniaturhölle im krassesten Elendsviertel der Stadt und eine andere Miniaturhölle in einer der vornehmsten Karawansereien der hotelzivilisierten Welt.