de-en  Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson - Teil 4.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf; Nils Holgersson and the Wild Geese.

Part 4: Glimminge Manor: Black Rats and Gray Rats.

In southeastern Scania, not far away from the sea, there is an old castle by the name of Glimminge Manor. It consists of a single tall, large and strong stone building that can be seen for miles in the flat surrounding area. ... It has only four stories, but is so mighty, that a normal farmhouse on the same estate appears like a doll's house by comparison. ...

This stone house's outer walls and dividing walls and arches are all so thick, that inside there is hardly space for anything else but the thick transverse walls. The stairways are narrow, the corridors small, and there are only few rooms.

And in order for the walls to be able to retain their strength, there was only a small number of windows in the upper stories, but in the lower ones there were only small light openings. In old times of war people were only too glad, if they could lock themselves in such a big, strong house, like somebody is happy in an ice-cold winter, if he can climb inside his fur.

But when the good peace times arrived, the people did not longer want to live in the dark cold rooms of the castle; they left Glimminge Manor a long time ago, and moved into homes where air and light might enter.

At the time, when Nils Holgersson was on the move with the wild geese, therefore were no people in Glimminge Manor, but that does not mean there were no other inhabitants. On the roof, a pair of storks lived in a large nest every summer. Under the roof lived two night owls, in the aisles hung bats, on the stove in the kitchen lived an old cat and down there in the cellar there were hundreds of the old type of black rats.

Rats are not really held in high esteem with the other animals; but the black rats of Glimminge Manor were an exception, and they were spoken of with respect for they had proven their courage in the fight with their enemies, and also a lot of endurance during the times big misery though which its peoples had gone.

That is to say, they belonged to a people of rats, which used to be numerous and powerful, but now were about to die out. For a long number of years, the black rats, called land rats, had owned Scania and the whole country....

They had been found in almost every cellar, almost in every attic, in all the barns and haylofts, in all pantries and bakeries, in farm buildings and stables, in churches and castles, in stills and mills, as well as in all buildings habited by people; but now they had been driven out from all of these and nearly extinguished. You could only still find some of them in the one or the other isolated place, but nowhere were they as numerous as at Glimminge Manor.

When an animal race dies out, this is mostly due to the actions of the people, but this was not the case here. The humans, of course, had fought with the black rats, but they had not been able to inflict any considerable damage on them. Those who had conquered them, had been a people of its own tribe, a people that was called "gray rats".

The gray rats, or the common rats, had not lived in the country as the black rats had done from time immemorial. They were descended from a couple of poor immigrants which had come ashore with a Lübeck ship in Malmö one hundred years ago. They were homeless, half-starving twits, who took residence in this harbor, swam around the pillars under the bridges and ate garbage which was thrown into the water. They never ventured into the city that belonged to the black rats.

But gradually, as the number of gray rats increased, they took courage and went into town. In the beginning, they only moved into a few old abandoned houses that the black rats had given up; they searched for their food in gutters and manure heaps and made do with all the muck that the black rats did not want to touch.

They were weatherproof, modest and fearless animals; and in a few years they had become so powerful, that they undertook to chase the black rats away from Malmö. They took their attics, cellars and storage rooms away, starved them out or bit them to death, because they were not at all afraid of struggle and quarrel.

And after Malmö was taken, they moved out to capture the whole land in smaller or larger droves. It is almost incomprehensible why the black rats did not gather themselves for a big joint campaign and destroy the gray rats as long as these were not yet numerous.

But the black ones were probably so convinced of their might, that they could not imagine they could be overthrown. They sat quietly on their estates, and in the meantime the gray rats took away from them farm after farm, village after village, town after town. They became starved, displaced, extinguished. Nowhere in Scania, they had been able to hold their ground, except on Glimminge Manor. ...

The old stone house had such thick walls and so few rat passageways led through them that the black rats succeeded in keeping it and in preventing the gray rats from intruding. ... One year after another, one night after another, the fight between the attackers and the defenders had gone on; but the black rats had faithfully stood guard and fought with the greatest death-defying courage, and thanks to the old, magnificent house, had always triumphed up to now.

It must be admitted that the black rats, as long as they had had the power, had also been detested by all living creatures like the gray ones are now, and that quite justifiably so.

They had thrown themselves at poor, chained prisoners and tormented them, they had eaten corpses, had snitched away the last turnip form the cellar of the poor, bitten off the feet of sleeping geese, robbed hens of eggs and their little yellow chicks covered with delicate down, and carried out thousands of other misdeeds.

But ever since misfortune had befallen them, all that was forgotten, as if it had never happened, no one could refrain from admiring the last of the species who had resisted the gray rats for so long. ...

The gray rats, who lived in the Glimminge Manor and its surroundings, kept on fighting and tried to use every possible opportunity to seize the castle. ... One would have thought that they probably could have left the small pack of black rats in possession of Glimmingehus since they occupied all the rest of the country, but that thought didn't cross their minds at all.

They used to say that it was a point of honor to conquer the black rats after all. But anyone who knew the gray rats probably knew that there was another reason; namely, the people used Glimmingehus as a granary and therefore the gray rats did not intend to stop until they conquered it.

One morning, the geese who were standing and sleeping outside on the ice of Vomb Lake were awakened very early by loud cries in the air. "Trirop! Trirop!" it sounded. "Trianut, the crane, greets the wild goose Akka and her flock! ... Tomorrow the big crane dance will take place on the Kulla mountain!" Akka quickly raised her head and replied:" Many thanks and greeting! ... Many thanks and greeting!" After that the cranes continued to fly, but the wild geese heard them shouting for a long time above every field and every forest hill: "Trianut sends his regards! Tomorrow the big crane dance will take place on the Kulla Mountain!" The wild geese were happy about this message. "You're lucky," they said to the white gander," that you are allowed to be present at the Great Crane Dance." "Is it so strange then, watching the cranes dance?" the gander asked. ...

"It is something you never could have dreamed of," the wild geese answered. "Now we have to think about what to do with tomte tomorrow so that no misfortune happens to him while we are traveling to Kulla mountain," Akka said.
"Thumbling can't be left alone!" the gander shouted. "If the cranes won't allow him to watch their dance, I will stay with him." "No human has ever been allowed to attend the gathering of the animals on Kulla Mountain," Akka said, "and I don't dare take the tomte there. But we want to talk about it later in the day. Now we have to think about getting something to eat, " Akka gave the signal to leave. Because of Smirre, she searched for far away grazing grounds on this day too, and only alighted on the swampy meadows a bit south of Glimminge Manor. Throughout this whole day the boy sat on the bank of a small pond and blew on a reed pipe.

He was in a bad mood, because he was not allowed to see the crane dance and could not bring himself to speak a single word to the gander or one of the wild geese. Oh, how bitter it was that Akka still distrusted him!

If a boy had refused to become a human being again because he preferred to move around with a group of poor wild geese, then she would have to understand that he would not betray her. And she would have to understand as well that it would be her duty to let him see all the strange things that only she could show him; after all, he had given up so much to remain with the wild geese.

"I'll have to give them a piece of my mind without much ado," he thought. ... But one hour after another passed without his having carried out his intention. This may sound a bit strange, but the boy really held out a kind of reverence for the old Akka, and he surely felt that it wouldn't be easy to resist her will.

On one side of the swampy meadow, where the geese grazed, lay a wide stone wall. And then it happened that the boy's gaze fell on the wall as he raised his head in the evening to speak to Akka. ... Then a small cry of amazement slipped out of his mouth, causing all of the geese to look up quickly, and they, too, stared surprised at the same spot.

At first glance they all believed, not excluding the boy, that the grey round stones, which made up the low wall, had gotten legs and were running away; but soon they saw that it was a group of rats which were running over the stones. ... They moved very fast and ran forward close to one another in marching formation, and there were so many of them that they covered the whole wall for a good while.

The boy had been afraid of rats even when he had been a big strong human. How could he not be, now that he was so small that two or three of them could overpower him? One shiver after another ran down his back as he looked at the train of rats.

But strangely enough, the geese seemed to have the same loathing for the rats. They did not speak to them; and when the rats had passed, they shuddered as if silt was stuck between their feathers. ...
"So many gray rats are underway," said Yksi from Vassijaure, "that isn't a good sign." The boy wanted to now seize the opportunity and tell Akka that he thought she should take him to Kulla Mountain; but he was prevented from doing so again, for a large bird hastily landed in the middle among the geese.

If you looked at this bird, you might have thought it had borrowed its body, neck and head from a small white goose. But in addition to all of that, he sported big black wings, long red legs and a long, thick beak that was much too large for his little head, and which pulled him down, so that the bird had a somewhat anxious, troubled appearance.

Akka hurriedly folded her wings and bowed her neck many times whilst she approached the stork. ... She wasn't particularly surprised to see him so early in the year in Scania because she knew that the male storks would arrive in good time to see if the stork's nest had suffered any damage during the winter before the female storks made the effort to fly over the Baltic Sea.

But she was certainly very surprised and wondered what it could mean that the stork sought her out, because the stork prefers to associate only with its own kind. ... "Your apartment will not be in disorder, Mr. Ermenrich?" Akka said.

It was now apparently quite true what they say, a stork can seldom open his beak without complaining. And since it was difficult for the stork to get the words out, what he said sounded even more sorrowful. First he rattled with his beak for a while, and then he spoke with a hoarse, feeble voice.

He complained about all sorts of things; the nest high up on the roof ridge of Glimminge Manor was completely ruined by the winter storms, and he could not find food. The people gradually acquired all his possessions. They reclaimed his swampy meadows and cultivated his moors. ... He had a mind to move away from Scania, and never to return again.

While the stork thus complained, Akka, the wild goose, which nowhere enjoyed protection and safeguard, couldn't but think to herself: "If I had it as good as you, Mr. Ermenrich, then I would be too proud to complain.

You still are allowed to be a free, wild bird, and yet you are so respected by human beings that nobody shoots at you or steals an egg from your nest." But she kept her thoughts to herself and only said to the stork that she couldn't believe he wanted to leave a house, which had already been the storks' home since it was built.

Now the stork quickly asked whether the geese had seen the march of the gray rats toward Glimminge Manor, and Akka answered , yes, she actually had seen those fiends of hell, he told her about the brave black rats who had been defending the castle for many years.

But this night, Glimminge Manor will come under the reign of the grey rats," said the stork sighing.

"Why just this night, Mr. Ermenrich?" Akka asked. "Because almost all black rats, trusting that all the other animals would hurry there as well, set out for Kullaberg last night," the stork answered.

"But see, the gray rats stayed at home, and now they gather to enter the castle at night when it is only defended by a few old frail ones who cannot travel to Kulla Mountain. They will reach their goal too; but having lived in peace with the black rats for so many years, it does not please me to have to associate with their enemies." Now Akka understood why the the stork had come to them; he was so upset about the conduct of the grey rats, that he wanted to complain about them. ... But in the manner of storks, he would certainly have done nothing to avert the disaster. ...

"Did you send word to the black rats, Mr. Ermenrich?" Akka asked. "No," the stork replied, "that wouldn't be of any use. Before they can get back, the castle will be taken." " Don't be so sure of hat, Mr. Ermenrich," Akka said. ... "I think I know an old wild goose that would like to prevent such an outrage." After Akka had said this, the stork raised his head and looked at her disbelievingly. ... And that was not surprising, because the old Akka had neither claws nor beaks that could be used in a fight. And moreover, she was a daybird, as soon as the night came, she fell asleep infallibly while the rats fought at night.

But Akka seemed determined to support the black rats. ... She summoned Yksi von Yassijaure and commanded her to lead the geese to Vombsee, and when the geese raised objections, she called out imperiously: "I believe it will be best for all of us, if you obey my order.

I have to fly to the big stone house, and if you accompany me, it can't be avoided that the people from the courtyard will see us and then they will shoot at us. The only one I want to take is Thumbling. He can make himself very useful because he has good eyesight and is able to stay awake at night." On this day, the boy was in his most stubborn mood, and when he heard what Akka said, he stood up to his entire height and stepped forward, his hands on his back and his nose in the air, to declare that he did not intend to stoop to fighting with rats, and therefore Akka would have to look around for other help.

But the moment he showed himself, the stork began to move. In the manner of storks, he had stood there with his head lowered and his beak pressed against his neck. But now his throat began to gurgle, as if he were laughing. Lightning-fast, he lowered his beak, seized the boy and threw him up a couple meters high into the air.

He repeated this feat seven times, while the boy screamed and the geese shouted: "What are you doing, Mr. Ermenrich, this isn't a frog! He is a human, Mr. Ermenrich!" Finally, the stork put the boy, quite unscathed, on the ground again. Then he said to Akka: "I am now flying back to Glimminge Manor Mother Akka. Everyone who lived there was very worried when I flew away. They will certainly be very happy if I inform them that the wild goose Akka and tomte, the human dwarf, will come to save them." With that, the stork stretched out his throat, flapped his wings and flew off like an arrow from a tautly drawn bow. Akka knew that he was making fun of her, but didn't let this disturb her. She waited while the boy looked for his wooden shoes, which the stork had shaken from him, then she put him on her back and flew after the stork.

And the boy offered no resistance on his part and didn't say a word that he did not want to go along. He was extremely angry and laughed deridingly. ... This conceited fellow with the long red legs probably believed that he wasn't useful for anything. But he would show him what kind of fellow Nils Holgersson of Westvemmenhög was.

A few moments later Akka stood in the stork's nest on Glimminge Manor. It was a big, splendid nest. A wheel formed its base with several layers of twigs and pieces of turf on top of it. ...

The nest was that old that different bushes and herbs had put down roots up there; and when mother stork sat on her eggs in the round hollow in the middle of the nest, she could not only enjoy the magnificent view across a part of Scania, but also of the wild roses and houseleek.

The boy and Akka could immediately see that something extraordinary [46] was going on here. On the edge of the stork nest were sitting two night owls, an old gray striped cat and a dozen of age-old rats with grown out teeth and dripping eyes. Those weren't exactly the animals you usually see in a peaceful community.

None of them turned to look at or greet Akka. They had thoughts for nothing but steadfastly stared at some long gray lines which here and there were to be seen on the bare fields of winter.

All the black rats were sitting there quietly. One could see, that they were in the greatest distress and probably knew, that they were neither able to defend their lives nor the castle.

The two owls rolled their big eyes and at the same time wiggled continously with the fascial discs that surrounded them. At the same time they talked in horribly croaking voices about the cruelty of the gray rats and said that because of them they would have to leave their home now, for they had heard that these animals spared neither eggs nor young dependents.

The old, striped cat was quite certain that the gray cats would bite her to death if they penetrated into the castle in such great numbers, and she squabbled incessantly with the black rats. "How could you be so stupid and let your best warriors go away?" she said. "How could you trust the grey rats? It is completely inexcusable." The twelve rats didn't say a word; but the stork, despite his anguish, could not stop teasing the cat.... "Don't be afraid, mouser," he said. "Can't you see that Mother Akka and Thumbling have come to save the castle? You can rely on them to succeed.

Now I have to get myself ready for sleep, and I do it quite calmly. Tomorrow, when I wake up, not a single gray rat will be found in Glimminge Manor." The boy darted Akka a glance that indicated how gladly he would have pushed the stork onto his back as the latter at the moment was positioning himself on the extreme edge of his nest for sleeping, one leg raised.

But Akka did not look at all insulted. She calmed the boy and said: "It would be very sad if anyone who is as old as I am could not help themselves out of bigger difficulties than this one here. If you, Mr. and Mrs. Owl, who can keep awake all night, will take care of a few errands for me, then, I am sure, everything will be well." The two owls were willing to pass on the messages, and Akka ordered the owl man to find the black rats who had moved away and to advice them to return home as fast as possible.

The owl wife though, she sent to the tower owl Flammea, who lived in the cathedral of Lund, in fact with such a secret order that Akka only dared to entrust it ony whisperingly to the owl wife.

It was close to midnight when after a lot of searching the gray rats finally found an open cellar window. ...

It was fairly high up in the wall, but the rats got on top of each other, always one on the shoulders of the previous one, and thus it did not really take long till the most courageous of them could jump through the hole, ready right away to enter Glimminge Manor, before whose walls so many of his ancestors had perished.

The gray rat sat in the cellar air hole for a while waiting to be attacked.... However, the main body of the army of the defenders was away, but she assumed that the remaining black rats would not give in without a fight.

With her heart beating, she listened to the slightest sound; but everything remained completely silent. Then the leader of the grey rats plucked up courage and jumped into the cold, dark cellar. ...

One grey rat after another followed the leader. All kept very still and expected to see the black rats ambush them. ... Only when so many had entered the cellar that there was no room on the floor left, did they venture to move on.

Though they had never before been in the building themselves, they found their way without any difficulty, and they also very soon found the passages within the walls, which the black rats had used to move to the upper floors.

Before they climbed up those narrow, cramped stairs, they listened very carefully to all sides again. That the black rats held back so much was far more scary for them than their being ready to fight openly.

They could hardly believe their luck as they reached the first storey without mishap. Immediately upon entering, they were confronted by the smell of the grain, which lay in large heaps on the ground. But it was not yet time for them to enjoy their victory.

With the greatest possible care, they first searched the gloomy, bare chambers. In the old castle kitchen they jumped onto the stove which stood in the middle of the floor, and in the next room they almost fell into a well. They left none of the narrow windows unchecked, but nowhere did they encounter black rats. ...

When this floor was completely under their control, they began, with the same caution, to take possession of the second. ... Again they had to make an arduous and dangerous climb through the walls, all the while in breathless fear that the enemy would attack them.

And although the delightful aroma of the piles of corn tempted them, they still forced themselves to investigate very carefully the former servants' room with its mighty columns, the stone table and the hearth, the deep window recesses and the hole in the floor through which in earlier times they had poured boiling pitch down onto the invading enemy. ...

But the black rats were and remained invisible. ... The gray ones were now looking for a route to the third floor with the great banqueting hall of the lord of the castle, which was as bare and empty as all the other rooms of the old house, and they even advanced towards the uppermost floor, which consisted of only one large, desolate room. ...

The only place they did not think of, and which they did not inspect, was the big stork nest on the roof, where this very moment the owl woman woke up Akka and informed her that the tower owl Flammea had obeyed her wish and had sent what she had asked for.

After the grey rats had carefully searched the whole castle, they felt reassured. They assumed that the black rats had moved away without thinking of resistance, and they jumped onto the mounds of grain with happy hearts.

But hardly had they eaten the first grains of wheat when down in the yard of the castle the soft sound of a small keen pipe was resounded... The rats raised their heads from the grain, listen without moving, sprang forward a few steps, as if they wanted to leave the heap, but turned around and started to feed anew.

Again the pipe sounded with a strong, piercing sound. And now something strange happened. One rat, two rats, even a whole gang let go of the grains, jumped out of the heaps of grain and took the shortest way, as fast as they could, down to the cellar, to get out of the house.

However, many gray rats still remained. Those thought of all the trouble they had had to take Glimminge Manor, and they did not want to leave it again.

But the whistling sounds compelled them once again and then they had to obey them. In a wild hurry, they also fell out of the piles of grain, ran through the narrow holes in the walls and tumbled over each other in their eagerness to come down.

In the middle of the courtyard stood a little dwarf, blowing on a pipe. All around him he already had gathered a whole sphere of rats who entranced and spellbound were listening to him, and every second more rats flocked in. ...

Whenever he silenced the pipe for just a second, it looked as if the rats felt like launching themselves at him and biting him to death, but as soon as he blew it they were under his power.

When the dwarf had piped all the gray rats out of Glimminge Manor, he slowly began to walk to the courtyard and to the country road; and all the gray rats followed him because the pipe tones sounded so sweet to their ears that they could not resist them.

The dwarf walked along in front of them and lured them along on the path to Vallby. He blew incessantly on his pipe, which seemed to have been made from an animal's horn, although the horn was so small that there is in our day no animal from whose forehead it could have been snapped off.

Also nobody knew who had made the pipe. ... But the Turmeule Flammea had found the horn in an alcove of the Lund cathedral; she had shown it to the raven Bataki, and these two had figured out together that this must be one of those horns which in earlier times had been made by the humans who wanted to get power over rats and mice.

But the raven was Akka's friend, and it was from him she learned that Flammea owned a treasure like this. And indeed, the rats couldn't resist the pipe. The boy walked ahead of them and blew his flute as long as the stars were in the sky at night, and the rats were following him all the time.

He blew his pipe at daybreak, at sunrise, and still the whole pack of rats followed him, and was lured farther and farther away from the large granaries at Glimminge Manor.
unit 1
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 2
Selma Lagerlöf; Nils Holgersson und die Wildgänse.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 3
Teil 4: Haus Glimminge: Schwarze Ratten und graue Ratten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 8
Die Treppen sind eng, die Gänge schmal, und es sind nur wenig Zimmer da.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 13
Auf dem Dache wohnte jeden Sommer ein Storchenpaar in einem großen Nest.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 26
Nie wagten sie sich in die Stadt hinein, die den schwarzen Ratten gehörte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 35
Sie wurden ausgehungert, verdrängt, ausgerottet.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 36
In Schonen hatten sie sich nirgends halten können, ausgenommen auf Glimmingehaus.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 44
Sie pflegten zu sagen, es sei ihnen Ehrensache, die schwarzen Ratten doch noch zu besiegen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 47
„Trirop!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 48
Trirop!“ erklang es.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 49
„Trianut, der Kranich, läßt die Wildgans Akka und ihre Schar grüßen!
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 55
„Däumling darf nicht allein bleiben!“ rief der Gänserich.
4 Translations, 8 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 57
Aber wir wollen später am Tage noch weiter darüber sprechen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 60
unit 62
Ach, wie bitter war es, daß Akka ihm noch immer mißtraute!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 65
„Ich muß ihnen meine Meinung gerade heraus sagen,“ dachte er.
5 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 66
Aber eine Stunde um die andre verging, ohne daß er seine Absicht ausgeführt hätte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 68
Auf der einen Seite der sumpfigen Wiese, wo die Gänse weideten, lag eine breite steinerne Mauer.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 73
Der Junge hatte sich vor Ratten gefürchtet, als er noch ein großer starker Mensch gewesen war.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 75
unit 76
Aber merkwürdigerweise schienen die Gänse ganz denselben Abscheu vor den Ratten zu haben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 84
„Ihre Wohnung wird doch nicht in Unordnung sein, Herr Ermenrich?“ sagte Akka.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 89
Die Menschen eigneten sich allmählich sein ganzes Besitztum an.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 90
Sie machten seine sumpfigen Wiesen urbar und bebauten seine Moore.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 91
Er habe im Sinn, von Schonen wegzuziehen und nie wieder zurückzukehren.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 96
„Warum gerade in dieser Nacht, Herr Ermenrich?“ fragte Akka.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 100
Aber nach Art der Störche hätte er sicherlich nichts getan, das Unglück abzuwenden.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 101
„Haben Sie den schwarzen Ratten Nachricht geschickt, Herr Ermenrich?“ fragte Akka.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 102
„Nein,“ antwortete der Storch, „das würde nichts nützen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 107
Aber Akka schien fest entschlossen, den schwarzen Ratten beizustehen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 110
Der einzige, den ich mitnehmen will, ist Däumling.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 112
Aber in dem Augenblick, wo er sich zeigte, begann der Storch sich zu regen.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 114
Jetzt begann es jedoch in seinem Hals zu gurgeln, als lache er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 118
Hierauf sagte er zu Akka: „Ich fliege jetzt nach Glimmingehaus zurück, Mutter Akka.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 119
Alle, die dort wohnen, waren sehr ängstlich, als ich wegflog.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 121
Akka verstand, daß er sich über sie lustig machte, ließ sich das aber nicht anfechten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 123
unit 124
Er ärgerte sich grün und gelb und schlug ein spöttisches Gelächter auf.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 125
unit 126
Aber er würde ihm schon zeigen, was der Nils Holgersson von Westvemmenhög für ein Kerl war.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 127
Einige Augenblicke später stand Akka im Storchennest auf Glimmingehaus.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 128
Es war ein großes, prächtiges Nest.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 129
Als Unterlage hatte es ein Rad und darauf mehrere Lagen Zweige und Rasenstücke.
5 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 131
Der Junge und Akka konnten gleich sehen, daß hier etwas Außergewöhnliches [46] vorging.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 133
Das waren nicht gerade die Tiere, die man sonst in friedlicher Gemeinschaft sieht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 134
Keines von ihnen wendete sich um, Akka anzusehen oder zu begrüßen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 136
Alle schwarzen Ratten saßen ganz still da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 141
„Wie konntet ihr auch so dumm sein und eure besten Krieger weggehen lassen?“ sagte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 142
„Wie konntet ihr den grauen Ratten trauen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 144
„Hab keine Angst, Mausefängerin,“ sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 145
„Siehst du nicht, daß Mutter Akka und Däumling gekommen sind, die Burg zu retten?
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 146
Du kannst dich darauf verlassen, daß es ihnen gelingen wird.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 147
Jetzt muß ich mich zum Schlaf zurecht machen, und ich tue es ganz beruhigt.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 154
Die graue Ratte saß eine Weile im Kellerloch und wartete, daß sie angefallen werde.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 156
Mit klopfendem Herzen horchte sie auf das kleinste Geräusch; aber alles blieb ganz still.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 158
Eine graue Ratte nach der andern folgte dem Anführer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 164
Sie konnten ihrem Glück kaum trauen, als sie das erste Stockwerk ohne Unfall erreicht hatten.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 166
Aber es war für sie noch nicht an der Zeit, ihren Sieg zu genießen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 167
Mit der größten Sorgfalt durchsuchten sie zuerst die düsteren, kahlen Gemächer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 173
Aber die schwarzen Ratten waren und blieben unsichtbar.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 180
Wieder erklang die Pfeife mit starkem, durchdringendem Ton.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 181
Und jetzt geschah etwas Merkwürdiges.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 183
Es waren jedoch noch viele graue Ratten zurückgeblieben.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 185
Aber die Pfeifentöne nötigten sie noch einmal, und da mußten sie ihnen folgen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 187
Mitten auf dem Hofe stand ein kleiner Knirps, der auf einer Pfeife blies.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 191
Der Knirps ging vor ihnen her und lockte sie mit sich auf den Weg nach Vallby.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 193
Es wußte auch niemand, wer die Pfeife verfertigt hatte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 196
Und es war in der Tat so, die Ratten konnten der Pfeife nicht widerstehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 61  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 198  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 196  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 186  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 145  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 145  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 192  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 181  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 181  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 180  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 157  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 142  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 129  1 year, 1 month ago
Merlin57 • 3754  commented  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 154  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3421  commented on  unit 55  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4794  commented on  unit 36  1 year, 1 month ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 49  1 year, 1 month ago

Die Frage ist, wie soll der tomte heißen?? Däumling, Thumbling or Tom Thumb. ???

by Merlin57 1 year, 1 month ago

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf; Nils Holgersson und die Wildgänse.

Teil 4: Haus Glimminge: Schwarze Ratten und graue Ratten.

Im südöstlichen Schonen, nicht weit vom Meere entfernt, liegt eine alte Burg, Glimmingehaus genannt. Sie besteht aus einem einzigen hohen, großen und starken steinernen Bau, den man in der ebenen Gegend meilenweit sehen kann. Sie hat nur vier Stockwerke, ist aber so mächtig, daß ein gewöhnliches Bauernhaus, das auf demselben Gut steht, sich wie ein Puppenhäuschen dagegen ausnimmt.

Die äußern Mauern und die Zwischenwände und Wölbungen dieses steinernen Hauses sind alle so dick, daß im Innern kaum noch für etwas andres Raum ist als für die dicken Quermauern. Die Treppen sind eng, die Gänge schmal, und es sind nur wenig Zimmer da.

Und damit die Mauern ihre Stärke behalten sollten, ist auch nur eine kleine Zahl Fenster in den obern Stockwerken angebracht worden, in dem untersten aber sind überhaupt nur kleine Lichtöffnungen. In den alten Kriegszeiten waren die Menschen nur zu froh, wenn sie sich in ein so großes, starkes Haus einschließen konnten, wie jemand jetzt im eisigkalten Winter froh ist, wenn er in seinen Pelz hineinkriechen kann.

Aber als die gute Friedenszeit kam, wollten die Leute nicht mehr in den dunkeln, kalten steinernen Räumen der Burg wohnen; sie haben schon seit langer Zeit Glimmingehaus verlassen und sind in Wohnungen gezogen, wo Luft und Licht hineindringen können.

Zu der Zeit, wo Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen umherzog, befanden sich also keine Menschen in Glimmingehaus, aber deshalb fehlte es da doch nicht an Bewohnern. Auf dem Dache wohnte jeden Sommer ein Storchenpaar in einem großen Nest. Unter dem Dache wohnten zwei Nachteulen, in den Gängen hingen Fledermäuse, auf dem Herd in der Küche wohnte eine alte Katze, und drunten im Keller gab es Hunderte von der alten Sorte der schwarzen Ratten.

Ratten stehen nicht gerade in großem Ansehen bei den andern Tieren; aber die schwarzen Ratten auf Glimmingehaus machten eine Ausnahme, und es wurde immer mit Achtung von ihnen gesprochen, weil sie im Streit mit ihren Feinden große Tapferkeit bewiesen hatten und auch sehr viel Ausdauer während der großen Unglückszeiten, die über ihr Volk hingegangen waren.

Sie gehörten nämlich einem Rattenvolk an, das einmal sehr zahlreich und mächtig gewesen, jetzt aber am Aussterben war. Während einer langen Reihe von Jahren hatten die schwarzen Ratten, Landratten genannt, Schonen und das ganze Land besessen.

Sie waren fast in jedem Keller zu finden gewesen, fast auf jedem Boden, in Scheunen und auf Heuböden, in Vorratskammern und Backstuben, in den Wirtschaftsgebäuden und Ställen, in Kirchen und Burgen, in Brennereien und Mühlen, sowie in allen andern von Menschen bewohnten Gebäuden; aber jetzt waren sie von allen diesen vertrieben und beinahe ausgerottet. Nur auf dem einen oder andern einsam gelegenen Platz konnte man noch einige antreffen, aber nirgends waren sie so zahlreich wie auf Glimmingehaus.

Wenn ein Tiervolk ausstirbt, beruht das meistens auf dem Vorgehen der Menschen; hier aber war das nicht der Fall gewesen. Die Menschen hatten freilich mit den schwarzen Ratten gekämpft, sie hatten ihnen aber keinen namhaften Schaden zufügen können. Wer sie besiegt hatte, das war ein Tiervolk ihres eignen Stammes gewesen, ein Volk, das man die grauen Ratten nannte.

Die grauen Ratten, oder die Wanderratten, hatten nicht wie die schwarzen von Urzeiten her im Lande gewohnt. Sie stammten von ein paar armen Einwanderern her, die vor hundert Jahren von einem lübischen Schiff in Malmö ans Land gestiegen waren. Sie waren heimatlose, halb verhungerte Tröpfe, die in diesem Hafen ihren Aufenthalt nahmen, um die Pfeiler unter den Brücken herumschwammen und den Abfall fraßen, der ins Wasser geworfen wurde. Nie wagten sie sich in die Stadt hinein, die den schwarzen Ratten gehörte.

Aber allmählich, nachdem die grauen Ratten an Zahl zugenommen hatten, faßten sie Mut und gingen in die Stadt hinein. Anfangs zogen sie nur in ein paar alte verlassene Häuser, die die schwarzen Ratten aufgegeben hatten; sie suchten ihre Nahrung in Rinnsteinen und auf Misthaufen und nahmen mit allem Unrat vorlieb, den die schwarzen Ratten nicht anrühren wollten.

Es waren wetterfeste, genügsame und unerschrockene Tiere; und in ein paar Jahren waren sie so mächtig geworden, daß sie es unternahmen, die schwarzen Ratten von Malmö zu verjagen. Sie nahmen ihnen Dachräume, Keller und Magazine weg, hungerten sie aus, oder bissen sie tot, denn sie fürchteten sich durchaus nicht vor Kampf und Streit.

Und nachdem Malmö genommen war, zogen sie in kleinern und größern Scharen aus, das ganze Land zu erobern. Es ist beinahe unbegreiflich, warum die schwarzen Ratten sich nicht zu einem großen gemeinsamen Heereszug versammelten und die grauen Ratten vernichteten, so lange diese noch nicht zahlreich waren.

Aber die schwarzen waren wohl von ihrer Macht so überzeugt, daß sie sich die Möglichkeit, das Land zu verlieren, gar nicht vorstellen konnten. Sie saßen ruhig auf ihren Besitztümern, und inzwischen nahmen ihnen die grauen Ratten Hof um Hof, Dorf um Dorf, Stadt um Stadt weg. Sie wurden ausgehungert, verdrängt, ausgerottet. In Schonen hatten sie sich nirgends halten können, ausgenommen auf Glimmingehaus.

Das alte steinerne Haus hatte so dicke Mauern und so wenige Rattengänge führten hindurch, daß es den schwarzen Ratten gelungen war, es zu halten und die grauen Ratten am Hereindringen zu verhindern. Ein Jahr ums andre, eine Nacht um die andre war der Streit zwischen den Angreifern und Verteidigern fortgegangen;

aber die schwarzen Ratten hatten treulich Wache gestanden und mit der größten Todesverachtung gekämpft, und dank dem alten, prächtigen Haus hatten sie bis jetzt immer gesiegt.

Es muß zugegeben werden, daß die schwarzen Ratten, so lange sie die Macht gehabt hatten, von allen lebenden Geschöpfen ebenso verabscheut gewesen waren, wie die grauen es jetzt sind, und das mit vollem Recht.

Sie hatten sich über arme gefesselte Gefangene geworfen und sie gequält, sie hatten Leichen aufgefressen, hatten die letzte Rübe aus dem Keller der Armen wegstibitzt, schlafenden Gänsen die Füße abgebissen, den Hühnern die Eier und ihre kleinen mit zartem Flaum bedeckten gelben Kücken geraubt und tausend andre Missetaten vollführt.

Aber seit das Unglück über sie gekommen war, war das alles wie vergessen, niemand konnte es unterlassen, die letzten des Geschlechts, die den grauen Ratten so lange widerstanden hatten, zu bewundern.

Die grauen Ratten, die auf dem Glimmingehof und dessen Umgebung wohnten, führten den Streit immer weiter und versuchten jede nur mögliche Gelegenheit zu benützen, sich der Burg zu bemächtigen. Man hätte meinen können, sie hätten die kleine Schar schwarzer Ratten wohl im Besitz von Glimmingehaus lassen können, da sie ja das ganze übrige Land besaßen, aber das fiel ihnen gar nicht ein.

Sie pflegten zu sagen, es sei ihnen Ehrensache, die schwarzen Ratten doch noch zu besiegen. Aber wer die grauen Ratten kannte, wußte wohl, daß es einen andern Grund hatte; die Menschen benützten nämlich Glimmingehaus als Kornspeicher, und darum wollten die grauen keine Ruhe geben, bis sie es erobert hätten.

Eines Morgens wurden die Gänse, die draußen auf dem Eis des Vombsee standen und schliefen, durch laute Rufe in der Luft sehr früh geweckt. „Trirop! Trirop!“ erklang es. „Trianut, der Kranich, läßt die Wildgans Akka und ihre Schar grüßen! Morgen findet der große Kranichtanz auf dem Kullaberg statt!“

Akka streckte schnell den Kopf in die Höhe und antwortete: „Schönen Dank und Gruß! Schönen Dank und Gruß!“

Darauf flogen die Kraniche weiter, aber die Wildgänse hörten noch lange, wie sie über jedem Feld und über jedem Waldhügel riefen: „Trianut läßt grüßen! Morgen findet der große Kranichtanz auf dem Kullaberg statt!“

Die Wildgänse freuten sich über diese Botschaft. „Du hast Glück,“ sagten sie zu dem weißen Gänserich, „daß du bei dem großen Kranichtanz anwesend sein darfst.“
„Ist es denn etwas so Merkwürdiges, die Kraniche tanzen zu sehen?“ fragte der Gänserich.

„Es ist etwas, was du dir nie träumen lassen könntest,“ antworteten die Wildgänse.„Nun müssen wir überlegen, was wir morgen mit Däumling tun, damit ihm kein Unglück widerfährt, während wir nach dem Kullaberg reisen,“ sagte Akka.
„Däumling darf nicht allein bleiben!“ rief der Gänserich. „Wenn die Kraniche ihm nicht erlauben, ihren Tanz mit anzusehen, dann bleibe ich bei ihm.“

„Keinem Menschen ist je vergönnt gewesen, der Versammlung der Tiere auf dem Kullaberg beizuwohnen,“ sagte Akka, „und ich wage es nicht, Däumling dorthin mitzunehmen. Aber wir wollen später am Tage noch weiter darüber sprechen. Jetzt müssen wir vor allem daran denken, etwas zum Essen zu bekommen.“

Damit gab Akka das Zeichen zum Aufbruch. Auch an diesem Tag suchte sie Smirres wegen das Weidefeld in großer Entfernung und ließ sich erst bei den sumpfigen Wiesen ein Stück südlich von Glimmingehaus nieder. Diesen ganzen Tag hindurch saß der Junge am Ufer eines kleinen Teichs und blies auf einer Rohrpfeife.

Er war schlechter Laune, weil er den Kranichtanz nicht sehen sollte, und konnte sich nicht überwinden, mit dem Gänserich oder mit einer der Wildgänse ein einziges Wort zu sprechen. Ach, wie bitter war es, daß Akka ihm noch immer mißtraute!

Wenn ein Junge es abgeschlagen hatte, wieder ein Mensch zu werden, weil er lieber mit einer Schar armer Wildgänse umherziehen wollte, dann müßte sie doch begreifen, daß er sie nicht verraten würde. Und ebensogut müßte sie begreifen, daß es ihre Pflicht wäre, ihn alles Merkwürdige, was sie ihm nur zeigen könnte, sehen zu lassen; er hatte doch so viel aufgegeben, um bei den Wildgänsen zu bleiben.

„Ich muß ihnen meine Meinung gerade heraus sagen,“ dachte er. Aber eine Stunde um die andre verging, ohne daß er seine Absicht ausgeführt hätte. Dies klingt vielleicht etwas merkwürdig, aber den Jungen war wirklich eine Art Ehrfurcht vor der alten Akka überkommen, und er fühlte wohl, daß es nicht leicht sein würde, sich ihrem Willen zu widersetzen.

Auf der einen Seite der sumpfigen Wiese, wo die Gänse weideten, lag eine breite steinerne Mauer. Und da geschah es, daß der Blick des Jungen, als er gegen Abend den Kopf aufrichtete, um mit Akka zu sprechen, auf die Mauer fiel. Da entfuhr ihm ein kleiner Schrei der Verwunderung, so daß alle Gänse schnell aufsahen, und auch sie starrten überrascht nach derselben Stelle.

Im ersten Augenblick glaubten alle, der Junge nicht ausgeschlossen, daß die grauen rundlichen Steine, aus denen das Mäuerchen bestand, Beine bekommen hätten und auf und davon gingen; aber bald sahen sie, daß es eine Schar Ratten war, die darüber hinlief. Sie bewegten sich sehr schnell und liefen dicht nebeneinander in Marschordnung vorwärts, und es waren ihrer so viele, daß sie eine gute Weile das ganze Mäuerchen bedeckten.

Der Junge hatte sich vor Ratten gefürchtet, als er noch ein großer starker Mensch gewesen war. Wie sollte er das jetzt nicht tun, wo er so klein war, daß zwei oder drei von ihnen ihn überwältigen konnten? Ein Schauder nach dem andern lief ihm den Rücken hinunter, während er den Rattenzug betrachtete.

Aber merkwürdigerweise schienen die Gänse ganz denselben Abscheu vor den Ratten zu haben. Sie sprachen nicht mit ihnen; und als die Ratten vorüber waren, schüttelten sie sich, als ob ihnen Schlick zwischen die Federn gekommen wäre.
„So viele graue Ratten unterwegs,“ sagte Yksi von Vassijaure, „das ist kein gutes Zeichen.“

Jetzt wollte der Junge die Gelegenheit ergreifen und Akka sagen, daß er meine, sie müßte ihn eigentlich mit auf den Kullaberg nehmen; aber wieder wurde er daran verhindert, denn ein großer Vogel ließ sich ganz hastig mitten zwischen den Gänsen nieder.

Wenn man diesen Vogel ansah, hätte man denken können, er habe Leib, Hals und Kopf von einer kleinen weißen Gans entlehnt. Aber zu all dem hatte er sich große schwarze Flügel angeschafft, sowie lange rote Beine und einen langen, dicken Schnabel, der viel zu groß für den kleinen Kopf war und ihn herunterzog, so daß der Vogel ein etwas bekümmertes, sorgenvolles Aussehen bekam.

Akka legte in aller Eile ihre Flügel zurecht und verbeugte sich viele Male mit dem Halse, während sie dem Storch entgegenging. Sie war nicht besonders verwundert, ihn so früh im Jahr in Schonen zu sehen, weil sie wußte, daß die Storchenmännchen zu guter Zeit eintreffen, um nachzusehen, ob das Storchennest während des Winters keinen Schaden gelitten habe, ehe die Storchenweibchen sich der Mühe unterziehen, über die Ostsee zu fliegen.

Aber sie verwunderte sich doch sehr, was es zu bedeuten habe, daß der Storch sie aufsuchte, denn der Storch geht am liebsten nur mit Leuten seines eignen Stammes um. „Ihre Wohnung wird doch nicht in Unordnung sein, Herr Ermenrich?“ sagte Akka.

Nun zeigte es sich, daß es ganz wahr ist, wenn es heißt, der Storch öffne nur selten den Schnabel, ohne zu klagen. Und da es dem Storch schwer wurde, die Worte herauszubringen, so klang das, was er sagte, noch betrübter. Zuerst klapperte er eine gute Weile mit dem Schnabel, und dann sprach er mit einer heisern, schwachen Stimme.

Er beklagte sich über alles mögliche; das Nest hoch droben auf dem Dachfirst von Glimmingehaus sei von den Winterstürmen ganz verdorben, und er könne keine Nahrung finden. Die Menschen eigneten sich allmählich sein ganzes Besitztum an. Sie machten seine sumpfigen Wiesen urbar und bebauten seine Moore. Er habe im Sinn, von Schonen wegzuziehen und nie wieder zurückzukehren.

Während der Storch so klagte, konnte es Akka, die Wildgans, die nirgends Schutz und Schirm genoß, nicht lassen, im stillen zu denken: „Wenn ich es so gut hätte wie Sie, Herr Ermenrich, dann würde ich zu stolz zum Klagen sein.

Sie haben ein freier, wilder Vogel bleiben können und sind doch so gut bei den Menschen angeschrieben, daß keiner eine Kugel auf Sie abschießt oder ein Ei aus Ihrem Nest stiehlt.“

Aber sie behielt ihre Gedanken für sich, und zu dem Storch sagte sie nur, sie könne nicht glauben, daß er ein Haus verlassen wolle, das den Störchen schon seit seiner Erbauung als Heimat gedient hätte.

Jetzt fragte der Storch schnell, ob die Gänse den Zug der grauen Ratten nach Glimmingehaus gesehen hätten, und als Akka antwortete, ja, sie hätten das Teufelszeug wohl gesehen, erzählte er ihr von den tapfern schwarzen Ratten, die seit vielen Jahren die Burg verteidigt hätten.

„Aber in dieser Nacht wird Glimmingehaus unter die Herrschaft der grauen Ratten kommen,“ sagte der Storch seufzend.

„Warum gerade in dieser Nacht, Herr Ermenrich?“ fragte Akka. „Weil beinahe alle schwarzen Ratten, im Vertrauen darauf, daß alle andern Tiere auch dorthin eilen würden, gestern abend nach dem Kullaberg aufgebrochen sind,“ antwortete der Storch.

„Aber sehen Sie, die grauen Ratten sind daheim geblieben, und jetzt versammeln sie sich, um in der Nacht in die Burg einzudringen, wenn diese nur von ein paar alten Schwächlingen, die nicht mit nach dem Kullaberg reisen können, verteidigt wird. Sie werden ja auch ihr Ziel erreichen;

aber ich habe nun seit so vielen Jahren in friedlicher Nachbarschaft mit den schwarzen Ratten gelebt, daß es mir nicht gefällt, wenn ich mit deren Feinden Umgang pflegen soll.“

Jetzt verstand Akka, warum der Storch zu ihnen gekommen war; er war über die Handlungsweise der grauen Ratten so empört, daß er sich über sie beklagen wollte. Aber nach Art der Störche hätte er sicherlich nichts getan, das Unglück abzuwenden.

„Haben Sie den schwarzen Ratten Nachricht geschickt, Herr Ermenrich?“ fragte Akka. „Nein,“ antwortete der Storch, „das würde nichts nützen. Ehe sie zurück sein können, ist die Burg genommen.“

„Seien Sie dessen nicht so ganz sicher, Herr Ermenrich,“ sagte Akka. „Ich glaube, ich kenne eine alte Wildgans, die eine solche Schandtat gerne verhindern würde.“

Nachdem Akka dies gesagt hatte, hob der Storch den Kopf und sah sie groß an. Und das war nicht verwunderlich, denn die alte Akka hatte weder Klauen noch Schnabel, die in einem Kampf zu gebrauchen waren. Und überdies war sie ein Tagvogel, sobald die Nacht kam, schlief sie unfehlbar ein, während die Ratten gerade bei Nacht kämpften.

Aber Akka schien fest entschlossen, den schwarzen Ratten beizustehen. Sie rief Yksi von Vassijaure herbei und befahl ihr, die Gänse nach dem Vombsee zu führen, und als die Gänse Einwendungen machten, rief sie gebieterisch: „Ich glaube, es wird für uns alle das beste sein, wenn ihr mir gehorcht.

Ich muß nach dem großen Steinhaus fliegen, und wenn ihr mich begleitet, ist es nicht zu vermeiden, daß die Leute vom Hofe uns sehen, und dann schießen sie auf uns. Der einzige, den ich mitnehmen will, ist Däumling. Er kann sich sehr nützlich machen, weil er gute Augen hat und bei Nacht wach zu bleiben vermag.“

An diesem Tag war der Junge in seiner störrischsten Laune, und als er hörte, was Akka sagte, richtete er sich in seiner ganzen Länge auf und trat, die Hände auf dem Rücken und die Nase in der Luft, vor, um zu erklären, daß er sich nicht dazu hergeben wolle, mit Ratten zu kämpfen, und sich Akka also nach einer andern Hilfe umsehen müsse.

Aber in dem Augenblick, wo er sich zeigte, begann der Storch sich zu regen. Er hatte nach der Gewohnheit der Störche mit gesenktem Kopf und den Schnabel gegen den Hals gedrückt, dagestanden. Jetzt begann es jedoch in seinem Hals zu gurgeln, als lache er. Er senkte den Schnabel blitzschnell, erfaßte den Jungen und warf ihn ein paar Meter hoch in die Luft hinauf.

Dieses Kunststück wiederholte er siebenmal, während der Junge schrie und die Gänse riefen: „Was tun Sie denn, Herr Ermenrich, das ist kein Frosch! Es ist ein Mensch, Herr Ermenrich!“

Endlich stellte der Storch den Jungen doch wieder ganz unbeschädigt auf die Erde. Hierauf sagte er zu Akka: „Ich fliege jetzt nach Glimmingehaus zurück, Mutter Akka. Alle, die dort wohnen, waren sehr ängstlich, als ich wegflog. Sie werden sicherlich sehr froh sein, wenn ich ihnen mitteile, daß die Wildgans Akka und Däumling, der Menschenknirps, kommen werden, sie zu retten.“

Damit streckte der Storch den Hals vor, schlug mit den Flügeln und flog wie ein Pfeil von einem straff gespannten Bogen davon. Akka verstand, daß er sich über sie lustig machte, ließ sich das aber nicht anfechten. Sie wartete, während der Junge seine Holzschuhe suchte, die der Storch von ihm abgeschüttelt hatte, dann setzte sie ihn auf ihren Rücken und flog dem Storch nach.

Und der Junge leistete seinerseits keinen Widerstand und sagte auch kein Wort, daß er nicht mitwolle. Er ärgerte sich grün und gelb und schlug ein spöttisches Gelächter auf. Dieser eingebildete Gesell mit den langen roten Beinen glaubte wohl von ihm, er sei zu nichts nütze. Aber er würde ihm schon zeigen, was der Nils Holgersson von Westvemmenhög für ein Kerl war.

Einige Augenblicke später stand Akka im Storchennest auf Glimmingehaus. Es war ein großes, prächtiges Nest. Als Unterlage hatte es ein Rad und darauf mehrere Lagen Zweige und Rasenstücke.

Das Nest war so alt, daß verschiedene Büsche und Kräuter da droben Wurzel geschlagen hatten; und wenn die Storchenmutter in der runden Vertiefung mitten im Nest auf ihren Eiern saß, konnte sie sich nicht allein an der großartigen Aussicht über einen Teil von Schonen erfreuen, sondern auch an wilden Rosen und Hauslauch.

Der Junge und Akka konnten gleich sehen, daß hier etwas Außergewöhnliches [46] vorging. Auf dem Rande des Storchennestes saßen nämlich zwei Nachteulen, eine alte graugestreifte Katze und ein Dutzend uralte Ratten mit ausgewachsenen Zähnen und triefenden Augen. Das waren nicht gerade die Tiere, die man sonst in friedlicher Gemeinschaft sieht.

Keines von ihnen wendete sich um, Akka anzusehen oder zu begrüßen. Sie hatten für nichts einen Gedanken, sondern starrten nur unverwandt auf einige lange graue Linien, die da und dort auf den kahlen Winterfeldern zu sehen waren.

Alle schwarzen Ratten saßen ganz still da. Man sah ihnen an, daß sie in der größten Verzweiflung waren und wohl wußten, daß sie weder ihr eignes Leben noch die Burg verteidigen konnten.

Die beiden Eulen rollten ihre großen Augen und zuckten dabei unaufhörlich mit den Federkränzen, die diese umgaben. Dabei erzählten sie mit schauerlich krächzenden Stimmen von der Grausamkeit der grauen Ratten und sagten, derentwegen müßten sie jetzt ihre Wohnung verlassen, denn sie hätten gehört, daß diese Tiere weder Eier noch unflügge Junge verschonten.

Die alte gestreifte Katze war ganz sicher, daß die grauen Ratten sie totbeißen würden, wenn sie in so großer Zahl in die Burg eindrängen, und sie keifte unaufhörlich mit den schwarzen Ratten. „Wie konntet ihr auch so dumm sein und eure besten Krieger weggehen lassen?“ sagte sie. „Wie konntet ihr den grauen Ratten trauen? Es ist ganz unverzeihlich.“

Die zwölf Ratten erwiderten kein Wort; aber der Storch konnte es trotz seines Kummers nicht lassen, die Katze zu necken. „Hab keine Angst, Mausefängerin,“ sagte er. „Siehst du nicht, daß Mutter Akka und Däumling gekommen sind, die Burg zu retten? Du kannst dich darauf verlassen, daß es ihnen gelingen wird.

Jetzt muß ich mich zum Schlaf zurecht machen, und ich tue es ganz beruhigt. Morgen, wenn ich erwache, wird keine einzige graue Ratte auf Glimmingehaus zu finden sein.“

Der Junge warf Akka einen Blick zu, der andeutete, wie gerne er dem Storch eins auf den Rücken versetzt hätte, als dieser sich jetzt auf den äußersten Rand des Nestes, das eine Bein in die Höhe gezogen, zum Schlafen aufstellte.

Aber Akka sah gar nicht beleidigt aus, sie beschwichtigte den Jungen und sagte: „Es wäre sehr schlimm, wenn jemand, der so alt ist wie ich, sich nicht aus größeren Schwierigkeiten als dieser hier heraushelfen könnte. Wenn Sie, Herr und Frau Eule, da Sie sich die ganze Nacht wach halten können, ein paar Aufträge für mich besorgen wollen, dann wird, denke ich, alles noch gut werden.“

Die beiden Eulen waren willig, die Aufträge auszurichten, und Akka befahl dem Eulenmann, die weggereisten schwarzen Ratten aufzusuchen und ihnen zu raten, so schnell wie möglich heimzukehren.

Die Eulenfrau aber schickte sie zu der Turmeule Flammea, die in der Domkirche zu Lund wohnte, und zwar mit einem so geheimnisvollen Auftrag, daß Akka ihn der Eulenfrau nur mit flüsternder Stimme anzuvertrauen wagte.

Es war gegen Mitternacht, als die grauen Ratten nach vielem Suchen endlich ein offenstehendes Kellerloch fanden.

Es saß ziemlich hoch in der Mauer, aber die Ratten stellten sich aufeinander, immer eine auf die Schultern der vorhergehenden, und so dauerte es gar nicht lange, bis die mutigste von ihnen durch das Loch springen konnte, sofort bereit, in Glimmingehaus einzudringen, vor deren Mauern so viele ihrer Vorfahren gefallen waren.

Die graue Ratte saß eine Weile im Kellerloch und wartete, daß sie angefallen werde. Das Hauptheer der Verteidiger war allerdings abwesend, aber sie nahm an, daß die zurückgebliebenen schwarzen Ratten sich nicht ohne Kampf ergeben würden.

Mit klopfendem Herzen horchte sie auf das kleinste Geräusch; aber alles blieb ganz still. Da faßte der Anführer der grauen Ratten sich ein Herz und sprang in den kalten, dunklen Keller hinein.

Eine graue Ratte nach der andern folgte dem Anführer. Alle verhielten sich sehr still, und alle erwarteten, die schwarzen Ratten aus einem Hinterhalt hervorbrechen zu sehen. Erst als so viele in den Keller eingedrungen waren, daß keine mehr Platz auf dem Boden hatte, wagten sie sich weiter.

Obgleich sie noch nie in dem Gebäude selbst gewesen waren, fanden sie den Weg doch ohne jegliche Schwierigkeit, und sie fanden auch sehr bald die Gänge in den Mauern, deren die schwarzen Ratten sich bedient hatten, um in die obern Stockwerke zu gelangen.

Ehe sie diese schmalen und engen Treppen hinaufkletterten, lauschten sie wieder sehr aufmerksam nach allen Seiten. Daß sich die schwarzen Ratten so gänzlich zurückhielten, war ihnen viel unheimlicher, als wenn sie sich zu offnem Kampfe gestellt hätten.

Sie konnten ihrem Glück kaum trauen, als sie das erste Stockwerk ohne Unfall erreicht hatten. Gleich beim Eintreten schlug ihnen der Duft des Korns entgegen, das in großen Haufen auf dem Boden lag. Aber es war für sie noch nicht an der Zeit, ihren Sieg zu genießen.

Mit der größten Sorgfalt durchsuchten sie zuerst die düsteren, kahlen Gemächer. Sie sprangen in der alten Schloßküche auf den Herd, der mitten auf dem Boden stand, und wären im nächsten Raum beinahe in einen Brunnen gestürzt. Keine einzige der schmalen Lichtöffnungen ließen sie unbeachtet, aber nirgends stießen sie auf schwarze Ratten.

Als nun dieses Stockwerk ganz und gar in ihrer Gewalt war, begannen sie, sich mit ganz derselben Vorsicht des zweiten zu bemächtigen. Wieder mußten sie eine mühevolle gefährliche Kletterpartie durch die Mauern machen, während sie in atemloser Angst erwarteten, daß der Feind über sie herfalle.

Und obgleich sie der herrlichste Duft von den Kornhaufen lockte, zwangen sie sich doch, in größter Ordnung die frühere Gesindestube mit ihren mächtigen Pfeilern zu untersuchen, den steinernen Tisch und den Herd, die tiefen Fensternischen und das Loch im Boden, durch das man in früheren Zeiten siedendes Pech auf den eindringenden Feind hinuntergegossen hatte.

Aber die schwarzen Ratten waren und blieben unsichtbar. Die grauen suchten nun den Weg nach dem dritten Stockwerk mit dem großen Festsaal des Schloßherrn, der eben so kahl und leer war wie alle andern Gemächer des alten Hauses, und sie drangen sogar bis hinauf ins alleroberste Stockwerk, das nur aus einem einzigen großen, öden Raum bestand.

Der einzige Ort, an den sie nicht dachten und den sie nicht untersuchten, war das große Storchennest auf dem Dache, wo gerade in diesem Augenblick die Eulenfrau Akka weckte und ihr mitteilte, daß die Turmeule Flammea ihrem Wunsche willfahrt habe und ihr das Erbetene schicke.

Nachdem die grauen Ratten also gewissenhaft die ganze Burg durchsucht hatten, fühlten sie sich beruhigt. Sie nahmen an, daß die schwarzen Ratten davongezogen seien, ohne an Widerstand zu denken, und frohen Herzens hüpften sie auf die Kornhaufen hinauf.

Aber kaum hatten sie die ersten Weizenkörner verzehrt, als da unten im Hof vor der Burg der weiche Ton einer kleinen scharfen Pfeife ertönte. Die Ratten hoben die Köpfe aus dem Korn, lauschten unbeweglich, sprangen ein paar Schritte vor, als wollten sie die Haufen verlassen, kehrten aber wieder um und begannen aufs neue zu fressen.

Wieder erklang die Pfeife mit starkem, durchdringendem Ton. Und jetzt geschah etwas Merkwürdiges. Eine Ratte, zwei Ratten, ja ein ganzer Trupp ließen die Körner los, sprangen aus den Kornhaufen heraus und liefen auf dem kürzesten Weg, so schnell sie konnten, in den Keller hinunter, um aus dem Hause hinauszukommen.

Es waren jedoch noch viele graue Ratten zurückgeblieben. Diese dachten an die Mühe, die es sie gekostet hatte, Glimmingehaus zu erobern, und sie wollten es nicht wieder verlassen.

Aber die Pfeifentöne nötigten sie noch einmal, und da mußten sie ihnen folgen. In wilder Eile stürzten auch sie aus den Kornhaufen heraus, rannten durch die engen Löcher in den Mauern und purzelten in ihrem Eifer, hinunterzukommen, übereinander.

Mitten auf dem Hofe stand ein kleiner Knirps, der auf einer Pfeife blies. Rund um sich her hatte er schon einen ganzen Kreis von Ratten, die ihm entzückt und hingerissen zuhörten, und mit jedem Augenblick strömten neue herbei.

Sobald er die Pfeife nur eine Sekunde lang verstummen ließ, sah es aus, als ob die Ratten Lust hätten, sich auf ihn zu werfen und ihn totzubeißen, aber sobald er blies, waren sie unter seiner Macht.

Als der Knirps alle grauen Ratten aus Glimmingehaus herausgepfiffen hatte, begann er langsam zum Hofe hinaus und auf die Landstraße zu wandern; und alle grauen Ratten folgten ihm, weil ihnen alle die Pfeifentöne so süß in den Ohren klangen, daß sie nicht widerstehen konnten.

Der Knirps ging vor ihnen her und lockte sie mit sich auf den Weg nach Vallby. Unaufhörlich blies er auf seiner Pfeife, die aus einem Tierhorn gemacht zu sein schien, obgleich das Horn so klein war, daß es in unsern Tagen kein Tier gibt, aus dessen Stirn es hätte gebrochen sein können.

Es wußte auch niemand, wer die Pfeife verfertigt hatte. Aber die Turmeule Flammea hatte das Horn in einer Nische der Domkirche zu Lund gefunden; sie hatte es dem Raben Bataki gezeigt, und diese beiden hatten miteinander ausgerechnet, daß dies eines von jenen Hörnern sein müsse, die in früheren Zeiten von den Menschen verfertigt worden waren, die sich Macht über Ratten und Mäuse verschaffen wollten.

Der Rabe aber war Akkas Freund, und von ihm hatte sie erfahren, daß Flammea einen solchen Schatz besaß. Und es war in der Tat so, die Ratten konnten der Pfeife nicht widerstehen. Der Junge ging vor ihnen her und blies so lange, als die Sterne am Himmel strahlten, und die ganze Zeit liefen die Ratten hinter ihm her.

Er blies beim Morgengrauen, er blies beim Sonnenaufgang, und noch immer folgte ihm die ganze Rattenschar und wurde weiter und immer weiter von den großen Kornböden auf Glimmingehaus weggelockt.