de-en  Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson - Teil 3.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf: ... Nils Holgersson.. Part 3: The Life of the Wild Birds.

On the farm.

Thursday, March 24.

Precisely in those days an event took place, not only causing a lot of talk but also appearing in the newspapers; many felt it must be a fabrication because they were unable to explain it to themselves. ....

For in the park of Övedskloster Manor a female squirrel had been caught and taken to a nearby farm.

All the inhabitants of the farm, old and young, were pleased about the sweet little animal with the big tail and the intelligent, curious eyes and the neat, little feet. ...

The whole Summer, they wanted to enjoy her agile movements, her cute manner of nibbling Hazelnuts and her playfulness.

They quickly tidied up the old squirrel cage, which consisted of a little house painted green, and a treadwheel made up of wires.

The little house, which had a door and windows, should serve the squirrel as dining room and bedroom, therefore they made a bed out of leaves and put a bowl of milk and a few hazelnuts inside.

The treadwheel was supposed to be its playroom where it could play and climb and swing around in circles.

The people believed that they had provided well for the squirrel, and they were very surprised that he obviously did not like it. ...

Sad and sullen and giving out a sharp wail now and then, it sat in a corner of his little room.

She didn't touch the food, and not once did she venture onto the wheel.

"It is afraid," the people on the farm said. "But tomorrow, when it got used to his environment, it will certainly be playing and feeding." At that time, there were lots of preparations for a party on the farm, and especially on the day, when the squirrel had been caught, everybody was busy baking all sorts of things.

However as misfortune would have it, either the dough had not wanted to rise, or the people had been somewhat slow in their work, and so they still had to labour on long after nightfall. ...

Everywhere there was a great hustle and bustle, and in the kitchen everyone was hurrying to get things done; no one took the time to check on the squirrel.

However the old mother of the house was too aged to be able to help with the baking; and though she understood that quite well, she was still saddened by being completely excluded; therefore she did not go to bed but sat at the window of the sitting room and looked outside. ...

Due to the heat inside, the door of the kitchen was open, and through the doorway a bright beam of light fell onto the yard outside.

The yard, enclosed by buildings, was now so brightly lit, that the woman could clearly see the cracks and holes in the lime wash on the opposite wall.

She also saw the squirrel's cage, which hung exactly where the light shone the brightest, and then she saw that the squirrel was constantly running from its little room to the tread wheel and back to the little room again, without giving itself a moment's rest. ...

She thought that the animal was in some kind of strange commotion, but she reckoned the bright light kept it awake.

Between the cow shed and the horse stable was a big, wide entrance gate, which now was also brightly illuminated by the light from the kitchen. ...

After quite a while had passed, the old mother saw that a tiny imp was sneaking quietly and carefully through the yard gate; his height was but a span, but he wore wooden shoes at his feet and leather pants like a normal worker.

The old mother knew right away that this was a tomte, and wasn't afraid at all because he had always heard that someone like he lived on the farm, though nobody had ever seen it; and a tomte also brought luck wherever it showed itself.

As soon as the tomte came into the cobble stone yard, he ran hurriedly towards the cage, and because he was unable to reach it, because it was too high up, he went into the tool shed, fetched a pole, leaned it against the cage and climbed up the pole to it, just as a sailor would climb up a rope.

When he reached the cage, he rattled at the door of the little green house, attempting to open it; but the old mother was quite reassured, because she knew that the children had attached a padlock in case the boys from the neighbouring farm tried to steal the squirrel.

The woman saw the tomte unable to force open the door and the squirrel come out into the tread-wheel.

Now the two had a long conversation, and after the tomte knew everything that the animal had to say to him, he slid down the pole again and ran hurriedly out of the gate.

The woman did not believe that she would see any more of the tomte this night, but remained sitting at the window anyway.

After a while, he did come back again.

He was in such a hurry, that his feet scarcely seemed to touch the ground, and he ran straight towards the cage.

The woman, with her far-sighted eyes, saw him clearly and noticed that he was carrying something in his hands; but could not recognise what it was.

Now, what he held in his left hand he set down upon the cobble stones, but that which was in his right hand, he took with him up to the cage. Here he struck the little window so strongly with his wooden clog that the window pane shattered and he was able to reach in to give the squirrel that which he held in his hand.

He then slid down the pole, picked up the other object from the ground and climbed back up to the cage with it. As quick as lightning he was down on the ground again, and rushed away so fast, that the woman could hardly follow him with her eyes.

But now the old mother was no longer able to contain her curiosity and remain in her room.

Quietly she stood up from her chair, went out into the yard and placed herself in the shadow of the well to wait for the tomte.

And there was still someone else, who had also become watchful and inquisitive.

It was the house cat; she came creeping quietly and stopped at the wall, just a few steps away from the bright beam of light.

The two had to wait for a long time in the cold night, and the woman was already considering whether she would be better off going inside when she heard a clatter on the pavement and saw that the little dwarf of a tomte was really coming near again. ...

And now he carried something in each hand, and what he carried wriggled and squealed. ...

Now it began to dawn on the old mother, and she understood that the tomte had run into the hazelnut grove, had fetched the squirrel's young ones there and was now bringing them to their mother so that they would not have to starve to death.

The old woman kept quite still in order not to disturb the tomte and he did not appear to have noticed her either.

He was just about to put the one young one on the ground in order to climb up to the cage when he suddenly saw the green eyes of the cat glittering right next to him. ...

Quite at a loss what to do, he stopped, a young squirrel in each hand. ...

He turned and peered around in the yard.

Then he caught sight of the old mother, and without much ado he quickly stepped up to her and handed her one of the little animals. ...

The old mother did not want to show herself unworthy of the trust the tomte had put in her; she took the squirrel from him and held it tight until the tomte had climbed up to the cage with the first one and then came to get the second one which he had entrusted to her. ...

Next morning, when the people had gathered at the farmhouse for breakfast, the old woman found it impossible to keep last night's incident to herself. ...

But they all laughed at her and said, that she had only dreamt it.

At this time of the year there weren't yet any young squirrels.

But she was very sure of what she had experienced and demanded that they look into the cage. They did that, and lo and behold, on the bed of leaves in the little room lay four half-naked, half-blind young ones, only two days old. ...

When the father saw this, he said: "This may have happened now as it may, but so much is certain, we here at the courtyard must be ashamed of ourselves in front of animals and people." With that, he took the squirrel along with the four young ones from the cage and put all of them into the mother's apron.

Take your apron with the little ones to the hazelnut grove, and set them free again," he said. ...

This is the incident that had caused so much of a stir and even appeared in the newspaper, but that most people did not want to believe because they could not explain it.

In the Övedskloster park. ...

The day that the wild geese outsmarted the fox, the boy spent in a deep sleep in an abandoned squirrel's nest.

When he woke towards evening, he was very sad. ... "Now they will soon send me home", he thought,"and then there is no escape, I will have to show myself to Mother and Father as I am now". But as he came to the wild geese, who were swimming and bathing in the Vombsee, no word was spoken about his departure. ...

"Maybe they think that the white one is too tired to set off with me this evening", he thought.

The next morning the geese were already awake long before sunrise and the boy was cocksure that he and the gander would have to set out on the journey home immediately. ...

But strangely enough, both were allowed to accompany the wild geese on their morning excursion.

The boy could not possibly imagine what could be the reason for this delay, but then he cleverly figured out that the wild geese did not want to send the gander on such a long journey before he had properly eaten his fill. ...

Be that as it may, the boy was glad at heart for each additional hour that lay between him and the reunion with his parents. ...

The wild geese flew over Övedskloster mansion, which was situated in a splendid park to the east of the lake, and which looked wonderful with its great castle, its beautiful cobbled courtyard surrounded by low walls and summer houses and its elegant old-fashioned garden with cut hedges, close arbors, ponds, fountains, splendid trees and short-cut lawns with borders full of colorful spring flowers.

When the wild geese flew over the manor in the early morning, there was no one to be seen. ...

After making sure of this, they let themselves down very close to the kennel and shouted: "What is this little hut here? What kind of a little hut is this?" Immediately the dog came running out of his house, angry and furious and barking with all his might. ...

"You call this a cabin, you, you tramps? Can't you see that this is a big stone castle?

Don't you see what beautiful walls, how many windows, which mighty gates and what splendid terrace it has, woof, woof, woof?

You call this a cabin, do you?

Don't you see the courtyard, the garden, the greenhouses and the marble figures? ... You call this a cabin, do you?

Are huts usually surrounded by a park where there are beech forests and hazelnut bushes and tree meadows and oak groves and fir groves and a zoo full of deer? ...

Wow, wow, wow! You call this a hut, do you?

Have you seen huts with so many outbuildings that they form a whole village? ...

You probably know a lot of huts, which have their own church and rectory and which command mansions and farms and lease farms and official residences, woof, woof woof!

You call this a hut, you guys?... To this hut belongs the greatest estate in all of Skåne, you beggars!

Not a single spot of land could be seen by you up there at your height that wouldn't belong to this hut, woof, woof, woof!" The dog actually brought all of this out in one breath, the geese flew back and forth over the courtyard and listened to him until he had to take a breath, but then they shouted: "Why are you so angry? ... We weren't asking about the castle at all, but only about your kennel!" When the boy heard this bantering, he laughed at first, but then the thought dawned on him all at once that made him serious.

"Oh, how many of these jokes you would hear if you were allowed to travel with the wild geese all over the country up to Lapland!" he sighed quietly.

"Because you've surely spoiled your life this way, such a journey would be the best thing that could happen to you yet." The wild geese flew to one of the large fields beyond the mansion where they grazed on the winter grass for a few hours.

In the meantime, the boy went into the big park, which was adjoining the field, and peered eagerly to see if there wasn't a hazelnut from the past autumn on the branches of the hazelnut bushes. But while he was wandering around in the park, the thought of the return trip surfaced threateningly one time after another before his soul. Again and again he had to imagine how beautiful it would be if he were allowed to stay with the wild geese.

Of course he would often be hungry and cold, but on the other hand, he would be free of all work and study. ...

While he was still pursuing this thought, the old grey goose suddenly sat down next to him and asked if he had found something edible.

No, he hadn't found anything, the boy replied. ...

Then Akka tried to help him, but she didn't find any hazelnuts either, however instead she discovered some rose hips which still hung on a wild rose bush. ...

The boy ate them eagerly; but he also asked himself what his mother might say if she knew that her son made do with raw fish and frozen rose hips.

When the wild geese had finally had their fill, they moved back to the lake again and amused themselves with all kinds of games till noon.

They challenged the white gander to compete in their arts, in jumping, flying, and swimming, and the big domesticated goose did his best, but the nimble wild geese ranked ahead in everything.

During the whole time, the boy sat on the back of the gander, spurred him on, and had as much fun as the others.

There was shouting and laughter, and it was just very surprising that the lordship of the castle did not become aware of it.

After the wild geese had become tired of playing, they flew back over to the ice and spend a few hours resting.

They spent the afternoon almost like the morning, first grassing for a few hours, then bathing and playing at the edge of the ice till sundown, and then they stood on the the ice where they also fell asleep right away.

"Yes, I would certainly like such a life," the boy thought, when he slipped unter the wing of the gander in the evening. "But tomorrow I will certainly be sent away." Before he fell asleep, he thought about all the advantages that would arise from a journey with the wild geese.

He would not be scolded for being lazy, he could dally away the day, and his only worry would be to find something to eat.

But indeed, he now needed so little for his keep, then there would always be advice. ...

And then he imagined all the things he might see, and all the adventures he might experience.

Oh, that would be something quite different than the work and drudgery at home. ...

"Oh, if I might only be allowed to accompany the wild geese on this journey, then I would certainly not fret about my transformation!" he thought.

He was afraid of nothing but to be sent home; but also on Wednesay the wild geese did not insist that it was time to leave.

The day passed like the previous one, and the boy liked the footloose life in the open more and more.

He felt as if he had the solitary park, which was as big as a forest, all to himself, and he felt no desire to return to the cramped room and the small plot of land at his home.

On Wednesday he believed that the wild geese had the intention of allowing him to stay with them, but on Thursday he didn't have this hope any more.

Thursday started just like the previous day. ...

The wild geese grazed on the big fields, and the boy went in the park to search for food.

After some time Akka joined him and asked if he had found something edible. No, he hadn't found anything. ...

Then Akka discovered a withered caraway bush, on which all the small fruits were hanging untouched. ...

However, after the boy had eaten, Akka said to him that she thought he was roaming around the park too recklessly, as though he wasn't aware how many enemies a little creature like him should watch out for? ...

No, he did not know that, the boy said, and Akka began to enumerate him the enemies.

If he were to go into the forest, she said he should watch out for the fox and the marten, if he were to stop at the shore, he shouldn't forget about the otters, if he were to sit on a stone wall, he must think about the weasel, which could slip through the smallest hole, and if he were to lay down on a heap of leaves to sleep, he would first have to investigate whether an adder wasn't hibernating in the same pile.

As soon as he was to come to open fields, he should beware of the the hawk and the volture, the eagle and the falcon, who were soaring high up in the air.

In the hazelnut bushes he can be caught by the sparrow hawk. ...

Jackdaws and crows were to be found on everywhere, and he shouldn't trust them too much. ..

And as soon as dawn was breaking, he was to prick up his ears and watch the big owls who came gliding in on silent wings, so that they were already real close to him before he even perceived how close they were.

When the boy heard of so many foes trying to kill him, it seemed impossible for him to get away alive. ...

He wasn't particularly afraid of dying, but he didn't want to be eaten.

He therefore asked Akka what he had to do to avoid the predators.

And Akka immediately answered that he must try to put himself on good terms with the community of small animals in the forest and in the field, with the squirrels and the hares, with the finches, chickadees, woodpeckers and skylarks.

If he befriended them, they would warn him of dangers, show him hiding places and, in the utmost distress, unite to defend him.

However, when later in the day the boy wanted to heed her council and approached Sirle, the squirrel, for kindly support it turned out that the squirrel did not want to help him. ...

"You mustn't get any hope of help from the little animal species," Sirle said. "Do you think we didn't know that you are Nils, the goose herder, who last year tore down the swallows' nests, broke the starlings' eggs, threw the young crows into the marl pit, ensnared the thrushes and locked squirrels in cages? ...

You must help yourself as best as you can and can still yourself lucky if we do not gang up and chase you back to your own kind." This was just such an answer which the boy would not have let go unpunished in the past. ...

But now he was only afraid that even the wild geese might find out how mean he could be.

Since that time, he had been in constant fear that the wild geese would disallow him to stay with them in the end, and for this reason he had not taken the slightest liberties in their company. ...

Of course, he could not have done much evil because he was so small, but he could have destroyed birds' nests, and crushed the eggs, if he'd been in a mind to.

But he had always been very polite, hadn't plucked a feather from any goose's wing, hadn't given a single impolite answer, and when he wished Akka good morning, he took off his cap and bowed to her every time. ...

Throughout Thursday he thought that the wild geese would certainly not take him along to Lappland just because of his wickedness, and when he heard in the evening that the mate of Sirle the squirrel had been kidnapped and that his newborn young ones would now have to starve to death, he decided to help them, and it has already been reported how well Nils Holgersson succeeded.

When the boy came to the park on Friday, he heard the chaffinches in every shrub singing of how the mate of Sirle the squirrel had been kidnapped away from her newborn young ones by grim robbers and how the goose-boy Nils had dared to go among the humans and bring her her small ones.

"Who now is being celebrated so much in the park of Övedskloster," sang the chaffinches, "as Tumbling who everybody feared when he was still the goose-herder Nils?

Sirle, the squirrel gives him nuts, the poor rabbits grovel ot him, the deer put him on their backs and run away with him, when Smirre, the fox, shows up near them, the tits warn him of the sparrow haw,, and the finches and larks sing about his heroic deed!" The boy was quite sure that Akka and the other wild geese had heard all that, but still all Friday passed without his being told that he might now stay with them.

Until Saturday the wild geese were allowed to graze on the fields near Öved without being disturbed by Smirre.

But when they came over to the field on Saturday morning, he lay there in ambush and followed them from one arable land to another.

When Akka now saw that there was no way he would leave them in peace, she came to a quick decision, rose high up into the air and flew with her flock for several miles away over the plains of Färs and the mountain ridges of Linderöd.

There they settled in the Vittskövle area.

Then it was Sunday again. A whole week had now passed since the boy had been bewitched, and he was still as small as on the first day.

But it did not look as if this would trouble him much.

On Sunday afternoon he sat on a large, dense willow bush by the lake shore and blew on a willow flute. All around him there were as many tits and chaffinches and starlings as there was room in the shrubbery, and they tweeted their songs which the boy tried to imitate.

But the boy was not very adept at this art; he blew such false tones that the little masters' feathers stood on end and they screamed in utter horror and beat their wings. ...

But the boy laughed so heartily about their zealousness that he dropped his flute.

Again he began to blow, but it wasn't any better this time either, and all the birds moaned: "Today you're playing even worse than usual, Tom Thumb!" ... You don't bring out a pure tone. Just where do you have your thoughts, Tom Thumb?" "They are somewhere else," the boy replied. ... And that was quite true.

He always had to think about how long he might yet be allowed stay with the wild geese and whether he would be sent away at the end of the day. ...

But suddenly the boy threw the pipe away and jumped down from the willow groves, because he saw Akka and all the geese in a long row coming towards him.

They approached unusually slowly and solemnly, and the boy realized right away that he would learn now what they intended to do with him. ...

When finally the geese stopped in front of him, Akka said: "You have every reason to wonder about me, because I have not yet thanked you for saving me from Smirre's claws. ...

But I'm one of those who prefers to thank with deeds rather than with words. ...

And I believe, dear Thumbling, that I have managed to do you a great service. ...

I have sent a message to the tomte that bewitched you. ...

At first, he didn't want to hear anything about changing you back into your old form, but I sent message after message to let him know how well you conducted yourself with us. ...

Now he sends you his regards and wants you to know that you as soon as you returned home you would become a man again." But how strange! As happy the boy was when Akka had begun to speak, he was just as saddened when she stopped speaking. ...

He didn't say a word, but he just turned away and wept.

"What does that mean?" Akka asked.

"It looks like you had expected from me more than I offered to you." But the boy thought about carefree days and amusing bantering, about adventure and freedom and journeys high above the earth, what he had to miss from now on, and he cried loudly in grief and sadness. ...

"I don't want to be a human being again!" he sobbed. "I want to go with you to Lapland!" "I want to tell you something," Akka replied. "The tomte is apt to take offence easily, and I am afraid it will be difficult for you to make him decide in your favor again if you turn down his offer now." It had always been strange that this boy had never actually loved anyone, neither father nor mother, nor schoolteacher, nor schoolmates, nor the boys on the neighboring farms. ...

Everything they had ever asked him to do, whether it was a play or work, had seemed boring to him. ...

Therefore there was no one whom he missed or longed for.

The only ones with whom he had been able to get along were the goose girl Åsa and her brother Klein-Mats, a couple children who, like him, also kept geese.

But even with them he had no real friendship. Oh no, not at all!

"I do not want to be turned back into a human being again," the boy sobbed. .. "I want to go with you to Lapland! That's why I've been good for a whole week.'' You are not to be denied to accompany us as long as this is your wish," Akka said. ...

"But, first think about whether you wouldn't rather return home. ... The day could come when you regret it." "No," said the boy, "there is nothing to regret. Things have never been as good for me as here with you." "Well, then be it is as you wish," said Akka. ...

"Thank you, thank you!" the boy shouted.

And he felt so happy that he now had to cry with joy just as much as he had cried with sorrow before.
unit 1
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 2
Selma Lagerlöf: ... Nils Holgersson.. Teil 3: Das Leben der Wildvögel.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 3
Im Bauernhof.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 4
Donnerstag, 24 März.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 14
Es rührte die Speisen nicht an und schwang sich auch nicht ein einziges Mal in dem Rad.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 15
„Es fürchtet sich,“ sagten die Leute auf dem Bauernhof.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 32
Nach einer Weile kam es auch richtig wieder.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 39
Aber jetzt litt es die alte Mutter nicht mehr im Zimmer.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 41
Und noch jemand war da, der auch aufmerksam und neugierig geworden war.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 44
Auch jetzt trug er in jeder Hand etwas, und was er trug, das zappelte und quietschte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 48
Ganz ratlos blieb es stehen, in jeder Hand ein junges Eichhörnchen.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 49
Es drehte sich um und spähte im Hof umher.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 53
Aber alle miteinander lachten sie aus und sagten, sie habe das nur geträumt.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 54
Zu dieser Jahreszeit gäbe es ja noch gar keine jungen Eichhörnchen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 55
Doch sie war ihrer Sache ganz sicher und verlangte, daß man im Käfig nachsehe.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 58
„Geh damit in das Haselnußwäldchen und gib ihnen ihre Freiheit wieder,“ sagte er.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 60
Im Park von Övedskloster.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 62
Als er gegen Abend erwachte, war er sehr betrübt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 66
Aber merkwürdigerweise durften alle beide die Wildgänse auf ihren Morgenausflug begleiten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 70
Als die Wildgänse in aller Frühe über den Herrenhof hinflogen, war noch kein Mensch zu sehen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 73
„Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr, ihr Landstreicher?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 74
Seht ihr nicht, daß das ein großes steinernes Schloß ist?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 76
Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 77
Seht ihr denn nicht den Hof, den Garten, die Gewächshäuser und die Marmorfiguren?
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 78
Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 80
Wau, wau, wau!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 81
Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 82
Habt ihr Hütten gesehen mit so vielen Nebengebäuden, daß sie einen ganzen Ort bilden?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 84
Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 85
Zu dieser Hütte hier gehört das größte Gut in ganz Schonen, ihr Bettelvolk!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 94
Nein, er habe nichts gefunden, antwortete der Junge.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 106
Doch er brauchte ja jetzt so wenig zu seinem Unterhalt, da würde sich schon Rat schaffen lassen.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 107
unit 108
O das wäre etwas ganz anderes als die Arbeit und Schinderei daheim.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 114
Der Donnerstag begann ganz wie der vorhergehende Tag.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 115
unit 116
Nach einiger Zeit gesellte sich Akka zu ihm und fragte, ob er etwas Eßbares gefunden habe.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 117
Nein, das hatte er nicht.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 120
Nein, das wisse er nicht, sagte der Junge, und darauf begann Akka ihm die Feinde aufzuzählen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 123
Im Haselnußgebüsch könne er vom Sperber gefangen werden.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 124
Dohlen und Krähen fänden sich überall, und ihnen solle er nur nicht zu viel trauen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 128
Er fragte deshalb Akka, was er tun müsse, um den Raubtieren zu entgehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 132
„Von dem kleinen Tiervolk darfst du dir keine Hoffnung auf Hilfe machen,“ sagte Sirle.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 135
Jetzt aber bekam er nur Angst, auch die Wildgänse möchten erfahren, wie böse er sein konnte.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 146
Dort ließen sie sich in der Gegend von Vittskövle nieder.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 147
Dann wurde es wieder Sonntag.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 149
Aber es sah nicht aus, als ob ihm das großen Kummer machte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 153
Der Junge aber lachte so herzlich über ihren Eifer, daß ihm die Pfeife entfiel.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 155
Du bringst keinen reinen Ton heraus.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 156
Wo hast du nur deine Gedanken, Däumling?“ „Die sind anderswo,“ antwortete der Junge.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 157
Und das war ganz wahr.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 162
Aber ich gehöre zu denen, die lieber mit Taten als mit Worten danken.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 163
Und ich glaube, lieber Däumling, daß es mir gelungen ist, dir einen großen Dienst zu erweisen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 164
Ich habe nämlich an das Wichtelmännchen, das dich verzaubert hat, Botschaft geschickt.
5 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 168
Er sagte kein Wort, sondern wendete sich nur ab und weinte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 169
„Was soll denn aber das bedeuten?“ fragte Akka.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 171
„Ich mache mir nichts daraus, wieder ein Mensch zu werden!“ schluchzte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 172
„Ich will mit euch nach Lappland!“ „Ich will dir etwas sagen,“ erwiderte Akka.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 175
Deshalb gab es jetzt auch keinen Menschen, nach dem er sich gesehnt oder den er vermißt hätte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 177
Aber auch mit ihnen verband ihn keine richtige Freundschaft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 178
O nein, ganz und gar nicht!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 179
„Ich will nicht wieder ein Mensch werden!“ schluchzte der Junge.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 180
„Ich will euch nach Lappland begleiten!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 182
„Aber überlege dir nun zuerst, ob du nicht lieber nach Hause zurückkehren möchtest.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 185
„Danke, danke!“ rief der Junge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 180  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 179  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 181  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 100  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 98  1 year, 1 month ago

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf: ... Nils Holgersson..

Teil 3: Das Leben der Wildvögel.

Im Bauernhof.

Donnerstag, 24 März.

Gerade in jenen Tagen trug sich in Schonen ein Ereignis zu, das nicht allein sehr viel von sich reden machte, sondern auch in die Zeitungen kam, das aber viele für eine Erfindung hielten, weil sie es sich durchaus nicht erklären konnten.

Im Park von Övedskloster war nämlich ein Eichhornweibchen gefangen und auf einen nahegelegenen Bauernhof gebracht worden.

Alle Bewohner des Bauernhofs, alte und junge, freuten sich sehr über das kleine hübsche Tier mit dem großen Schwanz, den klugen neugierigen Augen und den kleinen netten Füßchen.

Sie wollten sich den ganzen Sommer an seinen flinken Bewegungen, seiner putzigen Art, Haselnüsse zu knabbern, und an seinem lustigen Spiel erfreuen.

Schnell brachten sie einen alten Eichhörnchenkäfig in Ordnung, der aus einem kleinen grün angestrichenen Häuschen und einem aus Draht geflochtenen Rad bestand.

Das Häuschen, das Tür und Fenster hatte, sollte dem Eichhörnchen als Eß- und Schlafzimmer dienen, deshalb machten sie ein Lager aus Laub zurecht, stellten eine Schale Milch hinein und legten einige Haselnüsse dazu.

Das Rad sollte sein Spielzimmer sein, wo es spielen und klettern und sich im Kreise herumschwingen könnte.

Die Menschen glaubten, sie hätten es für das Eichhörnchen recht gut gemacht, und sie verwunderten sich sehr, daß es ihm offenbar nicht gefiel.

Betrübt und mißmutig und nur ab und zu einen scharfen Klagelaut ausstoßend, saß es in einer Ecke seines Stübchens.

Es rührte die Speisen nicht an und schwang sich auch nicht ein einziges Mal in dem Rad.

„Es fürchtet sich,“ sagten die Leute auf dem Bauernhof. „Aber morgen, wenn es an seine Umgebung gewöhnt ist, wird es schon spielen und fressen.“

In dem Bauernhofe waren aber zu der Zeit große Vorbereitungen zu einem Fest im Gang, und gerade an dem Tag, wo das Eichhörnchen gefangen worden war, war große Backerei.

Zum Unglück jedoch hatte entweder der Teig nicht recht aufgehen wollen, oder die Leute waren etwas langsam bei der Arbeit gewesen, und so mußten sie noch lange nach Einbruch der Dunkelheit arbeiten.

Überall herrschte natürlich großer Eifer, und man hatte es sehr eilig in der Küche; niemand nahm sich Zeit, nachzusehen, wie es dem Eichhörnchen ging.

Doch die alte Mutter des Hauses war zu bejahrt, um noch beim Backen helfen zu können; und obwohl sie das recht gut einsah, war sie doch betrübt darüber, ganz ausgeschlossen zu sein;

sie ging auch nicht zu Bett, sondern setzte sich ans Fenster der Wohnstube und sah hinaus.

Die Küchentür war der Wärme wegen aufgemacht worden, und durch sie fiel ein heller Lichtschein auf den Hof hinaus.

Es war ein von Gebäuden umschlossener Hof, der jetzt so hell erleuchtet war, daß die Frau die Risse und Löcher in der Verkalkung an der gegenüberliegenden Wand deutlich sehen konnte.

Sie sah auch den Käfig des Eichhörnchens, der gerade dort hing, wo der Lichtschein am hellsten hinfiel, und da sah sie, daß das Eichhörnchen immerfort aus seinem Stübchen in das Rad und vom Rad wieder ins Stübchen hineinlief, ohne sich einen Augenblick Ruhe zu gönnen.

Sie dachte, das Tier sei doch in einer sonderbaren Aufregung, aber sie meinte, der scharfe Lichtschein halte es wach.

Zwischen dem Kuh- und dem Pferdestall war ein großes, breites Einfahrtstor, das jetzt auch von dem Lichtschein aus der Küche hellbeleuchtet war.

Als eine gute Weile vergangen war, sah die alte Mutter, daß durch das Hoftor ganz leise und vorsichtig ein winziger Knirps hereingeschlichen kam;

er war nur eine Spanne hoch, hatte aber Holzschuhe an den Füßen und trug Lederhosen wie ein gewöhnlicher Arbeiter.

Die alte Mutter wußte sogleich, daß dies das Wichtelmännchen war, und fürchtete sich nicht im geringsten, denn sie hatte immer gehört, daß sich ein solches auf dem Hofe aufhalte, obgleich es noch nie jemand gesehen hatte;

und ein Wichtelmännchen brachte ja Glück, wo es sich zeigte.

Sobald das Wichtelmännchen auf den gepflasterten Hof kam, lief es eilig auf den Käfig zu, und da es ihn nicht erreichen konnte, weil er zu hoch hing, ging es nach dem Geräteschuppen, holte eine Stange heraus, lehnte sie an den Käfig und kletterte an ihr hinauf, gerade wie ein Seemann an einem Tau hinaufklettert.

Als es den Käfig erreicht hatte, rüttelte es an der Tür des kleinen grünen Hauses, um es zu öffnen; aber die alte Mutter war ganz beruhigt, denn sie wußte, daß die Kinder ein Vorlegeschloß daran gehängt hatten, aus Angst, die Jungen vom Nachbarhof könnten versuchen, das Eichhörnchen zu stehlen.

Die Frau sah, daß das Eichhörnchen, als das Wichtelmännchen die Tür nicht aufbrachte, in das Rad herauskam.

Da führten nun die beiden ein langes Zwiegespräch, und nachdem das Wichtelmännchen alles wußte, was ihm das Tier zu sagen hatte, glitt es an der Stange wieder hinunter und lief eilig zum Tor hinaus.

Die Frau glaubte nicht, daß sie in dieser Nacht noch etwas von dem Wichtelmännchen zu sehen bekäme, blieb aber doch am Fenster sitzen.

Nach einer Weile kam es auch richtig wieder.

Es hatte es so eilig, daß seine Füße kaum den Boden zu berühren schienen, und lief spornstreichs auf den Käfig zu.

Mit ihren fernsichtigen Augen sah es die Frau deutlich, auch bemerkte sie, daß es etwas in den Händen trug; aber was es war, konnte sie nicht erkennen.

Jetzt legte es das, was es in der linken Hand hielt, auf das Steinpflaster nieder, aber das in seiner Rechten nahm es mit hinauf zum Käfig. Hier stieß es mit seinem Holzschuh so heftig an das Fensterchen, daß die Scheibe zersprang, und durch diese reichte es nun das, was es in der Hand hielt, dem Eichhörnchen hinein.

Dann rutschte es an der Stange herunter, nahm den andern Gegenstand vom Boden und kletterte auch damit zum Käfig hinauf. Schnell wie der Blitz war es wieder unten und stürmte so eilig davon, daß ihm die alte Frau kaum mit den Augen folgen konnte.

Aber jetzt litt es die alte Mutter nicht mehr im Zimmer.

Ganz leise stand sie von ihrem Stuhl auf, ging auf den Hof hinaus und stellte sich in den Schatten des Brunnens, um hier das Wichtelmännchen zu erwarten.

Und noch jemand war da, der auch aufmerksam und neugierig geworden war.

Das war die Hauskatze; leise kam sie dahergeschlichen und blieb an der Mauer, gerade ein paar Schritte von dem hellen Lichtstreifen entfernt, stehen.

Die beiden mußten in der kalten Nacht lange warten, und die Frau überlegte sich schon, ob sie nicht lieber hineingehen sollte, als sie ein Geklapper auf dem Pflaster hörte und sah, daß der kleine Knirps von einem Wichtelmännchen wirklich noch einmal daherkam.

Auch jetzt trug er in jeder Hand etwas, und was er trug, das zappelte und quietschte.

Jetzt ging der alten Mutter ein Licht auf, und sie verstand, daß das Wichtelmännchen in das Haselnußwäldchen gelaufen war, dort die Jungen des Eichhörnchens geholt hatte und sie jetzt ihrer Mutter brachte, damit sie nicht verhungern müßten.

Die alte Frau verhielt sich ganz still, um das Wichtelmännchen nicht zu stören, und das schien sie auch nicht bemerkt zu haben.

Es war eben im Begriff, das eine Junge auf den Boden zu legen, um zum Käfig hinaufzuklettern, als es plötzlich die grünen Augen der Katze dicht neben sich funkeln sah.

Ganz ratlos blieb es stehen, in jeder Hand ein junges Eichhörnchen.

Es drehte sich um und spähte im Hof umher.

Da gewahrte es die alte Mutter, und ohne sich lange zu besinnen, trat es rasch zu ihr hin und reichte ihr eines der Tierchen.

Die alte Mutter wollte sich des Vertrauens des Wichtelmännchens nicht unwürdig zeigen;

sie nahm ihm das Eichhörnchen ab und hielt es fest, bis das Wichtelmännchen mit dem ersten zum Käfig hinaufgeklettert war und dann kam, das zweite, das es ihr anvertraut hatte, zu holen.

Am nächsten Morgen, als die Leute auf dem Bauernhofe beim Frühstück versammelt waren, konnte die Alte unmöglich über das Erlebnis der vergangenen Nacht schweigen.

Aber alle miteinander lachten sie aus und sagten, sie habe das nur geträumt.

Zu dieser Jahreszeit gäbe es ja noch gar keine jungen Eichhörnchen.

Doch sie war ihrer Sache ganz sicher und verlangte, daß man im Käfig nachsehe. Man tat es, und siehe da, auf dem Lager aus Laub, in der kleinen Stube, lagen vier halbnackte, halbblinde, erst zwei Tage alte Junge.

Als der Vater dies sah, sagte er: „Das mag nun zugegangen sein, wie es will, aber so viel ist sicher, wir hier auf dem Hofe haben uns benommen, daß wir uns vor Tieren und Menschen schämen müssen.“

Damit nahm er das Eichhörnchen mitsamt den vier Jungen aus dem Käfig heraus und legte alle in die Schürze der Mutter.

„Geh damit in das Haselnußwäldchen und gib ihnen ihre Freiheit wieder,“ sagte er.

Dies ist das Ereignis, das so viel von sich reden gemacht hatte und sogar in die Zeitung kam, das aber die meisten nicht glauben wollten, weil sie es sich nicht erklären konnten.

Im Park von Övedskloster.

Den Tag, an dem die Wildgänse ihr Spiel mit dem Fuchs trieben, verbrachte der Junge in einem verlassenen Eichhörnchennest in tiefem Schlafe.

Als er gegen Abend erwachte, war er sehr betrübt. „Nun werden sie mich bald nach Hause zurückschicken,“ dachte er, „und dann gibt es keinen Ausweg mehr für mich, ich muß mich Vater und Mutter so zeigen, wie ich jetzt bin.“

Aber als er zu den Wildgänsen hinkam, die im Vombsee umherschwammen und badeten, wurde kein Wort von seiner Abreise laut.

„Sie meinen vielleicht, der Weiße sei zu müde, um sich heute abend noch mit mir auf den Weg zu machen,“ dachte er.

Am nächsten Morgen waren die Gänse schon lange vor Sonnenaufgang munter, und der Junge war fest überzeugt, daß er und der Gänserich die Heimreise nun unverzüglich antreten mußten.

Aber merkwürdigerweise durften alle beide die Wildgänse auf ihren Morgenausflug begleiten.

Der Junge konnte sich durchaus nicht denken, was der Grund zu diesem Aufschub sein könnte, aber dann klügelte er sich heraus, daß die Wildgänse den Gänserich nicht auf eine so weite Reise schicken wollten, ehe er sich ordentlich sattgegessen hätte.

Wie es sich aber auch verhalten mochte, der Junge war über jede weitere Stunde, die zwischen ihm und dem Wiedersehen mit seinen Eltern lag, von Herzen froh.

Die Wildgänse flogen über den Herrenhof von Övedskloster hin, der in einem herrlichen Park östlich von dem See lag, und der wundervoll aussah mit seinem großen Schloß, seinem schönen gepflasterten, von niedrigen Mauern und Lusthäusern umgebenen Hofe und seinem vornehmen altmodischen Garten mit den geschnittenen Hecken, dichten Laubgängen, Teichen, Springbrunnen, prachtvollen Bäumen und kurzgeschorenen Rasenplätzen, wo die Rabatten voller bunter Frühlingsblumen standen.

Als die Wildgänse in aller Frühe über den Herrenhof hinflogen, war noch kein Mensch zu sehen.

Nachdem sie sich dessen genau versichert hatten, ließen sie sich ganz nahe zur Hundehütte hinunter und riefen:

„Was ist das hier für eine kleine Hütte? Was ist das hier für eine kleine Hütte?“

Sogleich kam der Hund zornig und wütend aus seinem Hause herausgerannt und bellte aus Leibeskräften.

„Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr, ihr Landstreicher? Seht ihr nicht, daß das ein großes steinernes Schloß ist?

Seht ihr nicht, was für schöne Mauern, wie viele Fenster, welche mächtigen Tore und welche prachtvolle Terrasse es hat, wau, wau, wau?

Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?

Seht ihr denn nicht den Hof, den Garten, die Gewächshäuser und die Marmorfiguren? Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?

Haben die Hütten für gewöhnlich einen Park ringsum, wo es Buchenwälder und Haselnußgebüsch und Baumwiesen und Eichenhaine und Tannengehölze und einen Tiergarten voller Rehe gibt?

Wau, wau, wau! Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr?

Habt ihr Hütten gesehen mit so vielen Nebengebäuden, daß sie einen ganzen Ort bilden?

Ihr kennt wohl sehr viele Hütten, die eine eigne Kirche und ein eignes Pfarrhaus haben und die über Herrenhäuser und Bauernhöfe und Pachthöfe und Amtswohnungen gebieten, wau, wau, wau!

Nennt ihr das eine Hütte, ihr? Zu dieser Hütte hier gehört das größte Gut in ganz Schonen, ihr Bettelvolk!

Nicht ein einziges Fleckchen Erde könnt ihr da droben von eurer Höhe aus sehen, das nicht unter dieser Hütte stünde, wau, wau, wau!“

Der Hund brachte dies alles wirklich in einem Atemzug heraus; die Gänse flogen über dem Hofe hin und her und hörten ihm zu, bis er Atem schöpfen mußte, dann aber riefen sie:

„Warum bist du denn so zornig? Wir haben gar nicht nach dem Schloß gefragt, sondern nur nach deiner Hundehütte!“

Als der Junge diese Neckerein hörte, lachte er zuerst, aber dann drängte sich ihm der Gedanke auf, der ihn auf einmal ernst stimmte.

„Ach, wie viele solcher Scherze würdest du zu hören bekommen, wenn du mit den Wildgänsen durchs ganze Land bis hinauf nach Lappland reisen dürftest!“ seufzte er leise.

„Da du dir dein Leben nun doch einmal so verdorben hast, wäre eine solche Reise noch das beste, was dir widerfahren könnte.“

Die Wildgänse flogen auf einen der jenseits vom Herrenhof gelegenen großen Äcker und weideten da ein paar Stunden lang das Wintergras ab.

Inzwischen ging der Junge in den an den Acker anstoßenden großen Park hinein und spähte eifrig, ob nicht an den Zweigen der Haselsträucher da und dort noch eine Haselnuß vom vergangenen Herbst zu finden wäre

Aber während er so im Parke umherstreifte, tauchte der Gedanke an die Heimreise einmal ums andre drohend vor seiner Seele auf. Immer wieder mußte er sich ausmalen, wie schön er es haben würde, wenn er bei den Wildgänsen bleiben dürfte.

Hungern und frieren würde er freilich oftmals müssen, dafür aber wäre er auch aller Arbeit und allem Lernen enthoben.

Während er noch diesen Gedanken nachhing, ließ sich plötzlich die alte graue Gans neben ihm nieder und fragte ihn, ob er etwas Eßbares gefunden habe.

Nein, er habe nichts gefunden, antwortete der Junge.

Da versuchte Akka ihm zu helfen, aber auch sie fand keine Haselnüsse, entdeckte jedoch dafür ein paar Hagebutten, die noch an einem wilden Rosenbusch hingen.

Der Junge verzehrte sie mit gutem Appetit; aber er fragte sich doch, was wohl seine Mutter sagen würde, wenn sie wüßte, daß ihr Sohn sich mit rohen Fischen und ausgefrornen Hagebutten das Leben fristete.

Als die Wildgänse endlich satt geworden waren, zogen sie wieder an den See hinunter und trieben da bis zur Mittagszeit allerlei Kurzweil.

Sie forderten den weißen Gänserich zum Wettbewerb in ihren Künsten heraus, im Springen, Fliegen und Schwimmen, und der große zahme tat sein Bestes, aber die flinken Wildgänse liefen ihm in allem den Rang ab.

Während dieser ganzen Zeit saß der Junge auf dem Rücken des Gänserichs, feuerte diesen an und war eben so vergnügt wie die andern.

Das war ein Geschrei und Gelächter und Gegacker, und es war nur zu verwundern, daß die Herrschaft auf dem Schloß nicht darauf aufmerksam wurde.

Nachdem die Wildgänse des Spielens überdrüssig geworden waren, flogen sie auf das Eis hinüber und pflegten ein paar Stunden der Ruhe.

Den Nachmittag verbrachten sie fast ganz auf dieselbe Weise wie den Vormittag, zuerst weideten sie ein paar Stunden, dann badeten und spielten sie am Rande des Eises bis zum Sonnenuntergang, und dann stellten sie sich auf dem Eise auf, wo sie auch sogleich einschliefen.

„Ja, so ein Leben würde mir gerade gefallen,“ dachte der Junge, als er am Abend unter den Flügel des Gänserichs kroch. „Aber morgen werde ich wohl fortgeschickt werden.“

Bevor er einschlief, überlegte er noch einmal alle Vorteile, die ihm aus der Reise mit den Wildgänsen erwachsen würden.

Er würde nicht gescholten, wenn er faul wäre, den lieben langen Tag hindurch könnte er dem lieben Gott die Zeit abstehlen, und seine einzige Sorge wäre, wie er sich etwas Eßbares verschaffen könnte.

Doch er brauchte ja jetzt so wenig zu seinem Unterhalt, da würde sich schon Rat schaffen lassen.

Und dann malte er sich aus, was er alles zu sehen bekäme, und wie viele Abenteuer er erleben würde.

O das wäre etwas ganz anderes als die Arbeit und Schinderei daheim.

„Ach, wenn ich doch die Wildgänse auf dieser Reise begleiten dürfte, dann wollte ich mich über meine Verwandlung gewiß nicht grämen!“ dachte er.

Er hatte jetzt vor nichts Angst, als nach Hause geschickt zu werden; aber auch am Mittwoch mahnten die Wildgänse nicht an die Abreise.

Der Tag verging wie der vorhergehende, und dem Jungen gefiel das ungebundene Leben im Freien immer besser.

Er war der Meinung, er habe den einsamen Park, der so groß war wie ein Wald, ganz für sich allein, und er fühlte durchaus keine Sehnsucht nach der engen Stube und den kleinen Äckerchen seiner Heimat.

Am Mittwoch glaubte er, die Wildgänse hätten die Absicht, ihn bei sich zu behalten, aber am Donnerstag hatte er diese Hoffnung nicht mehr.

Der Donnerstag begann ganz wie der vorhergehende Tag.

Die Wildgänse weideten auf den großen Äckern, und der Junge ging im Park auf die Nahrungssuche.

Nach einiger Zeit gesellte sich Akka zu ihm und fragte, ob er etwas Eßbares gefunden habe. Nein, das hatte er nicht.

Da stöberte Akka eine vertrocknete Kümmelstaude auf, an der noch alle die kleinen Früchte unversehrt hingen.

Aber nachdem der Junge gegessen hatte, sagte Akka zu ihm, sie finde, er streife viel zu verwegen im Park umher, ob er denn nicht wisse, vor wie vielen Feinden sich so ein kleines Geschöpf, wie er eines sei, zu hüten habe?

Nein, das wisse er nicht, sagte der Junge, und darauf begann Akka ihm die Feinde aufzuzählen.

Wenn er in den Wald gehe, sagte sie, solle er sich vor dem Fuchs und dem Marder in acht nehmen, wenn er sich am Ufer aufhalte, dürfe er die Fischotter nicht vergessen, wenn er auf einem Steinmäuerchen sitze, müsse er an das Wiesel denken, das durch das kleinste Loch hindurchschlüpfen könne, und wenn er sich auf einen Laubhaufen niederlegen wolle, um zu schlafen, müsse er zuerst untersuchen, ob nicht etwa eine Kreuzotter in eben diesem Haufen ihren Winterschlaf halte.

Sobald er aufs offne Feld hinauskomme, solle er sich vor Habicht und Geier, vor Adler und Falken, die droben in der Luft schwebten, hüten.

Im Haselnußgebüsch könne er vom Sperber gefangen werden.

Dohlen und Krähen fänden sich überall, und ihnen solle er nur nicht zu viel trauen.

Und sobald die Dämmerung hereinbreche, solle er die Ohren spitzen und auf die großen Eulen aufpassen, die mit lautlosem Flügelschlag daherschwebten, so daß sie schon ganz dicht bei ihm seien, ehe er ihre Nähe nur ahne.

Als der Junge von so vielen Feinden hörte, die ihm mit dem Tode drohten, erschien es ihm ganz unmöglich, mit dem Leben davonzukommen.

Er fürchtete sich zwar nicht besonders vor dem Sterben, wollte aber doch lieber nicht aufgefressen werden.

Er fragte deshalb Akka, was er tun müsse, um den Raubtieren zu entgehen.

Und Akka antwortete sogleich, er müsse versuchen, sich mit dem kleinen Tiervolk in Wald und Feld, mit den Eichhörnchen und den Hasen, mit den Finken, Meisen, Spechten und Lerchen auf guten Fuß zu stellen.

Wenn er sich die zu Freunden mache, dann würden sie ihn vor Gefahren warnen, ihm Schlupfwinkel zeigen und in der höchsten Not sich zusammentun, ihn zu verteidigen.

Als sich dann aber der Junge später am Tag diesen Rat zunutze machen wollte und sich an Sirle, das Eichhörnchen, um gütigen Beistand wandte, da zeigte es sich, daß dieses ihm nicht helfen wollte.

„Von dem kleinen Tiervolk darfst du dir keine Hoffnung auf Hilfe machen,“ sagte Sirle. „Meinst du, wir wüßten nicht, daß du Nils, der Gänsejunge bist, der im vorigen Jahr die Schwalbennester herunterriß, die Stareneier zerbrach, die jungen Krähen in die Mergelgrube warf, Drosseln in Schlingen fing und Eichhörnchen in Käfige sperrte?

Du mußt dir selber helfen, so gut du kannst, und mußt noch froh sein, wenn wir uns nicht zusammentun und dich zu den Deinen zurückjagen.“

Das war gerade so eine Antwort, die der Junge früher nicht ungestraft hätte hingehen lassen.

Jetzt aber bekam er nur Angst, auch die Wildgänse möchten erfahren, wie böse er sein konnte.

Seither war er in beständiger Angst gewesen, die Wildgänse würden ihm am Ende die Erlaubnis, bei ihnen zu bleiben, verweigern, und er hatte sich deshalb, seit er in ihrer Gesellschaft war, nicht die kleinste Unart erlaubt.

Viel Böses hätte er freilich, da er doch so klein war, nicht anstellen können, aber er hätte doch Gelegenheit genug gehabt, Vogelnester auszunehmen und die Eier zu zerbrechen.

So aber war er immer nur ganz artig gewesen, hatte keiner Gans eine Feder aus dem Flügel gerupft, keine einzige unhöfliche Antwort gegeben, und wenn er Akka guten Morgen wünschte, nahm er jedesmal die Mütze ab und verbeugte sich dazu.

Den ganzen Donnerstag hindurch dachte er, die Wildgänse wollten ihn gewiß nur seiner Schlechtigkeit wegen nicht mit nach Lappland nehmen, und als er am Abend hörte, daß das Weibchen des Eichhörnchens Sirle geraubt worden sei und dessen neugeborenen Jungen nun verhungern müßten, beschloß er, ihnen zu helfen, und es ist schon berichtet worden, wie gut das Nils Holgersson gelang.

Als der Junge am Freitag wieder in den Park kam, hörte er die Buchfinken in jedem Gebüsch davon singen, wie das Weibchen des Eichhörnchens Sirle durch grimmige Räuber von ihren neugeborenen Jungen weg geraubt worden sei und wie der Gänsejunge Nils sich zwischen die Menschen hineingewagt und ihr ihre Kleinen gebracht hätte.

„Wer ist nun im Park von Övedskloster so gefeiert,“ sangen die Buchfinken, „wie Däumeling, den alle fürchteten, so lange er der Gänsejunge Nils war?

Sirle, das Eichhörnchen, gibt ihm Nüsse, die armen Hasen machen Männchen vor ihm, die Rehe nehmen ihn auf den Rücken und laufen mit ihm davon, wenn der Fuchs Smirre in seiner Nähe auftaucht, die Meisen warnen ihn vor dem Sperber, und die Finken und Lerchen singen von seiner Heldentat!“

Der Junge war ganz sicher, daß Akka und die andern Wildgänse alles dies gehört hatten, aber trotzdem verging der ganze Freitag, ohne daß ihm gesagt worden wäre, er dürfe jetzt bei ihnen bleiben.

Bis zum Samstag durften die Wildgänse auf den Äckern bei Öved weiden, ohne von Smirre gestört zu werden.

Aber als sie am Samstag früh auf das Feld hinüberkamen, lag er da im Hinterhalt und verfolgte sie von einem Acker zum andern.

Als nun Akka sah, daß er sie durchaus nicht in Ruhe lassen wollte, faßte sie einen raschen Entschluß, sie erhob sich hoch in die Luft und flog mit ihrer Schar mehrere Meilen weit über die Ebenen von Färs und dem Linderöder Bergrücken hin.

Dort ließen sie sich in der Gegend von Vittskövle nieder.

Dann wurde es wieder Sonntag. Eine ganze Woche war nun vergangen, seit der Junge verzaubert worden war, und noch immer war er ebenso klein wie am ersten Tage.

Aber es sah nicht aus, als ob ihm das großen Kummer machte.

Am Sonntagnachmittag saß er auf einem großen, dichten Weidenbusch am Seeufer und blies auf einer Weidenpfeife. Ringsumher saßen so viele Meisen und Buchfinken und Stare, als auf dem Gebüsch Platz hatten, und zwitscherten ihre Weisen, die der Junge nachzublasen versuchte.

Aber der Junge verstand sich nicht besonders auf diese Kunst; er blies so falsch, daß sich den kleinen Lehrmeistern alle Federn sträubten und sie in hellem Entsetzen schrien und mit den Flügeln schlugen.

Der Junge aber lachte so herzlich über ihren Eifer, daß ihm die Pfeife entfiel.

Wieder begann er zu blasen, aber auch diesmal ging es nicht besser, und die ganze Vogelschar jammerte:

„Heute spielst du noch schlechter als sonst, Däumling! Du bringst keinen reinen Ton heraus. Wo hast du nur deine Gedanken, Däumling?“

„Die sind anderswo,“ antwortete der Junge. Und das war ganz wahr.

Er mußte immerfort daran denken, wie lange er wohl noch bei den Wildgänsen bleiben dürfte, und ob er am Ende schon an diesem Tage noch fortgeschickt werde.

Doch plötzlich warf der Junge die Pfeife weg und sprang von dem Weidenbusch herunter, denn er sah Akka und alle Gänse in einer langen Reihe auf sich zukommen.

Sie schritten ungewöhnlich langsam und feierlich daher, und dem Jungen wurde sogleich klar, daß er jetzt erfahren werde, was sie mit ihm zu tun gedächten.

Als die Gänse schließlich vor ihm stehen blieben, sagte Akka:

„Du hast allen Grund, dich über mich zu verwundern, weil ich mich noch nicht bei dir bedankt habe, daß du mich aus Smirres Klauen errettet hast.

Aber ich gehöre zu denen, die lieber mit Taten als mit Worten danken.

Und ich glaube, lieber Däumling, daß es mir gelungen ist, dir einen großen Dienst zu erweisen.

Ich habe nämlich an das Wichtelmännchen, das dich verzaubert hat, Botschaft geschickt.

Zuerst wollte es nichts davon hören, dich wieder in deine alte Gestalt zu verwandeln, aber ich habe eine Botschaft um die andre geschickt und ihm mitteilen lassen, wie gut du dich hier bei uns aufgeführt hast.

Jetzt läßt es dich grüßen und dir sagen, daß du, sobald du wieder nach Hause zurückgekehrt seiest, wieder ein Mensch werden würdest.“

Aber wie merkwürdig! Ebenso vergnügt wie der Junge gewesen war, als Akka zu sprechen angefangen hatte, ebenso betrübt war er, als sie zu sprechen aufhörte.

Er sagte kein Wort, sondern wendete sich nur ab und weinte.

„Was soll denn aber das bedeuten?“ fragte Akka.

„Es sieht aus, als habest du mehr von mir erwartet, als ich dir jetzt geboten habe.“

Aber der Junge dachte an sorgenfreie Tage und lustige Neckereien, an Abenteuer und Freiheit und an die Reisen hoch über der Erde hin, deren er nun verlustig gehen würde, und er weinte laut vor Kummer und Betrübnis.

„Ich mache mir nichts daraus, wieder ein Mensch zu werden!“ schluchzte er. „Ich will mit euch nach Lappland!“

„Ich will dir etwas sagen,“ erwiderte Akka. „Das Wichtelmännchen ist sehr leicht verletzt, und ich fürchte, es werde dir schwer werden, es ein andres Mal zu deinen Gunsten zu stimmen, wenn du sein Anerbieten jetzt ausschlägst.“

Es war von jeher merkwürdig gewesen, daß dieser Junge noch niemals jemand eigentlich lieb gehabt hatte, weder Vater noch Mutter, noch den Schullehrer, noch die Schulkameraden, noch die Jungen auf den Nachbarhöfen.

Alles, was sie je von ihm verlangt hatten, einerlei, ob es sich um Spiel oder Arbeit handelte, war ihm langweilig vorgekommen.

Deshalb gab es jetzt auch keinen Menschen, nach dem er sich gesehnt oder den er vermißt hätte.

Die einzigen, mit denen er sich einigermaßen vertragen hatte, waren das Gänsemädchen Åsa und ihr Bruder Klein-Mats gewesen, ein paar Kinder, die wie er auch Gänse hüteten.

Aber auch mit ihnen verband ihn keine richtige Freundschaft. O nein, ganz und gar nicht!

„Ich will nicht wieder ein Mensch werden!“ schluchzte der Junge. „Ich will euch nach Lappland begleiten! Deshalb bin ich eine ganze Woche lang artig gewesen.“

„Es soll dir nicht verweigert werden, uns zu begleiten, so lange du Lust hast,“ sagte Akka.

„Aber überlege dir nun zuerst, ob du nicht lieber nach Hause zurückkehren möchtest. Es könnte ein Tag kommen, wo du es bereutest.“

„Nein,“ sagte der Junge, „da ist nichts zu bereuen. Es ist mir noch nie so gut gegangen, wie hier bei euch.“

„Nun, dann sei es also, wie du willst,“ sagte Akka.

„Danke, danke!“ rief der Junge.

Und er fühlte sich so glücklich, daß er jetzt ebenso vor Freude weinen mußte, wie er vorher vor Kummer geweint hatte.