de-en  Konstruktiver_Journalismus
(https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/med/21006282.html).

Constructive Journalism.
Happy End instead of Bad News.

Only bad news are good news?

Some media do not think so and want to report more "constructively" in future. ...

But the biggest critics are in their own ranks.

"Gut zu wissen" ("Good to know") - since the end of 2016, that is the new, unofficial slogan of the Sächsische Zeitung, a local newspaper from the eastern part of Germany.

In each edition, the lettering is emblazoned with a green smiley face over some items. It is a small revolution for this regional newspaper. For "Gut zu wissen" (Good to know) stands for a new approach of doing journalism.

The principle to which SZ has committed itself is called Constructive Journalism. Instead of mainly reporting on problems such as Islamist terror, polluted rivers or town hall scandals, the editorial team intentionally highlights positive topics and proposals for solutions.

The idea: journalism is to depict the world in its entirety. But the media are said to take up mainly negative trends and conflicts to raise the attention of the media consumer, always following the old motto: only bad news is good news.

The Sächsische Zeitung wants to drastically change this policy: in the meantime, around 400 articles have been published with smileys and legend.

Criticism: It is only a whitewashing and dumbing down campaign - that reaction is not new. ... Indeed, the idea comes from the years after WWII. However, constructive journalism in large media houses has really only been used for several years.

One of the best known initial examples is in the New York Times, where the American author, David Bornstein, has been discussing suggestions for improvements for the world's problems in his solution-oriented column "Fixes" since 2012. ...

The "Sächsische Zeitung" has been experimenting with this "more positive" view of the available news since November 2016.

Supporters of constructive journalism do not want to ignore conflicts. However, they are to be weighted differently and suggestions for solutions should always be presented.

Yet the experiment is also controversial in its own house: There was "initial anger" in the editorial office, admits Oliver Reinhard, deputy feuilleton department manager. Colleagues are said to have criticized that the new approach was "whitewashing".

"Some call it a campaign to dumb people down." He himself is one of the pioneers of the idea at the SZ and defended the project to other journalists at the European Newspaper Congress in May 2017.

"On no day in the world do only bad things happen," says Reinhard, "A newspaper must portray that." Women, especially, appreciate the proposal. The reader's reaction has affirmed the experiment. Around 90 percent of the letters to the editor are benevolent to positive.

They are now trying to publish two to four constructive articles in the newspaper every day. 80 percent of an article must emit "positive, inspiring, and motivating vibes", for the article to be considered "constructive".

Even the data positively confirms the new approach, Reinhard explains. Smiley articles would have about four to eighteen percent higher reading ratio. Women especially and people with higher education respond to more constructive reporting. ... The advertising revenues also have increased.

"But it has not become second nature to us yet, the biggest obstacle of constructive journalism is to pull it off on a day to day basis," he admits.

According to Reinhard, sometimes there would still be editions without good news. "In my opinion, such a newspaper shouldn't even go into print." In Germany even the online publications of the two most important national weekly media, Der Spiegel and Die Zeit, announced the publishing of more "constructive" content.

Already in 2015, Florian Harms, former chief editor of "Spiegel Online" promised more articles "which even in depressing topics show an aspect that raises hope, that points out an alternative." ...

However, these constructive articles are not marked on the platforms. Only in the print edition, does Der Spiegel acknowledge the idea under the heading of "Previously, everything was worse" in a permanent place.

Other countries are farther along than Germany. Therefore, compared to other reporting, constructive journalism plays a minor role in Germany.

A strict editorial policy can only be found in smaller, usually younger media: Tea after Twelve, Brandeins, Perspective Daily and Kater Demos among them.

"With us the constructive approach is continued through the entire magazine," explains Alexander Sängerlaub, founder and editor in chief of Kater Demos. Social and political utopian ideas, for example about labor and the media of the future, have biannually been addressed in his magazine since 2015. ...

We can still pick one of the major topics. ... Thus, we have a lot of time and space to provide an input for solutions. ... It is certainly much more difficult for the dailies." The production (of Kater Demos) is financed by crowdfunding, which the editioring team breings off for each issue. ... The last time, we collected 11.000 Euro. ... Traditionally, advertisements are not published in the paper, says Sängerlaub, the editors should remain impartial. ...


In other countries, such as Denmark, constructive journalism is considerably further along, finds Sängerlaub. But the German media landscape is said to be changing greatly. ...

The readers would wish for more constructive reporting. "But honestly, we aren't thinking very much at all about the readers when we write,"admits Sängerlaub, laughing. "We simply produce a magazine that we would like to read ourselves."
unit 1
(https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/med/21006282.html).
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 2
Konstruktiver Journalismus.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 3
Happy End statt Hiobsbotschaft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 4
Nur schlechte Nachrichten sind gute Nachrichten?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 5
Nein, finden einige Medien in Deutschland und wollen künftig konstruktiver berichten.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 6
Doch die größten Kritiker sitzen in den eigenen Reihen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 8
In jeder Ausgabe prangt der Schriftzug zusammen mit einem grünen Smiley über einigen Artikeln.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 9
Er ist für die Regionalzeitung eine kleine Revolution.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 10
Denn „Gut zu wissen“ steht für einen neuen Ansatz, Journalismus zu machen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 11
Konstruktiver Journalismus nennt sich das Prinzip, dem sich die SZ verpflichtet hat.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 13
Die Idee: Journalismus soll die Welt in ihrer Gesamtheit abbilden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 16
Kritik: Schönschreiber und Volksverdummungspropaganda- Das Konzept ist nicht neu.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 17
Tatsächlich stammt der Gedanke aus den Jahren nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 21
Unterstützer des konstruktiven Journalismus wollen Konfliktthemen nicht ausklammern.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 22
Allerdings sollen sie anders gewichtet und stets mit Lösungsvorschlägen präsentiert werden.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 24
Kollegen hätten kritisiert, der neue Ansatz sei „Schönfärberei.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 27
Rund 90 Prozent der Leserbriefe seien wohlwollend bis positiv.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 28
Man versuche nun täglich zwei bis vier konstruktive Artikel in die Zeitung zu heben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 30
Auch die Daten sprechen für den neuen Ansatz, erklärt Reinhard.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 31
Smiley-Artikel hätten eine um vier bis 18 Prozent höhere Lesequote.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 33
Die Anzeigenerlöse seien ebenfalls gestiegen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 35
Manchmal gäbe es noch Ausgaben ohne gute News, so Reinhard.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 38
Gekennzeichnet werden diese konstruktiven Artikel auf den Plattformen aber nicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 44
„Wir können uns immer ein großes Thema nehmen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 45
Dadurch haben wir viel Zeit und Platz, Input für Lösungsansätze zu liefern.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 47
11.000 Euro kamen zuletzt zusammen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 50
Doch die deutsche Medienlandschaft wandle sich gerade stark.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 51
Die Leser würden sich mehr konstruktive Geschichten wünschen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 48  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4798  commented  1 year, 1 month ago

Copyright: Text: Goethe-Institut, Michel Penke. Dieser Text ist lizenziert unter einer Creative Commons Namensnennung – Weitergabe unter gleichen Bedingungen 3.0 Deutschland Lizenz (CC BY SA).
Creative Commons Lizenzvertrag
Juni 2017

by bf2010 1 year, 1 month ago

(https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/med/21006282.html).

Konstruktiver Journalismus.
Happy End statt Hiobsbotschaft.

Nur schlechte Nachrichten sind gute Nachrichten?

Nein, finden einige Medien in Deutschland und wollen künftig konstruktiver berichten.

Doch die größten Kritiker sitzen in den eigenen Reihen.

„Gut zu wissen“ – das ist seit Ende 2016 der neue, inoffizielle Slogan der Sächsischen Zeitung, einem Lokalblatt aus dem Osten Deutschlands.

In jeder Ausgabe prangt der Schriftzug zusammen mit einem grünen Smiley über einigen Artikeln. Er ist für die Regionalzeitung eine kleine Revolution. Denn „Gut zu wissen“ steht für einen neuen Ansatz, Journalismus zu machen.

Konstruktiver Journalismus nennt sich das Prinzip, dem sich die SZ verpflichtet hat. Statt vorwiegend über Problemlagen wie islamistischen Terror, verschmutzte Flüsse oder Rathausskandale zu berichten, hebt die Redaktion bewusst positive Themen beziehungsweise Lösungsvorschläge ins Blatt.

Die Idee: Journalismus soll die Welt in ihrer Gesamtheit abbilden. Doch die Medien würden überwiegend negative Entwicklungen und Konflikte aufgreifen, um die Aufmerksamkeit der Medienkonsumenten zu erhöhen, ganz nach dem alten Motto: Only bad news are good news.

Diese Strategie will die Sächsische Zeitung durchbrechen: Rund 400 Artikel sind mittlerweile mit Smiley und Schriftzug erschienen.

Kritik: Schönschreiber und Volksverdummungspropaganda-

Das Konzept ist nicht neu. Tatsächlich stammt der Gedanke aus den Jahren nach dem Zweiten Weltkrieg. Wirklich zum Einsatz kommt konstruktiver Journalismus in großen Medienhäusern aber erst seit einigen Jahren.

Eines der bekanntesten ersten Beispiele findet sich in der New York Times, wo der US-amerikanische Autor David Bornstein seit 2012 in seiner lösungsorientierten Kolumne „Fixes“ Verbesserungsvorschläge für die Welt bespricht.

Die Sächsische Zeitung experimentiert seit November 2016 mit diesem „positiveren“ Blick auf die Nachrichtenlage.

Unterstützer des konstruktiven Journalismus wollen Konfliktthemen nicht ausklammern. Allerdings sollen sie anders gewichtet und stets mit Lösungsvorschlägen präsentiert werden.

Dabei ist das Experiment auch im eigenen Haus umstritten: Es habe „zunächst Ärger in der Redaktion“ gegeben, gibt Oliver Reinhard, stellvertretender Feuilleton-Ressortleiter, zu. Kollegen hätten kritisiert, der neue Ansatz sei „Schönfärberei.

„Manche bezeichnen ihn als Volksverdummungspropaganda.“ Er selbst gehört bei der SZ zu den Vorkämpfern der Idee und verteidigt das Projekt auf der Medienkonferenz European Newspaper Congress im Mai 2017 vor anderen Journalisten.

„An keinem Tag der Welt passiert nur Schlechtes“, sagt Reinhard, „Eine Zeitung muss das abbilden.“

Vor allem Frauen schätzen das Angebot
Die Leserreaktion hat das Experiment bestätigt. Rund 90 Prozent der Leserbriefe seien wohlwollend bis positiv.

Man versuche nun täglich zwei bis vier konstruktive Artikel in die Zeitung zu heben. 80 Prozent eines Artikels müssten „eine positive, inspirierende und motivierende Ausstrahlung“ haben, damit der Artikel als „konstruktiv“ gelte.

Auch die Daten sprechen für den neuen Ansatz, erklärt Reinhard. Smiley-Artikel hätten eine um vier bis 18 Prozent höhere Lesequote. Vor allem Frauen und Menschen mit höheren Bildungsabschlüssen sprechen auf die konstruktivere Berichterstattung an. Die Anzeigenerlöse seien ebenfalls gestiegen.

„Er ist uns aber noch nicht in Fleisch und Blut übergegangen, die größte Schwierigkeit beim konstruktiven Journalismus ist es, ihn in der alltäglichen Praxis durchzuziehen“, gibt er zu.

Manchmal gäbe es noch Ausgaben ohne gute News, so Reinhard. „Meiner Meinung nach, sollte eine solche Zeitung gar nicht erst in den Druck gehen.“

In Deutschland haben auch die Online-Auftritte der beiden wichtigsten überregionalen Wochenmedien Der Spiegel und Die Zeit angekündigt, mehr „konstruktive“ Inhalte zu veröffentlichen.

Florian Harms, ehemaliger Chefredakteur von Spiegel Online, versprach schon 2015 mehr Artikel, „die auch bei düsteren Themen einen Aspekt aufzeigen, der Hoffnung macht, der einen Ausweg weist“.

Gekennzeichnet werden diese konstruktiven Artikel auf den Plattformen aber nicht. Nur in der Print-Ausgabe räumt Der Spiegel der Idee unter der Rubrik „Früher war alles schlechter“ einen festen Platz ein.

Andere Länder sind weiter als Deutschland
Im Vergleich zur sonstigen Berichterstattung nimmt der konstruktive Journalismus in Deutschland damit eine untergeordnete Rolle ein.

Als strenge Blattlinie taucht er nur noch bei kleineren, meist jüngeren Medien auf: Tea after Twelve, Brandeins, Perspective Daily und Kater Demos gehören dazu.

„Bei uns zieht sich der konstruktive Ansatz durch das ganze Heft“, erklärt Alexander Sängerlaub, Gründer und Chefredakteur von Kater Demos. Seit 2015 widmet sich sein Magazin halbjährlich gesellschaftlichen und politischen Utopien, etwa der Arbeit und den Medien der Zukunft.

„Wir können uns immer ein großes Thema nehmen. Dadurch haben wir viel Zeit und Platz, Input für Lösungsansätze zu liefern. Die Tagespresse hat es da sicher schwerer.“

Finanziert wird die Produktion durch Crowdfunding, das die Redaktion zu jeder Ausgabe neu durchführt. 11.000 Euro kamen zuletzt zusammen. Werbeanzeigen erscheinen traditionell nicht im Blatt, sagt Sängerlaub, die Redaktion solle unabhängig bleiben.

In anderen Ländern wie Dänemark sei man mit dem konstruktiven Journalismus erheblich weiter, findet Sängerlaub. Doch die deutsche Medienlandschaft wandle sich gerade stark.

Die Leser würden sich mehr konstruktive Geschichten wünschen. „Aber ganz ehrlich: Wir denken beim Schreiben gar nicht so sehr an die Leser“, räumt Sängerlaub ein und lacht, „Wir machen einfach ein Magazin, das wir gerne selber lesen würden.“