de-en  Dt. Lausbub in Amerika, Kapitel 0
Chapter 10. How the wandering ended.

The railway has us! – Section 423, Southern Pazific. - As a gandy dancer in Arizona. – The "boss". - About Italy's children. ... - We have the railway again! - Hands up! - His Honor, the Justice of the Peace. – The good rogues from El Dorado. – Skittering and work. - About the shivering fits of malaria. -Sick and lonely. - To St. Louis. - A real man.

Close to the railway track, many miles away from the two closest stations, stood a plain wooden house with many tiny windows, over whose doors the inscription in black letters said: Section 423, Southern Pacific. The train stopped for a moment, and we jumped off. A burly man in blue work clothes, with a respectable paunch and shaggy, blazing red hair, came out the door and scrutinized us. ...
"The three from Lucky Water?" he asked. "Do you understand anything about the work?" "Don't say a word!" Billy whispered to me. Then he replied, "Oh, yes!" "That's darn agreeable to me," the redhead grumbled. "What are your names?" "Billy Smith, Joe Donovan, Ed Müller." "Americans?" "Two of us, yes. Our friend here is a German" "So? It doesn't matter. Now come in for dinner. You know the working conditions, right? One dollar seventy a day, flat, food and lodgings deducted already. ... Working period at least 31 days. Whoever leaves before that, gets no pay. Come in!" When we went in he said: "Thank goodness that one can at least use the Lord's English with you, for heaven's sake!" (He obviously was an Irishman.)

"The others are Italians, darn it, and when I say somehting, they grin. I have to lead them by the nose to work until they understand what is to be done. I have to talk with my hands like a blessed Indian - dammit! ... Why does this country really need chattering sons of monkey-owning hurry-gurdy players? I'd really like to know! ... Well, come in, come in!" In the room at a long table covered with an oilcloth sat seven Italian railroad workers eagerly chewing, who all together shouted their "parla italiano? at us." ... and looked disappointed, when we shook our heads. A fat woman with a funny face served up dinner, and we helped ourselves. I wondered about the richness of the food. There was fried meat and baked potatoes. Tomatoes as well. Then fine little pancakes were brought, plates with real mountains of them and finally apple cakes. Plates with bacon, snowy-white bred, bottles with all kinds of sauces stood on the table.

"Do you have 'overalls'?" Billy asked the redhead after the meal. "We would like to protect our clothes.""Yes," he said.... "That's what I call Christian. The Italians aren't that clean. You can have them. ... Clothes too." He fished blue work trousers out of a chest, sack-like things which you climbed into and buttoned up over the shoulders; flannel shirts and rough underwear. ... Then we also bought tobacco and to his astonishment paid cash instead of having the money deducted later on. Then it was off to bed. One of the two sleeping rooms was crowded with Italians, so we slept alone in the next room. ... Clean iron bunk beds stood there, freshly covered, and in the corner was a simple wash jug and bowl, but just as clean.

"The work is hard," Billy explained, "so hard and the pay is relatively so poor that Americans only rarely stoop to doing it, and then only for a short time. ... Almost all the section hands are Italians. But the living conditions are good." At the dawn of the following morning we had breakfast, a very sound meal, and shortly after sunrise we were off for work on the tracks. On handcars. These are handcars of the simplest construction, their wheels fit exactly on the track and are equipped with pump handles like a fire engine pumper. By pushing the hand grips up and down the force is transferred to the axles. With the speed of an express train we "pumped" ourselves forward to the workplace of the day.

Enormous heaps of new shining white oak railroad ties were lying there that needed to replace the old ones. The labor was gruesomely hard because it had to be done in a hurry. The Americans don't tolerate any wasted time. The heavy clamps were knocked out with steel hammers and chisels, and then the old rotten ties under the rails were pulled out.

The new ties had to be pushed in, clamped down (I quickly learned to direct the giant hammer) and tamped into the gravel of the rail bed. "Tamping" was the technical term for this. Long iron rods, the ends of which was blunted on an angle, were pushed under the ties until they and the ground underneath were a solid mass. Enormous responsibility rested on the "boss", the master, the foreman, for it was necessary to work according to the spirit level so that the rails remained perfectly horizontal, and on curves with the elevated outer rail, a very difficult calculation was necessary.

In Germany an engineer would have done such work. Here it was performed by an old Irish man who could hardly read and write. A practical man, under whose supervision were forty miles of rail track for which he and only he alone was responsible for its condition.

He has to make certain that rotten ties don't make the railroad unsafe, he exchanges rails, he digs refined drainage canals when groundwater threatens the embankment, with his handful of people he patrols gigantic route daily over which he rules. The railway company made the simple practice of self-governing and thus produced the highest conceivable performance from it. It forced him to think! To organize! And in this way he did far more than if he had done his day work according to bureaucratic order and obedience. For this, the railway paid him well and allowed him to earn money to feed his workers.


From sunrise to sunset, the work was done, with a brief pause in between, during which the lunch brought along was consumed. Every muscle in his body hurt. My back nearly wanted to break because of hammering and pushing and shoveling all the time. But I kept on working - with all my might. For I didn't want to take a backseat to anyone. And I soon understood the purpose of the work, its subtleties. Even the roughest work surely has its tricks. ...

"That's honest Christian work!" said O'Flanagan the boss, when we stepped tired and worn-out on the handcars in the evening. ... "Billy's extra great, Joe's good, and the German's gonna be fine. To me that's damned delightful. Away from the handles, you three! Only the Italians should be pumping; I am happy enough that for once there are blessed Christians here to whom you can put a spirit level and a measuring stick in their hands!" So, the evening patrol, which always extended at least twenty miles, became a ride for us. Our favoritism led naturally to scuffling which resulted in splendid black eyes in the Italian camp. That may have been very rough, but it was very nice!

You worked, you ate, you crawled into bed early in the evening, tired to death. One day was like the other. Only on Sundays did they sleep until the bright of day, and in the afternoon they read the newspapers of the week. It didn't take long until my hands became calloused and my muscles hard as iron. But I never missed rubbing my hands with glycerin and the careful nail care Billy showed me with real fanaticism. One would have to treat one's hands and fingers well, if they aren't meant to operate the shovel forever, he used to say. A disciplined brain ensures a disciplined appearance under all circumstances! Billy was wise.

Forty days were gone when the special train with the purser came who paid the sections of the rail system, and we received our money. O'Flanagan arranged it in that way that the patrol trip took us to the next western station that evening.
"Good-bye, boys,"he said," "you've been Christian! I'd rather you'd stay longer. But I can't blame you, be jabers. Could do something smarter than working on the railroad. So long!" "Remember that, Billy!" grinned Joe.
"You have to take the work as it comes," Billy answered with a shrug.
"The boot is on the other foot, my dear Billy! The railroad had us - so now, with my blessed aunt Jasmima, we have the railroad again! !" And the next express train took three non-paying passengers west.
Day and night it went there, as if missed time had to be recovered. In scarcely ten days we traveled a tremendous distance, first on a side line to the west, then back in an arc to the east, crossing the Arizona line, through Albuquerque to the north, through New Mexico to Colorado, seized by the fever of onward rushing. On this journey I came for the first and only time into conflict with the power of the law in the United States.


It was in a little town not far from La Junta in Colorado. On the magnificent sommer morning the freight train rumbled along, stopped, rumbled again to and fro. And then everything was quiet.
" Confound it," Billy said after a while, "I think we are on a sidetrack." Carefully he opened the sliding door for a gap and looked out. "Indeed! Infamous bad luck. Tiny little station as well!" Annoyed we climbed out in order to look around and as soon as possible to resume traveling on another train. First Billy jumped to the ground, then Joe and eventually I. There was no one to be seen. We were about to cross over the tracks to the street when suddenly a figure emerged from the embankment, and a threatening voice shouted, "Hands up!" Billy and Joe held up their arms promptly while I stared stunned at the man in the floppy hat and the giant revolver in his fists. "Hands up! his voice thundered again. "Hands up - or, oh God, there'll be a funeral!" Then my arms also shot up vertically and an indescribable fear came over me. But Billy smiled.

"Turn around!" commanded the man in the slouch hat and I noticed how his searching hand feeled my pockets.
"So! Now you march in front of me; on the left when I say left, on the right when I say right, and whoever tries to escape gets a bullet. Forward, in the name of the law!" "What's the matter - what can it possibly be ... " I shouted terrified. Billy, however, asked without turning the head: "My dear man, do you possibly have sunstroke?" "No wisecracks!" ordered the man behind us. But I heard, how he laughed quietly.
"Are you always so impolite in this region?" Billy continued. And I'd really like to inquire, what in heaven's name do you actually want from us?" "You'll hear that from the Justice of the Peace!" "So? Well, the justice of the peace will also hear some things from me." "Oh, that won't make any difference," laughed the man behind us.
The town consisted of a maximum of two dozen houses. We were marched into a house in which there was a hardware store and found ourselves in a room that included nothing but a bench, a table and a chair. We had to sit down on the bench and the man with the revolvers planted himself next to us. After a while, a white-whiskered gentleman in shirtsleeves entered, took a gown from the nail on the door, put it on and said: "The court is in session!" What do you have to report to the court, Mr. Sheriff?" "Three tramps, your Honor!" "Fine. Raise your right hand and swear...in the name...the truth...nothing but the truth..." The sheriff also mumbled something.
"Statement of facts?"asked the justice of the peace.
"Illegal traveling on the train, Your Honor, and loafing around as a public menace with no means of subsistence. I personally observed the three accused as they climbed out of a freight car." The grave judge rubbed his hands.
"Four days of forced labour in road construction!" he announced. "The court is adjourned!" I almost fell over.
"One moment," said Billy, "may I reach into my pocket?" "Certainly." Billy took out a handful of dollar bills which the grave judge eyed, surprised, and immediately sat back down.


"The Court is in session again!" he said.
"We have to confess to be guilty of illegally traveling," Billy began, "but in view of this, that we are not without funds and are not a public menace, but are only looking for work, I request a fine be imposed." "Granted!" the justice of the peace said immediately. "First of all, let's say 6 dollars a man!" "A little much, your honor, for the unemployed." "Hm - shall we say 10 dollars for all three?" The sheriff came to the judge's table and whispered something. I distinctly heard the words: cash money - there are plenty of tramps ... "Five dollars is the total fine, considering the circumstances!" was the judge's decision, and Billy paid.


"So," said His Honor, raking in the money: "The court session is closed!" The sheriff took us back to the street and said it was time for lunch. In his home we could eat excellently for half a dollar all together! As we sat at the table, Billy said, "Clever, sly area here, isn't it, Mr. Sheriff?" "Very" "Do you always do it like that?" "Hm," said the sheriff comfortably, "anyway, that is awfully easy. We're building a new road here and we've got damn little money for it. Well, and when we catch tramps, they have to work without pay. ... Fine idea! When the times are good, we've already gotten thirty men a week. But I'll be damned if you're not the first we've gotten cash money out of." "Great!" Billy said. "The joke is worth nearly five dollars. By the way, what is this hopeful, flourishing community named?" "El Dorado," said the sheriff.
Then all three of us laughed resoundingly. ...
"Once I retire," Billy snorted,"I come here. A city where you let others do the work that you should do yourself is really a dorado. For example, you could, however, let occasional vagabonds split your wood too?" "That's not a bad idea," the Sheriff said. .... "But once it becomes known, they won't come here any more!" he added sadly.

Summer and autumn had dwindled away in a restless confusion of hasty skittering and work. Through great stretches of Colorado, through southern Kansas, back to Texas and Arkansas, across and back to Kansas our rather haphazard journey had led us.
Once we worked in a quarry; we helped the farmers now and then, we slaved away for a month on a section of the Kansas railroad, we dragged sacks of coal, we worked at a power station. It would have been an infinitely poor life if the railroad hadn't exerted such a wonderful and ever new attraction. And if Billy hadn't held us together with his humor, his cleverness, and indescribable influence. ... But in all our dreams and during all the hurrying there came to him and to me often a longing for another life, and we discussed so many work plans.


"First money in the hand and then use your head!" That was his fundamental thought. Finaly we decided to go to San Francisco, that Billy knew well, and there catching the happiness; the resources for very large hikes, to excitement and experience in great style. It was in Kansas at a tiny little Union Pacific station where we made this decision. ... We wanted to bring it into realization immediately. ... Joe, the simple, who was loyal to Billy like a butler his master, went everywhere, without asking and without worrying the least about things in the future. So to the west we went our way.


"In twelve days at the latest we'll be in Frisco," Billy said," and at first it's just Joe and I working, until you get us well again. Boring story about being sick. Don't do it again!" Because I was sick.
In a perpetual fever. My face had almost turned lemon yellow, like that of a Chinese, and from day to day I got weaker. I suffered from malaria. I had probably already acquired the germs of the disease in Texas or perhaps in the marshes of the state of Arkansas. Billy noticed immediately, what was wrong with me. Every day I swallowed so many pills of the only antidote that there was, quinine. The day started and stopped with quinine. At first, the illness was barely noticeable other than in the strange colour in the face, in fever and in fatigue. But I was so hardened that a little fever did not matter much to me. That lasted for weeks. Then it came over me like hypersomnia and I often had to force myself to stay awake on hazardous journeys. And then the chills of malaria seized me.


An unpleasant fellow. I sat together with Billy and Joe in a freight car as I suddenly felt a rush of heat through my body. Scarcely a second later I was shaking with icy cold and my teeth began to chatter. And then I shuddered and shook as if I were a rat between the teeth of a fox terrier. My body flew back and forth, my mouth opened and shut without being able to speak a word; arms and legs jerked as if they were cramping. Neither my will or self-control had any effect. To call it shivering is much too mild and weak to describe the elemental force of a malarial fever. I was as helpless as a child. The legs hammered on the floor of the wagon, the body was thrown about. And strangely enough, I felt neither pain nor a particular feeling of cold - only an involuntary giving in of each muscle under mysterious jolting force - a wondering of what it may be, how long it might last.


The fit lasted for ten minutes, followed by exhaustion and tiredness.
Now the misery began. Punctually every second day, around the same hour, at almost the same minute, the bout of shivering regularly repeated itself. And with increasing force. ... Every second day as it reached half past one, I knew exactly what was coming: My loyal enemy, the shivers! ... Neither quinine, even in enormous doses, nor generous amounts of whisky helped. ...

Shivering had to be. ... So shaken that I often thought my limbs should be torn from my joints; so shaken that I could neither see nor hear. ... In that way weeks had passed, weeks of chills and fever. And I became ever weaker and more miserable. Ever thinner. ... My face became increasingly yellow. ...


But I did not let it show how miserable I felt, but like a child looked forward to sunny California. ... Every day I swallowed more quinine, and every day I had to increasingly gather all my strength. ...
Then came a day in late October that put an end to the dreaming and wandering. It was near Rossville, at a small water station. I was very sick.

The Express rushed towards us. ... Billy and Joe jumped on the blind platform. I jumped beside them. And the moment I wanted to jump up, it danced in front of my eyes like a thousand stars, and in my head the things seemed to swirl. Nevertheless, I grabbed blindly. Then I felt a bump, a jolt and rolled down the embankment. I had missed the brass handle and had jumped against the side of the mail car ... with all my limbs trembling, I righted myself. ...

Contemplation! Billy and Joe had of course not been able to jump off and traveled on without me. I looked at the timetable. The express went a distance of 69 miles without a stopover. ...

Of course, Billy and Joe would be waiting for me at that station. So continue with the next train! It came, a express train, in an hour. I drank water, smoked a cigarette. But all at once, through the shock of being hurled down, all of the arduous, restraining weakness of the disease led to an outbreak. The things were swimming in front of my eyes. I could barely stand only walk with great effort. When the fast train came, I wanted to go with him, but I fell forward on the second jump. I knew then, that I was very ill and would never reach California in my condition, and sat down and cried heartbreakingly for my Billy. ... I was only barely a twenty years old boy!


And I thought and thought. Even if I was riding behind Billy on a passenger train, it was just a new shame. I was sick and I'd only be a burden to him. Thinking - thinking... I stared at the map and a thought crept into my feverish brain: To St. Louis! To a very big city; to the city that had been my destination in the early spring. The wandering was certainly over; because somebody who can hardly stand, had to get away from the rails which require strength and courage.
Billy! Billy!!

Not for a single moment did I think about what I was going to do in St. Louis. Such things were infinitely indifferent to the man in fever! I only knew it was over - out. No more express trains; no more jumping. And that I wanted to go to St. Louis!


With a mighty effort I crept over to the station, and asked what a ticket to St.Louis would cost. ... The distance was relatively short, barely 400 miles.
" Seventeen dollars," said the agent.
"You're welcome! When's the next train leaving?" " 4:32." That was in barely an hour. I paid, and only a few dollars remained. Then I swallowed one quinine pill after another and tried to smoke. And then I suddenly sat on a soft cushion and dreamed dead tired in a doze into myself, in one single imagination, in one single thought.
Billy!

Again and again I saw the man with the bright eyes in front of me; whom I idolized, how only youth can idolize. No ugly word - no ugly thought I had ever heard of him. For this man, wandering hard on the line separating the useful man and the vagabond, was a whole man[A]. Proud and noble and free. And the feverish young man there in the express train sobbed to himself - the world had become poorer for him.
unit 1
Wie das Wandern endete.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 2
Die Eisenbahn hat uns!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 3
– Sektion 423, Southern Pazific.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 4
– Als Streckenarbeiter in Arizona.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 5
– Der »boss«.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 9 months ago
unit 6
– Von Kindern Italiens.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 7
– Wir haben wieder die Eisenbahn!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 8
– Hände in die Höhe!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 9
– Seine Ehren, der Friedensrichter.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 10
– Die braven Spitzbuben von El Dorado.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 11
– Dahinjagen und Arbeit.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 12
– Von den Schüttelfrösten der Malaria.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 13
– Krank und einsam.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 14
– Nach St. Louis.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 15
– Ein ganzer Mann.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 17
Der Zug hielt einen Augenblick lang, und wir sprangen ab.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 19
»Die drei von Lucky Water?« fragte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 20
»Versteht ihr 'was von der Arbeit?« »Halt' den Mund!« raunte Billy mir zu.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 21
Dann gab er Antwort: »Oh ja!« »Ist mir verflucht angenehm,« brummte der Feuerrote.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 22
»Wie heißt ihr?« »Billy Smith, Joe Donovan, Ed Müller.« »Amerikaner?« »Wir beide, ja.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 23
Unser Freund hier ist Deutscher.« »So?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 24
Das macht nichts aus.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 25
Nun kommt herein zum Essen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 26
Die Arbeitsbedingungen kennt ihr ja.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 27
Einen Dollar siebzig im Tag, glatt, Essen und Wohnen schon abgezogen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 28
Arbeitszeit mindestens 31 Tage.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 29
Wer vorher geht, bekommt kein Geld.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 31
»Die andern sin' Italiener, hol' sie der Kuckuck, und wenn ich was sag', grinsen sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 32
Mit den Nasen muß ich sie auf die Arbeit stoßen, bis sie kapieren, was getan werden soll.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 33
Mit den Händen muß ich reden wie ein gesegneter Indianer – hol's der Teufel!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 34
Wozu braucht eigentlich dies Land schnatternde Söhne von affenbesitzenden Orgeldrehern?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 35
Das möcht' ich wissen!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 37
entgegenschrien und enttäuscht aussahen, als wir die Köpfe schüttelten.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 38
Eine dicke Frau mit einem lustigen Gesicht trug das Abendessen auf, und wir griffen zu.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 39
Ich wunderte mich über die Reichhaltigkeit der Speisen.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 40
Es gab gebratenes Fleisch und gebackene Kartoffeln.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 41
Dazu Tomaten.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 43
Teller mit Speck, schneeweißes Brot, Flaschen mit allerlei Saucen standen auf dem Tisch.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 44
»Haben Sie "overalls"?« fragte Billy den Feuerroten nach dem Essen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 45
»Wir möchten unsere Kleider schonen.« »Jawohl,« meinte er.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 46
»Das nenn' ich christlich.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 47
Die Italiener sin' nich' so sauber.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 48
Könnt' ihr haben.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 51
Dann ging's ins Bett.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 55
In den sections gibt's fast nur Italiener.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 57
Auf handcars.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 59
Durch das Auf- und Niederdrücken der Handgriffe überträgt sich die Kraft auf die Axen.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 60
Wir "pumpten" uns mit Eilzugsgeschwindigkeit vorwärts bis zum Arbeitsplatz des Tages.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 62
Die Arbeit war bitterhart, denn es mußte im Eiltempo gearbeitet werden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 63
Der Amerikaner duldet kein Zeitvertrödeln.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 66
"Tamponieren" hieß der Fachausdruck dafür.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 69
In Deutschland hätte ein Ingenieur solche Arbeit geleistet.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 70
Hier tat's ein alter Irländer, der kaum lesen und schreiben konnte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 74
Sie zwang ihn zu denken!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 75
Zu organisieren!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 77
unit 79
Jeder Muskel am Körper schmerzte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 80
Der Rücken wollte mir beinahe brechen vor lauter Hämmern und Stoßen und Schaufeln.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 81
Aber ich arbeitete darauf los – aus Leibeskräften.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 82
Denn ich wollte hinter keinem zurückstehen.
6 Translations, 8 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 83
Und ich begriff bald den Zweck der Arbeit, ihre Feinheiten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 84
Selbst gröbste Arbeit hat ja ihre Tricks.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 86
»Billy ist extraprima, Joe is gut un' der Deutsche wird noch gut.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 87
Das is mir verdammt angenehm.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 88
Weg von den Handgriffen, ihr drei!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 91
Das mag sehr roh gewesen sein – aber es war sehr schön!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 92
Man arbeitete, man aß, man kroch früh am Abend todmüde ins Bett.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 93
Ein Tag war wie der andere.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 95
Es dauerte nicht lange, so wurden meine Hände schwielig und meine Muskeln eisenhart.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 98
Ein diszipliniertes Hirn sorge unter allen Umständen für ein diszipliniertes Äußere!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 99
Billy war weise.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 102
»Adieu, Jungens,« sagte er, »seid christlich gewesen!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 103
Wär' mir lieber, ihr würdet noch bleiben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 104
Kann's euch aber nicht übelnehmen, be jabers.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 105
Könnt was Gescheiteres tun, als Eisenbahnarbeiten.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 106
So long!« »Das merk' dir, Billy!« grinste Joe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 107
»Man muß die Arbeit nehmen, wie sie kommt,« antwortete Billy achselzuckend.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 108
»Jetzt aber wird der Spieß umgedreht, my dear Billy!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 110
!« Und der nächste Schnellzug führte drei nichtzahlende Passagiere nach Westen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 111
Tag und Nacht ging es dahin, als müsse versäumte Zeit eingeholt werden.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 114
Es war in einem kleinen Städtchen nicht weit von La Junta in Colorado.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 115
unit 116
Und dann war Ruhe.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 118
»Wahrhaftig!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 119
Infames Pech.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 121
Zuerst sprang Billy zu Boden, dann Joe und endlich ich.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 122
Kein Mensch war zu sehen.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 124
»Hände in die Höhe!
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 125
!« donnerte es wieder.
5 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 126
»Hands up – oder, bei Gott, 's gibt ein Begräbnis!
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 129
»So!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 133
Aber ich hörte, wie er leise lachte.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 134
»Ist man in dieser Gegend immer so unhöflich?« fuhr Billy fort.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 137
Das Städtchen bestand aus höchstens zwei Dutzend Häusern.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 139
Wir mußten uns auf die Bank setzen, und der Mann mit den Revolvern pflanzte sich neben uns auf.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 141
Was haben Sie dem Gericht zu melden, Mr. Sheriff?« »Drei Tramps, Euer Ehren!« »Schön.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 143
»Tatbestand?« fragte der Friedensrichter.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 146
»Vier Tage Zwangsarbeit im Straßenbau!« verkündete er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 147
»Das Gericht ist geschlossen!« Ich fiel beinahe um.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 149
»Die Gerichtssitzung ist wieder eröffnet!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 154
In seinem Hause könnten wir für einen halben Dollar alle zusammen ausgezeichnet essen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 156
Wir bauen hier eine neue Straße un' haben verflucht wenig Geld dazu.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 157
Well, un' wenn wir Tramps erwischen, müssen sie gratis arbeiten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 158
Feine Idee!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 159
Wenn die Zeiten gut sind, haben wir schon dreißig Mann in der Woche gekriegt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 161
»Der Scherz ist beinahe fünf Dollars wert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 163
Da lachten wir alle drei schallend auf.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 164
»Wenn ich mich einmal zur Ruhe setze,« prustete Billy, »dann komm' ich hierher.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 167
»Aber wenn's einmal bekannt wird, kommen sie nicht mehr hierher!« setzte er betrübt hinzu.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 174
unit 176
unit 177
Wir wollten ihn sofort zur Ausführung bringen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 179
Nach Westen also ging unser Weg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 181
Langweilige Geschichte, krank zu sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 182
Tu's nicht wieder!« Denn ich war krank.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 183
In fortwährendem Fieber.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 185
Ich litt an Malaria.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 187
Billy erkannte sofort, was mir fehlte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 188
Täglich schluckte ich so und soviele Pillen des einzigen Gegenmittels, das es gab, Chinin.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 189
Der Tag fing mit Chinin an und hörte mit Chinin auf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 191
Aber ich war so abgehärtet, daß ich mir aus dem bißchen Fieber wenig machte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 192
Das dauerte wochenlang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 194
Und dann packte mich der Schüttelfrost der Malaria.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 195
Ein unangenehmer Geselle.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 197
unit 198
unit 200
Da half kein Wollen, keine Selbstbeherrschung.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 202
Wehrlos war man wie ein Kind.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 203
Die Beine trommelten auf dem Boden des Wagens, der Körper wurde umhergeworfen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 205
Zehn Minuten währte der Anfall, auf den Erschöpfung und Müdigkeit folgte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 206
Nun begann das Elend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 208
Und in immer zunehmender Stärke.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 210
Da half weder Chinin, selbst in den ungeheuerlichsten Dosen, noch Whisky in großen Gaben.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 211
Geschüttelt mußte werden.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 213
So waren Wochen vergangen, Wochen von Frost und Fieber.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 214
Und immer schwächer und elender wurde ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 215
Immer magerer.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 216
Immer gelber im Gesicht.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 219
Da kam ein Tag im Spätoktober, der dem Träumen und dem Wandern ein Ende machte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 220
In der Nähe von Roßville war es, auf einer kleinen Wasserstation.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 221
Ich war sehr krank.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 222
Der Expreß war herangebraust.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 223
Billy und Joe sprangen auf die blinde Plattform.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 224
Ich sprang neben ihnen her.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 226
Trotzdem packte ich blindlings zu.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 227
Dann verspürte ich einen Stoß, einen Ruck und kollerte die Böschung hinab.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 229
Nachdenken!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 230
Billy und Joe hatten natürlich nicht mehr abspringen können und fuhren ohne mich weiter.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 231
Ich sah im Fahrplan nach.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 232
Der Expreß fuhr 69 Meilen weit ohne Aufenthalt.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 233
Selbstverständlich würden Billy und Joe auf jener Station auf mich warten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 234
Also weiter mit dem nächsten Zug!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 235
Der kam, ein Eilfrachtzug, in einer Stunde.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 236
Ich trank Wasser, rauchte eine Zigarette.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 238
Die Dinge schwammen mir vor den Augen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 239
Ich konnte kaum stehen, nur mit großer Mühe gehen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 240
Als der Eilzug kam, wollte ich mitfahren, fiel aber beim zweiten Sprung vorwärts schon hin.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 242
War ich doch nur ein kaum zwanzigjähriger Junge!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 243
Und ich dachte nach und dachte nach.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 244
Wenn ich Billy auch mit einem Personenzug nachfuhr, so war es doch nur neuer Jammer.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 245
Ich war krank und würde ihm nur eine Last sein.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 247
In eine ganz große Stadt; in die Stadt, die im Vorfrühling mein Ziel gewesen war.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 249
Billy!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 250
Billy!!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 251
unit 252
Solche Dinge waren dem Mann im Fieber unendlich gleichgültig!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 253
Ich wußte nur, daß es aus war – aus.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 254
Keine Schnellzüge mehr; kein Springen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 255
Und daß ich nach St. Louis wollte!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 257
Die Entfernung war verhältnismäßig gering, kaum 400 Meilen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 258
»Siebzehn Dollars,« sagte der Agent.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 259
»Bitte!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 260
Wann geht der nächste Zug?« »4 Uhr 32 Minuten.« Das war in kaum einer Stunde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 261
Ich bezahlte, und wenige Dollars blieben mir übrig.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 262
Dann verschluckte ich eine Chininpille nach der andern und versuchte zu rauchen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 264
Billy!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 266
Kein häßliches Wort – keinen häßlichen Gedanken hatte ich je von ihm gehört.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
unit 268
Stolz und vornehm und frei.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 159  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 262  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 253  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3408  translated  unit 250  1 year, 1 month ago
lollo1a • 3408  translated  unit 249  1 year, 1 month ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 2  1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8394  translated  unit 158  1 year, 1 month ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 49  1 year, 1 month ago
DrWho • 8394  commented on  unit 91  1 year, 1 month ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 34  1 year, 1 month ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 27  1 year, 1 month ago
3Bn37Arty • 2758  commented on  unit 31  1 year, 1 month ago
bf2010 • 4788  translated  unit 8  1 year, 1 month ago
Siri • 1143  commented  1 year, 1 month ago

Kapitel 10!

by Siri 1 year, 1 month ago

Wie das Wandern endete.

Die Eisenbahn hat uns! – Sektion 423, Southern Pazific. – Als Streckenarbeiter in Arizona. – Der »boss«. – Von Kindern Italiens. – Wir haben wieder die Eisenbahn! – Hände in die Höhe! – Seine Ehren, der Friedensrichter. – Die braven Spitzbuben von El Dorado. – Dahinjagen und Arbeit. – Von den Schüttelfrösten der Malaria. – Krank und einsam. – Nach St. Louis. – Ein ganzer Mann.

Dicht neben dem Schienenstrang, viele Meilen weit von den beiden nächsten Stationen entfernt, stand ein schmuckloses hölzernes Haus mit vielen kleinen Fensterchen, über dessen Türe in schwarzen Buchstaben die Inschrift stand: Sektion 423, Southern Pazific. Der Zug hielt einen Augenblick lang, und wir sprangen ab. Ein vierschrötiger Mann in blauen Arbeitskleidern, mit respektablem Bäuchlein und wirren feuerroten Haaren, trat aus der Türe und sah uns prüfend an.
»Die drei von Lucky Water?« fragte er. »Versteht ihr 'was von der Arbeit?«
»Halt' den Mund!« raunte Billy mir zu. Dann gab er Antwort:
»Oh ja!«

»Ist mir verflucht angenehm,« brummte der Feuerrote. »Wie heißt ihr?«
»Billy Smith, Joe Donovan, Ed Müller.«
»Amerikaner?«
»Wir beide, ja. Unser Freund hier ist Deutscher.«

»So? Das macht nichts aus. Nun kommt herein zum Essen. Die Arbeitsbedingungen kennt ihr ja. Einen Dollar siebzig im Tag, glatt, Essen und Wohnen schon abgezogen. Arbeitszeit mindestens 31 Tage. Wer vorher geht, bekommt kein Geld. Come in!«

Beim Hineingehen sagte er: »Ein Segen, daß man mit euch wenigstens christliches Englisch reden kann, begorra!« (Er war offenbar ein Irländer.)

»Die andern sin' Italiener, hol' sie der Kuckuck, und wenn ich was sag', grinsen sie. Mit den Nasen muß ich sie auf die Arbeit stoßen, bis sie kapieren, was getan werden soll. Mit den Händen muß ich reden wie ein gesegneter Indianer – hol's der Teufel! Wozu braucht eigentlich dies Land schnatternde Söhne von affenbesitzenden Orgeldrehern? Das möcht' ich wissen! Well, kommt nur herein!«

An dem langen, wachstuchbedeckten Tisch in der Stube saßen, eifrig kauend, sieben italienische Bahnarbeiter, die uns alle miteinander ihr "parla italiano?" entgegenschrien und enttäuscht aussahen, als wir die Köpfe schüttelten. Eine dicke Frau mit einem lustigen Gesicht trug das Abendessen auf, und wir griffen zu. Ich wunderte mich über die Reichhaltigkeit der Speisen. Es gab gebratenes Fleisch und gebackene Kartoffeln. Dazu Tomaten. Dann wurden ausgezeichnete kleine Pfannkuchen gebracht, Platten mit wahren Bergen davon, und endlich Apfelkuchen. Teller mit Speck, schneeweißes Brot, Flaschen mit allerlei Saucen standen auf dem Tisch.

»Haben Sie "overalls"?« fragte Billy den Feuerroten nach dem Essen. »Wir möchten unsere Kleider schonen.«

»Jawohl,« meinte er. »Das nenn' ich christlich. Die Italiener sin' nich' so sauber. Könnt' ihr haben. Wäsche auch.«

Er fischte aus einer Truhe die blauen Arbeitshosen hervor, sackartige Affären, in die man hineinkletterte und sie sich über den Schultern zuknöpfte; Flanellhemden und derbe Wäsche. Dann kauften wir uns noch Tabak und bezahlten zu seinem großen Staunen bar, statt uns den Betrag später abziehen zu lassen. Dann ging's ins Bett. Einer der beiden Schlafräume war von den Italienern voll besetzt, so daß wir im Nebenraum allein schliefen. Saubere eiserne Feldbetten standen da, frisch überzogen, und in der Ecke war einfaches Waschgeschirr, aber ebenso sauber.

»Die Arbeit ist schwer,« erklärte Billy, »so schwer und verhältnismäßig so schlecht bezahlt, daß sich Amerikaner nur selten und dann nur kurze Zeit dafür hergeben. In den sections gibt's fast nur Italiener. Aber die Lebensbedingungen sind gut.«

Im Dämmergrauen am nächsten Morgen wurde gefrühstückt, eine sehr solide Mahlzeit, und kurz nach Sonnenaufgang ging's hinaus auf den Schienenstrang zur Arbeit. Auf handcars. Das sind Draisinen einfachster Konstruktion, deren Räder genau auf die Geleise passen, mit Pumpgriffen versehen wie eine Feuerwehrspritze. Durch das Auf- und Niederdrücken der Handgriffe überträgt sich die Kraft auf die Axen. Wir "pumpten" uns mit Eilzugsgeschwindigkeit vorwärts bis zum Arbeitsplatz des Tages.

Dort lagen riesige Haufen von weißglänzenden neuen Eichenschwellen, die gegen die alten ausgewechselt werden mußten. Die Arbeit war bitterhart, denn es mußte im Eiltempo gearbeitet werden. Der Amerikaner duldet kein Zeitvertrödeln. Mit Stahlhammer und Stemmeisen wurden die schweren Klammern herausgeschlagen und dann die alten verfaulten Schwellen unter den Schienen hervorgezerrt.

Die neuen Schwellen mußten eingeschoben, niedergeklammert (ich lernte es schnell, den riesigen Hammer zu führen) und in den Kies des Schienenbetts eingestampft werden. "Tamponieren" hieß der Fachausdruck dafür. Mit langen eisernen Stangen, deren Ende schräg abgestumpft war, wurde unter die Schwellen hineingestoßen, bis Schwellen und Untergrund eine feste Masse waren. Auf dem "boss", dem Herrn, dem Vorarbeiter, ruhte gewaltige Verantwortlichkeit, denn es mußte nach der Wasserwage gearbeitet werden, damit die Schienen völlig horizontal blieben, und an Kurven mit der erhöhten Außenschiene war sogar eine recht schwierige Kalkulation erforderlich.

In Deutschland hätte ein Ingenieur solche Arbeit geleistet. Hier tat's ein alter Irländer, der kaum lesen und schreiben konnte. Ein Praktiker, unter dessen Aufsicht vierzig Meilen Schienenstrang standen, für dessen Beschaffenheit er und nur er allein verantwortlich war.

Er mußte dafür sorgen, daß nicht verfaulte Schwellen das Geleise unsicher machten, er wechselte Schienen aus, er grub raffinierte Abzugskanäle, wenn Grundwasser den Bahndamm bedrohte, er patroullierte mit seiner Handvoll Leute täglich die Riesenstrecke, über die er herrschte. Die Eisenbahngesellschaft machte den simplen Praktikus zum Selbstherrscher und holte so die denkbarste Höchstleistung aus ihm heraus. Sie zwang ihn zu denken! Zu organisieren! Und so leistete er weit mehr, als wenn er in bureaukratischem Befohlenwerden und Gehorchen gleichgültig sein Tagewerk getan hätte. Dafür bezahlte ihn die Bahn gut und ließ ihn an der Beköstigung seiner Arbeiter Geld verdienen.

Von Sonnenaufgang bis nach Sonnenuntergang wurde gearbeitet, mit einer kurzen Pause dazwischen, in der das mitgebrachte Lunch verzehrt wurde. Jeder Muskel am Körper schmerzte. Der Rücken wollte mir beinahe brechen vor lauter Hämmern und Stoßen und Schaufeln. Aber ich arbeitete darauf los – aus Leibeskräften. Denn ich wollte hinter keinem zurückstehen. Und ich begriff bald den Zweck der Arbeit, ihre Feinheiten. Selbst gröbste Arbeit hat ja ihre Tricks.

»Das is' christlich!« sagte O'Flanagan, der boss, als wir abends müde und zerschlagen auf die Draisinen stiegen. »Billy ist extraprima, Joe is gut un' der Deutsche wird noch gut. Das is mir verdammt angenehm. Weg von den Handgriffen, ihr drei! Pumpen sollen nur die Italiener; bin froh genug, daß 'mal gesegnete Christen da sin', denen man eine Wasserwage und einen Maßstab in die Pfoten geben kann!«

So wurde die abendliche Patrouille, die sich jedesmal über mindestens zwanzig Meilen erstreckte, für uns zu einer Spazierfahrt. Unsere Bevorzugung führtenatürlich zu Händeln, bei denen es im italienischen Lager prachtvolle blaue Flecken um die Augengegend gab. Das mag sehr roh gewesen sein – aber es war sehr schön!

Man arbeitete, man aß, man kroch früh am Abend todmüde ins Bett. Ein Tag war wie der andere. Nur an den Sonntagen schlief man bis in den hellen Tag hinein und las am Nachmittag die Zeitungen der Woche. Es dauerte nicht lange, so wurden meine Hände schwielig und meine Muskeln eisenhart. Aber ich versäumte an keinem Abend die Handeinreibung mit Glyzerin und die sorgfältige Nagelpflege, die Billy mir mit wahrem Fanatismus vormachte. Man müsse Hände und Finger gut behandeln, wenn sie nicht ewig die Schaufel führen sollten, pflegte er zu sagen. Ein diszipliniertes Hirn sorge unter allen Umständen für ein diszipliniertes Äußere! Billy war weise.

Vierzig Tage waren vergangen, als der Extrazug mit dem Zahlmeister kam, der die Sektionen des Bahnsystems ablohnte, und wir bekamen unser Geld. O'Flanagan richtete es so ein, daß die Patrouillenfahrt an jenem Abend uns bis zur nächsten westlichen Station brachte.
»Adieu, Jungens,« sagte er, »seid christlich gewesen! Wär' mir lieber, ihr würdet noch bleiben. Kann's euch aber nicht übelnehmen, be jabers. Könnt was Gescheiteres tun, als Eisenbahnarbeiten. So long!«

»Das merk' dir, Billy!« grinste Joe.
»Man muß die Arbeit nehmen, wie sie kommt,« antwortete Billy achselzuckend.
»Jetzt aber wird der Spieß umgedreht, my dear Billy! Hat die Eisenbahn uns gehabt – so haben wir jetzt, bei meiner seligen Tante Jemima, wieder die Eisenbahn!!«

Und der nächste Schnellzug führte drei nichtzahlende Passagiere nach Westen.
Tag und Nacht ging es dahin, als müsse versäumte Zeit eingeholt werden. In kaum zehn Tagen legten wir eine ungeheure Strecke zurück, zuerst auf einer Nebenlinie nach Westen, dann zurück im Bogen nach Osten, die Arizonalinie überschreitend, über Albuquerque nach dem Norden, durch Neumexiko nach Colorado hinein – gepackt vom Fieber des Vorwärtshastens. Auf dieser Fahrt kam ich zum ersten und einzigen Mal in den Vereinigten Staaten mit der Macht des Gesetzes in Konflikt.

Es war in einem kleinen Städtchen nicht weit von La Junta in Colorado. Der Frachtzug rumpelte in dem prachtvollen Sommermorgen dahin, hielt, rumpelte wieder hin und her. Und dann war Ruhe.
»Confound it,« sagte Billy nach einer Weile, »ich glaub', wir sind auf einem Nebengeleise.«

Er öffnete vorsichtig die Schiebetüre einen Spalt weit und guckte hinaus. »Wahrhaftig! Infames Pech. Winzig kleine Station auch noch!«

Verärgert kletterten wir hinaus, um uns umzusehen und so schnell als möglich mit einem anderen Zug weiterzufahren. Zuerst sprang Billy zu Boden, dann Joe und endlich ich. Kein Mensch war zu sehen. Wir wollten über das Geleise hinweg zur Straße hinübergehen, als urplötzlich aus der Böschung eine Gestalt auftauchte und eine drohende Stimme rief:
»Hände in die Höhe!«

Billy und Joe hielten prompt die Arme empor, während ich fassungslos den Mann im Schlapphut und die riesigen Revolver in seinen Fäusten anstarrte.
»Hände in die Höhe!!« donnerte es wieder. »Hands up – oder, bei Gott, 's gibt ein Begräbnis!!«

Da schossen auch meine Arme senkrecht empor, und eine unbeschreibliche Angst kam über mich. Billy aber lächelte.

»Umdrehen!« befahl der Mann im Schlapphut, und ich merkte, wie seine tastende Hand meine Taschen befühlte.
»So! Nun marschiert ihr vor mir her; links, wenn ich links sage, rechts, wenn ich rechts sage, und wer einen Versuch macht, zu entfliehen, bekommt eine Kugel. Vorwärts, im Namen des Gesetzes!«

»Was ist denn nur – was kann es denn sein …« rief ich, erschrocken. Billy aber fragte, ohne den Kopf zu wenden:
»Lieber Herr, haben Sie vielleicht den Sonnenstich?«

»Keine Witze!« befahl der Mann hinter uns. Aber ich hörte, wie er leise lachte.
»Ist man in dieser Gegend immer so unhöflich?« fuhr Billy fort. »Und ich möchte mich wirklich erkundigen, was im Namen aller Unvernunft Sie eigentlich von uns wollen?«

»Das werdet Ihr beim Friedensrichter hören!«
»So? Nun, der Friedensrichter wird auch von mir Verschiedenes zu hören bekommen.«

»Ach, das wird keinen Unterschied machen,« lachte der Mann hinter uns.
Das Städtchen bestand aus höchstens zwei Dutzend Häusern. Wir wurden in ein Haus hineinmarschiert, in dem eine Eisenhandlung war, und fanden uns in einer Stube, die nichts enthielt als eine Bank, einen Tisch und einen Stuhl. Wir mußten uns auf die Bank setzen, und der Mann mit den Revolvern pflanzte sich neben uns auf. Nach einer Weile trat ein weißbärtiger Herr in Hemdsärmeln ein, nahm einen Rock vom Nagel an der Türe, zog ihn an und sagte:
»Die Gerichtssitzung ist eröffnet! Was haben Sie dem Gericht zu melden, Mr. Sheriff?«

»Drei Tramps, Euer Ehren!«
»Schön. Heben Sie die rechte Hand empor und schwören Sie – im Namen m–m–m die Wahrheit um–m – um … nichts als die Wahrheit … m–m –«

Der Sheriff murmelte auch etwas.
»Tatbestand?« fragte der Friedensrichter.
»Illegales Fahren auf der Eisenbahn, Euer Ehren, und gemeingefährliches Herumtreiben ohne Subsistenzmittel. Ich persönlich habe die drei Angeklagten beobachtet, wie sie aus einem Frachtwaggon kletterten.«

Der würdige Richter rieb sich die Hände.
»Vier Tage Zwangsarbeit im Straßenbau!« verkündete er. »Das Gericht ist geschlossen!«

Ich fiel beinahe um.
»Einen Moment,« sagte Billy, »darf ich in die Tasche greifen?«
»Jawohl.«

Billy holte eine Handvoll Dollarnoten hervor, die der würdige Richter überrascht betrachtete und sich darauf schleunigst wieder hinsetzte.

»Die Gerichtssitzung ist wieder eröffnet!« sagte er.
»Wir müssen uns illegalen Fahrens schuldig bekennen,« begann Billy; »ich bitte jedoch, in Erwägung dessen, daß wir nicht ohne Geldmittel und nicht gemeingefährlich, sondern nur auf Arbeitssuche sind, auf eine Geldstrafe zu erkennen.«

»Zugestanden!« erklärte der Friedensrichter sofort. »Sagen wir einmal 6 Dollars für den Mann!«

»Ein bißchen viel, Euer Ehren – für Arbeitslose.«
»Hm – sagen wir 10 Dollars für alle drei?«

Der Sheriff trat zum Richtertisch und flüsterte etwas. Ich hörte deutlich die Worte: bar Geld – Tramps gibt's genug …
»Fünf Dollars Gesamtgeldstrafe, in Anbetracht der Umstände!« entschied der Richter, und Billy bezahlte.

»So!« sagte Seine Ehren, das Geld einstreichend: »Die Gerichtssitzung ist geschlossen!«

Der Sheriff führte uns wieder auf die Straße und meinte, es sei Zeit zum Mittagessen. In seinem Hause könnten wir für einen halben Dollar alle zusammen ausgezeichnet essen! Als wir am Tisch saßen, meinte Billy:
»Kluge, gerissene Gegend hier, nicht, Mr. Sheriff?«

»Sehr!«
»Macht Ihr es immer so?«
»Hm,« sagte der Sheriff gemütlich, »das ist doch furchtbar einfach. Wir bauen hier eine neue Straße un' haben verflucht wenig Geld dazu. Well, un' wenn wir Tramps erwischen, müssen sie gratis arbeiten. Feine Idee! Wenn die Zeiten gut sind, haben wir schon dreißig Mann in der Woche gekriegt. Aber ich will verdammt sein, wenn Ihr nicht die ersten seid, aus denen wir bares Geld herausbekommen haben!«

»Großartig!« sagte Billy. »Der Scherz ist beinahe fünf Dollars wert. Übrigens – wie heißt denn dieses hoffnungsvolle, aufblühende Gemeinwesen?«

»El Dorado,« sagte der Sheriff.
Da lachten wir alle drei schallend auf.
»Wenn ich mich einmal zur Ruhe setze,« prustete Billy, »dann komm' ich hierher. Eine Stadt, in der man andere die Arbeit tun läßt, die man selbst tun sollte, ist wirklich ein Dorado. Ihr könntet euch doch zum Beispiel auch euer Holz von gelegentlichen Vagabunden spalten lassen?«

»Das ist keine schlechte Idee,« sagte der Sheriff. »Aber wenn's einmal bekannt wird, kommen sie nicht mehr hierher!« setzte er betrübt hinzu.

Sommer und Herbst waren dahingeschwunden in einem rastlosen Wirrwarr von hastendem Dahinjagen und Arbeit. Durch große Strecken von Colorado, durchdas südliche Kansas, wieder nach Texas und nach Arkansas hinüber und zurück nach Kansas, hatte unser planloser Weg uns geführt.
In einem Steinbruch arbeiteten wir einmal; wir halfen Farmern dann und wann, wir plagten uns einen Monat lang auf einer Sektion der Kansaseisenbahn, wir schleppten Kohlensäcke, wir arbeiteten in einem Elektrizitätswerk. Ein unendlich armes Leben wäre es gewesen, wenn nicht die Eisenbahn eine so wunderbare, immer neue Anziehungskraft ausgeübt hätte. Und wenn nicht Billy mit seinem Humor, seiner Klugheit, dem unbeschreiblichen Einfluß, der von ihm ausging, uns zusammengehalten hätte. Aber über ihn wie über mich kam es in all den Träumen und all dem Hasten oft wie ein Sehnen nach anderem Leben, und wir sprachen so manche Arbeitspläne durch.

»Zuerst Geld in den Händen haben und dann mit dem Kopf arbeiten!«

Das war der Grundzug seiner Ideen. Schließlich beschlossen wir, nach San Franzisko zu gehen, das Billy gut kannte, und dort uns das Glück zu erjagen; die Mittel zu ganz großen Wanderzügen, zu Aufregung und Erleben im großen Stil. In Kansas war es, auf einer winzig kleinen Station der Union Pazific, wo wir diesen Entschluß faßten. Wir wollten ihn sofort zur Ausführung bringen. Joe, der simple, Billy getreu wie ein Diener dem Herrn, ging überallhin mit, ohne zu fragen und ohne sich im geringsten um Dinge der Zukunft zu kümmern. Nach Westen also ging unser Weg.

»In zwölf Tagen spätestens sin' wir in Frisco,« sagte Billy, »und dort arbeiten zuerst nur Joe und ich, bis du uns wieder gesund geworden bist. Langweilige Geschichte, krank zu sein. Tu's nicht wieder!«

Denn ich war krank.
In fortwährendem Fieber. Mein Gesicht war zitronengelb fast geworden, wie das eines Chinesen, und von Tag zu Tag wurde ich schwächer. Ich litt an Malaria. Die Keime der Krankheit hatte ich mir wahrscheinlich schon in Texas oder vielleicht auch in den Sumpfgegenden des Staates Arkansas geholt. Billy erkannte sofort, was mir fehlte. Täglich schluckte ich so und soviele Pillen des einzigen Gegenmittels, das es gab, Chinin. Der Tag fing mit Chinin an und hörte mit Chinin auf. Zuerst machte sich die Krankheit auch kaum anders bemerkbar, als in der sonderbaren Gesichtsfarbe, in Fieber und in Müdigkeit. Aber ich war so abgehärtet, daß ich mir aus dem bißchen Fieber wenig machte. Das dauerte wochenlang. Dann kam es über mich wie Schlafsucht, und oft mußte ich mich auf gefährlicher Fahrt gewaltsam wachhalten. Und dann packte mich der Schüttelfrost der Malaria.

Ein unangenehmer Geselle. Ich saß zusammen mit Billy und Joe in einem Frachtwagen, als es mich auf einmal glühend heiß überlief. Kaum eine Sekunde später schauderte ich in eisiger Kälte, und die Zähne fingen mir an zu klappern. Und dann schüttelte und rüttelte es mich, als sei ich eine Ratte in den Zähnen eines Foxterriers. Mein Körper flog hin und her; der Mund klappte auf und zu, ohne daß ich ein Wort sprechen konnte; Arme und Beine zuckten wie in Krämpfen. Da half kein Wollen, keine Selbstbeherrschung. Der Begriff Schüttelfrost ist viel zu blaß und schwach, um die Urgewalt solch' eines Malariafrostes wiederzugeben. Wehrlos war man wie ein Kind. Die Beine trommelten auf dem Boden des Wagens, der Körper wurde umhergeworfen. Und merkwürdigerweise verspürte ich dabei weder Schmerz noch ein besonderes Kältegefühl – nur ein willenloses Nachgeben jedes Muskels unter geheimnisvoll rüttelnder Macht – ein Wundern, was das sein mochte, wie lange es dauern mochte.

Zehn Minuten währte der Anfall, auf den Erschöpfung und Müdigkeit folgte.
Nun begann das Elend. Pünktlich jeden zweiten Tag, um die gleiche Stunde, zur selben Minute fast wiederholte sich regelmäßig der Anfall von Schüttelfrost. Und in immer zunehmender Stärke. Wenn es halb zwei Uhr wurde je am zweiten Tag, so wußte ich genau: Jetzt kommt mein treuer Feind, der Schüttelfrost! Da half weder Chinin, selbst in den ungeheuerlichsten Dosen, noch Whisky in großen Gaben.

Geschüttelt mußte werden. Geschüttelt, daß ich oft meinte, die Glieder müßten mir aus den Gelenken gerissen werden; gerüttelt, daß Hören und Sehen mir verging. So waren Wochen vergangen, Wochen von Frost und Fieber. Und immer schwächer und elender wurde ich. Immer magerer. Immer gelber im Gesicht.

Aber ich ließ es mir nicht merken, wie erbärmlich mir zumute war, und freute mich wie ein Kind auf das sonnige Kalifornien. Täglich verschluckte ich mehr Chinin und täglich mußte ich mehr und mehr alle Kräfte zusammennehmen.
Da kam ein Tag im Spätoktober, der dem Träumen und dem Wandern ein Ende machte. In der Nähe von Roßville war es, auf einer kleinen Wasserstation. Ich war sehr krank.

Der Expreß war herangebraust. Billy und Joe sprangen auf die blinde Plattform. Ich sprang neben ihnen her. Und in dem Augenblick, als ich mich hinaufschwingen wollte, tanzte es vor meinen Augen wie tausend Sterne, und in meinem Kopf schienen die Dinge zu wirbeln. Trotzdem packte ich blindlings zu. Dann verspürte ich einen Stoß, einen Ruck und kollerte die Böschung hinab. Ich hatte den Messinggriff verfehlt und war gegen die Wand des Postwagens angesprungen …
Zitternd an allen Gliedern richtete ich mich auf.

Nachdenken! Billy und Joe hatten natürlich nicht mehr abspringen können und fuhren ohne mich weiter. Ich sah im Fahrplan nach. Der Expreß fuhr 69 Meilen weit ohne Aufenthalt.

Selbstverständlich würden Billy und Joe auf jener Station auf mich warten. Also weiter mit dem nächsten Zug! Der kam, ein Eilfrachtzug, in einer Stunde. Ich trank Wasser, rauchte eine Zigarette. Aber mit einemmal, durch den Shock des Herabgeschleudertwerdens wahrscheinlich, kam all' die mühsam verhaltene Krankheitsschwäche zum Ausbruch. Die Dinge schwammen mir vor den Augen. Ich konnte kaum stehen, nur mit großer Mühe gehen. Als der Eilzug kam, wollte ich mitfahren, fiel aber beim zweiten Sprung vorwärts schon hin. Da wußte ich, daß ich sehr krank war und in meinem Zustand niemals nach Kalifornien kommen würde, und setzte mich hin und heulte zum Steinerbarmen um meinen Billy. War ich doch nur ein kaum zwanzigjähriger Junge!

Und ich dachte nach und dachte nach. Wenn ich Billy auch mit einem Personenzug nachfuhr, so war es doch nur neuer Jammer. Ich war krank und würde ihm nur eine Last sein. Denken – denken … Ich starrte auf die Karte, und in mein fieberndes Hirn schlich sich ein Gedanke ein:

Nach St. Louis! In eine ganz große Stadt; in die Stadt, die im Vorfrühling mein Ziel gewesen war. Mit dem Wandern war es ja aus; denn wer kaum stehen konnte, der mußte weg vom Schienenstrang, der Kraft und Mut erforderte.
Billy! Billy!!

Keinen einzigen Augenblick lang beschäftigte mich der Gedanke, was ich in St. Louis anfangen würde. Solche Dinge waren dem Mann im Fieber unendlich gleichgültig! Ich wußte nur, daß es aus war – aus. Keine Schnellzüge mehr; kein Springen. Und daß ich nach St. Louis wollte!

Mit vieler Mühe schlich ich nach der Station hinüber und fragte, was eine Fahrkarte nach St. Louis kosten würde. Die Entfernung war verhältnismäßig gering, kaum 400 Meilen.
»Siebzehn Dollars,« sagte der Agent.
»Bitte! Wann geht der nächste Zug?«
»4 Uhr 32 Minuten.«

Das war in kaum einer Stunde. Ich bezahlte, und wenige Dollars blieben mir übrig. Dann verschluckte ich eine Chininpille nach der andern und versuchte zu rauchen. Und dann saß ich auf einmal auf weichem Polster und träumte todmüde im Halbschlaf in mich hinein, in einer einzigen Vorstellung, in einem einzigen Gedanken.
Billy!

Immer wieder sah ich den Mann mit den leuchtenden Augen vor mir; ihn, den ich vergötterte wie nur Jugend vergöttern kann. Kein häßliches Wort – keinen häßlichen Gedanken hatte ich je von ihm gehört. Denn dieser Mann, hart an der Linie wandernd, die den nützlichen Menschen und den Vagabunden scheidet, war ein ganzer Mann [A]. Stolz und vornehm und frei. Und der fiebernde junge Mensch da im Schnellzug schluchzte in sich hinein –
Die Welt war ärmer geworden für ihn.