de-en  Heimat_Identität_Vielfalt Medium
(https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/ges/eu2/ptf/20968283.html).

Freepost: Is ancestry the same as home, the same as identity?

Or does globalisation cut off all roots?

This is what writer, Nora Bossong and pianist, Igor Levit discuss in this post.

Their digital exchange of letters was freepost - and is also still open for your opinion, your opposition and your question, in the comment field on this page or on Twitter and Facebook under the hashtag #portofrei.

Geraldine de Bastion, who moderated the debate, included the comments in the exchange.

Geraldine de Bastion: Home is, where WLAN automatically connects?

Home in the digital world, home; sounds like a cross stitch picture that is slowly fading.

Thereby, in various regards the term is more relevant than ever before: Many people, expelled by war from their country, find their new home in our country.

Others feel intimidated by changes, whether by modern architecture, digital innovation or people who look unfamiliar, and cling to a nostalgic concept of home. ...

I belong to those people who move freely in the digital and analog world.

My window to the world are social media and a video-chat-window, that connects me to my loved ones.

The most important memories, favorite songs, books and photos are always there - in the cloud .. The saying "Home is wherever the WiFi connects" is not a joke, but a reality .. Many in my environment live the privileged life of digital nomads: the personal identification framework extends beyond the geographic space where one lives.

And yet, I also feel an emotional attachment to the city in which I live, which goes beyond the bond to the people who live in it.

Berlin is home. The internet too.

Which different meanings does the word "home" have today?

Does it have a different meaning when you are one of those privileged digital nomads?

Or is it simply leaning on a sofa pillow looking down into the street from the first floor?

What does home mean for you?

Nora Bossong: Home is where you are yearning for your life and where you want to leave again after five minutes; every time I arrive in the city of my childhood and look around, I think: There are the dark green rhododendrons, here are the ramparts, over there is the bare-breasted sphinx in front of the museum.

Old memories awaken, that seem deeper and more meaningful than all those I have collected in my later years.

Home is a vague feeling of wanting to create a kind of bonding, a bonding with ourselves.

Whoever fails to do that, sometimes uses this concept, and seemingly easily, to exclude otherst, as if the deliminiation could create what nevertheless has to happen from the inside: to make something happen.

I move on to the next street, the beauty of secure childhood is superposed by feelings of an early loss.

Then again moments of longing.

At the same time, the feeling of having outgrown this city, this time because I am no longer my former self, because this city is no longer the city of the past, with its people, its relationships, its streets, its buildings.

And that, although my hometown has not been undermined by all this for the last thirty years, it has not been in a state which has ceased to exist.

It was not destroyed by war.

Iit is not governed by a regime which makes coming back to it dangerous if not impossible.

How much greater would the feeling of loss have been otherwise?

However, home, no matter how fragile or protected our places of origin are, is never a certain fixed point, but a point of fiction, an "as if", nothing where one is for five minutes, but rather that which one tries a lifetime to create.

It is nothing that codifies us but which allows us to wish, or, as Ernst Bloch writes, "what seems to come from our childhood and where nobody has ever been." Igor Levit: home, an expression which is hard to grasp. Difficult, because, as I felt previously, always limits us.

Restricts us to a place, a relatively narrow space.

Meanwhile, I however have defined my home for me differently.

Home, that's people. The people I love, the people I avoid, the people I learn of, the people who ask me for advice, the people who help me, the people I help.

Probably it had always been like this, but the one thing that inspired me in my life like nothing else was always the person..

Within and with him I feel understood, with him I feel secure and thus at home.

Since I was a little boy, I wanted to travel most of all, but not to look at nature, landscapes or architectural masterpieces, no, I wanted to get to know people.

And it became increasingly clear to me that I found myself through and with the help of others.

With the help of my family, my friends. That has become "home" for me - the meeting, the togetherness, the human being.

Part 2.

Geraldine de Bastion: Home - a construct that deliminates. but also segregates us.

What security signifies for the one, for example, constancy, changelessness and the dependability of the familiar, triggers a feeling of trepidation in the other.

Does home mean something different if you come from the country or places where there are hardly any changes than from a constantly changing big city?

Berlin, my home, changes its face constantly.

It is a "face with freckles", as Hildegard Knef once sang.

My homeland is an imperfect homeland, marked by change and not by permanence ... As seen geographically or relative to its people: How big is your homeland? And how constant is it?

Nora Bossong: A friend told me about the home of our stone age ancestors.

The area that was inhabited could have changed in a generation in the radius of a day's hike.

If they moved on ,for reasons of protection or food security, they took not only the beasts of burden and crops with them, but also ornamental plants and domestic animals.... Home, if you even want to talk about that in this context, does not seem only to be the useful, a place that secures your survival, but also something that suggests familiarity.

Today you can travel across the Federal Republic of Germany by car within a day, you would even reach larger parts of the neighboring countries, and by a direct flight we actually would reach almost every place in the world.

To speak of radius becomes absurd when it actually spans the entire globe. ...

Maybe, this is why I cannot decide where, geographically speaking, my home is.

Although there are memories to places, which i connect with home, but these put rather an inconsistent mosaic together than an clear picture.

My home is constantly changing, perhaps the only permanent aspect are the places and encounters that not only benefit me, but in which, renewed trust and familiarity are possible again and again. ...

Igor Levit: My home had always been limitless, geographically and in particular emotionally.

It was and is an inner state. An emotion, a thought. When I was about seventeen years old, the piano had suddenly become strange to me.

Not the music, but the instrument, my means of expression, my "home".

I simply did not have the feeling I could express what was important to me with my instrument. ...

I was at an impasse. ...

Bach sounded wrong, Beethoven sounded wrong, everything was "wrong."

If you will, my artistic inner home, was just about to disappear.

By chance I met two extraordinary musicians during this time. Lajos Rovatkay and Frederic Rzewski.

One of them an old-school genius, a Renaissance man par excellence who became a kind of Spiritus Rector for me, the other one, a maverick, a composer of contemporary music, a communist, a political thinker, an incredibly alert, yes even demanding mind, an American, a great composer.

Both so opposite and yet so close.

And suddenly my "home" changed. These two became home for me.

They gave me, independendly of each other, new air to breathe.

They gave me inspiration. To describe that in detail would go beyond the scope of this discussion, but these two people fundamentally redefined my home.

That's what I meant in the first text.

My home never was a place. It was never a nation. Never a city or an apartment.

It was always ... people. It has always been and still is connection, exchange, togetherness, to be there for each other.

It redefines itself every day. Thank god. My home is as big as it can only be.

It's as free as I can be.

My family is home, my closest friends Georg, Julia, Sonja, Frederic, Annette, Simon, Maren, Kristin, Martin, Thorsten, Thomas, Oliver, Sam, they are home, my last teacher Matti Raekallio, who so became a wonderful friend, is home.

The remembrance of the late Hannes Mahler, who was like a brother to me and still is at heart, is home. ...

The pain that I feel, since he is no longer there, the pain that sometimes tears me, it is a part of my home.

It will accompany me for the rest of my life. Music is of course home.

At this point, it's hard for me to continue writing.

Part 3.

Geraldine de Bastion: An interim balance: Home is not of the same origin.

Home is familiarity, security, and naturalness.

People, language, music - everything that can be an emotional home.

The cheap hotel on the corner of my street has been a refuge shelter for two years.

The children of the families living here are playing in front of the house.

Last week I noticed that they mainly speak German together, not Arabic anymore

"It's my turn, let me ride the bike". These children have lost everything at once, which was familiar to them.

What would have been their first impressions of this strange place, which is now home to them.

Of this country, which they knew nothing about before they came here?

A land, whose language they now speak, in which they are now at home, even if in a hotel room.

One of our readers wrote this week on Facebook: "I have noticed, it was only when away that the concept of 'home' became more acute." I've experienced this also. Through travel, one learns at least as much about one's own culture as about a foreign one.

One learns to treasure the little things - like, being able to drink water out of the tap - and one learns to distinguish peculiarities - for example, that we behave differently in public places than other cultures do.

You notice most what you miss - for example cheese sandwiches - and you notice what you do not miss: for example, bad-tempered comments of fellow passengers in local traffic instead of the smiles you get in many countries. ...

What did you learn about yourself and your homeland the last time you were far away from it.

Nora Bossong: Beeing for a longer time in foreign countries, I started with the weeks and month to bring back everything close to me, what I usually rejected, from which I escaped every time in a sense, something like that nuance of the North German, that I whenever I think on Bremen, I see as a straitjacket from me, tinkered from Protestant ethics, bad wheater and commercial rejection from all wasteful, the beauties and capers in mind and in the passion, which can not immediately be monetarized and calculated.

When I lived in Rom for some time, I started to delve into the Buddenbrooks every evening, not really to get to the core of the book once and for all; rather to recall the characters and the mood every day, to build a northern German enclave in my Italian flat-sharing community, but because I would have been lost a little bit alone in my self-chosen exile; the Italian language, Catholicism, the streets of Rome, because I felt right there in how much we really are with what we grew up, whether we later believe we to love it or not, whether we would have chosen it ourselves, whether we had had the choice or whether we would never ever chosen the bleakness in northern Germany.

Igor Levit: What is identity?

Recently I spoke with an Iranian composer.

She was a tremendous clever, inquisitive, bright, attentive person and accordingly a very prestiguous musician.

I ask her, which part in her opinion she would play in the community, whose part she is. Her answer was as clear as painful.

"None." I asked her how she searches for her identity, and here her answer was an exceptionally beautiful one: by traveling, with the help of people. ...

She told about journeys to the USA, to Europe, and how journeys enriched, changed and satisfied her.

And then she related the drama that so many of us follow in the news every day: virtually from one day to the next, as an Iranian citizen it was no longer possible to travel to the United States. ...

The snatched from this woman effectively a large part of her inner home. ... They blocked the most important avenues of opportunity for her.

Why do I tell that?

I travel very often and sometimes the deep longing for my friends and for my home is brutally.

Many trips I actually spend alone, and calls, Skype or the like, at the end of the day, can't be compared with a living being.

But I take it, accept it. I rarely blame my life for anything, and my friends don't do it with me either.

No, when traveling, my view of my home doesn't change. ...

My awareness for every moment, every place, every human being - it becomes sharper, more alert, more curious, day after day.

But the home, my home is always with and in me.


Part 4.

Geraldine de Bastion: only this weekend a friend of mine told me that whilst living abroad she started to watch "Tatort", as well as several other TV series which she would never have watched at home, just to feel connected with home. ....

"Just only to hear the language," she thought.

Language: to feel understood, to joke and to get it. Cursing and quarreling is only possible, if you have mastered the language.

Not to think about the language, means to feel at home.

In our series "freepost" the translation of the term "Heimat" caused some dispute - homeland is not the same as home.

The terms are differently connoted and create different associations.

According to the theory of linguistic relativity, also known as Sapir-Whorf-hypothesis, the structure of a language influences the world view of the speaker.

If we define the term language fairly broadly and include also music, chess or programming languages - how much does your language influence your world view?


Nora Bossing: During my first weeks in Rome, when I was still anything but fluent in the Italian language, I thought while riding the bus that the people around me would most certainly be talking on and on about Dante and Da Vinci, in a way as if the beauty of the vowel-rich Italian language still unfamiliar to me and of the wealth of the art and the history in front of the window was reflected immediately in the conversations of the people.

The more I understood Italian, the clearer it became to me that the conversations were just as often as trite as they were in Germany. ... Somebody had not done the dishes, another one had been late, a third had fallen out with Lucca, because the latter was an idiot. ...

Of course, it would be indeed odd to assume that we could see our world beyond language.

"Our World" appears in a peculiar present that is the blank space between the past and the future.

Both of these, the before and the after, we cannot perceive, we can only imagine, remember, verbally formulate.

But of course "Our World" especially manifests itself in our native language as well – and hence both in its expanse, for in no other language are connotations, undertones and language games so easily available, and also in its closeness, that intimacy which repeats forever well-practiced perspectives, which has become deadened by profane, not widely noticed everyday acts of speech, "a short trip, please," "wait, I have sixty cents in small change"...Time and again I move, or rather flee, for that reason, to a foreign language speaking country for a few months, often with the idea in my head: forever.

Of course, this is a freely chosen, a luxurious exile, not forced by evident existential plight and reversible again within a few hours by plane.

But most of the time to begin with, the exile, which is above all a linguistic exile, is already revising itself: If I become so familiar with the foreign language that I dream in it, think in it, it becomes incidental to me, and even Dante is more and more rare in it.



Igor Levit: It was the fourth. December 1995, when we reached Düsseldorf.

Airport, runway, day one in Germany. New world, new sounds, great adventure.

A kind of renaissance. Since then my life in this country has felt to me like a never ending happiness, however, one that I have always questioned and never taken for granted. ....

I thought everything was great, the colours, the speed, the unknown, the expectations - but the one thing that affected me most, which I had fallen in love with immediately upon arrival and what I still love today with all my heart, was the language. ...

I was so in love with the German language.

When I came to school, still in Dortmund, I wanted to speak better German than all my classmates from the very first day.

I wanted to learn German as soon as possible, understanding, reading and talking in German.

A few month later it was time.

My first book in the German language. ... My mother gave me Joachim Kaiser's book 'Große Pianisten unserer Zeit'. ( Great pianists of our time)

This language has become my key to everything.

A door opener for friendships, for relationships, for musical experiences, for my self-discovery, for anger, frustration, happiness, love, confusion, disentanglement....- simply for everything. ...

And it defined an essential part possibly not of "home" but of "returning", returning to myself. ...

Even today, returning to the German language after long tours is something I find immensely therapeutic, something independent of place, something timeless. ...

I was grateful to my parents (and still am) for deciding to bring my sister and me to Europe, making it possible for us to start a new life here.

It was the language, that became the most beautiful "tool".

It becames and remained an essentiell part of my concept of home.

(Summary) Geraldine de Bastion: Home – still not so covered in dust and meaningless in the present day. To the contrary, home is a term that is positively cast and rich in meaning for most people, rich in memories and associations.

We have asked ourselves in recent weeks how digitalization has an effect on our feelings about home, what role language plays in that, how homesickness and wanderlust are mutually dependent and how a living space becomes home for people who move to a new location.

We found: Home does not always mean place of origin but more like a place where you feel at ease, with which you are familiar.

Places are less important than language, food, and most of all the people you love.

"Home is where your heart is" or as Herbert Grönemeyer decribed in his song Heimat already in 1999, " Homeland is no place, homeland is a feeling."

So I also understood Igor Levit, the love to the people, who are close to him is his home.

In Nora Bossung's writing, I admired most of all the playful, loving interaction with the simple bourgeois home with which one is only conditionally associated.

As I write the final text for our first episode of Portofrei I sit in the airplane and Europe passes under me.

And once again I find myself thinking how fortunate one can consider oneself to be born at the time and the place from whence I come.

I am not only lucky to come from one of the greatest cities in the world, in addition I have a passport which allows me to consider a whole continent home and opens the doors of the world to me - so that I belong to the privileged few, who can more or less choose their home for themselves. ...
unit 1
(https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/ges/eu2/ptf/20968283.html).
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 2
Portofrei: Ist Herkunft gleich Heimat gleich Identität?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 3
Oder kappt die Globalisierung alle Wurzeln?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 4
Darüber debattierten an dieser Stelle Nora Bossong, Schriftstellerin, und Igor Levit, Pianist.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 6
Geraldine de Bastion, die die Debatte moderierte, brachte die Kommentare in den Austausch mit ein.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 7
Geraldine de Bastion: Zuhause ist, wo das WLAN sich automatisch verbindet?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 8
Heimat in der digitalen Welt, Heimat; Klingt wie ein Kreuzstichbild, das langsam verblasst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 11
Ich gehöre zu den Menschen, die sich in der digitalen und analogen Welt frei bewegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 15
Berlin ist Heimat.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 16
Das Internet auch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 17
Welche unterschiedliche Bedeutung nimmt der Begriff Heimat heute ein?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 18
Bedeutet er etwas anderes, wenn man einer dieser privilegierten digitalen Nomaden ist?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 19
Oder doch noch auf das Sofakissen gestützt vom ersten Stock auf die Straße schaut?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 20
Was bedeutet Heimat für Sie?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 26
Dann wieder Sehnsuchtsmomente.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 29
Sie wurden nicht durch Krieg zerstört.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 30
Sie unterliegt keinem Regime, das die Rückkehr zu ihr gefährlich, wenn nicht unmöglich macht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 31
Wie ungleich größer müsste das Gefühl von Verlust sonst sein?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 34
Schwierig, weil er, so habe ich es früher empfunden, immer eingegrenzt hat.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 35
Eingegrenzt auf einen Ort, einen relativ engen Raum.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 36
Mittlerweile habe ich meine Heimat für mich jedoch anders definiert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 37
Heimat, das sind Menschen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 40
In und mit ihm fühle ich mich verstanden, mit ihm fühle ich mich geborgen und demnach zuhause.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 42
Und es wurde mir immer klarer, dass ich durch und mithilfe anderer zu mir selbst fand.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 43
Mithilfe meiner Familie, meiner Freunde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 44
Das ist für mich Heimat geworden – die Begegnung, das Miteinander, der Mensch.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 45
Teil 2.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 46
Geraldine de Bastion: Heimat – ein Konstrukt, das uns eingrenzt, aber auch ausgrenzt.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 49
Meine Heimat Berlin hat ständig ein neues Gesicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 50
Sie ist ein „Gesicht mit Sommersprossen“, wie Hildegard Knef einst sang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 52
Und: Wie beständig ist sie?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 53
Nora Bossong: Eine Bekannte erzählt mir von der Heimat unserer steinzeitlichen Vorfahren.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 54
unit 58
Von Radius zu sprechen wird absurd, wenn er eigentlich den gesamten Globus umspannt.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 59
Vielleicht spielt das mit hinein, wenn ich Heimat für mich nicht geographisch festlegen kann.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 62
Igor Levit: Schon immer war meine Heimat grenzenlos gewesen, geographisch und vor allem emotional.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 63
Sie war und ist ein innerer Zustand.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 64
Eine Emotion, ein Gedanke.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 65
Als ich etwa siebzehn Jahre alt war, war mir das Klavier plötzlich fremd geworden.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 66
Die Musik nicht, aber das Instrument, mein Ausdrucksmittel, meine „Heimat“.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 68
Ich war in einer Sackgasse.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 69
Bach klang falsch, Beethoven klang falsch, alles war „falsch“.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 70
Wenn man so will, war meine künstlerische, innere Heimat einfach dabei, zu verschwinden.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 71
Durch einen Zufall lernte ich in dieser Zeit zwei außergewöhnliche Musiker kennen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 72
Lajos Rovatkay und Frederic Rzewski.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 74
Beide so gegensätzlich und doch so nah.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 75
Und plötzlich veränderte sich meine „Heimat“.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 76
Diese beiden wurden mir zur Heimat.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 77
Sie gaben mir, unabhängig voneinander, neue Luft zum Atmen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 78
Sie gaben mir Inspiration.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 80
Das meinte ich im ersten Text.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 81
Meine Heimat war nie Ort.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 82
Sie war nie Nation.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 83
Nie Stadt oder Wohnung.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 84
Sie war immer … Mensch.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 85
Sie war und ist immer Verbindung, Austausch, Miteinander, Füreinander.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 86
Sie definiert sich täglich neu.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 87
Gottseidank.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 88
Meine Heimat ist so groß, wie sie es nur sein kann.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 89
Sie ist so frei, wie ich frei sein kann.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 93
Er wird mich Zeit meines Lebens begleiten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 94
Musik ist natürlich Heimat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 95
An dieser Stelle fällt es mir schwer, weiterzuschreiben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 96
Teil 3.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 97
Geraldine de Bastion: Eine Zwischenbilanz: Heimat ist nicht gleich Herkunft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 98
Heimat ist Vertrautheit, Geborgenheit, Selbstverständlichkeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 99
Menschen, Sprache, Musik – all das, was einem ein emotionales Zuhause sein kann.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 100
Das Billighotel an der Ecke meiner Straße ist seit zwei Jahren eine Flüchtlingsunterkunft.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 101
Vor dem Haus spielen die Kinder der Familien, die hier untergebracht sind.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 102
unit 104
Was wohl ihre ersten Eindrücke waren von der Fremde, die für sie nun Heimat ist?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 105
Von diesem Land, von dem sie nichts wussten, bevor sie herkamen?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 108
Man lernt beim Reisen mindestens so viel über die eigene Kultur wie über die Fremde.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 111
Was haben Sie das letzte Mal über sich und Ihre Heimat gelernt, als Sie in der Ferne waren?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 114
Igor Levit: Was ist Identität?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 115
Vor Kurzem sprach ich mit einer iranischen Komponistin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 118
Ihre Antwort war so klar wie schmerzlich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 122
Man entriss dieser Frau quasi einen Großteil ihrer inneren Heimat.
5 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 123
Man hat ihr die wichtigste aller Türen vor der Nase zugehauen.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 124
Warum erzähle ich das?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 127
Aber ich nehme das hin, akzeptiere es.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 128
Ich werfe meinem Leben selten etwas vor und meine Freunde tun es mit mir auch nicht.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 129
Nein, mein Blick auf meine Heimat verändert sich nicht beim Reisen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 131
Aber die Heimat, meine Heimat, sie ist immer bei und in mir.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 132
Teil 4.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 134
„Einfach nur, um die Sprache zu hören“, meinte sie.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 135
Sprache: sich verstanden fühlen, Witze machen und verstehen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 136
Fluchen und Streiten geht nur, wenn man eine Sprache beherrscht.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 137
Nicht über Sprache nachdenken zu müssen bedeutet, sich zuhause zu fühlen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 139
Die Begriffe sind unterschiedlich konnotiert und bringen unterschiedliche Assoziationen hervor.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 145
Natürlich, es wäre ja seltsam anzunehmen, wir könnten unsere Welt jenseits von Sprache sehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 151
Igor Levit: Es war der 4.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 152
Dezember 1995, als wir Düsseldorf erreichten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 153
Flughafen, Landebahn, Tag eins in Deutschland.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 154
Neue Welt, neue Geräusche, großes Abenteuer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 155
Eine Art Neugeburt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 158
Ich war vernarrt in die deutsche Sprache.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 160
Ich wollte so schnell wie möglich Deutsch lernen, verstehen, lesen, mich auf Deutsch unterhalten.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 161
Einige Monate später war es dann soweit.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 162
Mein erstes Buch in deutscher Sprache.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 163
Meine Mutter schenkte mir Joachim Kaisers Buch Große Pianisten unserer Zeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 164
Diese Sprache wurde zu meinem Schlüssel für alles.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 169
Es war die Sprache, die zum allerschönsten „Tool“ wurde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 170
Sie wurde und blieb ein essentieller Teil meines Heimatbegriffes.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 174
Physische Orte sind weniger wichtig als Sprache, Essen, und vor allem die Menschen, die man liebt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 176
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 109  1 year, 2 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 90  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6261  translated  unit 96  1 year, 2 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  translated  unit 45  1 year, 2 months ago
Merlin57 • 3758  commented on  unit 15  1 year, 2 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented  1 year, 2 months ago

Übersetzung: Chris Cave
Copyright: Dieser Text ist lizenziert unter einer Lizenz (CC BY SA).
Goethe-Institut e. V., Internet-Redaktion
Mai 2017.

by bf2010 1 year, 2 months ago

(https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/ges/eu2/ptf/20968283.html).

Portofrei:

Ist Herkunft gleich Heimat gleich Identität?

Oder kappt die Globalisierung alle Wurzeln?

Darüber debattierten an dieser Stelle Nora Bossong, Schriftstellerin, und Igor Levit, Pianist.

Ihr digitaler Briefwechsel war portofrei – und ist immer noch offen auch für Ihre Meinung, Ihren Widerspruch und Ihre Frage, im Kommentarfeld auf dieser Seite oder auf Twitter und Facebook unter dem Hashtag #portofrei.

Geraldine de Bastion, die die Debatte moderierte, brachte die Kommentare in den Austausch mit ein.

Geraldine de Bastion:

Zuhause ist, wo das WLAN sich automatisch verbindet?

Heimat in der digitalen Welt, Heimat; Klingt wie ein Kreuzstichbild, das langsam verblasst.

Dabei ist der Begriff in vielerlei Hinsicht relevanter als jemals zuvor: Viele Menschen, vom Krieg aus ihrem Land vertrieben, finden bei uns eine neue Heimat.

Andere fühlen sich durch Veränderungen, egal ob durch moderne Architektur, digitale Innovation oder anders aussehende Menschen, verunsichert und hängen an einem nostalgischen Konzept von Heimat.

Ich gehöre zu den Menschen, die sich in der digitalen und analogen Welt frei bewegen.

Mein Fenster zur Welt sind soziale Medien und ein Video-Chat-Fenster, das mich mit meinen Liebsten verbindet.

Die wichtigsten Erinnerungen, Lieblingslieder, Bücher und Fotos – immer dabei – in der Cloud..

Der Spruch, „Home is where the WIFI connects“ ist kein Witz, sondern Wirklichkeit..

Viele in meinem Umfeld leben das privilegierte Leben des digitalen Nomaden:

Der persönliche Identifikationsrahmen erstreckt sich weiter als der geographische Raum, in dem man lebt.

Und doch empfinde auch ich zu der Stadt, in der ich lebe eine emotionale Verbundenheit, die über die Bindung zu den Menschen, die in ihr leben, hinausgeht.

Berlin ist Heimat. Das Internet auch.

Welche unterschiedliche Bedeutung nimmt der Begriff Heimat heute ein?

Bedeutet er etwas anderes, wenn man einer dieser privilegierten digitalen Nomaden ist?

Oder doch noch auf das Sofakissen gestützt vom ersten Stock auf die Straße schaut?

Was bedeutet Heimat für Sie? 

Nora Bossong:

Heimat ist das, wohin man sich sein Leben lang sehnt und wo man nach fünf Minuten wieder weg will, denke ich jedes Mal, wenn ich in meiner Kindheitsstadt ankomme, mich umsehe:

Dort die tiefgrünen Rhododendren, hier die Wallanlage, da drüben die barbusige Sphinx vor dem Museum.

Alte Erinnerungen werden wach, die tiefer und bedeutsamer erscheinen als alle, die ich in meinen späteren Jahren gesammelt habe.

Heimat ist ein diffuses Gefühl, eine Art Verbindlichkeit stiften zu wollen, eine Verbindlichkeit zu uns selbst.

Wem dies misslingt, der benutzt diesen Begriff mitunter und scheinbar leicht dafür, auszuschließen, als könnte die Abgrenzung schaffen, was doch von innen heraus geschehen muss: etwas hervor zu bringen.

Ich gehe eine Straße weiter, die Schönheit geborgener Kindheit wird überlagert von Gefühlen ersten Verlustes.

Dann wieder Sehnsuchtsmomente.

Zugleich das Empfinden, dieser Stadt, dieser Zeit entwachsen zu sein, weil ich nicht mehr das damalige Ich bin, weil diese Stadt nicht mehr die Stadt von damals ist, mit ihren Menschen, ihren Beziehungen, ihren Wegen, ihren Gebäuden.

Und das, obwohl meine Heimatstadt in den letzten dreißig Jahren all dies nicht erschüttert hat:

Sie lag nicht in einem Staat, der aufhörte zu existieren.

Sie wurden nicht durch Krieg zerstört.

Sie unterliegt keinem Regime, das die Rückkehr zu ihr gefährlich, wenn nicht unmöglich macht.

Wie ungleich größer müsste das Gefühl von Verlust sonst sein?

Doch Heimat, wie fragil oder geschützt auch immer unsere Herkunftsorte sind, ist eben niemals ein sicherer Fixpunkt, sondern ein Fiktionspunkt, ein „Als ob“, nichts, an dem man für fünf Minuten ist, sondern das man sich ein Leben lang zu schaffen versucht.

Sie ist nichts, was uns festschreibt, sondern was uns wünschen lässt, oder, wie Ernst Bloch schreibt, „was uns von der Kindheit her scheint und worin noch niemand war.“

Igor Levit:

Heimat, ein schwieriger Begriff. Schwierig, weil er, so habe ich es früher empfunden, immer eingegrenzt hat.

Eingegrenzt auf einen Ort, einen relativ engen Raum.

Mittlerweile habe ich meine Heimat für mich jedoch anders definiert.

Heimat, das sind Menschen. Menschen, die ich liebe, Menschen die ich meide, Menschen, von denen ich lerne, Menschen, die mich um Rat fragen, Menschen, die mir helfen, Menschen, denen ich helfe.

Wahrscheinlich war es immer schon so gewesen, aber das eine, was mich in meinem Leben inspiriert hat wie sonst nichts, das war immer der Mensch..

In und mit ihm fühle ich mich verstanden, mit ihm fühle ich mich geborgen und demnach zuhause.

Ich wollte, seit ich ein kleiner Junge war, am liebsten nur verreisen, jedoch nicht, um mir die Natur, Landschaften oder architektonische Meisterwerke zu betrachten, nein, ich wollte Menschen kennenlernen.

Und es wurde mir immer klarer, dass ich durch und mithilfe anderer zu mir selbst fand.

Mithilfe meiner Familie, meiner Freunde. Das ist für mich Heimat geworden – die Begegnung, das Miteinander, der Mensch.

Teil 2.

Geraldine de Bastion:

Heimat – ein Konstrukt, das uns eingrenzt, aber auch ausgrenzt.

Was für den einen Geborgenheit bedeutet, wie zum Beispiel die Beständigkeit, die Unveränderlichkeit und die Verlässlichkeit des Vertrauten, löst bei dem anderen Gefühle der Beklommenheit aus.
 
Bedeutet Heimat etwas anderes, wenn man vom Land kommt oder aus Orten, an denen wenig Veränderungen stattfinden, als wenn man aus einer sich ständig wandelnden Großstadt kommt?

Meine Heimat Berlin hat ständig ein neues Gesicht.

Sie ist ein „Gesicht mit Sommersprossen“, wie Hildegard Knef einst sang.

Meine Heimat ist eine imperfekte Heimat, die von Veränderung und nicht von Beständigkeit gezeichnet ist...

Geographisch gesehen oder bezogen auf die Menschen:

Wie groß ist Ihre Heimat? Und: Wie beständig ist sie?

Nora Bossong:

Eine Bekannte erzählt mir von der Heimat unserer steinzeitlichen Vorfahren.

Das Gebiet, das bewohnt wurde, habe sich pro Generation im Radius eines Tagesmarsches wandeln können.

Zog man weiter, aus Gründen des Schutzes oder der Nahrungssicherung, nahm man nicht nur Lastentiere und Nutzpflanzen mit, sondern auch Zierpflanzen und Haustiere. Heimat, wenn man in diesem Zusammenhang überhaupt davon sprechen will, scheint also nicht nur das Nützliche zu sein, der Ort, der uns das Überleben sichert, sondern das, was uns Vertrautheit suggeriert.

Heute lässt sich innerhalb eines Tages mit dem Auto die Bundesrepublik durchfahren, man käme sogar ein ganzes Stück noch durch die Nachbarländer und mit einem Direktflug erreichten wir binnen vierundzwanzig Stunden eigentlich fast jeden Ort auf der Welt.

Von Radius zu sprechen wird absurd, wenn er eigentlich den gesamten Globus umspannt.

Vielleicht spielt das mit hinein, wenn ich Heimat für mich nicht geographisch festlegen kann.

Zwar gibt es Erinnerungen an Orte, die ich mit Heimat verbinde, doch setzen diese eher ein widersprüchliches Mosaik als ein eindeutiges Bild zusammen.

Meine Heimat wandelt sich ununterbrochen, vielleicht ist das einzig Beständige, dass es Orte und Begegnungen sind, die mir nicht allein nützen, sondern in denen immer wieder von Neuem Vertrauen und Vertrautheit möglich wird.

Igor Levit:

Schon immer war meine Heimat grenzenlos gewesen, geographisch und vor allem emotional.

Sie war und ist ein innerer Zustand. Eine Emotion, ein Gedanke. Als ich etwa siebzehn Jahre alt war, war mir das Klavier plötzlich fremd geworden.

Die Musik nicht, aber das Instrument, mein Ausdrucksmittel, meine „Heimat“.

Ich hatte einfach nicht mehr das Gefühl, mit meinem Instrument das ausdrücken zu können, was mir wichtig war.

Ich war in einer Sackgasse.

Bach klang falsch, Beethoven klang falsch, alles war „falsch“.

Wenn man so will, war meine künstlerische, innere Heimat einfach dabei, zu verschwinden.

Durch einen Zufall lernte ich in dieser Zeit zwei außergewöhnliche Musiker kennen. Lajos Rovatkay und Frederic Rzewski.

Der eine ein Genie der alten Musik, ein Universalgelehrter par excellence, der für mich zu einer Art Spiritus Rector wurde, der andere ein Maverick, ein Komponist zeitgenössischer Musik, ein Kommunist, ein politischer Kopf, ein ungeheuer wacher, ja auch anstrengender Geist, ein Amerikaner, ein großer Komponist.

Beide so gegensätzlich und doch so nah.

Und plötzlich veränderte sich meine „Heimat“. Diese beiden wurden mir zur Heimat.

Sie gaben mir, unabhängig voneinander, neue Luft zum Atmen.

Sie gaben mir Inspiration. Das en détail zu beschreiben, würde jeden Rahmen sprengen, aber diese zwei Menschen definierten meine Heimat von Grund auf neu.

Das meinte ich im ersten Text.

Meine Heimat war nie Ort. Sie war nie Nation. Nie Stadt oder Wohnung.

Sie war immer … Mensch. Sie war und ist immer Verbindung, Austausch, Miteinander, Füreinander.

Sie definiert sich täglich neu. Gottseidank. Meine Heimat ist so groß, wie sie es nur sein kann.

Sie ist so frei, wie ich frei sein kann.

Meine Familie ist Heimat, meine engsten Freunde Georg, Julia, Sonja, Frederic, Annette, Simon, Maren, Kristin, Martin, Thorsten, Thomas, Oliver, Sam, sie sind Heimat, mein letzter Lehrer Matti Raekallio, der zu einem so wundervollen Freund wurde, ist Heimat.

Die Erinnerung an den verstorbenen Hannes Mahler, der mir wie ein Bruder war und im Herzen noch immer ist, ist Heimat.

Der Schmerz, den ich empfinde, seit er nicht mehr da ist, der Schmerz, der mich manchmal zerreißt, er ist Teil meiner Heimat.

Er wird mich Zeit meines Lebens begleiten. Musik ist natürlich Heimat.

An dieser Stelle fällt es mir schwer, weiterzuschreiben.

Teil 3.

Geraldine de Bastion:

Eine Zwischenbilanz: Heimat ist nicht gleich Herkunft.

Heimat ist Vertrautheit, Geborgenheit, Selbstverständlichkeit.

Menschen, Sprache, Musik – all das, was einem ein emotionales Zuhause sein kann. 

Das Billighotel an der Ecke meiner Straße ist seit zwei Jahren eine Flüchtlingsunterkunft.

Vor dem Haus spielen die Kinder der Familien, die hier untergebracht sind.

Letzte Woche habe ich bemerkt, dass sie vor allem Deutsch miteinander sprechen, nicht mehr Arabisch.

„Ich bin dran, lass mich mit dem Fahrrad fahren.“

Diese Kinder haben alles, was ihnen vertraut war, auf einmal verloren.

Was wohl ihre ersten Eindrücke waren von der Fremde, die für sie nun Heimat ist?

Von diesem Land, von dem sie nichts wussten, bevor sie herkamen?

Ein Land, dessen Sprache sie jetzt sprechen, in dem sie jetzt zu Hause sind – wenn auch in einem Hotelzimmer.

Einer unserer Leser schrieb diese Woche auf Facebook:

„Ich habe festgestellt: Erst, wenn man mal weg war, schärft sich der Blick für den Begriff Heimat.“

Diese Erfahrung habe ich auch gemacht. Man lernt beim Reisen mindestens so viel über die eigene Kultur wie über die Fremde.

Man lernt, die kleinen Dinge zu schätzen – etwa, das Wasser aus der Leitung trinken zu können –, und man lernt, Eigenheiten zu differenzieren – etwa, dass wir uns in öffentlichen Räumen anders verhalten als andere Kulturen.

Man merkt, was man am meisten vermisst – zum Beispiel Käsestullen –, und man merkt, was man nicht vermisst: zum Beispiel schlecht gelaunte Kommentare von Mitreisenden im Nahverkehr anstatt des Lächelns, das man in vielen Ländern bekommt.

Was haben Sie das letzte Mal über sich und Ihre Heimat gelernt, als Sie in der Ferne waren?

Nora Bossong:

Bin ich für längere Zeit im Ausland, beginne ich mit den Wochen und Monaten all das wieder in meine Nähe zu bringen, was ich für gewöhnlich von mir weise, vor dem ich in gewissem Sinne jedes Mal geflohen bin, etwa jene Nuance des Norddeutschen, die ich, wann immer ich an Bremen denke, als Zwangskorsett vor mir sehe, gebastelt aus protestantischer Ethik, schlechtem Wetter und kaufmännischer Ablehnung von allem Verschwenderischen, den Schönheiten und Kapriolen im Geist und in der Lust, die sich nicht gleich monetarisieren und berechnen lassen.

Als ich für einige Zeit in Rom lebte, vertiefte ich mich jeden Abend in die Buddenbrooks, gar nicht so sehr, um das Buch ein für alle Mal zu durchdringen;

eher, um mir die Gestalten und die Stimmung jeden Tag wieder herbeizuholen, eine norddeutsche Exklave in meiner römischen WG aufzubauen, wohl, weil ich eben doch auch ein wenig verloren gegangen wäre allein in dem, was ich mir selbst gewählt hatte;

die italienische Sprache, den Katholizismus, die Straßen Roms, weil ich dort spürte, wie sehr wir eben auch das sind, womit wir aufwachsen, ob wir es im Nachhinein zu lieben meinen oder nicht, ob wir es uns, wenn wir die Wahl gehabt hätten, selbst ausgesucht oder uns nie und nimmer für norddeutsche Kargheit entschieden hätten.

Igor Levit: Was ist Identität?

Vor Kurzem sprach ich mit einer iranischen Komponistin.

Sie war eine ungeheuer kluge, neugierige, aufgeweckte, aufmerksame Person und dementsprechend eine ganz wunderbare Musikerin.

Ich fragte sie, welche Rolle sie ihrer Meinung nach spielen würde in der Gesellschaft, deren Teil sie ist. Ihre Antwort war so klar wie schmerzlich.

„Keine.“ Ich fragte sie, wie sie ihre Identität sucht, und da war ihre Antwort eine überaus schöne: über das Reisen, mithilfe von Menschen.

Sie erzählte von Reisen in die USA, nach Europa, und wie diese Reisen sie bereicherten, veränderten, erfüllten.

Und dann erzählte sie von dem Drama, das so viele von uns tagtäglich in den Nachrichten verfolgen:

Als iranische Staatsbürgerin war es ihr quasi von einem Tag auf den anderen nicht mehr möglich, in die USA zu reisen.

Man entriss dieser Frau quasi einen Großteil ihrer inneren Heimat. Man hat ihr die wichtigste aller Türen vor der Nase zugehauen. 

Warum erzähle ich das?

Ich verreise sehr häufig und manchmal ist die Sehnsucht nach meinen Freunden, nach dem Zuhause bestialisch.

Viele Reisen verbringe ich faktisch allein, und Anrufe, Skypetelefonate oder Ähnliches sind am Ende des Tages mit einem lebendigen Zusammensein nicht zu vergleichen.

Aber ich nehme das hin, akzeptiere es. Ich werfe meinem Leben selten etwas vor und meine Freunde tun es mit mir auch nicht.

Nein, mein Blick auf meine Heimat verändert sich nicht beim Reisen.

Mein Bewusstsein für jeden Moment, jeden Ort, jeden Menschen – es wird schärfer, wacher, neugieriger, Tag für Tag.

Aber die Heimat, meine Heimat, sie ist immer bei und in mir.

Teil 4.

Geraldine de Bastion:

Erst dieses Wochenende erzählte mir eine Freundin, dass sie, als sie im Ausland lebte, anfing, Tatort zu schauen, sowie eine Reihe von Fernsehserien, die sie sich zuhause niemals angeschaut hätte, nur um sich der Heimat verbunden zu fühlen.

„Einfach nur, um die Sprache zu hören“, meinte sie.

Sprache: sich verstanden fühlen, Witze machen und verstehen. Fluchen und Streiten geht nur, wenn man eine Sprache beherrscht.

Nicht über Sprache nachdenken zu müssen bedeutet, sich zuhause zu fühlen.

In unserer Reihe Portofrei hat die Übersetzung des Begriffs Heimat zur Diskussion geführt – Homeland ist nicht gleich Heimat.

Die Begriffe sind unterschiedlich konnotiert und bringen unterschiedliche Assoziationen hervor.

Nach der Theorie der Linguistischen Relativität, auch Sapir-Whorf-Hypothese genannt, beeinflusst die Struktur einer Sprache die Weltanschauung des Sprechers.

Fassen wir den Begriff Sprache weit und beziehen ihn auch auf Musik, Schach oder Programmiersprachen – wie sehr beeinflusst Ihre Sprache Ihre Sicht auf die Welt?

Nora Bossong:

In meinen ersten Wochen in Rom, als ich der italienischen Sprache noch alles andere als mächtig war, meinte ich beim Busfahren, die Menschen um mich herum würden ganz sicher unablässig über Dante und Da Vinci reden, so als spiegele sich die für mich noch unvertraute Schönheit des vokalreichen Italienischen, der Kunst- und Geschichtsreichtum vor dem Fenster unmittelbar in den Unterhaltungen der Menschen.

Je besser ich Italienisch verstand, desto klarer wurde mir, dass die Unterhaltungen ebenso oft banal waren wie in Deutschland. Irgendjemand hatte den Abwasch nicht gemacht, ein anderer war verspätet, eine Dritte hatte sich mit Lucca zerstritten, weil der ein Idiot war.

Natürlich, es wäre ja seltsam anzunehmen, wir könnten unsere Welt jenseits von Sprache sehen.

„Unsere Welt“ zeigt sich in einem seltsamen Jetzt, das die Leerstelle zwischen Vergangenheit und Zukunft ist.

Dies beides, das Davor und das Danach, können wir nicht wahrnehmen, wir können es uns nur denken, erinnern, sprachlich formulieren.

„Unsere Welt“ zeigt sich aber natürlich insbesondere auch in unserer Muttersprache – und damit sowohl in ihrer Weite, denn in keiner anderen Sprache stehen uns Nebenbedeutungen, Untertöne, Sprachspiele so leicht zur Verfügung;

aber eben auch in ihrer Enge, jener Vertrautheit, die ewig eingespielte Perspektiven wiederholt, die sich abgestumpft hat durch die profanen, nicht weiter beachteten Alltagssprachhandlungen, „eine Kurzstrecke, bitte“, „Warten Sie, sechzig Cent habe ich klein“ ...

Immer wieder ziehe oder vielmehr fliehe ich deshalb ins fremdsprachige Ausland, für einige Monate, oft im Kopf mit der Idee: für immer.

Natürlich ist dies ein frei gewähltes, ein luxuriöses Exil, von keiner offensichtlichen existentiellen Notlage erzwungen und mit einem Flugzeug in wenigen Stunden wieder rückgängig zu machen.

Meist aber revidiert sich das Exil, das vor allem ein Sprachexil ist, vorab schon selbst:

Wenn ich der fremden Sprache so vertraut werde, dass ich in ihr träume, in ihr denke, sie mir beiläufig wird und auch Dante immer seltener in ihr vorkommt.

Igor Levit:

Es war der 4. Dezember 1995, als wir Düsseldorf erreichten.

Flughafen, Landebahn, Tag eins in Deutschland. Neue Welt, neue Geräusche, großes Abenteuer.

Eine Art Neugeburt. Ich empfand mein Leben in diesem Land seitdem als ein nicht endendes Glück, jedoch eines, was ich immer hinterfragt und kritisch betrachtet habe.

Ich fand alles großartig, die Farben, die Geschwindigkeit, das Unbekannte, die Erwartungen – aber das, was mich am allermeisten berührte, in das ich mich sofort nach der Ankunft verliebt hatte und was ich bis heute von ganzem Herzen liebe, war die Sprache.

Ich war vernarrt in die deutsche Sprache.

Als ich in die Schule kam, noch in Dortmund, wollte ich ab dem allerersten Tag besser Deutsch sprechen als alle meine Klassenkameraden.

Ich wollte so schnell wie möglich Deutsch lernen, verstehen, lesen, mich auf Deutsch unterhalten.

Einige Monate später war es dann soweit.

Mein erstes Buch in deutscher Sprache. Meine Mutter schenkte mir Joachim Kaisers Buch Große Pianisten unserer Zeit.

Diese Sprache wurde zu meinem Schlüssel für alles.

Zum Türöffner für Freundschaften, für Beziehungen, für musikalische Erlebnisse, für meine Selbstfindung, für Ärger, Frust, Glück, Liebe, Verwirrung, Entwirrung ... – einfach für alles.

Und sie definierte einen essentiellen Teil vielleicht nicht von Heimat, jedoch aber von „Rückkehr“, eine Rückkehr zu mir selbst.

Noch heute empfinde ich die Rückkehr in die deutsche Sprache nach langen Tourneen als etwas ungeheuer Wohltuendes, etwas Ortsunabhängiges, etwas Zeitloses.

Ich war meinen Eltern (und bin es noch immer) dankbar, dass sie die Entscheidung trafen, meine Schwester und mich nach Europa zu bringen, um uns hier ein neues Leben zu ermöglichen.

Es war die Sprache, die zum allerschönsten „Tool“ wurde.

Sie wurde und blieb ein essentieller Teil meines Heimatbegriffes.

(Zusammenfassung:)

Geraldine de Bastion:

Heimat – doch nicht so eingestaubt und bedeutungslos in der heutigen Zeit, im Gegenteil: Heimat ist ein Begriff, der für die meisten Menschen positiv besetzt und bedeutungsreich ist, reich an Erinnerungen und Assoziationen.
 
Wir haben uns in den letzten Wochen gefragt, wie sich Digitalisierung auf unsere Heimatgefühle auswirkt, welche Rolle die Sprache dabei spielt, wie sich Heimweh und Fernweh gegenseitig bedingen und wie ein Lebensraum zur Heimat wird für Menschen, die an einen neuen Ort ziehen.

Wir haben festgestellt: Heimat bedeutet nicht immer Herkunft, sondern vielmehr den Ort,  an dem man sich wohlfühlt, der einem vertraut ist.

Physische Orte sind weniger wichtig als Sprache, Essen, und vor allem die Menschen, die man liebt.

„Home is where the heart is“ oder, wie es Herbert Grönemeyer in seinem Song Heimat schon 1999 beschrieb: „Heimat ist kein Ort, Heimat ist ein Gefühl“.

So habe ich auch Igor Levit verstanden, die Liebe zu den Menschen, die ihm nahe sind, ist seine Heimat.

In Nora Bossongs Texten habe ich vor allem den spielerischen, liebevollen Umgang mit der leicht spießigen Heimat, mit der man sich nur bedingt assoziiert fühlt, bewundert.

Während ich diesen Abschlusstext für unsere erste Folge von Portofrei schreibe, sitze ich im Flugzeug und Europa zieht unter mir vorbei.

Und wieder einmal muss ich denken, wie glücklich man sich schätzen kann, an dem Zeitpunkt an dem Ort geboren zu sein, von dem ich komme.

Nicht nur habe ich das Glück, aus einer der tollsten Städte der Welt zu kommen, außerdem besitze ich einen Pass, der es mir erlaubt, einen ganzen Kontinent als Zuhause zu betrachten und mir die Türen der Welt öffnet – sodass ich zu den wenigen Privilegierten gehöre, die sich ihre Heimat mehr oder weniger selbst auswählen können.