de-en  Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson - Teil 1c.
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1. Selma Lagerlöf.

Wonderful Journey of the little Nils Holgersson with the Wild Geese.

Part 1c: The checkered cloth.

The boy felt so woozy that he wasn't aware of himself for a long time.

The air howled and rushed at him, the wings flapped next to him, and in the feathers it roared like a huge storm.

Thirteen geese flew around him, all of them beat their wings and gabbled.

It whirred before his eyes and roared in his ears; he didn't know whether they were flying high or low, nor where he being taken to.

However, eventually he regained his senses enough to realise that he needed to find out where the geese were flying to with him.

But this was not easy because he did not know where he should muster the courage to look down.

He was absolutely convinced that he would get completely dizzy at the first attempt. ...

Because of him, they even flew somewhat slower than usual.

But when the boy finally did look down, it deemed to him that he saw a large cloth, which was divided into an incredible number of bigger and smaller squares, spread underneath.

"Where on earth have I come now?" he asked himself.

He didn't see anything but square on square. Some were crossways, others oblong, but everywhere were corners and straight edges. Nothing was round, nothing bent.

"What is that big checkered cloth down there?" the boy said to himself, without expecting an answer from anyone. ...

But the wild geese around him shouted right away: "Fields and meadows! Fields and meadows!" Then the boy understood that the big checkered cloth over which he flew was the level ground of Scania.

And he began to understand why it looked so checkered and colored. First, he recognized the light green squares, those were the rye fields, which had been tilled last fall and had remained green under the snow.

The yellow gray squares were the stubble fields, where crops had grown last summer, the brownish ones were old clover fields and the black ones unused pastures or wasteland, which had not been plowed.

The brown squares with a yellow border were surely the beech forests because the tall trees there growing in the middle of the forest lose their leaves in winter, while the young beech trees on the edge of the forest keep their yellowed leaves until spring.

There were also dark squares with a little gray in the middle. These were the big square built farms with the blackened thatched roofs and the cobbled farm yards.

And then there were squares again, which were green in the middle and had a brown border.

These were the gardens where the lawns were already turning green, while the bushes and the trees which surrounded them still stood in their bare brown bark.

The boy could not help laughing when he saw how checkered everything looked.

But when the wild geese heard him laughing, they shouted censoriously: "Fertile, good ground! Fertile, good ground!" The boy had become serious again. "That you can laugh," he thought, "you, to whom the most terrible of all things that can befall a person has happened." He was serious for a while but soon he had to laugh again.

After he had become accustomed to this kind of travelling, so that he could think of something other than how he was supposed to survive on the back of a goose, he noticed that many flocks of birds were flying in the breezes, all of them heading north.

And there was a shouting and gaggling from wedge to wedge. ...

"Well - you have come over today!" some shouted.

"Yes," replied the geese. "What do you think about spring?" "Not a leaf on the trees and the water is cold in the lakes!" was the answer.

When the geese flew over a place where tame fowl were running about, they shouted, "What is the name of the farm?" Then the cock raised his head, and answered: "The farm is called Kleinfeld, this year as in the previous year!" Most of the houses are probably named after their owners as is customary in Skien, but instead of saying: "This farm belongs to Per Matsson and that to Ole Rasson," the cocks gave them the name which seemed to them to be the most suitable.

When they lived on a poor, small estate or in a cottage, they cried: "This farm is called 'Seedless'!" And to the very poorest they cried: "This farm is called 'Eat little! Eat little'!" The large, rich farms were given splendid names by the cocks, for example: Farm of Happiness, Egg Mountain, or House of Thalers!

But the cocks on the manors were too haughty to imagine something humorous, they only crowed and cried with such strength as though they wanted to be heard all the way to the sun: "This is Dybecks Manor! This year like last year, this year like last year!" And somewhat further stood another who cried: "This is Swaneholm, everybody ought to know!" The boy noticed, that the geese didn't fly in a straight line ahead. They were hovering up and down the whole southern plain, as if they were happy to be in Scania, and as if they wanted to greet every single farm. ...

So they came to a farm where several large and extensive buildings with high chimneys stood surrounded by lots of smaller houses.

"This is the Jodberga sugar factory!" cried the roosters. ... "This is the Jodberga sugar factory!" The boy on the back of the gander flinched. He should have recognized this place. It wasn't far from his parent's house and last year he had been the goose herder there.

However everything looked quite different when it was seen from above.

Ah ah! Whether perhaps the goose girl Åsa and Little-Mats, his pals from last year, were still there? ... And what would they say if they knew that he was flying high over their heads.

Then they lost sight of Jordberga and flew towards Svedala and Skabersee and then back via Börringekloster and Häckeberga. ...

The boy got to see more of Scania in this one day than in all of the rest of his life before.

Whenever the wild geese met domestic geese they were the happiest.

Then they flew very slowly and shouted down: "Now we are going to the high mountains! ... Do come with us! Do come with us!" But the tame geese replied: "It's still winter in the country! You come too early! Turn around again! Turn back again!" The wild geese descended so that they could understand the domestic geese better and called back: "Come with us, then we will teach you how to fly and to swim!" But at that the domestic geese felt insulted and they didn't even answer with a single gaggle.

But the wild geese descended still further down so that they almost touched the ground, and then, fast as lightning, climbed higher as if something had frightened them terribly. ...

"Oj, oj, oj!" they called. "Those aren't geese at all, they are only sheep, they are only sheep!" At that, the geese on the ground got terribly mad and shouted loudly: "If only you would be shot dead! ... All together, all together!" When the boy heard this bickering, he laughed. But then he remembered how much misfortune he caused himself, and he cried. But after a short time, he still laughed again. ...

He had never gone forward so fast, and riding fast and wildly had always been his pleasure.

And of course, he never would have thought that it could be so refreshing up there in the air, and that such a good earthy and resinous smell would rise up there from below.

And he had never imagined how would it be if one were flying high in the air.

It was just as if he were flying far away from his grief and worries and from all the unpleasantness that one could think of. ...
unit 1
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1 Selma Lagerlöf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 2
Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 3
Teil 1c: Das gewürfelte Tuch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 4
Dem Jungen war es so wirr im Kopfe, daß er lange nichts von sich wußte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 6
Dreizehn Gänse flogen um ihn her, alle schlugen mit den Flügeln und schnatterten.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 9
unit 10
Er war fest überzeugt, daß es ihm beim ersten Versuche ganz schwindlig werden würde.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 11
Seinetwegen flogen sie auch etwas langsamer als gewöhnlich.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 13
„Wohin bin ich denn gekommen?“ fragte er sich.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 14
Er sah nichts weiter als Viereck an Viereck.
3 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 15
Die einen waren überzwerch, die andern länglich, aber überall waren Ecken und gerade Ränder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 16
Nichts war rund, nichts gebogen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 18
Aber die Wildgänse um ihn her riefen sogleich: „Äcker und Wiesen!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 20
Und er begann zu verstehen, warum es so gewürfelt und farbig aussah.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 24
Es waren auch dunkle Vierecke da mit etwas Grauem in der Mitte.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 26
Und dann wieder waren Vierecke da, die in der Mitte grün waren und einen braunen Rand hatten.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 28
Der Junge mußte unwillkürlich lachen, als er sah, wie gewürfelt alles aussah.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 29
Aber als die Wildgänse ihn lachen hörten, riefen sie wie strafend: „Fruchtbares, gutes Land!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 30
Fruchtbares, gutes Land!“ Der Junge war schon wieder ernst geworden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 33
Und es war ein Schreien und Schnattern von Schar zu Schar.
6 Translations, 8 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 34
„So – ihr seid heute auch herübergekommen!“ schrieen einige.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 35
„Jawohl,“ antworteten die Gänse.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 44
„Dies ist die Zuckerfabrik von Jordberga!“ riefen die Hähne.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 45
unit 46
Diesen Ort hätte er kennen sollen.
3 Translations, 8 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 48
Aber alles sah eben ganz anders aus, wenn man es von oben aus betrachtete.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 49
Ei ei!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 50
Ob wohl das Gänsemädchen Åsa und Klein-Mats, seine Kameraden vom vorigen Jahre, noch da waren?
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 51
Und was würden sie wohl sagen, wenn sie wüßten, daß er hoch über ihren Köpfen dahinflog!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 54
Wenn die Wildgänse zahme Gänse trafen, waren sie am vergnügtesten.
3 Translations, 8 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 55
ann flogen sie ganz langsam und riefen hinunter: „Jetzt gehts auf die hohen Berge!
5 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 56
Kommt doch mit!
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 57
Kommt doch mit!“ Aber die zahmen Gänse antworteten: „Der Winter ist noch im Land!
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 58
Ihr seid zu zeitig dran!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 59
Kehrt wieder um!
3 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 62
„Oj, oj, oj!“ riefen sie.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 64
Alle miteinander, alle miteinander!“ Als der Junge dies Gezänke hörte, lachte er.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 65
Aber dann erinnerte er sich daran, wie sehr er sich ins Unglück gebracht hatte, und da weinte er.
5 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 66
Aber nach einer kleinen Weile lachte er doch wieder.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 69
Und er hatte sich auch noch nie vorgestellt, wie das wäre, wenn man hoch in der Luft dahinflöge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 24  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 67  1 year, 2 months ago
lollo1a • 3422  translated  unit 49  1 year, 2 months ago
Maria-Helene • 2285  commented on  unit 34  1 year, 2 months ago

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1

Selma Lagerlöf.

Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen.

Teil 1c: Das gewürfelte Tuch.

Dem Jungen war es so wirr im Kopfe, daß er lange nichts von sich wußte.

Die Luft pfiff und sauste ihm entgegen, die Flügel neben ihm bewegten sich, und in den Federn brauste es wie ein ganzer Sturm.

Dreizehn Gänse flogen um ihn her, alle schlugen mit den Flügeln und schnatterten.

Es schwirrte ihm vor den Augen, und es sauste ihm in den Ohren; er wußte nicht, ob sie hoch oder niedrig flogen, noch wohin er mitgenommen wurde.

Schließlich kam er doch wieder so weit zu sich, um sich annähernd klar machen zu können, daß er doch erfahren müsse, wohin die Gänse mit ihm flogen.

Aber dies war nicht so leicht, denn er wußte nicht, wo er den Mut hernehmen sollte, hinunterzusehen.

Er war fest überzeugt, daß es ihm beim ersten Versuche ganz schwindlig werden würde.

Seinetwegen flogen sie auch etwas langsamer als gewöhnlich.

Als der Junge schließlich aber doch hinuntersah, meinte er, unter sich ein großes Tuch ausgebreitet zu sehen, das in eine unglaubliche Menge großer und kleiner Vierecke eingeteilt war.

„Wohin bin ich denn gekommen?“ fragte er sich.

Er sah nichts weiter als Viereck an Viereck. Die einen waren überzwerch, die andern länglich, aber überall waren Ecken und gerade Ränder. Nichts war rund, nichts gebogen.

„Was ist denn das da unten für ein großes gewürfeltes Tuch?“ sagte der Junge vor sich hin, ohne von irgend einer Seite eine Antwort zu erwarten.

Aber die Wildgänse um ihn her riefen sogleich: „Äcker und Wiesen! Äcker und Wiesen!“

Da begriff der Junge, daß das große gewürfelte Tuch, über das er hinflog, der flache Erdboden von Schonen war.

Und er begann zu verstehen, warum es so gewürfelt und farbig aussah. Die hellgrünen Vierecke erkannte er zuerst, das waren die Roggenfelder, die im vorigen Herbst bestellt worden waren und sich unter dem Schnee grün erhalten hatten.

Die gelbgrauen Vierecke waren die Stoppelfelder, wo im vorigen Sommer Frucht gewachsen war, die bräunlichen waren alte Kleeäcker und die schwarzen leere Weideplätze oder ungepflügtes Brachfeld.

Die braunen Vierecke mit einem gelben Rand waren sicherlich die Buchenwälder, denn da sind die großen Bäume, die mitten im Walde wachsen, im Winter entlaubt, während die jungen Buchen am Waldessaum ihre vergilbten Blätter bis zum Frühjahr behalten.

Es waren auch dunkle Vierecke da mit etwas Grauem in der Mitte. Das waren die großen viereckig gebauten Höfe mit den geschwärzten Strohdächern und den gepflasterten Hofplätzen.

Und dann wieder waren Vierecke da, die in der Mitte grün waren und einen braunen Rand hatten.

Das waren die Gärten, wo die Rasenplätze schon grünten, während das Buschwerk und die Bäume, die sie umgaben, noch in der nackten braunen Rinde dastanden.

Der Junge mußte unwillkürlich lachen, als er sah, wie gewürfelt alles aussah.

Aber als die Wildgänse ihn lachen hörten, riefen sie wie strafend: „Fruchtbares, gutes Land! Fruchtbares, gutes Land!“

Der Junge war schon wieder ernst geworden. „Daß du lachen kannst,“ dachte er, „du, dem das Allerschrecklichste widerfahren ist, was einem Menschen begegnen kann.“

Er war eine Weile sehr ernst, aber bald mußte er wieder lachen.

Nachdem er sich an diese Art des Reisens gewöhnt hatte, so daß er wieder an etwas andres denken konnte als daran, wie er sich auf dem Gänserücken erhalten solle, bemerkte er, daß viele Vogelscharen durch die Lüfte dahinflogen, die alle dem Norden zustrebten.

Und es war ein Schreien und Schnattern von Schar zu Schar.

„So – ihr seid heute auch herübergekommen!“ schrieen einige.

„Jawohl,“ antworteten die Gänse. „Was haltet ihr vom Frühling?“

„Noch nicht ein Blatt auf den Bäumen und kaltes Wasser in den Seen!“ erklang die Antwort.

Als die Gänse über einen Ort hinflogen, wo zahmes Federvieh umherlief, riefen sie: „Wie heißt der Hof?“

Da reckte der Hahn den Kopf in die Höhe und antwortete: „Der Hof heißt Kleinfeld, heuer wie im vorigen Jahr, heuer wie im vorigen Jahr!“

Die meisten Häuser hießen wohl nach ihren Besitzern, wie es in Schonen Sitte ist, aber anstatt zu sagen: „Dieser Hof gehört Per Matsson und jener Ole Rasson,“ gaben die Hähne ihnen den Namen, der ihnen selbst am passendsten erschien.

Wenn sie auf einem armen Gütchen oder Kätnerhäuschen wohnten, riefen sie: „Dieser Hof heißt ‚Körnerlos‘!“

Und von den allerärmlichsten schrieen sie: „Dieser Hof heißt ‚Frißwenig! Frißwenig‘!“

Die großen, reichen Bauernhöfe bekamen große Namen von den Hähnen, zum Beispiel: Glückshof, Eierberg oder Talerhaus!

Aber die Hähne auf den Herrenhöfen waren zu hochmütig, sich etwas Scherzhaftes auszudenken, sie krähten nur und riefen mit einer Kraft, als wollten sie bis in die Sonne gehört werden: „Dies ist Dybecks Herrenhof! Heuer wie im vorigen Jahr, heuer wie im vorigen Jahr!“

Und etwas weiterhin stand einer, der rief: „Dies ist Swaneholm, das sollte doch jedermann wissen!“

Der Junge merkte, daß die Gänse nicht in gerader Linie weiter flogen. Sie schwebten über der ganzen südlichen Ebene hin und her, als freuten sie sich, wieder in Schonen zu sein, und als wollten sie jeden einzelnen Hof begrüßen.

So kamen sie auch an einen Hof, wo mehrere große ausgedehnte Gebäude mit hohen Schornsteinen standen und rings umher eine Menge kleinerer Häuser.

„Dies ist die Zuckerfabrik von Jordberga!“ riefen die Hähne. „Dies ist die Zuckerfabrik von Jordberga!“

Der Junge fuhr auf dem Rücken des Gänserichs zusammen. Diesen Ort hätte er kennen sollen. Er lag nicht weit vom Hause seiner Eltern entfernt, und im vorigen Jahre war er dort Gänsehirt gewesen.

Aber alles sah eben ganz anders aus, wenn man es von oben aus betrachtete.

Ei ei! Ob wohl das Gänsemädchen Åsa und Klein-Mats, seine Kameraden vom vorigen Jahre, noch da waren? Und was würden sie wohl sagen, wenn sie wüßten, daß er hoch über ihren Köpfen dahinflog!

Dann verloren sie Jordberga aus dem Gesicht und flogen nach Svedala und Skabersee und wieder zurück über Börringekloster und Häckeberga.

Der Junge bekam an diesem einen Tag mehr von Schonen zu sehen als in allen übrigen seines Lebens vorher.

Wenn die Wildgänse zahme Gänse trafen, waren sie am vergnügtesten.

ann flogen sie ganz langsam und riefen hinunter: „Jetzt gehts auf die hohen Berge! Kommt doch mit! Kommt doch mit!“

Aber die zahmen Gänse antworteten: „Der Winter ist noch im Land! Ihr seid zu zeitig dran! Kehrt wieder um! Kehrt wieder um!“

Die Wildgänse senkten sich nieder, damit die zahmen sie besser verstehen konnten, und riefen zurück: „Kommt mit, dann wollen wir euch Fliegen und Schwimmen lehren!“

Aber da fühlten sich die zahmen Gänse beleidigt, und sie antworteten auch nicht mehr mit einem einzigen Schnattern.

Aber die Wildgänse senkten sich noch tiefer hinunter, so daß sie beinahe die Erde berührten, und dann hoben sie sich blitzschnell in die Höhe, als wenn sie über etwas furchtbar erschrocken wären.

„Oj, oj, oj!“ riefen sie. „Das sind ja gar keine Gänse, es sind nur Schafe, es sind nur Schafe!“

Die Gänse auf der Erde gerieten dadurch ganz außer sich und schrieen laut: „Wenn ihr nur totgeschossen würdet! Alle miteinander, alle miteinander!“

Als der Junge dies Gezänke hörte, lachte er. Aber dann erinnerte er sich daran, wie sehr er sich ins Unglück gebracht hatte, und da weinte er. Aber nach einer kleinen Weile lachte er doch wieder.

Noch nie war er so schnell vorwärts gekommen, und schnell und wild zu reiten, das war von jeher sein Vergnügen gewesen.

Und er hätte natürlich nie gedacht, daß es da droben in der Luft so erfrischend sein könnte, und daß da ein so guter Erd- und Harzgeruch heraufdränge.

Und er hatte sich auch noch nie vorgestellt, wie das wäre, wenn man hoch in der Luft dahinflöge.

Das war ja gerade, als flöge man weit weg von seinem Kummer und seinen Sorgen und von allen Widerwärtigkeiten, die man sich denken konnte.