de-en  Dt. Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.7
Over there in Texas.

The scallywag becomes a pharmacist's apprentice. - in wonderland. - Grass-green thirst for knowledge. - The woman and the love powder. - A nightime bell experience - The scallywag is bored. - The little lane of tiny houses. - Little-Daisy. - The lady, the perfume and the consequences. - The former pharmacist. ... - The former lieutenant from holy Cologne and his advice. - The man with the bright eyes. - Preparations for a mysterious journey.

At a small round table in Gus Meyer's salon sat the editor and publisher of the Brenham Herald writing busily. Next to him stood a little boy in work clothes, bedaubed with printer's ink.
"Hello!" the editor shouted to me. "In three and a half seconds I finished off the governor of Texas." (He continued writing.) "Well. Here sonny! Run! Correction and the last cables you bring me here. Gus, another beer!... And how is Brother-happy-go-lucky from Germany doing?" He was shaking with laughter when I told him why I was in Brenham.
"And what do you want to do?" "I have no idea ..." "Of course you have no idea! he cried laughing, as if this was the best joke in the world. "I wouldn't have either if I were in your place. It would be really too much to ask of Mister Happy-go-lucky that he should - hokuspokus, didn't you see? turn into into a money-earning practical person as soon as he plops on American soil!" " Couldn't you give me some advice, Doctor?" " Hoh! That's the spirit. If you don't know anything yourself, maybe someone else knows something." He laughed, and with laughter and beer drinking he pumped everything out of me that he wanted to know with incredible speed. What's your father's job? Why I actually had left Germany? My family? My relatives? Which schools?
"Everything is right!" he finally smiled. "You would also be too young, to lie consistently and convincingly. ... That's actually a great art! Hm - and now we want to see what all can be done with you in this fine, blossoming Texas town. Aha - oho ... good morning, Mr. Mindus!" " Good day, Doctor," said a gentleman, who had just entered, a giant of respectable size and even more respectable in breadth, a giant in shirt sleeves, but in sleeves of iridescent silk; in flashy patent leather boots, a Panama hat on his head.
"Interesting case, Mr Mindus!" the doctor said. "We have a young German here, the one with the Muchows on their farm - I did tell you about it?" The man with the silken shirt sleeves nodded. ...
"Well, he noticed that he was rather superfluous during the off season time on the farm and left. Question: What is he doing?" "Money?" Mr. Mindus asked laconically.
"Ah where!" "Well, then he must work." "But, best of all, a pharmacist - Mr. Mindus is the owner of the big pharmacy over there, my boy - we know that too. But how and where? I think if a spoiled young person, fresh from school can endure five months of farm work, then he must be of some use." "We will find out about that," said the pharmacist and turned to me. "If you want, then you can work with me at the pharmacy --" I sat there, so amazed and so surprised, that I could scarcely say a word and heard the pharmacist explain to me that for the time being, he "estimated" I was worth fifteen dollars a month plus board to him, and I was to come to the pharmacy in a quarter of an hour. Then Mr Mindus shook the doctor's hand, nodded to me and went. The publisher of the Brenham Herald looked at me, laughing.
"A crazy world! Now, you are an apothecary apprentice back here in Texas!" Half an hour later, I held a mortar between my knees and labored on chalky pellets. I filled small boxes with the crushed chalk. Three drops of violet extract were put in each box. ... This is how powder was produced back here in Texas.

Huge glass spheres filled with poisonous green, delicate pink and screaming yellow aniline-colored water shimmered in the shop window as the symbol of the pharmacy. On giant shelves were the bottles and bottles of the raw materials of the pharmaceutical art; endless rows of patented remedies; of pills and mixtures, sarsaparilla and blood rejuvenators. All manner of goods were stacked up in showcases; brushes, combs, toilet articles, miraculous spot soaps and poker cards, samples of wonderfully growing seeds and guaranteed genuine Monte Carlo roulettes; vases, tokens, dolls. The pharmacy brought a sympathetic understanding to the gentlemen's world with a half dozen thick-bellied whiskey barrels, because whoever placed value on good whiskey, bought his bourbon or his rye at the pharmacy. The soda water fountain, which was operated by Jimmy Hawkins, catered to the ladies.
It was a marvel. Ice containers, carbonation apparatus and dozens of small kegs with all kinds of fruit juices and ingredients were concealed in a pompous nickel case, which filled half the store. Jimmy Hawkins played on this machine as if he were playing a piano; he hit the keys of the mysterious cocks and composed strange beverages. The basis was always a glass of soda water filled up to three quarters, added were fruit juices or liquid chocolate, and the whole thing was crowned with a spoonful Icecream. It was the punch romain of European Cafés, liquefied, translated into American and reduced in price, the soda drink at five cents. The high stools in front of the soda fountain were never empty. Everyday hundreds of women sipped the icy delights. This front part of the store was the sanctum of lovely femininity of the Texas town. Men from the lonely farms gathered further back; smoking, gabbing, chatting, because they not only wanted to buy, but also wanted to be entertained, to hear something from the workings of the town and things from the great world. Still farther back at the sales counters, the pharmacy was huge, the buying Negro masteries assembled. ... And the whole thing was a indescribable muddle!
Brother-happy-go-lucky seemed to be in wonderland.
To be sure, one had to sweep and brush and rinse in this wonderland, dragging crates and grinding boring ointments in boring mortars for a long time. But there were boxes and cupboards and bottles and cans that could be so beautiful to comb through, and mysterious poisons and even more mysterious apparatus, and the continual coming and going of many people. I developed a greedy studiousness, against which no man had any objection; burnt my fingers with sulfuric acid and cured my toothache with so much crystallized cocaine that I almost became very ill. I kept bombarding Mr. Mindus and the head clerk and Jimmy Hawkins with questions that were answered with a pleasant grin at my green as grass thirst for knowledge. Thus, from the peculiar confusion, bit by bit a trusted working knowledge with familiar things gradually developed. It wasn't long at all before the scallywag was selling quinine (which was a staple article) and patent remedies - and after a few weeks, he was allowed to stand next to the clerk's desk at the prescription table when there was much to do and help with the preparation of mixtures! A German pharmacist's hair would have stood on end over this recklessness, but they didn't exactly look at it that way back there in Texas. It was not at all so difficult either. ... The three doctors of the Texas town wrote their prescriptions pretty clearly and legibly, as is the custom in America, and my Latin and my eternal sniffing around and questioning soon became an advantage for me. I was formulating thereafter ... Imagine my pride.
Of course, I also did stupid things, and I'll never forget how delirious the pompous Mr. Mindus got when I sold five bottles of whiskey on credit to Brenham's most notorious crook. And once a young lady came and bashfully asked for:" Love powder, please!" Love powder?... What the heck was love powder?
"What do you mean?" I asked embarrassed. (At that time I was always afraid of not understanding a client and embarrassing myself.) ...
"A love powder - a very small love powder, Sir, but only of the very best quality." She smiled shyly "Thus, a rather good love powder; I need it for a friend." "But ... " Mr. Mindus came over.
"Love powder? Absolutely! I'll have it prepared immediately – we will do our best for you!" And he whispered to me: "Don't act so clumsy!" Give her a very small dose of saccharin! Wrap it neatly in a pink powder paper and charge one and a half dollars – no, two dollars!" When the woman had cheerfully paid and had walked away beaming, the pharmacist gave me some advice: "We have everything and stock everything. This is what you have to keep in mind! ... Ask me, if you don't know yourself. The black goose is of course in love with some guy and wants to find favor by providing him a little love powder. The fact is the gang is so superstitious. If I tell her there is no such thing, she will tell all her friends in Brenham, my pharmacy will be worth nothing and my business will suffer. Therefore, the guy gets his saccharin and it will probably help too. ... Love produces love in return, with or without saccharin, but you don't understand that yet. ... Business is business. Keep that in mind, please. ... You must become much more American, my dear fellow!" And sure enough – after a few days a young woman came into the pharmacy who also acted bashfully and smiled sheepishly as well.
"- A small love powder ..." she requested. "Just like my friend Matilda bought!" It must have helped! In any case, they decided not to be at all exacting down here in Texas. For the first time I was in great despair. ... I slept in a cabinet at the back of the store, together with Jimmy Hawkins, the assistant, a taciturn fellow, who had explained to me from the very beginning: "In the evening, I usually have urgent business in the city, my dear boy. ... Between ourselves. Officially I am here. Should that fat old Mindus come in someday, I've just now gone for a bit of the fresh air because I had a headache. Understood? ... If some fool comes in with a prescription, then he'll wait for me to return. Be nice to me and I am nice to you! Understood." And promptly at eight o'clock, Mr. Jimmy Hawkins regularly disappeared to return at midnight and go to bed without a word.
The bell made a racket once - it was already late night. When I hurried out, a farm wagon stood in front of the door. A man, who was trembling all over and could hardly speak because of anxiety, held out a little child to me. I removed the towels in which the softly groaning, almost unconscious child had been wrapped, and looked in indescribable horror to see that its little feet were hanging from scraps of skin. Raw burns! I would have preferred most of all to howl out of desperation, but something had to take place. So I drenched absorbent cotton in oil, and wrapped the poor little feet in it, more to calm the father than to help the child, whom I however could not help. Quickly, a few drops of California Tokaj wine were infused - then I jumped on the wagon and drove in a rushing gallop to the doctor. He seemed quite content with the harmless little remedy that had come to my mind. Jimmy Hawkins, however, had no more urgent business in Brenham for the next eight days at nighttime!
Weeks and months went by. ... The master pharmacist, Mindus, had given me a pharmaceutical work with a salutary admonitions, which I peered into three times, in order to gently touch it with my fingertips and hide it in the farthest corner of my room. The thing was even much more boring than the Greek grammar! ... Therefore, all night long I read many American newspapers (I still think that was much smarter) and smoked self-rolled Bull Durham cigarettes and refined brewed lemonades and all together, borrowed hundreds of American novels from the three doctors of the town. Then again I sniffed through boxes and drawers. And was very pleased with myself and wrote enthusiastic letters home. But very soon the pharmacy and then the people and the little town became everyday things and Brother Leichtfuß began to get very bored.
The Texas town was indeed simplicity itself. On the huge square in front of the pharmacy, in four rows of streets, the chase for the dollar took place. In the deep sand of these streets people crowded together and horses galloped all day long. A wooden town was connected to the business district, small houses with broad porches and green gardens. The common people lived there, the employees and the craftsmen. A vacant square which cut through the town of wood separated the White district from the shantytown of the African Americans, whom unrelenting custom forced to live together in the same district. On the other side, the streets of mansions stretched far into the flat countryside; the garden city of Brenham's successful residents. Down by the railway station were the storage sheds and the few factory buildings. This was how the town looked, into which the almighty dollar flowed from the farm hinterlands and, well and truly cut, wandered back in the form of goods - the town was the brain that created an enormous circulation of goods from the fruits of a blessed land and confidently reigned over the whole district. A perpetual hustling and bustling in the small town, and actually still the most primitive simplicity of life and people and methods – this is how it appeared to the scallywag, who still had no understanding whatsoever of the fine distinctions.
He was very bored, and he vigorously forced Mr. Jimmy Hawkins to share the evening hours with him. One day you, one day me! And of course, on his expeditions the scallywag found just what he should not have found. ...
Spring had come into the land, after the Texas winter of terrible downpours, cheerful sunshine, freezing northers, and like a youthful fragrance, spread over the small town. The four streets lay alone in the darkness of the evening. A horseman galloped past me - an old man shuffled with heavy steps in front of me - a buggy with ladies clad in white crunched in the sand ... From above, the starry splendor glittered from a deep dark blue sky. Dreaming, I strolled through the town made of wood, through the dim glow from the windows, which the sea of stars overwhelmed, and pictured how it would look now up there at the old Duke's castle or in my brown-paneled room in good old Munich. I passed by the shanties. Everywhere it was quiet. Then I crossed the railroad tracks and found myself in a little alley of the tinniest cottages that one can only imagine, put in the middle of the sand, into which, one sank ankle deep. Half a dozen little houses - tightly packed together, fine and dainty. Out of tiny little windows warm, red light got through firmly closed, red curtains. From everywhere very quiet a litte song sounded - Said the devil: I will be good, boys. Most assuredly I'll be!
But I'd rather not begin just yet, boys - Therefore, deary little darling, come to me!
Very quiet it sounded, sung by some girl and I roared with laughter about the funny devil. A quiet giggling answered.
"Boy - boy o' mine!" a voice whispered.
In the door of the small cottage something white shimmered, aus out of this whiteness a small face with merry eyes appeared and a small hand tugged at my sleeve.
"Whatever do you want here, my boy?" "Me? "Nothing at all!" "That, however is very little! Oh- but I still know you ? Of course, you are the little Dutchy from the pharmacy, aren't you? And is it nice between your ointments and small bottles? Alas, I would like to be with you sometime a whole day long and drink to my heart's delight all these nice, sweet, cold tonics. ... I think I envy you a little bit, my boy!" "I don't really like tonics any more," I answered very embarrassed.... "What on earth are these funny little cottages! And what do you do here?" "Me? My name is Daisy, my boy! Here the steamer came to my mind and Miss Daisy Benett and the wonderful summer nights we spent chatting on the warm Gulf.
"Isn't it a pretty name?" "Very pretty - Daisy!" And the little hand grabbed the scallywag by the ear, and a giggling whisper told him to come in if he wanted to be completely good.
"Seriously?" "Of course!" A narrow staircase went up, past a door with laughter and confusion, and then she scurried, dragging me into a tiny room. There it was snow-white and spotless and everything so strangely small and elegant. Daisy sat down and and was chatting continously about all and everybody in the small town. Many years ago Mr. Mindus had come to Brenham, which then was much smaller, and in the very street, where the pharmacy was right now, he had peddled cough medicine and quinine; standing at the corner, a small box strapped over his shoulders. The rich Mr. Mindus! And who else I did know? The doctor of the newspaper? Alas, he is a good person, but an awfully careless human being who would never get ahead. ...
"How do you know that?" I asked in amazement. ...
"Yes - we know everything!" And men are wicked and boring, and life sucks. She chatted like that for hours and laughed merrily, when I said something quite awkward, then suddenly stared dead ahead (with empty eyes) ... And I was a good little boy, and it was so nice to have the chance for a chat. ... But to me it seemed as though the warmest sunshine that one could only imagine dwelled in her eyes, and it occurred to me that life suddenly became much more beautiful. How fine it was to think back to foolish youth, to your own youth, seeing harsh things still hidden there through a delicate veil of roses. Poor little Daisy ... A shy kiss of farewell in the dark at the door. In this way, the scallywag got to know the girl, and on his way home, fetched exultant dreams from the flickering stars, one nicer than the other; dreams in which sunshine eyes and soft giggling whirled in confusion, as though it were something very big and totally incomprehensible. ... The dreams spun into the bright day.
Now and then, Daisy came into the pharmacy to nibble the splendors of the fountain, gleefully winking over to me; now and then, there was laughter and chatting in the tiny little house - always after heavy struggles with Mr. Jimmy Hawkins, who was greatly displeased that he too should first of all savor the beauty of the quiet domestic evening hours.
And then - - It was late in the evening, when softly, very quietly the night bell was ringing. ... With great agitation, I ran out of my room, startled, and ran to the door. ... There stood a certain little Daisy!
"Oh, Mr. Pharmacist," she said with a voice half choking with laughter," I would like a sleeping powder!" "You–you!" The moon, which twinkled a little through the display window between the green and red glass spheres, saw a great many goings-on in the respectable pharmacy. Two truly silly fools were together, two very naughty children who danced along between the counters and drank unpaid for lemonade. The one silly fool was awfully curious, and the other vain and pompous like a peacock, so it seemed to me when I showed the girl my own treasures and for an hour long was a genuine autocrat in the wonderland of the pharmacy. Little Daisy drank six lemonades with ice, I believe, looked aghast at the glass jar with a sticky brown lump of opium, which I confided to her could poison half the little Texas town, and stuck her little nose in all the cabinets. A giggle and a whisper! If it was a coincidence or it was an especially wicked little devil at the moment, this made me think of perfumes – I took a perfume bottle from the rack and sprayed the laughing girl with a shower of perfume of violets – "Sweet– simply sweet, you good boy!" Daisy exulted. "Give it here!" And at the same moment she had already snatched the golden labelled vial from me and was rotating it back and forth in her hands, trying it out over and over.
Then – a sharp metallic snap – a sudden flash of electrical light – and red and imposing, neat as always, Mr. Pharmacist himself, Mr. Mindus, stood in the door. He slowly shook his huge head from one side to the other and gazed at the mess with keen eyes.
"It's lovely! Good evening! !" he blurted out at last.
"Good evening," said Daisy politely. But I stood there, frozen like Lot's wife.
"Did you want to buy perfume so late, my lady?" asked Mr. Mindus icily.
"Oh, no, I just smelled a little," she smiled.
"And even my best French violet, too! It is unheard of..." I could have been beaten to death, but I had not produced a single word. I simply shuddered. An idea seemed to dawn on Daisy too, that the situation was devoid of all comfort.
"I think I could probably go now," she said. ...
"Do you really think so, miss?" grumbled the pharmacist. "Well, as you say. However, I would like to talk to my employee in private!" "Good evening," said little Daisy, looking at me regretfully and hopping out. In the doorway she turned around again: "It was all just in fun." "All right, my lady," was Mr. Mindus's icy cool reply. "And now," directed at me, "we want to talk seriously, if you please. This store is a pharmacy, if you do not know it yet. My patience is finished - out, to the end: You are fired!" I looked at him blankly.
"Dismissed on the spot! You are an airhead. What do you know about the girl, hey? What if she now had stolen any poison and would have caused the biggest calamity with it, hey? I do not want to ignore the moral side of the matter, although - you are nineteen, are not you? It's simply unbelievable!" "But-" "You're an air-head. I've been observing you for a long time. Well, you were diligent and more than willing, but you have no idea what an employee actually is. You sell without asking - and I bet a hundred times, no, a thousand times you sold things too cheaply because you did not want to ask for a long time. If you now put girls in your head too, I won't have another quiet moment. So now go to bed. Tomorrow we will see further. It - is - indeed - incredible!" Mr. Jimmy Hawkins came home.
"Hello! Mr. Mindus was here just now." "The old man!" cried Mr. Jimmy, horrified. "Great Caesar, did you tell him that I had a terrible headache, and only a little -" "I told him the tragedy, and the unfeeling man almost laughed himself to death. To me the mood was not at all laughable.
"And now you listen for once!" I said. "I only got my salary yesterday and I've been fired as well. I don't have the slightest desire to walk out tomorrow morning when the store is packed and have them laughing at me. Do you want to help me carry my trunk over to Gus Meyer's? I will be finished packing in half an hour." Yes, he would help.
In the back parlor at Gus Meyer's, my friend Starkenbach reigned, half landlord and half waiter, with whom I now and then had drunk a glass of beer in the late evening hours and by the way had learned a lot about American things. In devout Cologne, he had been a lieutenant and had taken off his military uniform for the sake of a girl. The mother-in-law, a widowed employer in the hops business, disapproved and pestered the husband and former lieutenant to be a traveling hops salesman; she sent him to Holland, here and there, and incessantly complained about his dreadful expense reports. ... A big squabble prevailed, until one fine day the light-hearted young couple had gone to America. Starkenbach knew every state and every major city in the United States. ... It had gone bitterly for him, but he remained amusing, he and his little woman, who, to my horror, always called me Bubi. In the small Texas town, slowly but surely he saved up a fortune as Gus Meyer's right-hand man.
He looked puzzled as I dragged the suitcase inside. And I spoke of the girl and the pharmacist, and he took his wife out of the kitchen, and together they laughed like mad.
Then Starkenbach became serious: "But now let's think about it. A great many people in Brenham would probably give you work, but only because you are a dirt cheap worker, and only under the condition that you are content with a few dollars a month. This isn't for you. You could remain here for another two years and not get a step further. No, I would advise you to go to a big city and to stand for once completely on own two feet. You've been here almost nine months, know something about American life - a little! - and speak good English. You've learned to work. That at least has benefited you. You are thus not so helpless anymore as you were at first. I would definitely not stay in Brenham if I were you. For God's sake don't remain seated in a small nest in this country! In big cities, life is pulsating." "Hunger lives in big cities!" His wife smiled sadly.
"Hunger lives everywhere. You must work with your hands here; there - in a big city -perhaps you can work with your head. You see, you learn, you have opportunities. Yes indeed, I advise you to get out of Brenham as fast as you can!" "And where to?" I ask, already half convinced, no, already almost enthusiastic.
"Somewhere. Chicago, Kansas City, St Louis - let's say St Louis. It's the closest, not even a thousand miles away. After Chicago, the quietest town in the mid-west. And when you're there, then just simply talk! Run from one skyscraper to the next, demand to talk only to the proprietor in each office, tell the people who you are and what you can do. Talk! People can take an interest in you if you only want to, for you have learned something and have good manners. Talk! People will give you advice, if only to get rid of you; people will send you hither and tither. Something will turn up!" "I'll do it!" I cried. A vision of an enormous city popped up in my head - hurrying people - scurrying life - thousands of options ... "You are right! How much does the trip cost?" "How much money do you have?" "Twenty dollars." "No where near enough," murmured Starkenbach. "Well, but it can be done, and it can also be done in another way. Billy!" The solitary guest slowly got up and stepped up to us at the the bar. From his clear-cut American face penetrating grey blue eyes blazed; so clear, so abysmally deep that one instinctively had to look into these eyes again and again. He wore a dark blue suit, soft blue flannel shirt, his cap pushed far back into his neck.
Starkenbach now spoke English. "Well, Billy, what is the cheapest way to St. Louis?" The gray eyes smiled: "You know that as well as me!" "Yeah, if it were me who wanted to go to St. Louis, it would be easy enough!" "Oh, I heard what it is about; I understand that much German. The journey is really quite simple for your German friend - across Texas via Dallas, Oklahoma Territory, Arkansas, Missouri via the Frisco lines. Santa Fé and Frisco lines. Almost straight up to the north." And this man called that simple!
"You are going to the north, Billy?" Starkenbach asked.
"Till Dallas. With the two o'clock night express, that is in two hours. How boring you are, Starkenbach, and how you beat around the bush! ... Why don't you say right away that I am to help your German friend? He looks as if he had guts, and if you wish I'll gladly take him along a piece. ... Naturally, he has no prospects here." He turned to me. ... I will show you the way to St. Louis. It is one of my peculiarities to travel a lot and never to waste my money on tickets and stuff like that. ... My kind of traveling is very interesting but somewhat goes against the generally accepted ideas, perhaps even against certain laws." "What then is your manner of traveling?" I asked curiously.
"You will find out soon enough!" muttered Starkenbach.
"Fine," smiled the gray eyes. "We still have an hour and a half. Your luggage must be left here; Starkenbach can forward it to you. The dark grey suit you are wearing, is very suitable. Put on a cap as well. The white linen doesn't go. Put on a flannel shirt. ... Take several handkerchiefs, some stockings (you can store them in your back pocket) a pocket comb, a pocket brush, a razor, a pocket knife, soap (Starkenbach will give you a piece of oiled paper), strong leather gloves, if you have some, a watch, but without a chain, a pipe and tobacco, of course, matches. ... Do you have a warm silk scarf? Take it with you. Do you have a revolver? Yes? Leave it here, please. Is only dangerous. Hm, and solid boots. That's all!" Then, he began to chat with the young woman as if the matter had been finished. ... Starkenbach pulled me into a small room next door, where he kept all sorts of bits and pieces.
"So, you can get changed here!" he said. ...
I was dumbfounded- I nearly felt something like fear, at least a discomfort. Stronger than anything else, however, was bottomless curiosity to me.
"Dude - who is this Billy? How does he travel? How should I get to St. Louis? And my suitcase?" " It remains here until you write to me. Billy is a gentleman to the core. A decent man. An interesting man. I have known him for many years and have travelled thousands of miles with him. Ho, you will be amazed. I cannot tell you everything in detail, but there are ways in this country to use a railway train without paying for it. Billy travels year in year out, from state to state, from city to city. What his name is, I don't know myself - he just wants to be called Billy. Speaks brilliant English as you rarely find it here and is highly educated. What is his real profession, I don't know either. When we had no money, it was in Denver, he wrote a few articles for a local newspaper there and was magnificently paid for them. I have seen him working as a precision mechanic and electrician. His malady is the wanderlust and sometimes I wish - oh well. Lordy, what the times were back then! A short while ago, he told me he just wanted to quickly go to Arizona for a bit - a few thousand miles! - because in early summer, the contrast between the cactus covered sand and gray rocky background was so colorful and attractive. ... Billy's like that! Now, you will be surprised! But you'll certainly get to St. Louis through him!" As in a dream, I packed in and out and changed my clothes; as in a dream, I put my bread and butter in my pockets ... "It's time!" said the man with the shining eyes shortly. ... "I wouldn't like to miss the train. Bye -bye, Starkenbach!" "I wish - I would like to wish sometimes ..." he sighed. ...
"Don't wish for any nonsense!" said Billy sharply. Thank the seven heavens for your settledness!" And then we went out into the darkness
unit 1
Da hinten in Texas.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 2
Der Lausbub wird Apothekerlehrling.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 3
– Im Wunderland.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 4
– Grasgrüner Wissensdurst.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 5
– Die Frau und das Liebespulver.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 6
– Ein Nachtklingel-Erlebnis.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 7
– Der Lausbub langweilt sich.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 8
– Das Gäßchen der winzigen Häuschen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 9
– Klein-Daisy.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 10
– Die Dame, das Parfüm und die Folgen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 11
– Ex-Apotheker.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 12
– Der frühere Leutnant aus dem heiligen Köln und sein Rat.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 13
– Der Mann mit den leuchtenden Augen.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 14
– Vorbereitungen zu einer geheimnisvollen Reise.
1 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 16
Neben ihm stand ein kleiner Junge in Arbeitskleidern, mit Druckerschwärze beschmiert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 17
»Hello!« rief mir der Redakteur entgegen.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 18
unit 19
»So.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 20
Hier, mein Söhnchen!
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 21
Lauf!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 22
Korrektur und letzte Depeschen bringst du mir hierher.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 23
Gus, noch 'n Bier!
3 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 26
»Ich hätte auch keine an Ihrer Stelle.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 29
So ist's recht.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 31
Was mein Vater sei?
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 32
Weshalb ich eigentlich Deutschland verlassen hätte?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 33
Meine Familie?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 34
Meine Verwandten?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 35
Welche Schulen?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 36
»Stimmt alles!« schmunzelte er endlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 37
»Sie wären auch viel zu jung, um konsequent und überzeugend zu lügen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 38
Das ist nämlich eine große Kunst!
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 41
»Interessanter Fall, Herr Mindus!« sagte der Doktor.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 43
»Nun, er hat gemerkt, daß er in der stillen Farmzeit ziemlich überflüssig war und ist gegangen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 44
Frage: Was fängt er an?« »Geld?« fragte Mr. Mindus lakonisch.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 46
Aber wie und wo?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 49
Dann schüttelte Mr. Mindus dem Doktor die Hand, nickte mir zu und ging fort.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 50
Der Verleger des Brenham Herald sah mich lachend an.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 51
»Eine verrückte Welt!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 53
Die zerstampfte Kreide füllte ich in kleine Schachteln.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 54
In jede Schachtel kamen drei Tropfen Veilchenextrakt.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 55
So fabrizierte man hier hinten in Texas Puder.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 60
Für die Damenwelt sorgte die Sodawasser-Fontäne, die Jimmy Hawkins bediente.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 61
Sie war ein Wunderwerk.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 66
Die hohen Stühle vor der Soda Fountain wurden niemals leer.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 67
Hunderte von Damen schlürften alltäglich die eiskalten Herrlichkeiten.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 68
Dieser vordere Teil des Ladens war das Sanktum der holden Weiblichkeit des Texasstädtchens.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 71
Und das Ganze war ein unbeschreiblicher Wirrwarr!
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 72
Bruder Leichtfuß schien es, als sei er im Wunderland.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 77
unit 80
Es war auch gar nicht so schwer.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 82
Ich rezeptierte darauf los … Man stelle sich meinen Stolz vor!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 84
Und einmal kam eine junge Frau und verlangte verschämt: »Love powder, please!« Liebespulver?
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 85
Was beim Kuckuck war Liebespulver?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 86
»Wie meinen Sie?« fragte ich verlegen.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 87
(Ich hatte damals eine ewige Angst, einen Kunden mißzuverstehen und mich zu blamieren.)
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 90
»Liebespulver?
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 91
Jawohl!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 93
Geben Sie ihr eine ganz kleine Dosis Saccharin!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 95
Das merken Sie sich gefälligst!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 96
Fragen Sie mich, wenn Sie selbst nicht Bescheid wissen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 98
Die Bande ist nun einmal so abergläubisch.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 100
Ergo bekommt der Kerl sein Saccharin und wahrscheinlich wird's auch helfen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 101
Liebe erzeugt Gegenliebe, mit oder ohne Saccharin, aber das verstehen Sie noch nicht.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 102
Geschäft ist Geschäft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 103
Das merken Sie sich, bitte.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 105
»– kleines Liebespülverchen …« bat sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 106
»So, wie mein' Freundin Matilda gekauft hat!« Es mußte also geholfen haben!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 107
Jedenfalls nahm man es entschieden gar nicht genau hier hinten in Texas.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 108
Einmal in der ersten Zeit war ich in heller Verzweiflung.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 110
Unter uns gesagt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 111
Offiziell bin ich hier.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 113
Sabé?
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 114
Kommt irgendein Narr mit einem Rezept, so soll er warten, bis ich wieder da bin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 115
Seien Sie nett zu mir und ich bin nett zu Ihnen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 117
Da machte einmal – es war schon spät Nacht – die Klingel einen Heidenlärm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 118
Als ich hinaus eilte, stand ein Farmwagen vor der Türe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 121
Rohe Brandwunden!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 122
Ich hätte am liebsten geheult vor Ratlosigkeit, aber irgend etwas mußte geschehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 126
Wochen und Monate vergingen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 128
Das Ding war noch viel langweiliger als die griechische Grammatik!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 130
Dann wieder durchschnüffelte ich Kasten und Schubladen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 131
Und war sehr zufrieden mit mir selbst und schrieb begeisterte Briefe nach Hause.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 133
Die Texasstadt war ja die Einfachheit selbst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 135
unit 137
Dort wohnten die kleinen Leute, die Angestellten und die Handwerker.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 140
Unten beim Bahnhof lagen die Warenschuppen und die wenigen Fabrikgebäude.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 144
Einen Tag du, einen Tag ich!
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 147
Die vier Straßen lagen einsam im Abenddunkel da.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 150
An Buden kam ich vorbei.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 151
Überall war es still.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 153
Ein halbes Dutzend Häuschen – eng zusammengedrückt, fein und zierlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 154
Aus winzigen Fensterchen drang durch festgeschlossene rote Vorhänge warmes rotes Licht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 156
But I'd rather not begin just yet, boys – Therefore, deary little darling, come to me!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 158
Ein leises Kichern antwortete.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 159
»Boy – boy o' mine!« flüsterte eine Stimme.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 161
»Was willst denn du hier, my boy?« »Ich?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 162
Gar nichts!« »Das ist aber wenig!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 163
Oh – ich kenn' dich aber doch?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 164
Freilich, du bist ja der kleine Dutchy von der Apotheke!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 165
Und ist es denn hübsch zwischen deinen Salben und Fläschchen?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 168
»Was sind das nur für komische kleine Häuschen!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 169
Und was tust du denn hier?« »Ich?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 173
Da war es blütenweiß und blitzsauber und alles so sonderbar klein und zierlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 174
Daisy setzte sich hin und plauderte unaufhörlich, über alle und jeden im Städtchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 176
Der reiche Mr. Mindus!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 177
Und wen ich denn noch kenne?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 178
Den Doktor von der Zeitung?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 180
»Woher weißt du denn das?« fragte ich erstaunt.
5 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 181
unit 183
Und ich sei ein guter kleiner Junge, und es sei so nett, wieder einmal zu plaudern.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 186
Arme kleine Daisy … Ein schüchterner Kuß im Dunkeln bei der Türe zum Abschied.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 188
In den hellen Tag hinein spannen sich die Träume.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 190
Und dann – – Spät abends war es, als leise, ganz leise die Nachtklingel anschlug.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 191
Mit großem Gepolter fuhr ich erschrocken aus meinem Zimmerchen hervor und rannte zur Türe.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 192
Da stand eine gewisse kleine Daisy!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 197
Ein Gekicher und ein Geflüster!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 202
»Is' ja reizend!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 203
Guten Abend!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 204
!« sprudelte er endlich hervor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 205
»Guten Abend!« sagte Daisy höflich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 206
Ich aber stand da, erstarrt wie weiland Frau Lot.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 207
»Wollten Sie sich so spät noch Parfüm kaufen, mein Fräulein?« fragte Mr. Mindus eisig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 208
»Ach nein, ich hab' nur ein bißchen gerochen,« lächelte sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 209
»Und mein bestes französisches Violet auch noch!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 211
Mir grauste einfach.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 212
Auch in Daisy schien eine Ahnung aufzudämmern, daß die Situation aller Gemütlichkeit entbehre.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 213
»Ich glaub', ich könnte jetzt eigentlich gehen,« sagte sie.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 214
»Meinen Sie wirklich, mein Fräulein?« brummte der Apotheker.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 215
»Nun, wie Sie meinen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 218
»Und nun,« zu mir gewandt, »wollen wir uns ernsthaft unterhalten, wenn es Ihnen gefällig ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 219
Dieser Laden ist eine Apotheke, wenn Sie es noch nicht wissen sollten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 220
Meine Geduld ist finished, – aus, zu Ende: Sie sind entlassen!« Ich sah ihn verständnislos an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 221
»Auf der Stelle entlassen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 222
Sie sind ein Luftibus.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 223
Was wissen Sie von dem Mädel, heh?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 224
Wenn sie nun irgend ein Gift gestohlen und das größte Unglück damit angerichtet hätte, heh?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 226
Es ist doch unglaublich!« »Aber –« »Sie sind ein Luftibus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 227
Ich habe Sie schon längst beobachtet.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 230
Wenn Sie sich jetzt auch noch Mädels in den Kopf setzen, hab' ich keinen ruhigen Moment mehr.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 231
So, nun gehen Sie ins Bett.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 232
Morgen werden wir weiter sehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 233
Es – ist – doch – unglaublich!« Mr. Jimmy Hawkins kam nach Hause.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 234
»Hello!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 235
Mr. Mindus war soeben da.« »Der Alte!« schrie Mr. Jimmy entsetzt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 237
Mir war gar nicht lächerlich zumute.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 238
»Und nun hören Sie einmal!« sagte ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 239
»Mein Gehalt hab' ich erst gestern bekommen und entlassen bin ich auch.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 241
Wollen Sie mir helfen, meinen Koffer zu Gus Meyer hinüberzutragen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 242
Mit dem Packen bin ich in einer halben Stunde fertig.« Jawohl, das wollte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 244
unit 247
Starkenbach kannte jeden Staat und jede größere Stadt der Vereinigten Staaten.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 249
unit 250
Er machte ein verdutztes Gesicht, als ich den Koffer hineinschleppte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 252
Dann wurde Starkenbach ernst: »Aber nun wollen wir doch einmal überlegen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 254
Das ist nichts für Sie.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 255
Sie könnten noch zwei Jahre hierbleiben und um keinen Schritt weiterkommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 257
Sie sind fast neun Monate hier, wissen etwas vom amerikanischen Leben – ein wenig!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 258
– und sprechen gut Englisch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 259
Sie haben arbeiten gelernt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 260
Das wenigstens haben Sie profitiert.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 261
Sie sind also nicht mehr so hilflos wie zuerst.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 262
Ich würde entschieden nicht in Brenham bleiben an Ihrer Stelle.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 263
Um Gottes willen nicht in einem kleinen Nest sitzen bleiben in diesem Land!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 265
»Der Hunger wohnt überall.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 267
Sie sehen, Sie lernen, Sie haben Gelegenheiten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 269
»Irgendwohin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 270
Chicago, Kansas City, St. Louis – sagen wir St. Louis.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 271
Es ist am nächsten, keine tausend Meilen weit weg.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 272
Die rührigste Stadt des Mittelwestens, nach Chicago.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 273
Und wenn Sie dort sind, dann reden Sie einfach!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 275
Reden Sie!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 277
Reden Sie!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 279
Es wird sich etwas finden!« »Ich tu's!« rief ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 282
»Hm, man kann das aber so machen, und man kann es auch anders machen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 283
Billy!« Der einsame Gast stand langsam auf und trat zu uns an die Bar.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 286
Starkenbach sprach nun englisch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 289
Santa Fé und Frisco Linien.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 290
Schnurgerade fast nach Norden.« Und das nannte dieser Mann einfach!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 291
»Sie gehen nach Norden, Billy?« fragte Starkenbach.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 292
»Bis Dallas.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 293
Mit dem 2 Uhr Nacht-Expreß, also in zwei Stunden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 294
Wie langweilig Sie doch sind, Starkenbach, und wie Sie auf dem Busch herumklopfen!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 295
Weshalb sagen Sie es nicht gleich, daß ich Ihrem deutschen Freund helfen soll?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 297
Natürlich hat er hier keine Aussichten.« Er wandte sich zu mir.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 298
»Ich will Ihnen den Weg nach St. Louis zeigen.
5 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 301
»Das werden Sie schon sehen!« brummte Starkenbach.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 302
»Schön,« lächelten die grauen Augen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 303
»Wir haben noch anderthalb Stunden Zeit.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 304
Ihr Gepäck müssen Sie hier lassen; Starkenbach kann es Ihnen ja nachschicken.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 305
Der dunkelgraue Anzug, den Sie anhaben, geht sehr gut.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 306
Setzen Sie eine Mütze auf dazu.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 307
Die weiße Wäsche geht nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 308
Ziehen Sie ein Flanellhemd an.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 310
Haben Sie ein warmes seidenes Halstuch?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 311
Nehmen Sie's mit.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 312
Haben Sie einen Revolver?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 313
Ja?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 314
Den lassen Sie, bitte, hier.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 315
Ist nur gefährlich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 316
Hm, und feste Stiefel.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 317
unit 318
Starkenbach zog mich in ein Nebenzimmerchen, in dem er allerlei Krimskrams aufbewahrte.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 319
»So, hier können Sie sich umziehen!« sagte er.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 320
unit 321
Stärker aber als alles in mir war bodenlose Neugierde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 322
»Mann – wer ist dieser Billy?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 323
Wie reist er?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 324
Wie soll ich denn nach St. Louis kommen?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 325
Und mein Koffer?« »Bleibt hier, bis Sie mir schreiben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 326
Billy ist ein Gentleman bis in die Knochen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 327
Anständiger Mensch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 328
Interessanter Mensch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 329
Ich kenn' ihn seit vielen Jahren und bin Tausende von Meilen mit ihm gefahren.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 330
Ho, Sie werden sich wundern!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 332
Billy fährt jahraus, jahrein von Staat zu Staat, von Stadt zu Stadt.
5 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 333
Wie er heißt, weiß ich selbst nicht – er will nur Billy genannt werden.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 334
Spricht glänzendes Englisch, wie man's hierzulande selten findet und ist hochgebildet.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 335
Was sein eigentlicher Beruf ist, weiß ich auch nicht.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 337
Ich hab' ihn als Feinmechaniker arbeiten sehen und als Elektriker.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 338
Seine Krankheit ist der Wandertrieb und manchmal wünsche ich – – na ja.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 339
Herrgott, was waren das für Zeiten damals!
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 340
unit 342
So ist Billy!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 343
Nun, Sie werden sich wundern!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 345
»Möchte den Zug nicht versäumen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 346
unit 347
»Wünschen Sie sich keinen Unsinn!« sagte Billy scharf.
5 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 348
Merlin57 • 3754  commented on  unit 338  1 year, 2 months ago
DrWho • 8447  commented on  unit 331  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 272  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 280  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 313  1 year, 2 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 277  1 year, 2 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 275  1 year, 2 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 234  1 year, 2 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 121  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 45  1 year, 2 months ago
lollo1a • 3421  translated  unit 113  1 year, 2 months ago
lollo1a • 3421  translated  unit 91  1 year, 2 months ago