de-en  Selma Lagerlöf: Nils Holgersson - Teil 1b. Easy
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf.

Wonderful Journey of the little Nils Holgersson with the Wild Geese.

Part 1b: The wild geese.

The boy definitely did not want to believe that he had been turned into a tomte.

"It was certainly only a dream and my imagination," he thought.

"If I wait for a few moments, I will certainly be a man again." He stood in front of the mirror and closed his eyes. After only a few minutes, he opened them again, expecting now that the spell would be over.

But this was not the case, he still was as small as before.

His white flaxen hair, the freckles on his nose, the patches on his leather pants and the hole in the stocking, everything was as before, only very very small.

No, nothing was going to change, regardless of how long he stood there and waited. He had to try something else.

Oh, certainly the best thing he could do, would be to find the tomte and make up with him.

He jumped down to the floor and started searching. He peeped behind the chairs and cupboards, under the sofa and behind the stove.

He even crawled into a few mouse holes, but the tomte was not to be found. ...

While he searched, he wept and begged and promised to do anything and everything.

Never, never again would he break his word, never, never again be naughty, and never again fall asleep during a sermon!

If he could only regain his human form, he would most certainly become an excellent, obedient, well behaved boy. ...

But whatever he promised, it was to no avail.

Suddenly he remembered having heard his mother say that the tomte people liked to tarry in the cowshed, and he quickly decided to have a look in there too, to see if the tomte was to be found there. ...

Luckily the door stood open; for he could not have opened the lock on his own, and so he was able to slip out without problem.

When he came into the hallway, he looked around for his clogs, because in the room, of course he wore stockings.

He wondered how he would manage with the large, heavy clogs, but in this moment, he discovered a pair of tiny shoes on the doorstep.

When he saw that the tomte had been careful enough to transform his clogs as well, he became more afraid. ...

"This misery is apparently supposed to last for a long time," he thought.

On the old oaken board that was lying in front of the front door, a sparrow was hopping back and forth.

Scarcely had it seen the boy, than it cried out: "Look there, Nils, the gooseherder! Look at the little thumbling! Look at Nils Holgersson the thumbling!" Immediately the geese and the chickens turned to the boy and there was a terrible shrieking: "Cock-a-doodle-doo!" The rooster crowed.

"That serves him right! Cock-a-doodle-doo! He pulled my comb!" "Ga, ga, ga, gag, that serves him right!" the hens cried and carried on without ceasing.

The geese gathered themselves into a crowd, put their heads together and asked, "Who did this? "Who did that to him?" But the strange thing was that the boy understood what they said.

He was so amazed by it, that he remained on the doorstep and listened.

"That's certainly because I am transformed into a tomte," he said, "that's why I understand animal language." It was unbearable to him that the chickens did not want to stop at all with their eternal "That serves him right."

He threw a stone at them and cried: "Shut your trap, you bunch of rabble!" But he had forgotten one thing. He was no longer so big that the hens would have been afraid of him.

The whole flock of chickens bore down on him, planted itself around him and cried: "Ga, ga, ga gag! It serves you right! Gack-ack-ack ackack-ack! It serves you right!" The boy tried to escape from them; but the hens chased him and cried so loud, that he almost became deaf and blind.

He would hardly have been able to get away from them if the house cat had not turned up.

As soon as the hens saw the cat, they were silent and seemed to think on nothing else than scratching in the earth for worms.

The boy ran quickly toward the cat.

"Dear pussy," he said, "you know all the corners and hidey-holes here in the yard, don't you? Be nice and tell me where I can find the tomte." The cat did not answer him immediately. She sat down, lay her tail gently and carefully in a ring around her front paws and looked at the boy.

It was a big black cat with a white patch on its chest.

Its coat was smooth and shone in the sunlight. The cat had pulled in her claws, her eyes were uniformly gray with only a small narrow slit in the middle. The cat looked like a really good-natured animal. ...

"I certainly know where the tomte lives," she said in a friendly voice. "But that is not to say that I will tell you where." "Dear, dear Kitty, you have to help me," said the boy. "Don't you see that he has cast a spell on me?" The cat opened her eyes just a little bit, so that her green malice showed.

She curred and purred with pleasure before answering.

"Am I supposed to perhaps help you now because you have pulled me by the tail so often?" she said finally.

At that the boy became angry; he fully forgot how small and powerless he was now.

"I can pull your tail again, I will," he said and sprang towards the cat.

But at this very moment, the cat seemed to have become a different animal which the boy could hardly regard as the same animal. ...

She had arched her back – her legs had become longer, she scratched the back of her neck with her claws, her tail was short and thick, her ears lay back, her mouth hissed, and her eyes were wide open and glittered in a red glow.

The boy wouldn't let himself be frightened by a cat and took another step closer.

But then the cat pounced, came straight at the boy, knocked him over and puts its front paws onto his chest, mouth wide open. ....

The boy could feel the cat's claws penetrating through vest and shirt into his skin and her sharp canine teeth on his neck.

Then he began to scream for help with all his might.

But nobody came, and he was sure that it was all over with him.

Then he felt the cat pulling her claws in and letting go of his neck.

"Right," she said, "I will leave it at that now. This time, a scare is all you get but only because I like your good mother so much.

I just wanted you to know which one of us is the stronger." And with that, the cat went on her way, looking as gentle and docile as she was when she came.

The boy was so ashamed, that he couldn't say anything; thereupon he ran quickly into the cowshed to look for the tomte.

There were only three cows in the barn. But as the boy came in, they began to bellow and make such a row, that one could have thought that there were at least thirty of them.

"Moo, moo, moo!" bellowed Majros. "It is good indeed that there is still justice in the world." "Moo, moo, moo!" all three bellowed at once. The boy could not understand what they were saying, they were all screaming so wildly at the same time. ....

He wanted to ask about the tomte, but he could not make himself heard because the cows were in a complete uproar.

They behaved just as if a strange dog had been brought in among them, kicking with their hind feet, rattling their neck chains, turning their heads back and jabbing with their horns. ...

"Just come here!" said Majros. "Then I'll give you a butt which you will not forget for a long time." "Come here!" said Gull-Lilja. "Then I'll let you ride on my horns." "Come on, come, then you shall learn how I liked it when you threw your wooden shoe at my back, which you always did!" said Stern.

"Yes, just come over here, then I will make you pay for the wasps, you put in my ear!" cried Gull-Lilja.

Majros was the oldest and cleverest of the three, and she was the most irate.

"Just come here," she said, "so that I can pay you back for the many times when you pulled the milking stool away from under your mother, as well as for every time you put a foot out to trip her when she came in with the milking stool, and for all the tears she cried in here over you." The boy wanted to tell them how very much he regretted his bad behaviour and that he would always be good from now on if they would just tell him where the tomte could be found. ...

But the cows did not listen to him at all; they bellowed so loudly that he was afraid one of them might eventually break loose, and so he thought it best to slip out of the cowshed.

As the boy came back into the yard, he was quite despondent.

He realized that nobody on the whole farm wanted to help him search for the tomte.

And the tomte, even if he found it, would probably not help him much.

He crept onto the wide stone wall which enclosed the whole property and which was overgrown with hawthorn and blackberries.

There he sat down and considered what would happen to him, should he not get his human form back again.

When Father and Mother came back from church, they would be really baffled.

Yes, the whole country would be baffled, and people would come from Ost-Vemmenhög and from Torp and Skurup, yes, the whole Vemmenhög area would come here to have a look at him.

And who knows, maybe his parents would even take him with them to show him at the markets.

Ah, it was too terrible even to think about! In the end, it would still be the best for him if just no one would get to see him anymore.

Ah, how unhappy he was! In the whole world there had surely never been anyone as unhappy as he was.

He was no longer human, but a bewitched dwarf.

He slowly began to understand, what it would mean not to be a human anymore.

Now he was cut off from everything; he could not play with other boys anymore, he could never take over his parent's small farm, and it was completely out of the question that a girl would ever choose to marry him. ...

He looked at his home. It was a small farmhouse painted white that with its high, steep thatched roof looked like it was pressed into the earth.

The farm buildings were also small and the fields so tiny that a horse could barely turn around in them. But as small and poor the whole thing was, it was also much too good for him. ....

He could not ask for a better place to live in than a hole under the barn floor. ...

The weather was beautiful, all around him brooklets were murmuring, buds were appearing and birds chirping. ... But his heart was heavy.

He would never be able to enjoy anything again. He thought he had never seen the sky so dark blue as on this day.

Migratory birds came flying along. Coming from abroad, they had headed across the Baltic Sea to Smygehuk and were now on the way north.

There were birds of all different kinds; but he only recognized the wild geese, who flew in two long wedge-shaped arrays.

Thus, several flocks of wild geese had already passed. ...

They flew high overhead, but he still heard them crying: "Now we are on our way to the high mountains! Now it's onward to the high mountains!" As soon as the wild geese saw the tame ones milling about in the yard below, they flew lower and cried: "Come with us, come with us! ... Now it's onward to the high mountains!" The farm geese spontaneously stretched their necks and listened, but then answered sensibly: "We are doing quite well here! We are doing quite well here!" It was, as already mentioned, an extraordinarily beautiful day, and the air was so fresh and mild, that it must be a pleasure to fly therein. ...

And with every new flock of wild geese that passed, the farm geese became more excited. Several times they beat their wings as if they would really like to join them.

But every time the old mother goose said: "Don't be crazy, children, that would simply mean starving and freezing." But in one young gander, the cries had awoken an intense desire to travel. ... "If another flock comes, I will fly with them!" he cried. ...

Now a new flock came and cried like the others. ... Then the young gander cried. " Wait, wait, I will come with you!" He spread his wings and rose into the air. However he was not used to flying and fell back to the ground.

In any case, the wild geese must have heard his call. They turned around and slowly flew back to see if he was coming.

"Wait" Wait!" he called and made a new attempt.

All this was heard by the boy on the low wall. "That would be a shame if the big gander left, he thought; Father and Mother would be grieved if he was no longer here on their return." While he was thinking this, he quite forgot again, that he was small and powerless.

He sprang down from the small wall, ran in amongst the flock of geese and flung his arms around the gander.

"Fly away from here is something you definitely won't be doing, do you hear!" he cried.

But just at that moment, the gander had discovered what he had to do to lift off from the ground.

In his eagerness, he did not take the time to shake off the boy, who had to go with him up into the air.

They went up so fast, that the boy became dizzy.

Before it became clear to him that he needed to let go of the gander's neck, he was already so high up, that he would have died if he were to have fallen down now.

The only thing he could do to get himself into a more comfortable position, was to try to climb onto the gander's back.

And he actually did climb up, even if it was with great effort. ....

But it wasn't so easy to hold on between the two flapping wings. ...

With both hands he had to reach deep into the feathers and the down in order not to fall backwards. ...
unit 1
(http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 2
Selma Lagerlöf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 3
Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 4
Teil 1b: Die Wildgänse.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 5
Der Junge wollte durchaus nicht glauben, daß er in ein Wichtelmännchen verwandelt worden war.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 6
„Es ist gewiß nur ein Traum und eine Einbildung,“ dachte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 8
Erst nach [6] ein paar Minuten öffnete er sie wieder und erwartete nun, daß der Spuk vorbei sei.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 9
Aber dies war nicht der Fall, er war noch ebenso klein wie vorher.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 11
Nein, es half nichts, wenn er auch noch so lange dastand und wartete.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 12
Er mußte etwas andres versuchen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 14
Er sprang auf den Boden hinunter und begann zu suchen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 15
Er lugte hinter die Stühle und Schränke, unter das Kanapee und hinter den Herd.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 16
Er kroch sogar in ein paar Mauselöcher, aber das Wichtelmännchen war nicht zu finden.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 17
Während er suchte, weinte er und bat und versprach alles nur erdenkliche.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 20
Aber was er auch immer versprach, es half alles nichts.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 26
„Dieser Jammer soll offenbar lange dauern,“ dachte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 27
Auf dem alten eichenen Brett, das vor der Haustür lag, hüpfte ein Sperling hin und her.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 28
Kaum erblickte dieser den Jungen, da rief er auch schon: „Seht doch, Nils, der Gänsehirt!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 29
Seht den kleinen Däumling!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 31
„Das geschieht ihm recht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 32
Kikerikiki!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 35
Wer hat das getan?“ Aber das merkwürdige daran war, daß der Junge verstand, was sie sagten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 36
Er war so verwundert darüber, daß er auf der Türschwelle stehen blieb und [7] zuhörte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 39
Er war jetzt nicht mehr so groß, daß die Hühner sich vor ihm hätten fürchten müssen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 41
Es geschieht dir recht!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 42
Ga, ga, ga, gag!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 44
Er wäre ihnen auch wohl kaum entgangen, wenn nicht die Hauskatze daher gekommen wäre.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 46
Der Junge lief schnell auf die Katze zu.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 47
„Liebe Mietze,“ sagte er, „du kennst doch alle Winkel und Schlupflöcher hier auf dem Hofe?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 50
Es war eine große, schwarze Katze mit einem weißen Fleck auf der Brust.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 51
Ihr Fell war glatt und glänzte im Sonnenschein.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 53
Die Katze sah durch und durch gutmütig aus.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 54
„Ich weiß allerdings, wo das Wichtelmännchen wohnt,“ sagte sie mit freundlicher Stimme.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 57
Sie spann und schnurrte vor Vergnügen, ehe sie antwortete.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 59
Da wurde der Junge böse; er vergaß ganz, wie klein und ohnmächtig er jetzt war.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 60
unit 63
Der Junge wollte sich von einer Katze nicht erschrecken lassen und trat noch einen Schritt näher.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 66
Da begann er aus Leibeskräften um Hilfe zu schreien.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 67
Aber es kam niemand, und er glaubte schon sicher, seine letzte Stunde hätte geschlagen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 68
Da fühlte er, daß die Katze die Krallen einzog und seinen Hals losließ.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 69
„So,“ sagte sie, „jetzt will ich es genug sein lassen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 70
Für diesmal magst du meiner guten Hausmutter zuliebe mit der Angst davonkommen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 73
[9] Es waren nur drei Kühe im Stalle.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 75
„Muh, muh, muh!“ brüllte Majros.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 77
Der Junge konnte nicht verstehen, was sie sagten, so wild schrieen sie durcheinander.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 80
„Komm nur her!“ sagte Majros.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 84
Majros war die älteste und klügste von den dreien, und sie war am zornigsten.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 87
Als der Junge wieder auf den Hof kam, war er ganz mutlos.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 89
Und wahrscheinlich würde ihm auch das Wichtelmännchen, selbst wenn er es fände, wenig helfen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 92
Wenn nun Vater und Mutter von der Kirche heimkämen, würden sie sich baß verwundern.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 94
Und wer weiß, vielleicht würden die Eltern ihn sogar mitnehmen, ihn auf den Märkten zu zeigen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 95
[10] Ach, es war zu schrecklich, nur daran zu denken!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 96
Da wäre es ihm schließlich noch am liebsten, wenn ihn nur kein Mensch mehr zu sehen bekäme!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 97
Ach, wie unglücklich war er doch!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 98
Auf der weiten Welt war gewiß noch nie ein Mensch so unglücklich gewesen wie er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 99
Er war kein Mensch mehr, sondern ein verhexter Zwerg.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 100
Er begann allmählich zu verstehen, was das heißen wollte, kein Mensch mehr zu sein.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 102
Er betrachtete seine Heimat.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 105
Aber so klein und arm das Ganze auch war, es war doch noch viel zu gut für ihn.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 106
Er konnte keine bessere Wohnung verlangen als ein Loch unter dem Scheunenboden.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 107
Es war wunderschönes Wetter, rings um ihn her murmelte und knospte und zwitscherte es.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 108
Aber ihm war das Herz schwer.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 109
Nie wieder würde er sich über etwas freuen können.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 110
Er meinte, den Himmel noch nie so dunkelblau gesehen zu haben wie an diesem Tage.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 111
Zugvögel kamen dahergeflogen.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 114
Schon mehrere Scharen Wildgänse waren so vorübergeflogen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 115
Sie flogen hoch droben, aber er hörte doch, wie sie riefen: „Jetzt gehts auf die hohen Berge!
5 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 119
Und mit jeder neuen Schar Wildgänse, die vorüberflog, wurden die zahmen Gänse aufgeregter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 120
Ein paarmal schlugen sie mit den Flügeln, als hätten sie große Lust, mitzufliegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 122
„Wenn noch eine Schar kommt, fliege ich mit!“ rief er.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 123
Jetzt kam eine neue Schar und rief wie die andern.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 125
Aber er war des Fliegens zu ungewohnt und fiel wieder auf den Boden zurück.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 126
Die Wildgänse mußten jedenfalls seinen Ruf gehört haben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 127
Sie wendeten sich um und flogen langsam zurück, um zu sehen, ob er mitkäme.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 128
„Wartet!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 129
Wartet!“ rief er und machte einen neuen Versuch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 130
All das hörte der Junge auf dem Mäuerchen.
4 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 133
„Das wirst du schön bleiben lassen, von hier wegzufliegen, hörst du!“ rief er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 136
Es ging so schnell aufwärts, daß es dem Jungen schwindlig wurde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 139
Und er kletterte wirklich hinauf, wenn auch mit großer Mühe.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 42  1 year, 2 months ago
lollo1a • 3447  translated  unit 128  1 year, 2 months ago

(http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf.

Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen.

Teil 1b: Die Wildgänse.

Der Junge wollte durchaus nicht glauben, daß er in ein Wichtelmännchen verwandelt worden war.

„Es ist gewiß nur ein Traum und eine Einbildung,“ dachte er.

„Wenn ich ein paar Augenblicke warte, werde ich schon wieder ein Mensch sein.“

Er stellte sich vor den Spiegel und schloß die Augen. Erst nach [6] ein paar Minuten öffnete er sie wieder und erwartete nun, daß der Spuk vorbei sei.

Aber dies war nicht der Fall, er war noch ebenso klein wie vorher.

Sein weißes Flachshaar, die Sommersprossen auf seiner Nase, die Flicken auf seinen Lederhosen und das Loch im Strumpfe, alles war wie vorher, nur sehr, sehr verkleinert.

Nein, es half nichts, wenn er auch noch so lange dastand und wartete. Er mußte etwas andres versuchen.

O, das beste, was er tun könnte, wäre gewiß, das Wichtelmännchen aufzusuchen und sich mit ihm zu versöhnen!

Er sprang auf den Boden hinunter und begann zu suchen. Er lugte hinter die Stühle und Schränke, unter das Kanapee und hinter den Herd.

Er kroch sogar in ein paar Mauselöcher, aber das Wichtelmännchen war nicht zu finden.

Während er suchte, weinte er und bat und versprach alles nur erdenkliche.

Nie, nie wieder wolle er jemand sein Wort brechen, nie, nie mehr unartig sein und nie wieder über einer Predigt einschlafen!

Wenn er nur seine menschliche Gestalt wieder bekäme, würde ganz gewiß ein ausgezeichneter, guter, folgsamer Junge aus ihm.

Aber was er auch immer versprach, es half alles nichts.

Plötzlich fiel ihm ein, daß er Mutter einmal hatte sagen hören, das Wichtelvolk halte sich gern im Kuhstall auf, und schnell beschloß er, auch dort nachzusehen, ob das Wichtelmännchen da zu finden sei.

Zum Glück stand die Tür offen; denn er hätte das Schloß nicht selbst öffnen können, so aber konnte er ungehindert hinausschlüpfen.

Als er in den Flur kam, sah er sich nach seinen Holzschuhen um, denn im Zimmer ging er natürlich auf Strümpfen.

Er überlegte, wie er sich wohl mit den großen, schwerfälligen Holzschuhen abfinden solle, aber in diesem Augenblick entdeckte er auf der Schwelle ein Paar winzige Schuhe.

Als er sah, daß das Wichtelmännchen so vorsorglich gewesen war, auch seine Holzschuhe zu verwandeln, wurde er ängstlicher.

„Dieser Jammer soll offenbar lange dauern,“ dachte er.

Auf dem alten eichenen Brett, das vor der Haustür lag, hüpfte ein Sperling hin und her.

Kaum erblickte dieser den Jungen, da rief er auch schon: „Seht doch, Nils, der Gänsehirt! Seht den kleinen Däumling! Seht doch Nils Holgersson Däumling!“

Sogleich wendeten sich die Gänse und die Hühner nach dem Jungen um, und es entstand ein entsetzliches Geschrei: „Kikerikiki!“ krähte der Hahn.

„Das geschieht ihm recht! Kikerikiki! Er hat mich am Kamme gezogen!“

„Ga, ga, ga, gag, das geschieht ihm recht!“ riefen die Hühner, und sie fuhren ohne Aufhören damit fort.

Die Gänse sammelten sich in einen Haufen, steckten die Köpfe zusammen und fragten: „Wer hat das getan? Wer hat das getan?“

Aber das merkwürdige daran war, daß der Junge verstand, was sie sagten.

Er war so verwundert darüber, daß er auf der Türschwelle stehen blieb und [7] zuhörte.

„Das kommt gewiß daher, daß ich in ein Wichtelmännchen verwandelt bin,“ sagte er, „deshalb verstehe ich die Tiersprache.“

Es war ihm unausstehlich, daß die Hühner mit ihrem ewigen „das geschieht ihm recht“ gar nicht aufhören wollten.

Er warf einen Stein nach ihnen und rief: „Haltet den Schnabel, Lumpenpack!“

Aber er hatte eines vergessen. Er war jetzt nicht mehr so groß, daß die Hühner sich vor ihm hätten fürchten müssen.

Die ganze Hühnerschar stürzte auf ihn zu, pflanzte sich um ihn herum auf und schrie: „Ga, ga, ga, gag! Es geschieht dir recht! Ga, ga, ga, gag! Es geschieht dir recht!“

Der Junge versuchte ihnen zu entwischen; aber die Hühner sprangen hinter ihm her und schrien so laut, daß ihm beinahe Hören und Sehen verging.

Er wäre ihnen auch wohl kaum entgangen, wenn nicht die Hauskatze daher gekommen wäre.

Sobald die Hühner die Katze sahen, verstummten sie und schienen an nichts andres mehr zu denken, als fleißig in der Erde nach Würmern zu scharren.

Der Junge lief schnell auf die Katze zu.

„Liebe Mietze,“ sagte er, „du kennst doch alle Winkel und Schlupflöcher hier auf dem Hofe? Sei lieb und teile mir mit, wo ich das Wichtelmännchen finden kann.“

Die Katze gab ihm nicht sogleich Antwort. Sie setzte sich nieder, legte den Schwanz zierlich in einem Ring um die Vorderpfoten und sah den Jungen an.

Es war eine große, schwarze Katze mit einem weißen Fleck auf der Brust.

Ihr Fell war glatt und glänzte im Sonnenschein. Sie hatte die Krallen eingezogen, ihre Augen waren gleichmäßig grau mit nur einem kleinen, schmalen Schlitz in der Mitte. Die Katze sah durch und durch gutmütig aus.

„Ich weiß allerdings, wo das Wichtelmännchen wohnt,“ sagte sie mit freundlicher Stimme. „Aber damit ist nicht gesagt, daß ich es dir sagen werde.“

„Liebe, liebe Mietze, du mußt mir helfen,“ sagte der Junge. „Siehst du nicht, wie es mich verzaubert hat?“

Die Katze öffnete ihre Augen ein klein wenig, so daß die grüne Bosheit herausschien.

Sie spann und schnurrte vor Vergnügen, ehe sie antwortete.

„Soll ich dir vielleicht jetzt helfen, weil du mich so oft am Schwanz gezogen hast?“ sagte sie schließlich.

Da wurde der Junge böse; er vergaß ganz, wie klein und ohnmächtig er jetzt war.

„Ich kann dich ja noch einmal am Schwanz ziehen, jawohl,“ sagte er und sprang auf die Katze los.

In demselben Augenblick aber war diese so verändert, daß der Junge sie kaum noch für dasselbe Tier halten konnte.

Sie hatte den Rücken gekrümmt – die Beine waren länger geworden, sie kratzte sich mit den Krallen im Nacken, der Schwanz war kurz und dick, die Ohren legten sich zurück, das Maul fauchte, und die Augen standen weit offen und funkelten in roter Glut.

Der Junge wollte sich von einer Katze nicht erschrecken lassen und trat noch einen Schritt näher.

Aber da machte die Katze einen Satz, ging gerade [8] auf den Jungen los, warf ihn um und stellte ihm mit weitaufgesperrtem Maul die Vorderbeine auf die Brust.

Der Junge fühlte, wie ihm ihre Klauen durch die Weste und das Hemd in die Haut eindrangen und wie die scharfen Eckzähne ihm den Hals kitzelten.

Da begann er aus Leibeskräften um Hilfe zu schreien.

Aber es kam niemand, und er glaubte schon sicher, seine letzte Stunde hätte geschlagen.

Da fühlte er, daß die Katze die Krallen einzog und seinen Hals losließ.

„So,“ sagte sie, „jetzt will ich es genug sein lassen. Für diesmal magst du meiner guten Hausmutter zuliebe mit der Angst davonkommen.

Ich wollte nur, daß du wüßtest, wer von uns beiden der Stärkere ist.“

Damit ging die Katze ihrer Wege und sah eben so sanft und fromm aus wie vorher, als sie gekommen war.

Der Junge schämte sich so, daß er kein Wort sagen konnte; er lief deshalb eiligst in den Kuhstall hinein, das Wichtelmännchen zu suchen.

[9]

Es waren nur drei Kühe im Stalle. Aber als der Junge eintrat, begannen sie alle zu brüllen und einen solchen Spektakel zu machen, daß man hätte meinen können, es seien wenigstens dreißig.

„Muh, muh, muh!“ brüllte Majros. „Es ist doch gut, daß es noch eine Gerechtigkeit auf der Welt gibt.“

„Muh, muh, muh!“ riefen alle drei auf einmal. Der Junge konnte nicht verstehen, was sie sagten, so wild schrieen sie durcheinander.

Er wollte nach dem Wichtelmännchen fragen, aber er konnte sich kein Gehör verschaffen, weil die Kühe in vollem Aufruhr waren.

Sie betrugen sich genau so, als wäre ein fremder Hund zu ihnen hereingebracht worden, schlugen mit den Hinterfüßen aus, rasselten an ihren Halsketten, wendeten die Köpfe rückwärts und stießen mit den Hörnern.

„Komm nur her!“ sagte Majros. „Dann geb' ich dir einen Stoß, den du nicht so bald wieder vergessen wirst.“

„Komm her!“ sagte Gull-Lilja. „Dann lasse ich dich auf meinen Hörnern reiten.“

„Komm nur, komm, dann sollst du erfahren, wie es mir geschmeckt hat, wenn du mir deinen Holzschuh auf den Rücken warfst, was du immer tatest!“ sagte Stern.

„Ja, komm nur her, dann werde ich dich für die Wespen bezahlen, die du mir ins Ohr gesetzt hast!“ schrie Gull-Lilja.

Majros war die älteste und klügste von den dreien, und sie war am zornigsten.

„Komm nur,“ sagte sie, „daß ich dich für die vielen Male bezahlen kann, wo du den Melkschemel unter deiner Mutter weggezogen hast, sowie für jedes Mal, wo du ihr einen Fuß stelltest, wenn sie mit dem Melkeimer daherkam, und für alle Tränen, die sie hier über dich geweint hat.“

Der Junge wollte ihnen sagen, wie sehr er sein schlechtes Betragen bereue und daß er von jetzt an immer artig sein werde, wenn sie ihm nur sagten, wo das Wichtelmännchen zu finden wäre.

Aber die Kühe hörten gar nicht auf ihn; sie brüllten so laut, daß er Angst bekam, es könne sich schließlich eine von ihnen losreißen, und so hielt er es fürs beste, sich aus dem Kuhstalle davonzuschleichen.

Als der Junge wieder auf den Hof kam, war er ganz mutlos.

Er sah ein, daß ihm auf dem ganzen Hofe bei seiner Suche nach dem Wichtelmännchen niemand beistehen wollte.

Und wahrscheinlich würde ihm auch das Wichtelmännchen, selbst wenn er es fände, wenig helfen.

Er kroch auf das breite Steinmäuerchen, das das ganze Gütchen umgab und das mit Weißdorn und Brombeerranken überwachsen war.

Dort ließ er sich nieder, zu überlegen, wie es werden solle, wenn er seine menschliche Gestalt nicht mehr erlangte.

Wenn nun Vater und Mutter von der Kirche heimkämen, würden sie sich baß verwundern.

Ja, im ganzen Lande würde man sich verwundern, und die Leute würden daherkommen von Ost-Vemmenhög und von Torp und von Skurup, ja, aus dem ganzen Vemmenhöger Bezirk würden sie zusammenkommen, ihn anzuschauen.

Und wer weiß, vielleicht würden die Eltern ihn sogar mitnehmen, ihn auf den Märkten zu zeigen.

[10]

Ach, es war zu schrecklich, nur daran zu denken! Da wäre es ihm schließlich noch am liebsten, wenn ihn nur kein Mensch mehr zu sehen bekäme!

Ach, wie unglücklich war er doch! Auf der weiten Welt war gewiß noch nie ein Mensch so unglücklich gewesen wie er.

Er war kein Mensch mehr, sondern ein verhexter Zwerg.

Er begann allmählich zu verstehen, was das heißen wollte, kein Mensch mehr zu sein.

Von allem war er nun geschieden;

er konnte nicht mehr mit andern Jungen spielen, konnte niemals das Gütchen von seinen Eltern übernehmen, und es war ganz und gar ausgeschlossen daß sich je ein Mädchen entschließen würde, ihn zu heiraten.

Er betrachtete seine Heimat. Es war ein kleines weiß angestrichnes Bauernhaus, das mit seinem hohen, steilen Strohdach wie in die Erde hineingedrückt aussah.

Die Wirtschaftsgebäude waren auch klein und die Äckerchen so winzig, daß ein Pferd sich kaum darauf hätte umdrehen können. Aber so klein und arm das Ganze auch war, es war doch noch viel zu gut für ihn.

Er konnte keine bessere Wohnung verlangen als ein Loch unter dem Scheunenboden.

Es war wunderschönes Wetter, rings um ihn her murmelte und knospte und zwitscherte es. Aber ihm war das Herz schwer.

Nie wieder würde er sich über etwas freuen können. Er meinte, den Himmel noch nie so dunkelblau gesehen zu haben wie an diesem Tage.

Zugvögel kamen dahergeflogen. Sie kamen vom Auslande, waren über die Ostsee gerade auf Smygehuk zugesteuert und waren jetzt auf dem Wege nach Norden.

Es waren Vögel von den verschiedensten Arten; aber er kannte nur die Wildgänse, die in zwei langen, keilförmigen Reihen flogen.

Schon mehrere Scharen Wildgänse waren so vorübergeflogen.

Sie flogen hoch droben, aber er hörte doch, wie sie riefen: „Jetzt gehts auf die hohen Berge! Jetzt gehts auf die hohen Berge!“

Sobald die Wildgänse die zahmen Gänse sahen, die auf dem Hofe umherliefen, senkten sie sich herab und riefen: „Kommt mit, kommt mit! Jetzt gehts auf die hohen Berge!“

Die zahmen Gänse reckten unwillkürlich die Hälse und horchten, antworteten dann aber verständig: „Es geht uns hier ganz gut! Es geht uns hier ganz gut!“

Es war, wie gesagt, ein überaus schöner Tag, und die Luft war so frisch und leicht, daß es ein Vergnügen sein mußte, darin zu fliegen.

Und mit jeder neuen Schar Wildgänse, die vorüberflog, wurden die zahmen Gänse aufgeregter. Ein paarmal schlugen sie mit den Flügeln, als hätten sie große Lust, mitzufliegen.

Aber jedesmal sagte eine alte Gänsemutter: „Seid nicht verrückt, Kinder, das hieße so viel als hungern und frieren.“

Bei einem jungen Gänserich hatten die Zurufe ein wahres Reisefieber erweckt. „Wenn noch eine Schar kommt, fliege ich mit!“ rief er.

Jetzt kam eine neue Schar und rief wie die andern. Da schrie der junge Gänserich: „Wartet, wartet, ich komme mit!“

Er breitete seine Flügel aus [11] und hob sich empor. Aber er war des Fliegens zu ungewohnt und fiel wieder auf den Boden zurück.

Die Wildgänse mußten jedenfalls seinen Ruf gehört haben. Sie wendeten sich um und flogen langsam zurück, um zu sehen, ob er mitkäme.

„Wartet! Wartet!“ rief er und machte einen neuen Versuch.

All das hörte der Junge auf dem Mäuerchen. „Das wäre sehr schade, wenn der große Gänserich fortginge,“ dachte er; „Vater und Mutter würden sich darüber grämen, wenn er bei ihrer Rückkehr nicht mehr da wäre.“

Während er dies dachte, vergaß er wieder ganz, daß er klein und ohnmächtig war.

Er sprang von dem Mäuerchen hinunter, lief mitten in die Gänseschar hinein und umschlang den Gänserich mit seinen Armen.

„Das wirst du schön bleiben lassen, von hier wegzufliegen, hörst du!“ rief er.

Aber gerade in diesem Augenblick hatte der Gänserich herausgefunden, wie er es machen müsse, um vom Boden fortzukommen.

In seinem Eifer nahm er sich nicht die Zeit, den Jungen abzuschütteln; dieser mußte mit in die Luft hinauf.

Es ging so schnell aufwärts, daß es dem Jungen schwindlig wurde.

Ehe er sich klar machen konnte, daß er den Hals des Gänserichs loslassen müßte, war er schon so hoch droben, daß er sich totgefallen hätte, wenn er jetzt hinuntergestürzt wäre.

Das einzige, was er unternehmen konnte, um in eine etwas bequemere Lage zu kommen, war ein Versuch, auf den Rücken des Gänserichs zu klettern.

Und er kletterte wirklich hinauf, wenn auch mit großer Mühe.

Aber es war gar nicht leicht, sich auf dem glatten Rücken zwischen den beiden schwingenden Flügeln festzuhalten.

Er mußte mit beiden Händen tief in die Federn und den Flaum hineingreifen, um nicht hintüber zu fallen.