de-en  E. Rosen, Dt.Lausbub in Amerika, Auszug aus Kap.6
The little town made of sand and wood. - In a Texas store. - Mr. Muchow Senior. – A summer with King Cotton. - In Germany the farm would have been a manor ...- Cotton picking and Cotton mill. The publicity riders. ... - In the German Club. - How a wood became a field. - The American disease of wanderlust.

We walked through deep soft sand. Here and there stood sheds, some made out of untreated boards, some of grey corrugated iron; between them storage bins filled with piles of boards, coal, and long rows of barrels. In front of us a red, bare brick building stood out sharply against the blue sky, in the middle of a quadrangle of wooden houses that blazed with colors.
On all the walls were inscriptions in red and yellow and green and white, advertisements in words, in pictures; from the rooftops waved flags with the names of businesses next to the Stars and Stripes.
The picture was colourful, garish, gaudy. Riders on galloping horses chased across the sandy ground in front of the houses, men in colourful shirts, red and blue scarves slung around their throats, sombreros down on their necks.

Among them light, two-wheeled wagons drove at a crisp trot. Horses everywhere. Above the wooden sidewalk, a roof erected on wooden posts ran along the rows of houses, connecting house to house, a kind of loggia, a covered walkway. Hundreds of horses were tied up at posts, already saddled. The town was made up of sand and wood and colour and horses .... it was as if I stood at the portal of a magic world.

First of all we have to go to Robert Brothers," said Charley. .... "The old man will be there." The gentlemen Robert brothers lived in one of the stores in the colonnade. Thousands of different things stood around on the rough dirty wooden floor and hung on the squalid walls: piles of plows, saddles, blankets, shovels, clothes, pyramids of hats. Silver studded bridles covered the floor. Barrels of flour, chests of tobacco, sacks of sugar and salt stood around everywhere.

A silk hat was balanced with alluring grandeur on the handle of a plow, and between all kinds of leather goods, revolvers and rifles were carelessly strewn about; on a whiskey barrel was an ostentatious feathered women's hat, and in a box, cartridges were sharing the space with peaceful biscuits. And everywhere, wherever only a small place was available, men with pipes between their teeth and glasses of beer in their fists sat around on barrels and crates.

"Hello!" said Charley. "There he is!" He walked towards a corner.

" Hello Father!" "Hello Charley", said a figure in rough blue linen. "They tricked your old father so that he had to pay the drinks for the whole circle. No fool is as bad as an old fool, my boy!" "Whatever you say, father. This is a young German. He's called Ed. Friend of mine." "Damn pleasure!" said the the old man.
He comes with us to the farm." "Whatever you say, Charley," replied the old man. "Fresh from over there, aren't you? Well - well ... Buy him what he needs, Charley. What I still wanted to tell you, the Mexikans with the horses are here, and I bargained for a white horse. Want to drive there later." The old man with the shaggy gray beard blinked at me cheerfully.
I stood there, shy like a little boy, and didn't say a word. And had me dragged from one pile of goods to another, buying for me a broad-rimmed gray sombrero with a silver-studded leather hatband, blue cotton work clothes, sturdy boots and leather riding gaiters, a pipe and a few packs of tobacco.

Then I helped to put our suitcases on the green farm wagon and clumsily climbed on the seat next to the old Muchow. The two mules pricked up their long ears, extended their smoothly-clipped tails with the funny tufts of hair at the ends straight upright, and off we went. We sped along the rows of houses, turned around a corner and stopped with a lurch in front of a tiny wooden church.

Hundreds of horses in an immense mass cavorted in a multicolored tangle on the great open sand-pit beside the church, surrounded constantly by horsemen in knitted jackets and pointed sugarloaf shaped hats, keeping the animals together with shrill shouts and snapping whips. None of the horses stood still; they galopped disorderly, neighed and bit each other.

"The white mare there in the corner!" said the old Muchow. "Thirty dollars!" A Mexican, who had rode up to us, nodded, spurred his horse and whizzed into the tangle of horses. The animals scattered right and left. Now he had reached the white horse, who was throwing his head upwards, at a mighty rate of speed, breaking through the ranks of the horses and chasing it to us in a racing gallop. Charley sat calmly on his chestnut and wielded his laredo in ever bigger circles. The noose whizzed throught the air, fell over the horse's neck, tightened itself.

In next to no time Charley and the Mexican were with him, put a thick rope over neck and mouth in artful nooses, tied the other end of the rope to the wagon and - "Get going, Father!" cried Charley. "As fast as you can. We have got her!" With incredible speed we moved ahead.

Brenham was behind us. Here and there single wooden cabins appeared along lonely sandy stretches. Then came a forest, then green fields, then sand again, then we went through a brook that splashed water high up.
The old man stood completely erect at the front of the wagon, his pipe between his teeth and the whip in his hand; Charley galloped next to the white mare and pressed her forward when she wanted to bristle; I had climbed to the back and waved about with my arms and my hat.

I was giddy with excitement, didn't see, didn't hear anything, had eyes only for the wild horse. ... It seemed to me as if only a few minutes had passed when we stopped so abruptly in front of a wire fence that I was flung against the wall. ...

When I jumped down, Charley had already untied the long rope from the wagon, and looped it around a tree. The white mare stood there shivering and starred at us.

Within the field bordered by wire fence there were wooden buildings; a residence with a broad veranda, stables, open at one side where horses and mules stood, a few cabins. We went into the house, sat down at a table in a room, on whose walls rifles and leather gear were hanging, and ate.

There was bacon, corn bread and baked sweet potatoes, whose yellow flesh tasted exactly like chestnuts. During the meal it was agreed that my food and lodging should be free of charge and that I should be paid fifteen dollars a month.
We went to the yard. Charley looked thoughtfully at the white mare, which pulled at her rope. ...

"I'll ride her right away" he muttered. Actually he should remain tied to a tree all night and get nothing to eat or drink. Then he would be worn out tomorrow. But this is a drudgery. I want to get him yet. You can ride with me, if you want to." You bet, I did! ...

The horse went pell-mell across the sandy soil, into the grassland, across green shrubs, behind the white speck which became bigger and clearer and was now recognizable again as a man and a horse.
The white horse still fought back. The saddle girth held, the man remained seated. ... Thrice, four times, they madly rushed past me. It seemed to me as if the absurd dashing along was slackening, as if the horse was giving up.

But the man on its back did not allow that. Then suddenly the horse broke off in the middle of the run. The rider slid lightly from the saddle. I galloped over to him. Charley stood there facing the white horse, and the animal whinnied softly, rubbing its rosy snout on his sleeve and sniffing his hand. The man and horse were covered with sweat and dirt; the horse shook the white flakes of foam from its body - the dust lay in a thick crust on the man's face.

"The gray is mine," said Charley. ... "Texas Girl is what I'll call her, Texas Girl. ... You are a good horse, Texas Girl, and I think we both do not need the whip any more." He stood up, and the grey followed him like a doggy.

Slowly we went back. It was late afternoon, and the sun was not as scorching hot as in Brenham at noon. But there was still a tremulous flickering in the oppressive air. We walked on wide grasslands. ... In front of us stretched a mass of green bushes with millions of white patches, the cotton fields. Most of the land belonged to the Muchows.

Five tenths was planted with cotton, one tenth with corn and one tenth with sugar cane. The rest was grass and forest.

In Germany the farm would have been a feudal estate, the old man with the comical baggy trousers, a state-supportive agrarian, and Charley, a lieutenant guard!

Down here in Texas, the owner of nearly two square miles of land lived in a wooden house, which looked as if it had been nailed together in a single day, and ate bacon and potatoes for supper in his shirt sleeves.
In the large room, which served as living room and dining room, there was an expensive piano on the bare plank floor, and tobacco leaves hung over the piano from the ceiling for drying - in front of a mahogany rocking chair was a wooden block serving as a footstool; the same strange mixture of expensive things and the most primitive contrivances was everywhere . The house had no foundations. It was built on four brick piers, one meter high off the ground, and in the living room you could hear pigs rummaging under the floor. Outside, agricultural machinery that without a doubt had to be worth thousands were in the yard, carelessly pushed together into a corner without any protection from the weather.

Fourteen horses lived in a shed that was open on one side, and four mules were simply tied to a fence. And tack, abandondly ornated with silver, was hanging on the same fence ... "Well, that must seem really strange to you!" said the elder Muchow, who had laughed himself to tears over Charley's account of our meeting in Galveston. ...

"But there's no harm. Will already be done. Hard work never did anyone any harm, I say. ... When you have become a bit more American, you could perhaps do something smarter than working on a farm. ...
But you are welcome with us. You do with Charley what Charley does and, well, you will even get along." I slept upstairs in the attic together with the young Muchow because space was scarce in the little house. What dreams I had! Of cotton kings and Texas Girls and bushes on which white silver grew, and genial young Germans who became rich miraculously fast. Then a rumbling voice interrupted me in my becoming rich.
"Hello boys!" We went out into the dawn, sacks with wide straps over our shoulders and clay jugs in our hands. A bit of the glowing red sun could already be seen on the horizon, and the fine white mist over the sea of ​​green was slowly rising. In a few minutes we had reached the cotton field, which was to be picked. The old farmer and the two girls dived into the bush rows immediately.

"You hang your sack such that you drag it next to you," Charley explained. "Then you pick the fruit out of the capsules with both hands and put it in the sack. And in two hours your back will hurt so much that you will think that something has happened to your spine.

But that's just the cotton disease, and it'll stop you once you get used to bending over." He started picking a row of bushes, and I went to the next one. His arms worked like windmill sails, and his hands were digging in the cotton bushes, plucking, grasping, picking... How the silver knots looked like fine, snow-white hair.

They were set in four round capsules growing up together and could be plucked out with a soft grip, just as ripe acorns fall easily from their cups. Where the fruits of the capsules were growing, they were firm and hard; the threads, which were completely surrounded by the threads, could be plainly felt.
Out of the firm core, however, were yielded silky soft, fist-sized, in round balls; there were dozens and dozens of these sitting on each of the bushes. I picked and picked, but Charley was already far ahead ...
Then the heat of competition came over me. With quick fingers the white splendor went in, collecting the balls as quick as could be. I only had my eyes on my hands, which flew hastily from bush to sack and from sack to bush. ...

Soon my back began to ache, for the bushes only reached up to one's shoulders, and one had to stand continually in a stooped position.

"Empty it!" Charley cried.
His father and his sisters had come along. The old man pulled a primitive spring scale out of his pocket and began weighing.
"Charley, 25 pounds." "I poor old man: 23 pounds." "Mary, 24 pounds." "Lizzie, 22 pounds." "Ed, 18 pounds. Damn good for a greenhorn." A gulp of water from the clay jugs, and then it was back into the rows of bushes. The hours flew by; row after row was picked, sack after sack was weighed and emptied until it piled up like hills of freshly fallen snow at the end of the field.

It was getting hotter and hotter. ... The heavy hat squeezed my skull, the carrying strap cut into my shoulders, the clothes seemed to stick to my body; but I was as happy as I hadn't been for a long time, happy as a child who had gotten a new toy.

At lunch I ate more than I had ever eaten in my life, and at the evening I was so tired that the whole family laughed at me! And on the evening of the third day, I wrote an enthusiastic letter to my parents. I'm a Texas farmer. I was doing really fine. ... It was wonderful - simply wonderful ... At the end of the week, four wagons loaded high went to the cotton mill. I drove a wagon and felt very important on my high seat and held the reins frantically in my hands, als if the old mules had not followed the wagons without me!

After a half hour drive we stopped in the middle of the wood in front of a ramshakle looking wooden building from whose tall iron chimney black smoke was billowing.

Inside machines started to pound. One wagon after the other was driven close to the building, and its white contents were scooped out with large wooden shovels into a wide opening. From there the cotton was brought up to the top with a continuous hoist, a wide leather band with wooden boxes.
We went into the cotton gin, past a steam boiler, which a half-naked man was feeding with blocks of wood, and climbed up the ladder to the upper floor with the machines. ...
From the elevator, a white stream of cotton flooded into a sawmill, whose little saws, moving at a tremendous speed, tore and shredded the silver pods.

The feathery light white threads were pushed from the machine into a wide wooden box, which stretched vertically down to the ground, while the heavy seed kernels fell through an opening into the lower room. When the wooden box was filled with cotton fibers, a hydraulic press, which fit exactly into its opening, was pressed down, and the light white mass was pressed into a heavy bale, which the mechanical gadgetry surrounded with burlap and iron bands.

The old Muchow brushed a huge black colored stain onto every bale. "So," he said, "now we want to shovel the seed into a wagon and load the eight cotton bales onto a second wagon. You two can then drive to Brenham. It will be much more fun for you two boys to be able to drive into town than for me. I think we'll harness the four horses to your wagon, Charley, and let Ed have the mules. He can deal with them." " Of course!" I said.
When somebody had asked me then if I could build a steam engine, I probably would have said yes too! Driving four-in-hand went well something which testified to the good horse sense of the Muchow mules. The street was really abysmal and had all kinds of dangerous potholes and grooves, but the animals avoided them on their own.

As we approached Brenham, and the road became wide and level, Charley shouted to me to drive next to him.
"The riders trying to entice possible future customers will be here soon!" he shouted to me. ...

"The what?" "The Reclamer, my son. Boys who have a full bottle of whiskey in their saddle bags and take real pleasure offering a certain Charley and Ed a decent gulp of the right brand! ...
The thing is like this: for cotton seeds you get exactly the same money from each agent, the daily quotation, naturally. ... Therefore, the seed agents cannot outbid their competitors through higher prices, but only through higher sales. Therefore they send riders trying to entice possible future customers to the country roads, wily boys who know every farmer within fifty miles. ...
Often, half a dozen of such advertising riders are lurking on a single supply road. As soon as a wagonload comes into view, they ride toward the farmer and are as amiable to him as if he were the President of the United States; offering him whiskey, telling him the latest Brenhamer jokes, riding next to his wagon, until one of them gets the cargo. Heidi, there they are already!" Two horsemen came in close pursuit, just as the horses wanted to run, firmly side by side, hunched far forward on their horses, and pulled up sharply in front of our wagons.
"Hello, Muchow, old boy!" "Good afternoon, boys! Why are you in such a hurry? Is the sheriff after you?" "No, Muchow. The sheriff is sitting at home, figuring out for himself who is ripe for getting hanged. He's still vacillating between you and a villain from Palavera County.'' "Gosh, children, you're lucky then," said Charley, deadly serious. "The sheriff of Brenham is getting more negligent.

Doesn't he know you're back in the country?" Then the two riders held their hands up, laughing, "Allright, Charley. We give up. ... We can't do anything against it. Who is going to have your cotton business, Muchow? I ride for Smith & Donahan and John here for Faraday & Co. Who is it?" That depends," Charley laughed. ... "Dry area here, isn't it?" A bottle of whiskey appeared promptly, and Charley gazed long and prayerful at the sky through the bottle neck.

The other rider handed me a bottle. "New in the area here?" "Thank you. Yes. I am only a short time in the country." "But Ed! You don't have to advertise that to every vagabond horse thief!" "Certainly not!" said the promotional rider. "Otherwise, your still innocent reputation could suffer. ... Because only a very green-grass greenhorn (excuse the expression!) can one forgive, when he turns into a half-dead mummy, like this Muchow here, squatting down on a godforsaken farm." "Yes Sir!" Charley grinned. ... "He would see all sorts of lives with you - but the interior of the county prison, too! Dicky, you get the cargo, your whiskey is so bad that you desperately have to earn money to buy better. ... Next time, it will be your turn, John. So! Ride, boys! Go to the devil!" "Should we make something of it?" The horsemen shouted with laughter. "You see, Ed, these are nice, manly boys, with whom you can at least speak a rational word without having a silk hat on your head and making a bow at every third word. So, I'm glad of that! Good old Texas style, son!" "Grass-green greenhorn he said!" I meant. "Nice politeness!" "Well - if your Emperor would come to Texas, he would also be a greenhorn. ... There's nothing to it!" In Brenham, we were unloaded in half an hour; The seeds at Smith & Donahan, the bales in the Roberts Brothers' shed. We have tied the horses and the mules in front of the same shop as recently.
Charley and I went to Gus Meyer's Saloon at the corner of the promenade. ...

The small room was meticulously clean, the floor covered with white sand. On the ceiling were electric fans, whose sharp air draft brought cooling. Men who quickly quaffed a glass of beer at the bar came and went all the time.
A merry society sat around a huge of plate of caviar rolls on a large round table.

"The German Club," Charley whispered to me. "Good morning, gentlemen! It would be a pleasure for me to buy the next beers..." "Dear Muchow, your German is something dreadful, "chuckled a fat gentleman. .... "So, it would give you pleasure to buy the next round of beer? "Allowed!" "Yes, that's it," said Charley. "And this here is a young German who..." "We know," laughed the fat gentleman with jolly little eyes. "You underestimate old Brenham and its curiosity, dear Muchow. Do you really mean that someone fresh from Germany can come to this fine metropolis without being talked about? Prost!" (To me): "How do you like this? Good? Yes? It is strange, because there is still a crucial difference between the gymnasium and farm work. Well, sometimes I wonder what German parents actually think about it when they...well, this is a crazy world. Very crazy. But you are not allowed to pretend to be tired. Things will go well for you – and things will go badly for you – but never pretend to be tired!" He certainly did not look tired. Neither he nor the others. They sparkled with energy and self-confidence. The gentleman with the jolly little eyes was the owner of the Brenham Herald, the town's newspaper, which was published in a daily English edition and a weekly German edition.
There was the agent of a large brewery and a master harness maker, the owner of a soda water factory and the representative of a sewing machine business.
The conversation revolved around only work and money and new ventures. In Brenham, harvest time was in more than one sense.

King Cotton ruled, King Cotton, as the American South calls its white silver fruit – King Cotton rode over the country and converted its kingdom of delicate white thread into heavy gleaming gold. The cash was rolling in.

The almighty Dollar streamed from dozens of feeder roads to the small Texas town. The farmer paid off the loan with the town's business people he made use of over the year; he bought machines and spent money on pleasure. ...

And it was evident that men were struggling with all their might to get as much of the gold as possible. These German men, who spoke German and English in a chaotic jumble, were not satisfied with a single profession, with a single business, but extended their interests in all possible directions.

The editor and publisher, I was astonished to hear, not only operated the only Brenham book shop, but also owned a farm and had money in all kinds of business.

At the moment he was eager to establish an ice factory with caviar rolls and foaming lager beer. In ten minutes, he argued to his friends that ice, as a needed staple of the South, was an excellent article of manufacture, and that he did not understand at all why Brenham had to get its ice from out of town. The others nodded approvingly - the master saddle maker, who owned a sawmill besides; the beer agent, who was the director of two Brenham societies; the sewing machine man, who imported Mustangs from Mexico. "How much?" Asked the master saddle maker.
"Ten thousand, or let us say fifteen thousand," said the fat gentleman.
In another twenty minutes the company had agreed. The Brenham Ice Company Limited was almost founded! And in the the next moment, almost simultaneously, they talked about who would be appointed the managing director of the new ice factory and where they wanted to play poker that evening.

"Hustle!" said the owner of Brenham Herald, looking at me over his glasses. "Do you know the word? It means to urge it, move it, push forward with both elbows. Hustle!" Time is dwindling away. Long ago, the white splendor of the fields had migrated to the cotton centers of the world; the long stretches lay barren, dehydrated there from sunburn.
The Indian Summer was coming, the wonderful Texas autumn with its shining red and brown colors, with its golden sun. Always at the crack of dawn, at daybreak, the work on the farm started.

At first it was cotton picking from sunrise to sunset, then came the harvesting of the corn cobs, then cutting the Texas cane, the winter fodder for the horses and cattle.
When the harvest was finished, it was a matter of working on incidentals. The barbed wire fences were patched up, we laid irrigation ditches on the fields, we mended our saddle equipment, we built a new barn, we improved the farm wagons and painted them a beautiful green, or rumbled about between the plows and farm equipment.
The work on the Texas farm seemed to me not to be a burden.

I can't really picture your life," my father once wrote to me. "You report about horse riding, shooting, and hunting, you tell us funny stories. Is this farmers' work in Texas?" But the work was there and was hard. The whole nature of the country, however, gave it a romantic trait, and this romantic trait grew into a monster for a young man like myself. Just as there was no coin smaller than a five cent piece in the city because everyone wanted to dispense with copper money, so on the Texas farm all pettiness was missing.

Like sunny lightness, it lay over the almost virgin land, which yielded rich harvest without artificial aid. The work being dull never occurred to anyone there. We lived a free life on the farm in free nature, which gave a peculiar touch even to the hard work.
And sometimes the work was like a feast ... "Well, boys," old Muchow said one evening, "I think we are now going to the forest over there by Slim's lease to slash out a new piece of field." The next morning Charley and I rode to the tenants of the surrounding area to rustle up some workers, and the very next day the work began. At daybreak we pulled out. In front rode the old man, Charley and I, at the back Jim was driving four mules and a farm wagon packed with two huge kettles and bags of provisions. It passed over furrows and crackling corn stalks.

At the edge of the forest there was crackling a fire of dry wood, two black figures huddled there to warm up their hands above the flames. They were Slim and his wife Melusina Maryanne.

Fine good morning, Mistah Muchow, fine good morning, Mistah Charley, Mistah Ed. Fine thing, a small fire like that. Not nobody of the lazy people are here yet." "How many are coming, Slim?" "Sixty, Mistah Muchow - every blessed helper in this area, as true as this child will someday go to heaven. Only the Washington Columbus of Mistah Davis will not be at his farm, and that's a pity because he's the one who has fine ax know-how." "Why isn't he coming?" "Can't. He's sick. Can't sit, can't lie, can't stand, can't do anything at all." "Why?" "Oh, it's very simple. Another colorful gentleman shot a whole load of shot in his rear end." We burst out laughing.
"Because of a little misunderstanding at dice," interrupted Melusina Maryanne his young wife with a shrill voice.
"Lord - how this dice game is a bad habit! My Slim would not do that! I would drive him out with my broom!" When the red of the autumn sunrise shone through the rows of trees, they came from all sides, black figures with axes on their shoulders, on shaggy horses, on decrepit mules.

In no time a mountain of old saddles and blankets piled up at the edge of the forest. The ponies and mules began to graze outside in the field. The horsemen, however, crowded around the fire, letting Melusina Maryanne pour hot black coffee into their tin cups, fishing pieces of bacon from the bubbling pan and fresh cornbread from the kettle. White teeth crushed and thick lips smacked.

"Well, boys!" cried the master of the farm from his nag, now we'll get to work on the old forest. Charley, Ed, you count thirty men and start working here. The others come with me. Come on, kids. We'll see which side is working harder!" Shirts were pulled down, naked upper bodies shone in the sunlight, and pounding ax strikes thundered out. In a long line our thirty workers were working tree by tree. The axes, which swung high over their heads, fell with rhythmic regularity. First, a chop from above, which deeply bit into the trunk, then an additional horizontal blow, which hurled out the piece of wood that was cut away. Thus, a tiny little notch was created in the form of a lying V, flat as a plate at the bottom, obliquely digging into the tree trunk from above.

With each blow, the notch became larger until the wounded trunk could no longer bear its own weight, the wood fibers were torn, and the tree fell crashing to the ground. Then three or four men jumped on it and cut off its branches, and old Jim wrapped a chain around the trunk and dragged it with his mules out to the edge of the forest.

The branches were left. There were spruces, the red wood of which is so soft and watery that it is only suitable for burning; beeches, oaks and hickory trees, whose trunks were placed on a special heap, for they were so valuable that they were to be sold in Brenham.

Their wood is hard as iron. The tough tendrils, which twined from tree to tree, the ivy of the old oaks and the rampantly growing undergrowth with sharp thorns fell under the blows of the ax. Step by step they entered the forest.

I didn't watch for long, but jumped from my horse, fetched an ax and cut loose to send the white splinters of wood flying.
Bit by bit and day by day the forest disappeared. The trunks piled up out in the field.

After three weeks there was no longer a tree standing, and for half an English mile there was nothing but a heap of branches and naked, white-shimmering stumps. Now the actual clearing work began; the stumps were blasted out. The coarse blasting powder only split the stumps and loosened them from the ground. Fire had to complete the work.

The old man himself threw the fire into the undergrowth, and slowly the red flames set the small wood on fire, until a gust of wind came, whipping the little flicker of fire into a raging sea of fire, which drove a glowing smoke cloud over the land.

Throughout the day and night, we surrounded the flaming hearth and put out dozens and dozens of fires that had started in the neighboring fields from glowing sparks in the cotton bushes and among the corn stalks. Our way of extinguishing them was extremely simple. Two horsemen held a wet blanket stretched between them and galloping, dragged it over the burning ground. For several days the newly-won land burned.

But after that, not a small piece of wood could be found on the wide area; the stumps, the blasted-out roots, the branches, the undergrowth, the dry foliage from many years, the ancient foliage - all this was a black-carbonized mass with thousands of mounds of white ashes. Thus, the forest became the field ... "Charley and Ed, the two rogues," said old Muchow more than once, "are no longer to be separated. They always stick together. To me they ruin the horses by bad riding, their eternal shooting has already made me half crazy.. They prowl around, - but they do work, you have to leave them be.

In a manner, of course, as though they were doing it only because it gives them pleasure!" Months of great experience. I learned confidence in my fists and in my strength; learned to ride the wildest nag, too; learned the smooth English of the American South; learned the strange Texas mix of self-confidence and sauntering. The Muchows felt independent as great masters on their vast landed property, but they had, like their neighbors, little ambition to improve the old strolling system of farmers.

It was as if the people on the plains were infected by carelessness and indifference. They lived a master's life in their own way, but they ate cornbread and bacon throughout the year and lived in raw wooden houses; they wore coarse linen and looked at a cigar as a Sunday luxury.

Dozens of horses stood on each farm, and no one would have walked a hundred yards, but the animals were never shod and almost never groomed. The farms looked dirty and neglected, the roads to the town were so miserable that they became impassable during the rainy season. During the harvest season, the farmers threw gold pieces around, and half of the year they had to take advantage of loans from business people of the city. ...

They worked with all their might – but suddenly dropped everything whenever a worker came running with the news that Mister So-and-so from the next farm wanted to ride to the Brazos River to go fishing. Or rabbit hunting. Or on the hunt for raccoons. Then they immediately saddled their horses and rode along.

It was a peculiar life on the Texas farm that seemed indescribably appealing to me. I wanted to be a Texas farmer! It was very easy, once you were known as halfway industrious, to get credit and to become independent by the slow climb from tenant to farmer. Each farmer leased land. Neighbors built the house for you, the farmer provided the equipment, the money you needed until harvest time he advanced to you.

If cotton prices were just somewhat good, you could soon own enough of your own land.
How often had old Muchow explained that to me! But for the course of my life his son was a decisive influence. If the American affliction of the insatiable roving spirit had not seized him, in all probability I would be planting cotton today somewhere near the Muchow farm, a Texas girl would be my wife, Texas ground and soil would be my own...for in the late autumn a strange restlessness came over the young Muchow. There was hardly anything to do on the farm. The land looked desolate; everything was dried up, the ground, the bushes and the leaves, the grass.

You saw nothing but a monotonous brown. Every day we rode for miles across the land, and on one such ride, Charley suddenly pulled up his horse and let the reins fall. For a long time he looked around in circles.

Then he straightened himself up, like someone who was at ease with himself.
"I'm going away," he said.
"What?" "I'm going away. Too damn boring!" "Where to, then?" "Don't know yet. I ride off every year. It was New Mexico last Winter, Indian Territory the year before. Cooked for cowboys over in San Antonio (and the boys have grumbled about my cooking often enough!) ... - helped with the branding of cattle - then up to the northwest - invested earnings into a wagon and provisions and went searching for gold - damn well found nothing - arrived half starved in Albuquerque, sold the wagon and horse and rode home. ... Those were excellent five months, sonny! This time it is El Paso! A new railway is being built at El Paso. Gus spoke of it. The most amusing fellows from all over the South are gathering together. ... Yes - it's a fine idea! I'm riding to El Paso! Glory Hallelujah!" Like a contagious disease, his wanderlust jumped over to me.
"Take me with you!" I said.
"No Sir." "Why not?" "It does not work. You don't know the country yet. In the end, they'll smash your skull and I'll be to blame for it. No. Stay with the old man." When we got home, he blurted out his project: "Father - hm - mother - hm, I think I'm riding tomorrow ..." "Oh, my goodness!" said Mother Muchow.
"What do you mean," muttered the old man. "A damn business! You'll soon be back in some mishap. Well - well -- I've been young too, but the new generation surely could have learned something. I've already thought that vagabonding would begin again. Then go to blazes! Don't let yourself be tricked. Where are you going?" "To El Paso, Father. For railway construction." "Well, as you mean." I sat there, almost bursting with envy. And suddenly I felt like feverish unrest.

"If Charley goes away ... " I began.
"Hoh!" said the old Muchow. "There's still one! There is indeed nothing to do on the farm, of course, but honestly you could gladly stay here!" And I decided to try my luck in the Texas town.

Just before Brenham, the road to the east, to San Antonio and El Paso, crossed our path. There, at the crossroads, we stopped. The area there was brown, arid, barren, sandy. I think not vultures..Vögel ? But Plünderer
"Good bye, father, " said Charley.
"Well, then ride my boy. Be careful with the Mexicans over there!" "Allright, father. Good bye, Ed. Better, you stay with the old man. Think about it some more." And in a full galop Texasgirl sped forward on the road east with a rider waving his hat playfully as he shot off the six shots of his revolver in the air for farewell - "A damn business!" Grumbled the old man. ... If I had not been one of them myself, I could be truly angry with the villain. Well, he can take care of himself; whoever gets involved with him will have his hands full. What are you going to do in Brenham?" "No idea, Sir." "A damn business! Eh! I let everyone deal with whatever he has let himself in for. If one wants to do stupid things, then he should simply do them. You have to leave a man alone with his girl and a fool with his foolishness. Good bye, my boy!"
unit 1
Das Städtchen aus Sand und Holz.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 2
- Im Texasladen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 3
- Mr. Muchow Senior.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 4
– Ein Sommer beim König Baumwolle.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 5
unit 6
– Die Reklamereiter.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 7
– Im deutschen Klub.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 8
– Wie aus dem Wald das Feld wurde.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 9
– Die amerikanische Krankheit des Wandertriebs.
7 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 10
Wir schritten durch tiefen weichen Sand.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 14
Bunt, schreiend, grell war das Bild.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 16
Zwischen ihnen fuhren in scharfem Trab leichte zweirädrige Wägelchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 17
Pferde überall.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 19
An den Pfosten waren Hunderte von Pferden angebunden, fertig gesattelt.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 21
»Müssen zuerst nach Robert Brothers,« sagte Charley.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 22
»Dort wird der alte Mann sein.« Die Herren Gebrüder Robert hausten in einem Laden im Wandelgang.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 24
Silberverziertes Zaumzeug bedeckte den Boden.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 25
Fässer mit Mehl, Kisten mit Tabak, Säcke mit Zucker und Salz standen überall herum.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 28
»Hello!« sagte Charley.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 29
»Da ist er ja!« Er schritt auf einen Winkel zu.
4 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 30
»Guten Tag, Vater!« »Guten Tag, Charley,« sagte eine Gestalt in derbem blauem Leinen.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 32
Kein Narr ist so schlimm wie ein alter Narr, mein Junge!« »Wie du meinst, Vater.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 33
Dies ist ein junger Deutscher.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 34
Heißt Ed.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 35
Freund von mir.« »Verdammt angenehm!« sagte der Alte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 36
»Er kommt mit uns auf die Farm.« »Wie du meinst, Charley,« antwortete der Alte.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 37
»Frisch von drüben, nicht?
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 38
Well – well … Kauf' ihm, was er braucht, Charley.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 40
unit 41
Ich stand da, schüchtern wie ein kleiner Junge, und sagte kein Wort.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 47
Keines der Pferde stand ruhig; sie galoppierten durcheinander, wieherten und bissen sich.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 48
»Die weiße Stute dort in der Ecke!« sagte der alte Muchow.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 50
Rechts und links stoben die Tiere auseinander.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 52
Charley saß ruhig auf seinem Fuchs und schwang in immer größer werdenden Kreisen den Lasso.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 53
Die Schlinge zischte durch die Luft, fiel über den Hals des Pferdes, spannte sich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 55
»So schnell du kannst.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 56
Wir haben ihn!« In tollem Jagen ging es vorwärts.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 57
Brenham lag hinter uns.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 58
Da und dort tauchten noch vereinzelte Holzhütten auf, auf einsamen sandigen Strecken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 61
Ich war toll vor Aufregung, sah nichts, hörte nichts, hatte nur Augen für das wilde Pferd.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 64
Das weiße Pferd stand zitternd still und starrte uns an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 68
Beim Essen wurde ausgemacht, daß ich alles frei haben sollte und fünfzehn Dollar im Monat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 69
Wir gingen in den Hof.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 70
Charley betrachtete nachdenklich den Schimmel, der an seinem Strick zerrte.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 71
»Ich reit' ihn doch!« brummte er.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 73
Dann wär' er morgen mürbe.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 74
Aber das ist eine Schinderei.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 75
Ich will ihn schon kriegen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 76
Sie können mitreiten, wenn Sie wollen.« Ob ich wollte!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 78
Noch wehrte sich der Schimmel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 79
Der Sattelgurt hielt, der Mann blieb sitzen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 80
Dreimal, viermal ging die tolle Jagd an mir vorbei.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 81
unit 82
Aber das duldete der Mann auf seinem Rücken nicht.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 83
Da brach mit einemmal das Pferd mitten im Lauf ab.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 84
Der Reiter glitt leicht aus dem Sattel.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 85
Ich galoppierte hin.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 88
»Der Schimmel ist mein,« sagte Charley.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 89
»Texas Girl soll die Stute heißen, Texasmädel.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 91
Langsam gingen wir zurück.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 92
Es war Spätnachmittag, und die Sonne brannte nicht mehr so heiß wie mittags in Brenham.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 93
Aber noch lag es wie zitterndes Geflimmer in der drückenden Luft.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 94
Wir schritten auf weiter Grasfläche.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 96
Das Land gehörte zum größten Teil den Muchows.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 97
Fünf Zehntel waren mit Baumwolle bepflanzt, ein Zehntel mit Mais, ein Zehntel mit Zuckerrohr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 98
Der Rest war Gras und Wald.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 102
Das Haus hatte kein Fundament.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 107
»Schadet aber nichts.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 108
Wird sich schon machen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 109
Arbeit schändet nicht, sag' ich.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 111
Aber bei uns sind Sie willkommen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 113
Was ich alles träumte!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 115
Da störte mich eine polternde Stimme in meinem Reichwerden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 118
In wenigen Minuten hatten wir das Baumwollfeld erreicht, das gepflückt werden sollte.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 119
Der alte Farmer und die beiden Mädchen tauchten sofort in die Buschreihen hinein.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 127
Ich zupfte und zupfte, doch Charley war schon weit voraus.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 129
unit 131
»Ausleeren!« rief Charley.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 132
Sein Vater und seine Schwestern waren herbeigekommen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 133
Der Alte zog eine primitive Federwaage aus der Tasche und begann mit dem Wiegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 137
Immer heißer wurde es.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 140
Und am Abend des dritten Tages schrieb ich einen begeisterten Brief an meine Eltern.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 141
Ich sei Texasfarmer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 142
Mir ginge es ausgezeichnet.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 146
Drinnen begannen Maschinen zu stampfen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 148
unit 154
Ihr beide könnt dann nach Brenham hineinfahren.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 155
Euch Jungens macht es doch mehr Spaß, wenn ihr in die Stadt fahren könnt, als mir.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 156
Ich denke, wir spannen die vier Gäule vor deinen Wagen, Charley, und geben Ed die Maultiere.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 157
Mit denen kann er zurecht kommen.« »Selbstverständlich!« behauptete ich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 162
»Die Reklamereiter werden gleich kommen!« schrie er herüber.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 163
»Die was?« »Die Reklamereiter, mein Sohn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 168
Oft lauern auf einer einzigen Zufuhrstraße ein halbes Dutzend solcher Reklamereiter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 171
»Hello, Muchow, old boy!« »Guten Tag, Jungens!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 172
Warum habt ihr's denn so eilig?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 173
Ist der Sheriff hinter euch drein?« »Nee, Muchow.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 174
Der Sheriff sitzt zu Hause und rechnet sich aus, wer fürs Gehängtwerden reif ist.
5 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 176
»Der Sheriff von Brenham wird immer nachlässiger.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 178
Wir geben's auf.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 179
Dagegen können wir nicht an.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 180
Wer soll denn nun deinen Baumwollkram haben, Muchow?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 183
Der andere Reiter reichte mir eine Flasche herüber.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 184
»Neu in der Gegend hier?« »Danke.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 185
Ja.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 186
Ich bin erst kurze Zeit im Land.« »Aber Ed!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 188
»Ihr noch unschuldiger Ruf könnte sonst leiden.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 189
Denn nur einem ganz grasgrünen Grünhorn (entschuldigen Sie den Ausdruck!)
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 191
unit 193
Du kommst das nächstemal dran, John.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 194
So!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 195
Reitet, Jungens!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 197
So lass ich's mir gefallen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 198
Gute alte Texasmode, Sohn!« »Grasgrünes Grünhorn hat er gesagt!« meinte ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 199
»Nette Höflichkeit!« »Well – wenn Euer Kaiser nach Texas käme, wäre er auch ein Grünhorn.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 201
Die Pferde und die Maultiere banden wir vor dem gleichen Laden wie neulich an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 202
Charley und ich gingen in Gus Meyers Salon an der Ecke der Wandelhalle.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 203
Der kleine Raum war peinlich sauber, der Boden mit weißem Sand bedeckt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 204
An der Decke schnurrten elektrische Fächer, deren scharfer Luftzug Kühlung brachte.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 205
Männer, die an der Bar schnell ein Glas Bier hinunterstürzten, gingen und kamen fortwährend.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 207
»Der deutsche Klub,« flüsterte Charley mir zu.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 208
»Guten Morgen, gentlemen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 210
»Es würde Ihnen also ein Vergnügen sein, die nächste Auflage Bier zu stiften?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 211
Bewilligt!« »Yes, that's it,« sagte Charley.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 213
»Sie unterschätzen das alte Brenham und seine Neugierde, lieber Muchow.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 215
Prosit!« (Zu mir): »Wie gefällt's Ihnen?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 216
Gut?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 217
Ja?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 218
Das ist merkwürdig, denn zwischen Gymnasium und Farmarbeit ist doch ein wesentlicher Unterschied.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 220
Sehr verrückt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 221
Aber man darf nur keine Müdigkeit vorschützen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 223
Weder er noch die anderen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 224
Sie sprühten von Kraft und Selbstvertrauen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 227
Das Gespräch drehte sich nur um Arbeit und Geld und neue Unternehmungen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 228
In Brenham war Erntezeit in mehr als einem Sinn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 230
Das Geld rollte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 231
Der allmächtige Dollar strömte aus Dutzenden von Zufuhrstraßen nach dem Texasstädtchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 233
unit 239
»Zehntausend, oder sagen wir fünfzehntausend,« meinte der dicke Herr.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 240
In weiteren zwanzig Minuten hatte sich die Gesellschaft einverstanden erklärt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 241
Die Brenham Ice Company Limited war so gut wie gegründet!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 243
»Hustle!« sagte der Eigentümer des Brenham Herald, mich über die Brille hinweg anblinzelnd.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 244
»Kennen Sie das Wort?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 245
Drängen heißt es, sich rühren, sich mit beiden Ellbogen vorwärts schieben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 246
Hustle!« Die Zeit schwand dahin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 249
In aller Herrgottsfrühe, in der Morgendämmerung, begann immer die Arbeit der Farm.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 251
Als die Ernte eingeheimst war, ging es an Kleinarbeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 253
Die Arbeit der Texasfarm schien mir keine Bürde.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 254
»Ich kann mir kein rechtes Bild von deinem Leben machen,« schrieb mir einmal mein Vater.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 255
»Du berichtest über Reiten und Schießen und Jagen, du schreibst uns lustige Geschichten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 256
Ist das Bauernarbeit in Texas?« Doch die Arbeit war da und sie war schwer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 260
Dumpf dahin zu arbeiten, fiel hier keinem Menschen ein.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 263
Im Morgengrauen zogen wir hinaus.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 265
Über Ackerfurchen und knisternde Maisstengel ging's hinweg.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 267
Es waren Slim und seine Ehefrau Melusina Maryanne.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 268
»Schön' guten Morgen, Mistah Muchow, schön' guten Morgen, Mistah Charley, Mistah Ed.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 269
Feine Sache, so 'n kleines Feuerchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 272
Is krank.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 276
»Lord – was is' das Würfelspielen für ein' schlechte Gewohnheit!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 277
So was tut mein Slim nicht!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 279
Im Nu häufte sich ein Berg von alten Sätteln und Decken am Waldrand.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 280
Die Ponys und "mules" begannen draußen auf dem Feld zu grasen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 282
Weiße Zähne zermalmten und dicke Lippen schmatzten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 284
Charley, Ed, zählt euch dreißig Mann ab und fangt hier zu arbeiten an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 285
Die anderen kommen mit mir.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 286
Los, Kinder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 288
In langer Linie arbeiteten unsere dreißig Arbeiter, Baum an Baum.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 289
Mit rhythmischer Regelmäßigkeit fielen die hoch über die Köpfe geschwungenen Äxte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 294
Die Äste blieben liegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 296
Ihr Holz ist hart wie Eisen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 298
Schritt für Schritt drang man in den Wald ein.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 300
Stück für Stück und Tag um Tag verschwand der Wald.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 301
Die Stämme türmten sich draußen auf dem Feld auf.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 303
Nun begann die eigentliche Rodearbeit; die Stümpfe wurden herausgesprengt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 304
Das grobe Sprengpulver spaltete die Stümpfe nur und lockerte sie aus dem Erdreich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 305
Feuer mußte die Arbeit vollenden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 308
Unsere Löschmanier war höchst einfach.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 310
Mehrere Tage lang brannte das neugewonnene Land.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 313
Immer stecken sie beisammen.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 315
unit 318
unit 324
Oder zum Kaninchenjagen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 325
Oder auf die Waschbärenjagd.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 326
Dann sattelte man schleunigst die Gäule und ritt mit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 327
Es war ein merkwürdiges Leben auf der Texasfarm, das mir unbeschreiblich verlockend schien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 328
Texasfarmer wollte ich werden!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 330
Jeder Farmer verpachtete Land.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 332
Wenn die Baumwollpreise nur einigermaßen gut waren, konnte man bald genug eigenes Land besitzen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 333
Wie oft hatte mir der alte Muchow das auseinandergesetzt!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 334
Aber für den Gang meines Lebens bestimmend war sein Sohn.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 336
Es gab fast nichts zu tun auf der Farm.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 337
Das Land sah öde aus; alles war verdorrt, der Boden, die Büsche und das Laub, das Gras.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 338
Man sah nichts als einförmiges Braun.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 340
Lange Zeit sah er sich im Kreise um.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 341
Dann richtete er sich auf, wie jemand, der mit sich selber eins geworden ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 342
»Ich geh' fort,« sagte er.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 343
»Was?« »Fort geh' ich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 344
Zu verdammt langweilig!« »Wohin denn?« »Weiß noch nicht.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 345
Ich reit' jedes Jahr los.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 346
Neu-Mexiko war es letzten Winter, Indian-Territory das Jahr vorher.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 349
Das waren famose fünf Monate, sonny!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 350
Diesmal ist es El Paso!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 351
Bei El Paso wird eine neue Eisenbahn gebaut.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 352
Gus sprach davon.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 353
Da strömen die lustigsten Kerle aus dem ganzen Süden zusammen.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 354
Jawohl – es ist 'ne feine Idee!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 355
Ich reite nach El Paso!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 356
Glory Hallelujah!« Wie eine ansteckende Krankheit sprang sein Wandertrieb auf mich über.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 357
»Nimm mich mit!« sagte ich.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 358
»No, sir.« »Warum denn nicht?« »Geht nicht.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 359
Du kennst das Land noch nicht.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 360
Schließlich schlagen sie dir den Schädel ein und ich bin daran schuld.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 361
Nein.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 363
»Wie du meinst!« brummte der Alte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 364
»Eine verfluchte Wirtschaft!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 365
Du wirst schon noch in irgend 'n Malheur 'reintreten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 367
Hab' mir's schon gedacht, daß die Vagabundiererei wieder anfängt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 368
Dann reite in drei Kuckucksnamen!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 369
Lass dich nicht über die Ohren hauen!
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 370
Wo willst du hin?« »Nach El Paso, Vater.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 371
Zum Eisenbahnbau.« »Well, wie du meinst.« Ich saß da und wäre beinahe geplatzt vor Neid.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 372
Und auf einmal kam's über mich wie fiebernde Unruhe.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 373
»Wenn Charley fortgeht …« begann ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 374
»Hoh!« sagte der alte Muchow.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 375
»Da ist noch einer!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 377
unit 378
Dort, an der Kreuzung, hielten wir.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 379
Braun, dürr, öde, sandig lag die Gegend da.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 380
Auf dem untersten Ast eines Baumes am Straßenrande saßen träge vier Aasgeier.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 381
»Good bye, Vater,« sagte Charley.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 382
»Na, dann reite, mein Junge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 383
Nimm dich in acht bei den Mexikanern da drüben!« »Allright, Vater.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 384
Good bye, Ed.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 385
Besser, du bleibst beim alten Mann.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 387
unit 388
Na, er kann für sich sorgen; wer mit dem anbindet, hat alle Hände voll.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 389
Was willst du denn in Brenham anfangen?« »Keine Ahnung, sir.« »Eine verfluchte Wirtschaft!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 390
Ehem!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 391
Ich lasse jeden das aufessen, was er sich einbrocken will.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 392
Wenn einer Dummheiten machen will, dann soll er sie eben machen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 393
Man muss einen Mann mit seinem Mädel allein lassen und einen Narren mit seiner Narrheit.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 394
Good bye, mein Junge!«
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 237  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 357  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 318  1 year, 2 months ago
DrWho • 8394  translated  unit 272  1 year, 2 months ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 262  1 year, 2 months ago
Siri • 1143  commented on  unit 253  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 233  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 200  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  translated  unit 361  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  commented on  unit 199  1 year, 2 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 195  1 year, 2 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 194  1 year, 2 months ago
3Bn37Arty • 2758  translated  unit 217  1 year, 2 months ago
3Bn37Arty • 2758  translated  unit 216  1 year, 2 months ago
anitafunny • 6200  translated  unit 185  1 year, 2 months ago