de-en  S Lagerlöf. Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen - Kap1. Easy
(http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf.

Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen - Kap1. (en: The Wonderful Adventures of Nils - Chapter 1.) ...

A children's book.

(Translation from Swedish: Pauline Klaiber).

Part 1: The boy.

The Tomte. ...

Sunday, March 20.

Once there was a boy. He was about fourteen years old, tall and well-grown and flaxen-haired.

He was of little use, his favorite activities were sleeping and eating, and his greatest pleasure was to do some mischief.

It was a Sunday morning and his parents were getting ready to go to church.

The boy sat in short-sleeves on the edge of the table and thought how favourable it was that Dad and Mom were going away, and for a few hours he could do whatever he wanted.

"Now I can take down Dad's rifle and shoot without anybody objecting to it," he said to himself.

But it was almost as if the father had guessed the thoughts of his son, for when he was already standing on the threshold to go out, he stopped and turned to him.

"Since you don't want to go to church with mother and me," he said, "you should at least read the sermon at home. Will you promise me that?" "Yes," the boy replied," I can do that." But, of course, he thought he certainly wouldn't read more than what suited him. ...

It seemed to the boy as though his mother had never moved so fast before.

In an instant she was at the bookshelf, took down Luther's postil, opened it on the sermon of the day and placed the book on the table by the window.

She also opened the book of gospels and placed it next to the postil. ...

Finally, she moved the large armchair, which had been bought at the auction in the parsonage in Vemmenhög the previous year, and in which no one else except Father was allowed to sit, over to the table.

The boy thought his mother was making far too much trouble with these preparations, for he had in mind to read no more than one or two pages.

But for the second time it was as if his father could see right into his heart, for he stepped over to him and said in a strict tone, "Pay attention that you read it properly. When we come back, I'll question you about every page, and if you have skipped over something, it will go badly for you." "The sermon is fourteen and a half pages long," said his mother as though she wanted to establish the the amount of time he would need to spend reading.

"You'll have to start on it immediately if you want to finish it." With that they finally left, and when the boy stood at the door and looked for them, he felt as if he had been caught in a trap. ...

"Now they are congratulating themselves, that they have arranged it so well, that as long as they're gone, I have to sit and read the sermon," he thought to himself.

However, his father and mother certainly weren't congratulating themselves, but they were rather heartsick.

They were poor crofters, and their small property was no bigger than a garden.

When they had moved here, they could not have fed more than a pig and a few chickens; but they were extraordinarily assiduous and diligent people, and now they had cows and geese as well. ...

They had made tremendous progress, and on that fine morning they would have gone to church quite joyfully and contentedly if they didn't always have to think of their boy.

His father complained that he was so sluggish and lazy, that he didn't want to learn in school, and he was such a good-for-nothing that he could just about tend the geese.

His mother couldn't argue with that, but she was primarily distraught because he was so wild and bad, hard-hearted towards the animals and malicious against people. ...

"Oh, if only God would drive the wickedness out of him and give him another heart!" sighed the mother.

"In the end he will bring himself and us into misfortune." The boy deliberated for a long time as to whether he should read the sermon or not.

However, in the end he decided it would be best to be obedient this time.

So he sat down in the armchair from the parsonage and began to read.

But after he had babbled the words to himself in a low voice for a while, it seemed as if the babbling lulled him to sleep and he felt that he dozed off.

It was the most wonderful spring weather outside.

It was indeed the twentieth of March, but the boy lived far down in the southern part of Scania, in the village of Westvemmenhög, and spring there was already in full swing.

The trees were not green yet, but buds were sprouting forth everywhere. ...

All the ditches were full of water, coltsfoot was blooming by the side of the ditches, and the growth on the little stonewall had become brown and glossy. ...

The beech forest stretched into the distance, so to speak, and grew visibly denser, and a blue sky arched high above the earth.

The front door was ajar, and in the room one could hear the trill of the lark.

The chickens and the geese wandered around in the yard and the cows, that could feel the spring air penetrate into the stall, bellowed again and again "Moo, moo!" The boy read and nodded and fought to stay awake. "No, I don't want to sleep," he thought, "or I won't have been done with the sermon all mroning ." However, for whatever reason, he fell asleep all the same. ...

He didn't know whether he had slept for a short or long time, but he was woken by a slight noise that was audible behind his back. On the windowsill directly in front of him was a small mirror, in which one could survey most of the room.

Now, in that moment, when the boy lifted his head, he looked at the mirror and saw that the lid of mother's chest was open.

Mother owned a big, heavy oaken chest with iron hinges which nobody but her was allowed to open.

Inside she stored everything she had inherited from her mother and which had become especially dear to her.

Inside there were some old-fashioned traditional peasant women costumes made of red cloth with short camisoles and pleated skirts and bodice embroidered with pearls. ...

Also white starched head scarfs and heavy silver buckles and chains were in there.

People did not want to wear such things anymore and Mother had already often thought of selling them, however she couldn't bring herself to do so. ...

Now the boy saw quite clearly in the mirror that the lid of the chest stood open.

He could not understand how that could have happened, then before she left, mother had closed the lid.

Mother would never have left the chest open, if he remained at home alone.

He began to feel quite eerie. ...

He feared that a thief could have sneaked into the house, and so he didn't dare to move, but sat quite still and stared into the mirror.

While he sat there, waiting for the thief to show up, he began to ask himself what the black shadow might be, which was cast on the rim of the chest. ...

He watched and watched and did not want to believe what he saw. ...

But what at the beginning had seemed like a shadow, became clearer over time, and he soon realized that it was something real; it was in fact nothing else but a tomte, who sat astride the rim of the chest. ...

The boy had certainly heard talk about tomtes before, but he would never have thought that they could be so small.

The tomte which sat there on the rim was really only one span tall.

He had an old, wrinkled, beardless face and wore a black man's jacket with long laps, britches and a broad-rimmed black hat.

He looked very delicate and fine, with white lace around the neck and around the wrists, buckles on the shoes and the garters tied into a loop.

Just now he had taken the embroidered bib out of the chest und inspected the old piece of work with such reverence that he had not even noticed that the boy had woken up.

The boy was highly perplexed when he saw the tomte; but he was not really afraid of him.

Nobody could really be afraid of such a small creature.

And since the tomte was so self-absorbed that he could neither hear nor see, the boy immediately felt like playing a trick on him, pushing him into the chest and slamming the lid down, or something similar.

But the boy didn't dare touch the tomte with his hands; and thus he looked around for something in the room, with which he could give him a push.

He let his eyes wander from the canapé to the folding table and from the folding table to the stove. ..

He had a close look at the cooking pots and the coffee pot, which stood on a board next to the stove, the water jug next to the door, and the spoons, the knives and forks and the bowls and plates visible through the half-opened cupboard door.

He looked up to Father's rifle, which hung next to the Danish royal couple on the wall, and the geraniums and fuchsias, which were blooming on the window sill. ...

His very last glance fell on the old mosquito net that was hanging on the windows cross-piece. ...

Scarcely had he seen the mosquito net when he pulled it towards himself and swung it at the edge of the chest.

And he was surprised about his luck. ...

He almost didn't know himself how it had happened, but he had actually caught the tomte. ...

The poor chap lay there, head down in the long net and could not get out on his own.

For a moment the boy did not know what to do with his catch.

He carefully kept swinging the net to and fro, so that the tomte did not have time to climb out. ...

Now the tomte began to speak; asking and begging for his freedom, saying that he had done a lot of good things for the family for many years and would really be worthy of better treatment.

If the boy let him go, he would give him an old special thaler, as well as a silver chain and a gold coin as big as the cover on his father's silver watch. ...

Indeed, the ransom didn't seem especially large to the boy; but since he had the tomte in his power, he was afraid of him to some extent.

He felt that what he had gotten himself into was strange and eerie and not part of this world; so he was only too glad to get rid of it.

He thus responded quickly to the offer and held the net still so that the tomte could crawl out.

But when he was almost out of the net, the boy realized that he could have stipulated bigger things and all sorts of good things.

At least, he could have imposed the condition that the tomte had to conjure the sermon into his head.

"How stupid of me to let him free," he thought and began to swing the net back and forth again, so that the tomte would tumble back into it.

But barely had the boy done this, he got a terrible slap to his face that felt to him as if his head were shattered into a thousand pieces.

First he was thrown to one wall and then to the other, finally he fell to the floor and lay there unconscious.

When he awoke again, he was still in the hut.

There was no trace of the tomte left. ... The chest lid was closed, and the mosquito net hung in its usual place on the window.

If the boy had not felt his right cheek burning so much from the slap in the face, he would have been tempted to think of everything as a dream.

"But whatever may have happened, Father and Mother will declare that it was nothing but a dream," he thought.

"They will certainly not take anything away from the sermon because of the tomte, and it will be best if I hurry to get behind it now. "But when he went to the table, something very strange occurred to him.

Surely the room could not possibly have grown bigger.

But how did it happen that now he had to take so many more steps than usual when he went to the table?

And what had happened to the chair? ...

It didn't exactly look bigger than before, but the boy had to first climb onto the bar between the two chair legs and then finally up onto the seat.

And it was exactly the same with the table.

He could not see the top of the table, but had to climb onto the armrest of the chair.

"But what on earth is that?" said the boy.

"I really believe the tomte has bewitched the armchair, the table, and the whole room." The postil lay on the table, and apparently, it was unchanged.

But surely there was something wrong with it, for he could not read a word, but first had to climb up to the book itself.

He read a few lines, but then happened to look up.

Thereby his glance fell upon the mirror, and then he shouted out loudly, "Look, there's another one!" For in the mirror he very clearly saw a tiny little imp dressed in a pointed cap and leather pants.

"He is dressed exactly like me," said the boy, and clasped his hands together in astonishment. ...

But then he saw that the little fellow in the mirror did the same thing. ...

Then he began to pull his hair, pinch himself in the arm and spin in circles, and at once, the little fellow did the same thing. ...

Now the boy ran several times around the mirror to see whether perhaps such a little fellow was hidden behind the mirror, but he found no one behind it, and then he began to tremble all over his body. ...

For now he realized that the tomte had cast a spell over him, and that he himself was the little tot whose image he saw in the mirror.
unit 1
(http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 2
Selma Lagerlöf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 3
Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen - Kap1.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 4
Ein Kinderbuch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 5
(Übersetzung aus dem Schwedischen: Pauline Klaiber).
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 6
Teil 1: Der Junge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 7
Das Wichtelmännchen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 8
Sonntag, 20 März.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 9
Es war einmal ein Junge.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 10
Er war ungefähr vierzehn Jahre alt, groß und gut gewachsen und flachshaarig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 12
Es war an einem Sonntagmorgen, und die Eltern machten sich fertig, in die Kirche zu gehen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 18
Dem Jungen kam es vor, als ob seine Mutter sich noch nie so rasch bewegt hätte.
6 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 20
Sie schlug auch das Evangelienbuch auf und legte es neben die Postille.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 27
unit 28
Sie waren arme Kätnerleute, und ihr Gütchen war nicht größer als ein Garten.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 35
Aber schließlich hielt er es doch fürs beste, diesmal folgsam zu sein.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 36
Er setzte sich also in den Pfarrhauslehnstuhl und begann zu lesen.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 38
Draußen war das herrlichste Frühlingswetter.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 40
Die Bäume waren zwar noch nicht grün, aber überall sproßten frische Knospen hervor.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 43
Die Haustür war angelehnt, man konnte das Trillern der Lerchen im Zimmer hören.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 52
Auch weiße gestärkte Kopftücher und schwere silberne Schnallen und Ketten waren darin.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 54
Jetzt sah der Junge im Spiegel ganz deutlich, daß der Deckel der Truhe offen stand.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 57
Es wurde ihm ganz unheimlich zumute.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 60
Er sah und sah und wollte seinen Augen nicht trauen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 63
Das Wichtelmännchen, das dort auf dem Rande saß, war ja nur eine Spanne lang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 68
Vor einem so kleinen Geschöpf konnte man sich unmöglich fürchten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 71
Er ließ die Blicke vom Kanapee nach dem Klapptisch und vom Klapptisch nach dem Herd wandern.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 74
Ganz zuletzt fiel sein Blick auf ein altes Fliegennetz, das am Fensterkreuz hing.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 76
Und er war ganz überrascht über sein Glück.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 78
unit 79
Im ersten Augenblick wußte der Junge gar nicht, was er mit seinem Fang tun solle.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 91
Als er wieder erwachte, war er noch in der Hütte.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 92
Von dem Wichtelmännchen [5] war keine Spur mehr zu sehen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 93
unit 97
Das Zimmer konnte doch unmöglich größer geworden sein.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 99
Und was war denn mit dem Stuhl?
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 101
Und gerade so war es auch mit dem Tisch.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 102
unit 103
„Was ist denn aber das?“ sagte der Junge.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 11 months, 2 weeks ago
unit 106
Er las ein paar Zeilen, dann aber sah er zufällig auf.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 109
Aber da sah er, daß der Kleine im Spiegel dasselbe tat.
5 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented on  unit 35  1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  commented  1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  translated  unit 7  1 year, 3 months ago

The Swedish expression for "Wichtelmännchen" is tomte (or tomtenisse); please use "tomte for consistency; thanks:)

by bf2010 1 year, 3 months ago

(http://www.gutenberg.org/files/31114/31114-h/31114-h.htm#kap1).

Selma Lagerlöf.

Wunderbare Reise des kleinen Nils Holgersson mit den Wildgänsen - Kap1.

Ein Kinderbuch.

(Übersetzung aus dem Schwedischen: Pauline Klaiber).

Teil 1: Der Junge.

Das Wichtelmännchen.

Sonntag, 20 März.

Es war einmal ein Junge. Er war ungefähr vierzehn Jahre alt, groß und gut gewachsen und flachshaarig.

Viel nutz war er nicht, am liebsten schlief oder aß er, und sein größtes Vergnügen war, irgend etwas anzustellen.

Es war an einem Sonntagmorgen, und die Eltern machten sich fertig, in die Kirche zu gehen.

Der Junge saß in Hemdärmeln auf dem Tischrande und dachte, wie günstig das sei, daß Vater und Mutter fortgingen und er ein paar Stunden lang tun könne, was ihm beliebe.

„Jetzt kann ich Vaters Flinte herunternehmen und schießen, ohne daß es mir jemand verbietet,“ sagte er zu sich.

Aber es war fast, als habe der Vater die Gedanken seines Sohnes erraten, denn als er schon auf der Schwelle stand, um hinauszugehen, hielt er inne und wendete sich zu ihm.

„Da du nicht mit Mutter und mir in die Kirche gehen willst,“ sagte er, „so sollst du wenigstens daheim die Predigt lesen. Willst du mir das versprechen?“

„Ja,“ antwortete der Junge, „das kann ich schon.“

Aber er dachte natürlich, er werde gewiß nicht mehr lesen, als ihm behagte.

Dem Jungen kam es vor, als ob seine Mutter sich noch nie so rasch bewegt hätte.

In einem Nu war sie am Bücherbrett, nahm Luthers Postille herunter, schlug die Predigt vom Tage auf und legte das Buch auf den Tisch am Fenster.

Sie schlug auch das Evangelienbuch auf und legte es neben die Postille.

Schließlich rückte sie noch den großen Lehnstuhl an den Tisch, der im vorigen Jahr auf der Auktion im Pfarrhause zu Vemmenhög gekauft worden war und in dem sonst außer Vater niemand sitzen durfte.

Der Junge dachte, die Mutter mache sich wirklich zu viel Mühe mit diesen Vorbereitungen, denn er hatte im Sinne, nicht mehr als eine oder zwei Seiten zu lesen.

Aber zum zweiten Male war es, als ob der Vater ihm mitten ins Herz sehen könnte, denn er trat zu ihm und sagte in strengem Ton:

„Gib wohl acht, daß du ordentlich liest! Wenn wir zurückkommen, werde ich dich über jede Seite ausfragen, und wenn du etwas übergangen hast, geht es dir schlecht.“

„Die Predigt hat vierzehn und eine halbe Seite,“ sagte die Mutter, als [2] wollte sie das Maß feststellen.

„Du mußt dich gleich daran machen, wenn du fertig werden willst.“

Damit gingen sie endlich, und als der Junge unter der Tür stand und ihnen nachsah, war ihm, als sei er in einer Falle gefangen worden.

„Jetzt wünschen sie sich Glück, daß sie es so gut eingerichtet haben, und daß ich, so lange sie weg sind, über der Predigt sitzen muß,“ dachte er.

Aber der Vater und die Mutter wünschten sich sicherlich nicht Glück, sondern sie waren ganz betrübt.

Sie waren arme Kätnerleute, und ihr Gütchen war nicht größer als ein Garten.

Als sie hierhergezogen waren, hatten sie nicht mehr als ein Schwein und ein paar Hühner füttern können;

aber sie waren außerordentlich strebsame und tüchtige Leute, und jetzt hatten sie auch Kühe und Gänse.

Sie waren ungeheuer vorwärts gekommen und wären an dem schönen Morgen ganz froh und zufrieden in die Kirche gewandert, wenn sie nicht immer an ihren Jungen hätten denken müssen.

Der Vater klagte, daß er so träg und faul sei, in der Schule habe er nicht lernen wollen, und er sei ein solcher Taugenichts, daß man ihn mit knapper Not zum Gänsehüten gebrauchen könne.

Die Mutter konnte nichts dagegen sagen, aber sie war hauptsächlich betrübt, weil er so wild und böse war, hartherzig gegen die Tiere und boshaft gegen die Menschen.

„Ach, wenn Gott ihm doch die Bosheit austreiben und ihm ein andres Herz geben würde!“ seufzte die Mutter.

„Er bringt schließlich noch sich selbst und uns ins Unglück.“

Der Junge überlegte lange, ob er die Predigt lesen solle oder nicht.

Aber schließlich hielt er es doch fürs beste, diesmal folgsam zu sein.

Er setzte sich also in den Pfarrhauslehnstuhl und begann zu lesen.

Aber als er eine Weile die Wörter halblaut vor sich hingeplappert hatte, war es, als schläfre ihn das Gemurmel ein, und er fühlte, daß er einnickte.

Draußen war das herrlichste Frühlingswetter.

Es war zwar erst der zwanzigste März, aber der Junge wohnte weit drunten im südlichen Schonen, im Dorfe Westvemmenhög, und da war der Frühling schon in vollem Gange.

Die Bäume waren zwar noch nicht grün, aber überall sproßten frische Knospen hervor.

Alle Gräben standen voll Wasser, der Huflattich blühte am Grabenrande, und das Gesträuch, das auf dem Steinmäuerchen wuchs, war braun und glänzend geworden.

Der Buchenwald in der Ferne dehnte sich gleichsam und wurde zusehends dichter, und über der Erde wölbte sich ein hoher, blauer Himmel.

Die Haustür war angelehnt, man konnte das Trillern der Lerchen im Zimmer hören.

Die Hühner und die Gänse spazierten auf dem Hofe umher, und die Kühe, die die Frühlingsluft bis in den Stall hinein spürten, brüllten hin und wieder: „Muh, muh!“

Der Junge las und nickte und kämpfte mit dem Schlafe. „Nein, ich will nicht schlafen,“ dachte er, „sonst werde ich den ganzen Vormittag mit der Predigt nicht fertig.“

Aber was auch der Grund sein mochte, – er schlief dennoch ein.

Er wußte nicht, ob er kurz oder lang geschlafen hatte, aber er erwachte [3] von einem leichten Geräusch, das hinter seinem Rücken hörbar wurde. Auf dem Fensterbrett, gerade vor ihm, stand ein kleiner Spiegel, in dem man fast die ganze Stube überschauen konnte.

In dem Augenblick nun, wo der Junge den Kopf aufrichtete, fiel sein Blick in den Spiegel, und da sah er, daß der Deckel von Mutters Truhe aufgeschlagen war.

Mutter besaß eine große, schwere eichene Truhe mit eisernen Beschlägen, die außer ihr niemand öffnen durfte.

Darin verwahrte sie alles, was sie von ihrer Mutter geerbt hatte und was ihr besonders ans Herz gewachsen war.

Da drinnen lagen einige altmodische Bauerntrachten aus rotem Tuch mit kurzen Leibchen und gefältelten Röcken und perlenbestickten Bruststücken.

Auch weiße gestärkte Kopftücher und schwere silberne Schnallen und Ketten waren darin.

Die Leute wollten solche Sachen jetzt nicht mehr tragen, und Mutter hatte schon wiederholt daran gedacht, sie zu verkaufen, hatte das aber doch nie übers Herz gebracht.

Jetzt sah der Junge im Spiegel ganz deutlich, daß der Deckel der Truhe offen stand.

Er konnte nicht begreifen, wie das zugegangen war, denn Mutter hatte, bevor sie fortging, den Deckel zugemacht.

Das wäre Mutter nicht passiert, daß sie die Truhe offen gelassen hätte, wenn er allein zu Hause blieb.

Es wurde ihm ganz unheimlich zumute.

Er fürchtete, ein Dieb könnte sich hereingeschlichen haben, und wagte nicht, sich zu rühren, sondern saß ganz still und starrte in den Spiegel hinein.

Während er so dasaß und wartete, daß der Dieb sich zeige, begann er sich zu fragen, was das wohl für ein schwarzer Schatten sei, der auf den Rand der Truhe fiel.

Er sah und sah und wollte seinen Augen nicht trauen.

Aber was dort im Anfang einem Schatten geglichen hatte, wurde immer deutlicher, und bald merkte er, daß es etwas Wirkliches war;

und es war in der Tat nichts andres als ein Wichtelmännchen, das rittlings auf dem Rande der Truhe saß.

Der Junge hatte wohl schon von Wichtelmännchen reden hören, aber er hatte sich nie gedacht, daß sie so klein sein könnten.

Das Wichtelmännchen, das dort auf dem Rande saß, war ja nur eine Spanne lang.

Es hatte ein altes, runzliges, bartloses Gesicht und trug einen schwarzen Rock mit langen Schößen, Kniehosen und einen breitrandigen schwarzen Hut.

Es sah sehr zierlich und fein aus, mit weißen Spitzen um den Hals und um die Handgelenke, Schnallen an den Schuhen und die Strumpfbänder in eine Schleife gebunden.

Jetzt eben hatte es einen gestickten Brustlatz aus der Truhe herausgenommen und betrachtete die alte Arbeit mit solcher Andacht, daß es das Erwachen des Jungen gar nicht bemerkt hatte.

Der Junge war äußerst verdutzt, als er das Wichtelmännchen sah;

aber eigentlich Angst hatte er nicht vor ihm.

Vor einem so kleinen Geschöpf konnte man sich unmöglich fürchten.

Und da das Wichtelmännchen von seinem eignen Tun so hingenommen war, daß es weder hörte noch sah, bekam der Junge sogleich große Lust, ihm einen Streich zu spielen, es in die Truhe hineinzustoßen und den Deckel zuzuschlagen, oder etwas Ähnliches.

[4]

Aber das Wichtelmännchen mit den Händen anzurühren, das getraute sich der Junge doch nicht;

und deshalb sah er sich nach etwas im Zimmer um, womit er ihm einen Stoß versetzen könnte.

Er ließ die Blicke vom Kanapee nach dem Klapptisch und vom Klapptisch nach dem Herd wandern.

Er musterte die Kochtöpfe und die Kaffeekanne, die auf einem Brett neben dem Herde standen, den Wasserkrug neben der Tür, und die Löffel, die Messer und Gabeln und die Schüsseln und Teller, die durch die halbgeöffnete Schranktür sichtbar waren.

Er sah hinauf zu Vaters Flinte, die neben dem dänischen Königspaar an der Wand hing, und nach den Pelargonien und Fuchsien, die auf dem Fensterbrett blühten.

Ganz zuletzt fiel sein Blick auf ein altes Fliegennetz, das am Fensterkreuz hing.

Kaum hatte er das Fliegennetz erblickt, als er es auch schon zu sich heranzog und das Netz nach dem Truhenrande schwang.

Und er war ganz überrascht über sein Glück.

Er wußte beinahe selbst nicht, wie es zugegangen war, – aber er hatte das Wichtelmännchen wirklich gefangen.

Der arme Kerl lag, den Kopf nach unten, in dem langen Netze und konnte sich nicht mehr heraushelfen.

Im ersten Augenblick wußte der Junge gar nicht, was er mit seinem Fang tun solle.

Er schwang nur immer das Netz sorglich hin und her, damit das Wichtelmännchen keine Zeit bekomme, herauszuklettern.

Jetzt begann das Wichtelmännchen zu sprechen;

es bat und flehte um seine Freiheit und sagte, es habe der Familie seit vielen Jahren viel Gutes getan und wäre wirklich einer besseren Behandlung wert.

Wenn der Junge es loslasse, wolle es ihm einen alten Speziestaler geben sowie eine silberne Kette und eine Goldmünze, die so groß sei wie der Deckel an der silbernen Uhr seines Vaters.

Dem Jungen kam zwar das Lösegeld nicht gerade groß vor;

aber seit er das Wichtelmännchen in seiner Gewalt hatte, fürchtete er sich gewissermaßen vor ihm.

Er fühlte, daß er sich in etwas eingelassen hatte, was fremd und unheimlich war und nicht in diese Welt gehörte;

deshalb war er nur sehr froh, es loszuwerden.

Er ging also schnell auf das Angebot ein und hielt das Netz still, damit das Wichtelmännchen herauskriechen könne.

Als dieses aber beinahe aus dem Netz heraus war, fiel dem Jungen ein, daß er sich größere Dinge und alles mögliche Gute hätte ausbedingen können.

Jedenfalls hätte er die Bedingung stellen können, daß ihm das Wichtelmännchen die Predigt in den Kopf zaubern müsse.

„Wie dumm von mir, daß ich es freiließ,“ dachte er und begann das Netz aufs neue hin und her zu schwingen, damit das Wichtelmännchen wieder hineinpurzle.

Aber kaum hatte der Junge das getan, da bekam er eine fürchterliche Ohrfeige, daß ihm war, als zerspringe ihm der Kopf in tausend Stücke.

Er flog zuerst an die eine Wand und dann an die andre, schließlich fiel er auf den Boden und blieb da bewußtlos liegen.

Als er wieder erwachte, war er noch in der Hütte.

Von dem Wichtelmännchen [5] war keine Spur mehr zu sehen. Der Truhendeckel war geschlossen, und das Fliegennetz hing an seinem gewöhnlichen Platz am Fenster.

Wenn dem Jungen nicht die rechte Wange von der Ohrfeige so sehr gebrannt hätte, hätte er sich versucht gefühlt, alles für einen Traum zu halten.

„Was aber auch geschehen sein mag, jedenfalls werden Vater und Mutter behaupten, daß es nichts gewesen sei als ein Traum,“ dachte er.

„Sie werden mir wegen des Wichtelmännchens sicher nichts von der Predigt abziehen, und es wird am besten sein, wenn ich mich jetzt eilig dahinter mache.“

Aber als er an den Tisch ging, kam ihm etwas sehr verwunderlich vor.

Das Zimmer konnte doch unmöglich größer geworden sein.

Woher kam es denn aber, daß er jetzt so viel mehr Schritte machen mußte als sonst, wenn er an den Tisch ging?

Und was war denn mit dem Stuhl?

Er sah zwar nicht gerade aus, als sei er größer als vorher, aber der Junge mußte zuerst auf die Leiste zwischen den Stuhlbeinen steigen und dann vollends auf den Sitz hinaufklettern.

Und gerade so war es auch mit dem Tisch.

Er konnte nicht auf die Tischplatte hinaufsehen, sondern mußte auf die Armlehne des Stuhles steigen.

„Was ist denn aber das?“ sagte der Junge.

„Ich glaube wahrhaftig, das Wichtelmännchen hat den Lehnstuhl und den Tisch und die ganze Stube verhext.“

Die Postille lag auf dem Tische, und anscheinend war sie unverändert.

Aber etwas Verkehrtes mußte doch daran sein, denn er konnte kein Wort lesen, sondern mußte erst auf das Buch selbst hinaufsteigen.

Er las ein paar Zeilen, dann aber sah er zufällig auf.

Dabei fiel sein Blick in den Spiegel, und da rief er ganz laut:

„Ei sieh, da ist ja noch einer!“

Denn im Spiegel sah er ganz deutlich einen winzig kleinen Knirps in einer Zipfelmütze und Lederhosen.

„Der ist genau so angezogen wie ich,“ sagte der Junge und schlug vor Verwunderung die Hände zusammen.

Aber da sah er, daß der Kleine im Spiegel dasselbe tat.

Da begann er sich an den Haaren zu ziehen, sich in den Arm zu kneifen und sich im Kreise zu drehen, und augenblicklich tat der Kleine im Spiegel dasselbe.

Jetzt lief der Junge ein paarmal um den Spiegel herum, um zu sehen, ob vielleicht so ein kleiner Kerl hinter dem Spiegel verborgen sei, aber er fand niemand dahinter, und da begann er vor Schrecken am ganzen Leibe zu zittern.

Denn jetzt begriff er, daß das Wichtelmännchen ihn selbst verzaubert hatte, und daß er selbst der kleine Knirps war, dessen Bild er im Spiegel sah.