de-en  E. Rosen, Dt.Lausbub in Amerika, Kap. 5
Dear translators, I hope you still have further desire to follow the scallywag? There are still 10 more chapters ready. Have fun!

My last dollar.

Finding the way to work – the guidepost...– if only I were a shoemaker! ... – With the head of the chancellery in the German Consulate. - At the telegraph office. - The last piece of silver. - The good Samaritan. - Now begins a new life ... The situation was humorous: How did it actually happen that one has a clean slate in life? What then did soldiers of fortune do, when they ran out of money? Where now was the guidepost which pointed towards work and a busy life?

Me, a happy-go-lucky guy didn't find the guidepost - day by day I had wandered around the island city in the simmering heat, in the bustling port, in main streets seething with people, gaping, staring, and became more confused and helpless with every day.
Lady Logic declared bluntly and clear as daylight that something had to happen, anything, for even a happy-go-lucky guy (who calmly kept on staying at Galveston's best and most expensive hotel) recognized the big truth that life cost money.
And the money dwindled away and soon I would end up like the poor man in the Black Wale Fish in Askalon.

To find the guidepost - the guidepost ... Every day, hour by hour, I browsed the classified ads section of the newspapers in the hotel's vestibule.
There were tailors required, and there was an active inquiry for shoemakers and they seemed to be scrambling for an apprentice baker; but any position I could have filled never appeared in the newspaper. More than once I thought: "If only I were a shoemaker or at least a tailor!
My Latin and my Greek and all of my humanist education didn't seem to be worth a penny in this town in Texas.
God almighty, one couldn't simply ask total strangers if they perhaps had a job for me! How did one do that?
Hour by hour I agonised over the wording for a job application. Educated young German seeks - - well, what actually? What could I really offer?

Then I had a great idea. The German Reich kept German consuls in the big cities of foreign countries to provide advice and assistance to nationals of the German Reich. ...
Of course! That is where I had to go and there I would be given help! I asked for the address at the hotel and ran straight away to the consulate, completely overjoyed pressed the handle down and - "Can't you knock?" I heard a voice shouting at me.

In a barren room with two high desks painted yellow, pictures of the Emperor and the Empress and a huge wooden barrier sat a man on a high swivel chair who glared over his glasses at me in a rage.
Penholders stuck behind both of his ears.

"What do you want?" "I wish to speak to the German consul." "Isn't here. And anyway - just say what you want. I am the head of the chancellery." Then I really was embarrassed and did not quite know how I should submit my request.

"I have just arrived from Germany and -" "Well now, and what do you want here?" The question baffled me. "I don't rightly know ... I would like some advice -" The head of the chancellery climbed down from his hig seat and positioned himself in front of me.

"So? Sooo? Do you have any papers?" My German passport made the stern gentleman to be a bit friendlier.

"So what?" In my embarrassment I came right to the point. "Yes, I would appreciate it very much, if you could give me a piece of advice. The fact is that I have only very little money and- " Here the head of the chancellery literally pulled himself together.
In stern disapproval, the beady eyes behind the spectacles glared at me, and, snarling, as if he were reeling off what he learned by heart, he said: "The German who came to America would have preferred to remain in Germany in the first place.
Secondly, the German consulate cannot provide work for him because it has no influence on the job market and must, as an authority, refuse to deal with arranging employment!" "But –" "Thirdly, the consulate does not have any means for the purpose of support.
Well - if you don't have any money left, you can come back and have a card to the German club.
There you'll get a quarter dollar and a voucher for a meal." "Sir - do I look as if I needed that?" I said angrily.
I felt as if the earth would swallow me up. ... This man was a barbarian, a cad, a – –"Well, one cannot know that!" He sneered at me and I stared at him.

"Do you want to know anything else?" " Sir, I am classically educated!" I cried, slammed the door shut, and stumbled down the stairs.
Derisive laughter rang out after me.
Red with anger, I ran down the street.
I would write to the Consul, and give him a piece of my mind about the conducts of his head of the chancellory. ... I would write to my father and ask him to complain to the Bavarian ministry, and - Lord, what should I do now!

Today was the weekend and after paying the weekly bill in the hotel, I would probably have no more money left.
What to do - what to do? I decided to copy the German-sounding names of businessmen from the directory and ask them for advice, however hard it would be for me.

Something had to turn up somehow ... but what if nothing turned up!
If I would be without money? Bitter thoughts came to me and resulted in bitter self-recriminations.
Despite and in spite of everything had it been right to have sent me out into the wide world? ...
And suddenly, in my despair, the thought came to me that the money in my pocket was the only link between me and the help from home. ...
Today I could still send a telegram, tomorrow I wouldn't have the money for a cable anymore. . . I went to the telegaph office. ...
On a window sill at a quiet corner I filled in one form after another, only to tear one after the other to pieces. "Wire money immediately." No, that wasn't right; one had to give at least one reason, short and precise, for of course each word would cost a lot of money. ... "Helpless, please wire money." I tore this form up quickly, barely written, I was so ashamed of myself.
Stranded. How that sounded. No: "Hundred dollars please, Hotel City Galveston, since job search still unsuccessful." I hesitated again. I imagined the maid would bring the telegram into the living room. I imagined my father would shrug his shoulders and say something harsh and ugly, and my mother would ask ... What if I wired my mother? "Still no luck hard up send hundred dollars quickly, Hotel City Galveston." Admittedly, a hundred dollars was a lot of money - "No!" I said suddenly, so loudly that gentlemen passing stared at me inquisitively. No!

May it go as it wanted. They were completely right, there in beloved old Munich - they had had enough grief and worries with me.
It was nothing more than damned decency, not to bother them with my affairs.

The weekly bill was due. The weekly bill that devoured the last of my money.
The man in the hotel office raked in bank notes and silver indifferently and also asked me whether I had any special wishes and whether I had thought of staying for a longer time.

"Don't know yet," I said.

I sat down in one of the wicker chairs in the smoking room, puffed a cigarette and furtively felt the hard silver dollar in my vest pocket.
That was all I had left - one dollar. A single piece of silver stood between me and nothingness.
I gritted my teeth and tried to think. ... It was about three o'clock in the afternoon.
First of all, you have to pawn or sell your watch and some suits, I told myself. ... In America there will probably be pawnshops as well.
Of course, I would have to leave the hotel today; somewhere there must be cheaper places to stay.
I decided to ask a policeman about it. And then I had to look for work, find work, or else - I did not dare think about the other possibility, what would happen if I didn't find any work. I seemed to me to be so lost, so helpless, so – – Then a gentleman who was sitting next to me, leaning far back in his rocking chair with his legs crossed, spoke to me.
He had pushed the snow-white felt hat with a huge brim far back on his neck, and a comfortable suit made of thin raw silk hung loosely on his slender frame. ...
Angular face. Merrily blinking eyes. ... It is awfully hot today.
If I couldn't stomach the heat? ... I would look miserable. If I did't feel well? ...

"No. Yes. But I do!" I stammered confusedly. ...

"Well, you should have a whiskey! Fine thing, such a small whiskey, if you are not quite alright. Come with me to the bar! – Alright! Gosh, you looked as white as chalk just now. Better now?" "Yes, thanks," I murmured.

"And that's alright," smiled the Texan, leaning comfortably against the bar. "Are you fresh from over there? Yes? Since it seemed that way to me.
My father also came to Texas from Germany. Yeah, but I prefer to speak English. What do you want to begin here?" "That I just don't know!" I blurted out.

"I can imagine!" he said. He looked at me thoughtfully and chewed on his cigar. "Well, let's go back to the smoking room if that's OK with you. Chat a bit. Yes?" We sat down in the soft wickerwork chairs, me and the first person in this Texan town who minded me. ...

"Well - and how do you like our good old Texas?'" "Not at all!" I groaned. ...

Then he laughed and slapped his knee. "Man, tell me if you want.
Certainly don't want to impose. But would like to give you some advice." Mr. Happy-go-lucky didn't feel compelled to hold back for long in his misery and blurted out how bad off and how down on his luck he was.

"There's nothing to it. Not at all bad!" the Texan said indifferently when I had finished.
And then he suddenly burst out laughing.

"Ho - So you really do not have any money left?" "N-no!" "And then you live in the best hotel!" He had tears from laughing.

"I'm leaving today." "Where to then? Without money?" "I just have to pawn some things." "Oh!" He laughed and laughed.

"What else am I going to do?" The Texan laboriously lit a new cigar. "Nonsense!" he said. "Better men than you have been without money.
There is nothing to it. Just have to work. Every child can earn some money to live on. What can you actually do?" Then I blurted out my whole little life's story.

"Difficult!" he said. "Very difficult. But even for the thickest tree an ax has grown.
I do not believe Galveston is something for you. Here everything crowds together. Hm, yes, you are a greenhorn in the country, you've been doing nothing but attend school all your life and you have never held a job.
Do you want to work - anything at all?" "Of course!" "Sure? Any work?" "Anything!" "Well, come with us to our farm!" I let myself fall back into the chair and literally gasped for breath.

I could feel a hot flush coming over me. I could hardly speak.

"To your farm?" I stammered. "Are you saying - are you saying that seriously?" "Of course." "I don't know how to thank you --" "Nonsense, man. It's quite a simple business arrangement. You are young and strong and you can no doubt work if you want to.
The "old man" and I have our hands full with the work on the farm. White men are rare and expensive during the harvest season and the non-whites down here are the laziest rascals in God's wide world. Deal?
And that's allright!" And he held out his right hand to shake on it.

For hours I couldn't go to sleep that night. ... I saw myself flying along on a galloping horse - saw myself working outside in the fresh air - saw myself as a free man who earned his living with his own hands ... The Texan's name was Charles Muchow. His father's farm was one hundred miles north of Galveston, near the small town of Brenham, and tomorrow already he wanted to be on the way back, me with him.
He had bought a new farm wagon and a rotary plow in Galveston. ... What would have befallen me if chance had not made me meet him?
Now my worries had come to an end and the new life began. From the very first moment I had liked the young Texan and his curious self-confidence and unswerving serenity, and during the long evening hours in the smoking room we had alrmost become friends.
He called me Ed, I called him Charley.

"Mister is not in fashion in Texas," he had said, "and your Christian name is too complicated.... Let's say Ed. Short and clear - simply Ed!" Early the next morning he woke me up and after breakfast we went to the Santa Fe Railway train station. The cars of our train were inscribed with golden letters: Lone Star Express - "Einsamer-Stern-Expreß" in German.

We got on. A soft carpet covered the floor, and instead of benches or upholstered seats, comfortable armchairs with soft leather seats stood in long rows, two by two, side by side, which could be adjusted in all possible positions.
On the backs of the chairs in front of us were small flags with a star pressed in the corner, and again underneath stood "Lone Star Express" in gold letters; small blue stars on a red background were fashioned on the carpet of the carriage; everywhere, on the walls, on the doors, was the flag with the lone star - the emblem of the State of Texas.

The express flashed on. Between large, white shimmering areas.
The sun was blazing from deep blue skies, already oppressively hot, despite the early morning hour.
The immense masses of deep green stretched beyond the horizon; shrubbery, bushes in endless dead straight rows, in between were fine lines of black earth.
Above the massive green, it lay like freshly fallen snow, scattered in huge flakes, in shining silver snowballs.
Like threads of silver and spiderwebs the white beauty spread out throughout the whole country.

We rode through the kingdom of King Cotton.
unit 1
Liebe Übersetzer, ich hoffe ihr habt noch weiter Lust, dem Lausbub zu folgen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 2
Es liegen noch 10 weitere Kapitel bereit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 3
Viel Spaß!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 4
Mein letzter Dollar.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 5
Den Weg zur Arbeit finden – den Wegweiser … – Wär' ich nur ein Schuster!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 6
– Beim Herrn Kanzleichef im deutschen Konsulat.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 7
– Auf dem Telegraphenamt.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 8
– Das letzte Silberstück.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 9
– Der gute Samariter.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 11
Was taten Glückssoldaten denn, wenn ihnen das Geld ausging?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 12
Wo stand nun der Wegweiser, der zu Arbeit und tätigem Leben wies?
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 18
Mehr als einmal dachte ich: Wärst du nur ein Schuster oder doch wenigstens ein Schneider!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 21
Wie machte man es?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 22
Stundenlang quälte ich mich mit der Abfassung eines Stellengesuches.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 23
Gebildeter junger Deutscher sucht – – Ja, was denn eigentlich?
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 24
Was konnte ich denn leisten?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 25
Da kam die große Idee.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 27
Natürlich!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 28
Dorthin mußte ich gehen und dort würde mir geholfen werden!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 31
Hinter seinen beiden Ohren steckten Federhalter.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 32
»Was wollen Se?« »Ich wünsche, den deutschen Konsul zu sprechen.« »Is' nich' da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 33
Un' überhaupt – sagen Se nur, was Se wollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 36
»So?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 37
So–oh?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 38
Haben Se Papiere?« Mein deutscher Reichspaß machte den Gestrengen um eine Nuance freundlicher.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 39
»Na, und?« In meiner Verlegenheit tappte ich sofort in medias res hinein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 40
»Ja, ich wäre Ihnen sehr dankbar, wenn Sie mir einen Rat geben könnten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 46
Mir war, als müßte ich in den Boden sinken.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 49
Ein Hohngelächter gellte mir nach.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 50
Mit zornrotem Kopf lief ich die Straße entlang.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 54
Was tun – was tun?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 56
Irgend etwas mußte sich doch finden … Wenn sich aber nichts fand!
4 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 57
Wenn ich da stand ohne Geld?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 58
Bittere Gedanken stiegen in mir auf und formten sich zu bitteren Vorwürfen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 65
Hilflos.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 66
Wie das klang.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 70
Nein!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 71
Mochte es gehen wie es wollte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 73
War weiter nichts als verdammte Anstandspflicht, sie mit meinen Affären nicht mehr zu behelligen.
5 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 74
Die Wochenrechnung war fällig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 75
Die Wochenrechnung, die mein letztes Geld verschlang.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 77
»Weiß noch nicht,« sagte ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 79
Das war mir übrig geblieben – ein Dollar.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 80
Ein einziges Silberstück stand zwischen mir und dem Nichts.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 81
Ich biß die Zähne zusammen und versuchte, nachzudenken.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 82
Es war etwa drei Uhr nachmittags.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 83
Zuerst mußt du deine Uhr und ein paar Anzüge versetzen oder verkaufen, sagte ich mir.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 84
In Amerika wird's wohl auch Leihhäuser geben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 85
unit 86
Ich beschloß, einen Polizisten darüber zu befragen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 90
Scharfgeschnittenes Gesicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 91
Lustig blinzelnde Augen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 92
Es sei furchtbar heiß heute.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 93
Ob ich die Hitze nicht vertragen könne?
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 94
Ich sähe miserabel aus.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 95
Ob ich mich nicht wohl fühlte?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 96
»Nein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 97
Ja.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 98
Doch!« stotterte ich verwirrt.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 99
»Well, sollten einen Whisky nehmen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 100
Feine Sache, so 'n kleiner Whisky, wenn man nicht ganz allright ist.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 101
Kommen Sie mit mir zur Bar!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 102
– So!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 103
Mann, vorhin sahen Sie ja kreideweiß aus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 104
Besser jetzt?« »Ja, danke,« murmelte ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 105
»And that's allright,« lächelte der Texaner, sich bequem gegen die Bar lehnend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 106
»Sie sind frisch von drüben?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 107
Ja?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 108
Kam mir nämlich so vor.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 109
Mein Vater ist auch von Deutschland nach Texas gekommen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 110
Hm ja, ich spreche aber lieber englisch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 111
Was wollen Sie hier beginnen?« »Das weiß ich eben nicht!« platzte ich heraus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 112
»Kann ich mir denken!« meinte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 113
Er sah mich nachdenklich an und kaute an seiner Zigarre.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 114
»Well, lassen Sie uns wieder ins Rauchzimmer gehen, wenn's Ihnen recht ist.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 115
Bißchen plaudern.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 117
»Well – und wie gefällt's Ihnen im guten alten Texas?« »Gar nicht!« stöhnte ich.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 118
Da lachte er auf und schlug sich aufs Knie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 119
»Mann, erzählen Sie 'mal, wenn Sie wollen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 120
Will mich ja nicht aufdrängen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 122
»Ist nichts dabei.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 123
Gar nicht schlimm!« sagte der Texaner gleichmütig, als ich geendet hatte.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 124
Und dann brach er auf einmal in schallendes Gelächter aus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 126
»Ich will heute noch ausziehen.« »Wohin denn?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 127
Ohne Geld?« »Ich muß eben Sachen versetzen.« »Ach so!« Er lachte und lachte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 128
»Was soll ich denn sonst anfangen?« Der Texaner zündete sich umständlich eine neue Zigarre an.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 129
»Unsinn!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 130
»Bessere Männer als Sie sind schon ohne Geld dagesessen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 131
Is' nix dabei.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 132
Müssen eben arbeiten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 133
Das bißchen Geld zum Leben verdienen kann jedes Kind.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 134
Was können Sie denn eigentlich?« Da sprudelte ich mein ganzes bißchen Lebenslauf hervor.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 135
»Schwierig!« sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 136
»Sehr schwierig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 137
Aber auch für den dicksten Baum ist eine Axt gewachsen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 138
Ich glaub' nicht, daß Galveston etwas für Sie ist.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 139
Hier drängt sich alles zusammen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 141
Wollen Sie denn arbeiten – irgend etwas?« »Natürlich!« »Sicher?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 143
Siedendheiß lief es mir über den Körper.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 144
Ich konnte kaum sprechen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 145
»Auf Ihre Farm?« stotterte ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 147
Ist ein ganz einfaches Geschäft.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 148
Sie sind jung und Sie sind stark und Sie können ganz zweifellos arbeiten, wenn Sie wollen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 149
Der "alte Mann" und ich haben alle Hände voll Arbeit auf der Farm.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 151
Abgemacht?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 152
And that's allright!« Und er streckte mir die Rechte zum Handschlag hin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 153
Stundenlang konnte ich nicht einschlafen in dieser Nacht.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 156
Er hatte einen neuen Farmwagen und einen Rotationspflug in Galveston gekauft.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 157
Wie's mir wohl ergangen wäre, wenn nicht der Zufall mich mit ihm zusammengeführt hätte?
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 158
Jetzt hatten die Sorgen ein Ende und das neue Leben begann.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 160
Er nannte mich Ed, ich nannte ihn Charley.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 161
unit 162
Sagen wir Ed.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 165
Wir stiegen ein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 168
Der Expreß jagte dahin.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 169
Zwischen weiten, weißglänzenden Flächen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 170
Aus tiefblauem Himmel brannte die Sonne, drückend heiß schon, trotz des frühen Morgens.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 173
Wie Silberfäden und Spinngewebe breitete sich die weiße Schönheit über das ganze Land.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 174
Wir fuhren durch das Reich des Königs Baumwolle.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4798  translated  unit 151  1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4798  translated  unit 65  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 115  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 102  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 90  1 year, 3 months ago
3Bn37Arty • 2765  translated  unit 107  1 year, 3 months ago
3Bn37Arty • 2765  translated  unit 97  1 year, 3 months ago
3Bn37Arty • 2765  translated  unit 96  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 70  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 65  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 37  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 36  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 3  1 year, 3 months ago
Merlin57 • 3754  translated  unit 27  1 year, 3 months ago

Liebe Übersetzer, ich hoffe ihr habt noch weiter Lust, dem Lausbub zu folgen? Es liegen noch 10 weitere Kapitel bereit. Viel Spaß!

Mein letzter Dollar.

Den Weg zur Arbeit finden – den Wegweiser … – Wär' ich nur ein Schuster! – Beim Herrn Kanzleichef im deutschen Konsulat. – Auf dem Telegraphenamt. – Das letzte Silberstück. – Der gute Samariter. – Nun fängt ein neues Leben an …

In der Situation lag Humor:

Wie machte man es eigentlich, sich das Leben um die Ohren pfeifen zu lassen? Was taten Glückssoldaten denn, wenn ihnen das Geld ausging? Wo stand nun der Wegweiser, der zu Arbeit und tätigem Leben wies?

Bruder Leichtfuß fand den Wegweiser nicht –

Tag für Tag war ich in der backofenheißen Inselstadt umhergewandert, im Hafengetriebe, in menschenwimmelnden Hauptstraßen, staunend, starrend, und wurde mit jedem Tag verwirrter, hilfloser.
Frau Logika dozierte mit sonnenklarer Deutlichkeit, daß etwas geschehen müsse, irgend etwas, denn selbst Bruder Leichtfuß (der seelenruhig im besten und teuersten Hotel Galvestons wohnen blieb) erkannte die große Wahrheit, daß das Leben Geld kostet.
Und das Geld schwand dahin und bald würd' mir's ergehen wie dem armen Mann im schwarzen Walfisch zu Askalon.

Den Wegweiser finden – den Wegweiser …

Stundenlang jeden Tag stöberte ich im Hotelvestibül den Anzeigenteil der Zeitungen durch.
Da wurden Schneider verlangt, und nach Schustern war rege Nachfrage, und um Bäckergesellen schien man sich zu reißen; aber irgend eine Stellung, die ich hätte ausfüllen können, stand niemals in der Zeitung. Mehr als einmal dachte ich: Wärst du nur ein Schuster oder doch wenigstens ein Schneider!
Keinen Pfennig schienen mein Latein und mein Griechisch und die ganze humanistische Bildung in dieser Texasstadt wert zu sein.
Herrgott, man konnte doch nicht wildfremde Menschen fragen, ob sie vielleicht etwas für einen zu tun hätten! Wie machte man es?
Stundenlang quälte ich mich mit der Abfassung eines Stellengesuches. Gebildeter junger Deutscher sucht – – Ja, was denn eigentlich? Was konnte ich denn leisten?

Da kam die große Idee. Das deutsche Reich unterhielt in den großen Städten des Auslandes deutsche Konsuln, um deutschen Reichsangehörigen mit Rat und Tat beizustehen.
Natürlich! Dorthin mußte ich gehen und dort würde mir geholfen werden! Ich ließ mir im Hotel die Adresse geben und rannte spornstreichs nach dem Konsulat, drückte ganz aufgeregt vor Freude auf die Türklinke und –

»Können Se nich' anklopfen?« schrie mir eine Stimme entgegen.

In einem kahlen Raum mit zwei gelbangestrichenen Stehpulten, den Bildern des Kaisers und der Kaiserin und einer riesigen Holzbarriere saß auf hohem Drehstuhl ein Mann, der mich wutentbrannt über seine Brille hinweg anfunkelte.
Hinter seinen beiden Ohren steckten Federhalter.

»Was wollen Se?«

»Ich wünsche, den deutschen Konsul zu sprechen.«

»Is' nich' da. Un' überhaupt – sagen Se nur, was Se wollen. Ich bin der Kanzleichef.«

Da genierte ich mich gewaltig und wußte nicht recht, wie ich's anstellen sollte.

»Ich bin soeben erst aus Deutschland angekommen und –«

»Nu ja und was wollen Se hier?«

Die Frage verblüffte mich. »Ich weiß eben nicht … ich möchte Rat erbitten –«

Der Kanzleichef kletterte von seinem hohen Sitz herab und stellte sich vor mich hin.

»So? So–oh? Haben Se Papiere?«

Mein deutscher Reichspaß machte den Gestrengen um eine Nuance freundlicher.

»Na, und?«

In meiner Verlegenheit tappte ich sofort in medias res hinein. »Ja, ich wäre Ihnen sehr dankbar, wenn Sie mir einen Rat geben könnten. Ich habe nämlich nur noch sehr wenig Geld und –«

Da gab sich der Kanzleichef einen förmlichen Ruck.
In strenger Mißbilligung glotzten mich die brillenbewehrten Äuglein an, und schnarrend, schnell, als ob er Auswendiggelerntes herunterleiere, sagte er:

»Der Deutsche, der nach Amerika kommt, hätte erstens lieber in Deutschland bleiben sollen.
Zweitens kann das deutsche Konsulat ihm keine Arbeit verschaffen, denn es hat keinen Einfluss auf den Arbeitsmarkt und muß als Behörde es ablehnen, sich mit Arbeitsvermittlung zu beschäftigen!«

»Aber –«

»Drittens verfügt das Konsulat über keinerlei Mittel zu Unterstützungszwecken.
Tja – wenn Sie kein Geld mehr haben, können Se wiederkommen und 'ne Karte an den deutschen Verein haben.
Dort kriegen Se 'n Vierteldollar und 'n Mahlzeitticket.«

»Herr – seh' ich so aus?« sagte ich wütend.
Mir war, als müßte ich in den Boden sinken. Dieser Mann war ein Barbar, ein Prolet, ein – –

»Tja – das kann man nich' wissen!«

Er grinste mich an und ich starrte ihn an.

»Wollen Se sonst noch was wissen?«

»Herr, ich bin humanistisch gebildet!« schrie ich, knallte die Tür zu und stolperte die Treppenstufen hinunter.
Ein Hohngelächter gellte mir nach.
Mit zornrotem Kopf lief ich die Straße entlang.
Dem Konsul würde ich schreiben und ihm gründlich meine Meinung über das Betragen seines Kanzleichefs sagen! Meinem Vater würde ich schreiben und ihn bitten, sich beim bayerischen Ministerium zu beschweren und –

Herrgott, was anfangen!

Heute war Wochenende, und nach Bezahlung der Wochenrechnung im Hotel würde mir wahrscheinlich kein Geld mehr übrig bleiben.
Was tun – was tun? Ich nahm mir vor, aus dem Adreßbuch deutschklingende Namen von Kaufleuten herauszuschreiben und die um Rat zu bitten, so schwer's auch sein würde.

Irgend etwas mußte sich doch finden … Wenn sich aber nichts fand!
Wenn ich da stand ohne Geld? Bittere Gedanken stiegen in mir auf und formten sich zu bitteren Vorwürfen.
Trotz allem und trotz allem – war es recht gewesen, daß man mich aufs Geratewohl hinausgeschickt hatte in die weite Welt?
Und auf einmal kam mir in meiner Verzweiflung der Gedanke, daß das Geld in meiner Tasche das einzige Bindeglied zwischen mir und der Hilfe in der Heimat war.
Heute konnte ich noch telegraphieren, morgen würde ich das Geld für das Kabeltelegramm nicht mehr haben …

Ich ging aufs Telegraphenamt.
Auf einer Fensterbank in einem stillen Winkel beschrieb ich ein Formular nach dem andern, nur um eines nach dem anderen zu zerreißen. »Sofort Kabelgeld.«
Nein, so war's nicht richtig; einen Grund wenigstens mußte man angeben, kurz und klar, denn natürlich kostete jedes Wort viel Geld. »Hilflos, erbitte Kabelgeld.«
Dieses Formular zerriß ich schnell, kaum geschrieben, so schämte ich mich vor mir selber.
Hilflos. Wie das klang. Nein: »Bitte hundert Dollars Hotel City Galveston, da Arbeitssuche noch erfolglos.«
Wieder zögerte ich. Ich stellte mir vor, wie das Dienstmädchen das Telegramm ins Wohnzimmer bringen würde – Ich bildete mir ein, mein Vater würde die Achseln zucken und irgend etwas Scharfes, Häßliches sagen, und meine Mutter würde bitten …
Wenn ich meiner Mutter kabelte? »Noch erfolglos schlimm daran schnell hundert Dollars Hotel City Galveston.« Hundert Dollars waren freilich sehr viel Geld und –

»Nein!« sagte ich auf einmal, so laut, daß vorbeigehende Herren mich neugierig anstarrten.

Nein!

Mochte es gehen wie es wollte. Ganz recht hatten sie da drüben im geliebten alten München – hatten Kummer und Sorgen genug gehabt mit mir.
War weiter nichts als verdammte Anstandspflicht, sie mit meinen Affären nicht mehr zu behelligen.

Die Wochenrechnung war fällig. Die Wochenrechnung, die mein letztes Geld verschlang.
Der Mann im Hotelbureau strich gleichgültig Banknoten und Silber ein und fragte mich ebenso gleichgültig, ob ich irgend welche besonderen Wünsche hätte und ob ich noch längere Zeit zu bleiben gedächte.

»Weiß noch nicht,« sagte ich.

Ich setzte mich auf einen der Rohrstühle im Rauchzimmer, paffte eine Zigarette und befühlte verstohlen den harten Silberdollar in meiner Westentasche.
Das war mir übrig geblieben – ein Dollar. Ein einziges Silberstück stand zwischen mir und dem Nichts.
Ich biß die Zähne zusammen und versuchte, nachzudenken. Es war etwa drei Uhr nachmittags.
Zuerst mußt du deine Uhr und ein paar Anzüge versetzen oder verkaufen, sagte ich mir. In Amerika wird's wohl auch Leihhäuser geben.
Aus dem Hotel mußte ich noch heute fort, natürlich; irgendwo mußte man doch billiger wohnen können.
Ich beschloß, einen Polizisten darüber zu befragen. Und dann mußte ich Arbeit suchen, mußte Arbeit finden, sonst –

Daran zu denken, an das andere, an das, was geschah, wenn ich keine Arbeit fand, wagte ich nicht. Ich kam mir so verlassen vor, so hilflos, so – –

Da sprach mich ein Herr an, der neben mir saß, weit zurückgelehnt im Schaukelstuhl mit übergeschlagenen Beinen.
Den schneeweißen Filzhut mit riesiger Krämpe hatte er weit in den Nacken geschoben, und die schlanke Gestalt umschlotterte ein bequemer Anzug aus dünner Rohseide.
Scharfgeschnittenes Gesicht. Lustig blinzelnde Augen. Es sei furchtbar heiß heute.
Ob ich die Hitze nicht vertragen könne? Ich sähe miserabel aus. Ob ich mich nicht wohl fühlte?

»Nein. Ja. Doch!« stotterte ich verwirrt.

»Well, sollten einen Whisky nehmen! Feine Sache, so 'n kleiner Whisky, wenn man nicht ganz allright ist. Kommen Sie mit mir zur Bar! – So! Mann, vorhin sahen Sie ja kreideweiß aus. Besser jetzt?«

»Ja, danke,« murmelte ich.

»And that's allright,« lächelte der Texaner, sich bequem gegen die Bar lehnend. »Sie sind frisch von drüben? Ja? Kam mir nämlich so vor.
Mein Vater ist auch von Deutschland nach Texas gekommen. Hm ja, ich spreche aber lieber englisch. Was wollen Sie hier beginnen?«

»Das weiß ich eben nicht!« platzte ich heraus.

»Kann ich mir denken!« meinte er. Er sah mich nachdenklich an und kaute an seiner Zigarre. »Well, lassen Sie uns wieder ins Rauchzimmer gehen, wenn's Ihnen recht ist. Bißchen plaudern. Ja?«

Wir setzten uns in die weichen Rohrstühle, ich und der erste Mensch in dieser Texasstadt, der sich um mich kümmerte.

»Well – und wie gefällt's Ihnen im guten alten Texas?«

»Gar nicht!« stöhnte ich.

Da lachte er auf und schlug sich aufs Knie. »Mann, erzählen Sie 'mal, wenn Sie wollen.
Will mich ja nicht aufdrängen. Würd' Ihnen aber gerne einen Rat geben.«

Bruder Leichtfuß ließ sich nicht lange nötigen in seinem Jammer und sprudelte hervor, wie schlecht es ihm ginge und wie erbärmlich er daran sei.

»Ist nichts dabei. Gar nicht schlimm!« sagte der Texaner gleichmütig, als ich geendet hatte.
Und dann brach er auf einmal in schallendes Gelächter aus.

»Hoh – Sie haben also wirklich kein Geld mehr?«

»N–nein!«

»Und dann wohnen Sie im besten Hotel!« Er lachte Tränen.

»Ich will heute noch ausziehen.«

»Wohin denn? Ohne Geld?«

»Ich muß eben Sachen versetzen.«

»Ach so!« Er lachte und lachte.

»Was soll ich denn sonst anfangen?«

Der Texaner zündete sich umständlich eine neue Zigarre an. »Unsinn!« sagte er. »Bessere Männer als Sie sind schon ohne Geld dagesessen.
Is' nix dabei. Müssen eben arbeiten. Das bißchen Geld zum Leben verdienen kann jedes Kind. Was können Sie denn eigentlich?«

Da sprudelte ich mein ganzes bißchen Lebenslauf hervor.

»Schwierig!« sagte er. »Sehr schwierig. Aber auch für den dicksten Baum ist eine Axt gewachsen.
Ich glaub' nicht, daß Galveston etwas für Sie ist. Hier drängt sich alles zusammen. Hm ja, Sie sind also grasgrün im Land, sind Ihr Leben lang auf Schulbänken gesessen, und haben noch nie 'was gearbeitet.
Wollen Sie denn arbeiten – irgend etwas?«

»Natürlich!«

»Sicher? Irgendwelche Arbeit?«

»Alles!«

»Na, dann kommen Sie mit auf unsere Farm!«

Ich ließ mich in den Stuhl zurückfallen und schnappte förmlich nach Luft.

Siedendheiß lief es mir über den Körper. Ich konnte kaum sprechen.

»Auf Ihre Farm?« stotterte ich. »Sprechen Sie – sprechen Sie im Ernst?«

»Selbstverständlich.«

»Ich weiß gar nicht, wie ich Ihnen danken – – «

»Unsinn, Mann. Ist ein ganz einfaches Geschäft. Sie sind jung und Sie sind stark und Sie können ganz zweifellos arbeiten, wenn Sie wollen.
Der "alte Mann" und ich haben alle Hände voll Arbeit auf der Farm. Weiße Männer sind selten und teuer in der Erntezeit, und die Farbigen hier unten sind die faulsten Stricke auf der ganzen Gotteswelt. Abgemacht?
And that's allright!« Und er streckte mir die Rechte zum Handschlag hin.

Stundenlang konnte ich nicht einschlafen in dieser Nacht. Ich sah mich auf galoppierendem Pferd dahinjagen – sah mich arbeiten draußen in frischer Luft – sah mich als freien Mann, der durch seiner Hände Arbeit sein Brot verdiente …
Der Texaner hieß Charles Muchow. Die Farm seines Vaters lag hundert Meilen nördlich von Galveston, bei dem Städtchen Brenham, und morgen schon wollte er die Rückreise antreten, ich mit ihm.
Er hatte einen neuen Farmwagen und einen Rotationspflug in Galveston gekauft. Wie's mir wohl ergangen wäre, wenn nicht der Zufall mich mit ihm zusammengeführt hätte?
Jetzt hatten die Sorgen ein Ende und das neue Leben begann. Vom ersten Augenblick an hatte mir der junge Texaner mit seinem merkwürdigen Selbstbewußtsein und der unerschütterlichen Ruhe gefallen, und während der langen Abendstunden im Rauchzimmer waren wir beinahe Freunde geworden.
Er nannte mich Ed, ich nannte ihn Charley.

»Das Mistern ist nicht Mode in Texas,« hatte er gesagt, »und Ihr gesegneter Name ist zu vertrackt. Sagen wir Ed. Kurz und klar – einfach Ed!«

Früh am nächsten Morgen weckte er mich, und nach dem Frühstück ging's zum Bahnhof der Santa Fé Eisenbahn. Die Wagen unseres Zuges trugen in goldenen Lettern die Inschrift: Lone Star Express – Einsamer-Stern-Expreß.

Wir stiegen ein. Ein weicher Teppich bedeckte den Boden, und statt Bänken oder Polstersitzen standen in langen Reihen, je zwei und zwei nebeneinander, bequeme Lehnstühle mit weichen Ledersitzen, die sich in alle möglichen Lagen zurechtschrauben ließen.
Auf den Rücken der Stühle vor uns waren kleine Flaggen mit einem Stern in der Ecke eingepreßt, und darunter stand wieder in Goldbuchstaben »Lone Star Express«; kleine blaue Sterne auf rotem Grund bildeten den Deckenschmuck des Wagens; überall, an den Wänden, an den Türen prangte die Flagge mit dem einsamen Stern – das Wahrzeichen des Staates Texas.

Der Expreß jagte dahin. Zwischen weiten, weißglänzenden Flächen.
Aus tiefblauem Himmel brannte die Sonne, drückend heiß schon, trotz des frühen Morgens.
Unübersehbar, bis an den Horizont reichend, dehnten sich die ungeheuren Massen von tiefem Grün; Gebüsch, Sträucher, in schnurgeraden endlosen Reihen, dazwischen in feinen Strichen die schwarze Erde.
Über dem massigen Grün lag es wie frisch gefallener Schnee, hingestreut in riesigen Flocken, in silberleuchtenden Schneebällen.
Wie Silberfäden und Spinngewebe breitete sich die weiße Schönheit über das ganze Land.

Wir fuhren durch das Reich des Königs Baumwolle.