de-en  E. Rosen, Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.4 Medium
The Poker Ship.

Between New York and Texas. - About the guilty pleasures of the American nation. - "Fine game, this poker game!" - The wisdom of bluffing. – Key West and Johnny Young from San Antonio. - A biting comment about millionaires. - In the salon! - Good bye, Miss Daisy ... - This is Texas, my son!

"There you are! Good bye!" said the fidgety little agent of the Mallory Line, pointing to the gangplanks of the Texas steamship. He nodded to me and disappeared into the crowd.

Despite the early morning hours, there was a hellish noise on the pier. Masses of workers ran from the pier to the steamer and from the steamer to the pier.

Sacks, boxes, barrels, seemed to fly around in the air; steam winches screeched. A booming voice from the bridge cursingly spured them on to make haste. The black steamship with bright red smokestack stripes looked sooty and unwashed.
Between the people rushing hither and thither and the noisy loading of merchant goods, I scrambled on board without a single soul taking any notice of me. ...

Here, there was no paternal care like on the North German Lloyd – no policemen, no elegant ship's officers, no uniformed stewards who assigned places to you...A man in shirtsleeves (although he wore elegant trousers, lacquered boots and a gold-braided officer's cap) looked at me in amazement when I showed him my steerage ticket, and simply pointed with his thumb to the foredeck stairs. ... I went downstairs. In a moderately large steerage room stood a lot of bunks
But each one was occupied with a piece of luggage. A man in a white jacket came down the stairs.

"Where is my bunk?" I asked him.

"Here!" he said and pointed to the bunks.

"But there are all sorts of things laying around everywhere there!" "There's no room left," said the Steward, soberly.

"But I have paid for one!" "Well, no matter," the steward explained. "For your money, you come to Galveston. You can sleep wherever you like. In the bunks or on the floor or on the deck!" And whistling he went upstairs.

I looked around. Nobody was in steerage, nevertheless suitcases and bundles were everywhere.
However, at the other end of the row of bunks, I discovered a door and entered a large room in semidarkness, poorly lit by some light bulbs, where a few dozen people were standing in front of a tall bar table.

"There is another one," said the man behind the bar. ... "What's your specialty, Mister?" I looked at him questioningly.

"What do you want to drink, I mean," explained the man. ... "It seems you are a stranger?" "Yes," I answered. ... "Very much." "Well, that doesn't matter. ... This gentleman here is treating. ... What'll you have?" "A glass of beer." "Drink it down, sonny!" said one of the drinkers. ... "Yes - it's my treat. ... And it won't be the last time for this good old boy here" (he slapped his chest) "to pay for a round on this blessed ship.

Shouldn't a man perchance be glad when he is leaving New York? In winter it is so cold that you must be a millionaire to afford the price of coal; in summer it is so hot that you get sunstroke three times a day, and at night you have to sleep in an ice chest.
The wages are like vinegar because the Italian pack from over there works too cheaply, and you can't even start a respectable small business because simply everything in the commercial line is already done.

New York is uncomfortable. Damn New York, I say. Does one of the gentlemen have anything against it?" "Not me," said the man behind the bar. ... "New York can take care of itself. It's big enough." "That's true. A big, disgusting, smoky mass of a town it is.

I cannot subsist on skyscrapers and electric light, I say. Texas for me, gentlemen, where I'm the cleverer one, and not New York, where all of the others are the cleverer ones. Texas for me, I say." I was mischievously happy there because I understood every word effortlessly and drank up the tiny small glass of beer cheerfully.

"New York here, New York there," said a man next to me, a magnificent specimen of humanity, huge, with broad shoulders, and a curiously tender expression on his face. "I'm slipping down to Texas for the third time on this screwed up Mallory line. When I'm there, I figure that I want to be back in New York, and when I am again happily in New York, I can't rest until I've paid for my ticket back to Galveston.

When I'm sitting on a nag in Texas, I'd like to be in a New York vaudeville theater, and when I've eaten proper meals in New York for six months, I'm completely crazy for Texas cornbread and Texas bacon. I don't yet have the necessary tranquility, I imagine." The men gave a resounding laugh.

"This is true for all of us," one of them shouted. "I couldn't care less about the right tranquillity.
To have that, I'd have to be a millionaire or dead and buried.

This is a great country, and my mother's son wants to be there where something is happening. If I do not like one city, I go to another, and if the times are bad in the East, it is a far cry from saying that they must also be bad in the West.

Luck doesn't run after you. Always behind! Distance doesn't matter to me. Always behind, my gentlemen, and the devil takes the one who comes last." "German, are you? And only in the country for 24 hours ? Then leave it!" the giant grinned.

He had gone with me on deck. While the Sam Houston (the name of the Texas steamer) was winding its way through the harbor, he told me the names of the gigantic skyscrapers, went into raptures about the excellence of the New York vaudeville theaters and praised the appetizer bread rolls in the New York bars.

But when the skyscrapers merged into a single, huge mass of stone, when the steamers hurrying to and fro were becoming less frequent and the metropolis on the horizon slowly disappeared, he became impatient.

"Let's go down!" he had said, explaining that time could of course only be killed on this old ship by playing poker.

"But never on your life join the game! I felt insulted. ... When you have been sitting next to the son of an American consul during the seventh class of secondary school, you are in the know of the basic elements of the American national vice. ...

The secrets of pairs and four aces and the flush and bluffing were no longer secrets to me. Obviously I would play poker!!!

Woolen blankets were spread out everywhere on the floor of the bar, and on the blankets the men I had met earlier were crouching and squatting in small groups of fours and fives, with serious faces and cards in their hands.

In front of each lay a small pile of silver coins and crumpled dollar bills. Beer glasses and whisky bottles stood around.

'Well now, I'll eat my hat if that isn't an indecent hurry," smirked the giant.

"The blessed ship isn't really underway yet, and they've already started to play poker.
Six matches! Hoh!!! And I'll eat my hat again, if this isn't a very amusing trip! It's a true blessing, though, that no women and children are in steerage this time." Five minutes later I was already in the middle of an extremely enthusiastic poker game with Jack (as the Giant was called), Tommy (as the bartender was called) and two others, and in a further ten minutes I had lost my first bluff amidst the resounding laughter of the round...since Jack had four aces!

"To bluff against four aces is bad luck!" Jack said dryly. "Don't do it again." It was very quiet in the bar room, not a loud word was spoken. Only the pieces of silver clanged.
The men crouched motionless there with their eyes half concealed. ... As cold as ice.

The cards slid across the smooth blankets, the dollars accumulated into a pile, bank notes were tossed into the pot – until the hand of the winner raked it in for himself; the silver and the greenbacks wandered to and fro. ...

"Five dollars more..." " This – and another five!" "I'll hold – and five more!" So they whispered; in a detached tone, calmly, quietly. And yet even my inexperienced youth knew that underneath the mask of external calmness, the passion for gambling must be trembling inside - but how these men controlled themselves! How they did impress me! How I envied them for their coolness and their iron wills!

There was nothing more natural than attempting to follow suit. And I really did my best to look natural and relaxed. ...
I just glanced casually at my cards, as if their values didn't interest me at all, and my money rolled so easily on the blanket, as if I couldn't be rid of it fast enough.
It also actually vanished with astonishing speed. But that was not a possible admonition for me to be rational and to stop, instead I just played even better after that.

At one o'clock p.m. the steward came and brought the meal. Nobody felt disturbed in this way.
The tin plates with the beefsteaks and the fried potatoes and the tin pots with strong black coffee were placed on the blankets, as a matter of course, and in the same way the steward took a quarter from each blanket's pot for his efforts without saying a word. ...
So you ate in passing and played, played, played. Jackets were taken off, vests opened, collars untied. ...

Stokers covered in soot came climbing up from the engine room and played poker; sailors mingled among the groups of players.
The bar room was a gambling den. I lost and won, won and lost, I smoked countless cigarettes, didn't think of anything other than of cards and money. ... Not for any price would I have given up my place on the rug. "Three dollars more..." "Who deals?" "Full house, my money - " When the filthy stoker raked in the heap of money with my last piece of silver, the ship's engineer came down the steerage stairs.

"Gentlemen!" he shouted. "This blessed poker ship incidentally also swallows coal and needs people to feed it with coal. ...
So I would like to request the gentlemen stokers of the third watch to kindly make an effort to be where they belong, and damn fast. Down with you, you sons of playing cards!" "Poker ship is good," said Jack. "Funny boy, this engineer. Who deals?" It was my turn to deal. And I changed my last ten dollar note. Don't let yourself be taken aback, I said to myself, just don't let on! What the others can do, you can too!

Late at night Jack and I climbed on deck because it was much too hot to sleep in the bunk room. Between the barrels and the rigging at the front of the bow we made an encampment out of the poker blankets.

"Good night!" Jack said.

I lay there staring at the moon, and the unclear notion arose in me that I was a terrible ass.

You've been had, my boy ... The silver pieces and the dollar bills, which were still stuffed in my money purse in the morning, were now thrust in the pockets of other people - I had only a few dollars left. Too stupid - - "Fine game, this poker," said the giant next to me, "fabulous game!" Then I laughed brightly.

"Did you win?" "No." "Well, tomorrow is another day, and the day after likewise, and so on. Get it back. Bluff!" And in the shimmering moonlight, among the murmur of waves and the roar of the engine, American wisdom was preached to me for the first time by a simple worker.

Poker was nothing more than an imitation of life. Bluffing one had to do in life as in poker, to not allow oneself to be bamboozled.

If you had fifteen cents in your pocket and did not know where to get your next meal, you had to look and act as if you had countless dollars in your pocket and open credit at the nearest National Bank.
In so doing, you would improve your position better than if you shouted to every human being: "Pity me, I have only fifteen cents left!" You had to have guts.

When playing poker, you had to make the impression that you had excellent cards - in life you had to appear to be more hard working and wiser and better off than you were.

Just bounce back! Believe in yourself, and the others will believe in you. Tell people you are strong, and they won't like to pick a quarrel with you. ...
Help yourself, and all of the world will help you. Do not pray: "Dear God help me - I am so weak," but pray: "Dear God, I am so strong, let me stay so!"
And you always had to remember that the next game could bring luck, in poker and in life ... Then I fell asleep thoroughly happy.

Again the blankets were spread out and again the dollars rolled, and again the stokers and the sailors came in every spare minute. ... I was under the spell of the poker ship, like everyone else. ... My few dollars became a small heap of silver - then it melted away - then grew in the eternal back and forth.
For me the day just flew by. Three days. On the third day we arrived at Key West.
When a ship's officer shouted down to the bar, whoever might want go ashore for about two hours, I jumped up and hurried up the stairs.

But the others remained seated and continued to play poker.

The American preacher Talmage once mentioned in one of those sensational sermons, which were telegraphed to all the newspapers of America half an hour after the conclusion of the Sunday service in his famous Washington church (by himself, for fee! ), that poker is the national sin of the United States. ...

Undoubtedly, this devil's game around the golden calf was a faithful reflection of the peculiar characteristic American sin.
All games of chance were wicked, but even the conciliatory moment of levity was lacking in the game of poker. That is no longer a game of chance, but a refined, well-calculated sin!

With conscious greed the American sat down at the poker table and lured the poor fellow man with a respectable cold smile (which one must love as a Christian!) One dollar after another was gone.
The men with four aces in their hands and with a sad face, as if they had not even two kings, to bring the poor neighbor succinctly through this visual pretense of false facts - these men were worse sinners than the publicans!
A modern dance around the golden calf. It illustrated on a small scale the great American sins - the lust for gold; the presumption of being wiser than their neighbor; the addiction for enriching themselves by dishonest means, and, above all, a sacrilegious lack of Christian charity.
The man, who smiled with self-satisfied smiles at the sinful results of a vile bluff, was the ancient Pharisee in a modern American impression.
Only much worse! "Do not play poker anymore, oh Americans, and you will become better men!" Reverend Talmage preached - and a cheerful smile went over the whole country.
For that contest in the game of poker of self-control versus self-control, of impudence versus impudence, of monetary worth versus monetary worth and of bluff versus bluff is truly typical of the kind of men of the Yankee-land, and preacher Talmage would have been able to know that his fellow citizens are even proud of what he called their national sins.

People laughed terribly about the sermon. And it elicited pious desire in every good American, but quite frequently, as a modern Pharisee with a devout look, able to succumb to the succinct results of bluffing ... That is precisely the national sin!

On the gangplank of Sam Houston, I met a gentleman in white linen clothes and a huge gray floppy hat.

"Pardon me," he said. ...

"I beg your pardon", I answered.

"My fault!" "Aha - You are German! Well, I am Johnny Young from San Antonio and my friends claim, I would be unbearable curious.
Well, you are German? Furthermore, I believe I can say that you haven't been in this country long?" "N-no!" "I see! ... I knew, that no American tailor made this suit. It's quite easy to be a prophet if you keep your eyes open somewhat and think just a little bit. Well, well. You've played poker and lost?" I looked at him in amazement. ...

"Yes? Right? No, I am not a magician. Everyone played poker. And of course you played too. And of course you lost!" We walked along in soft, fine sand, on a wide, endless palm-tree lined path. The dark-green fans of the tree tops contrasted sharply with the yellow sand and the deep-blue cloudless sky.
The air was humid and sticky. Wooden huts appeared. In the background whitewashed houses were shimmering.
It was like a fairy tale - the palm trees all around, the heavy, muggy air, the harsh tropical light; the strange man beside me with his white hair and fresh face, who, from the first moment, made an indescribable impression upon me.

I think I would have followed him blindly, anywhere. As a young man he had been in Key West. As we walked under the palm trees, he told of the billions and billions of cigars, which are made every year in the maze of huts in the small island villages by the skillful fingers of the small creoles; of the smugglers of Key West, of the wrecks, of the filibusters, of the battles with customs boats, of the riffraff of the Florida Keys, of the gambling of Key West behind locked doors where mountains of gold pile up on the tables and every gambler lies his revolver right In front of him on the table.
The filibusters of Florida sail weapons transports to secluded landings on the Cuban coast, where people who are very poor are waiting, but nevertheless, have a lot of money left for weapons. Revolutionaries. They are always over there.

Often enough, a warship shoots half a dozen shells into the body of such a sailing vessel.
But the weapons are offset with gold – and as long as Key West stands, it will have its filibuster, just as it will always be the headquarters of the salvager.
These are desperate ship captains with small sailing boats and a crew of islanders who can handle diving suits. They cruise silently and unobtrusively on the coast. When a ship is stranded on the dangerous banks, a salvage ship is soon there, and sends down its divers, who carry everything which is worth taking upwards without worrying about to whom the cargo belongs.
The salvager regards everything as a good booty. He becomes a rich man if he succeeds in escaping Uncle Sam's gunboats. ...

I listened in breathless suspense. Johnny Young laughed as he finished and looked at me cheerfully.

"Yes, yes - I've got something left for the rapid life in spite of my sixty years. Lordy, if I were still young! Could I be great once again? Look, someone else would tell you that you were damned to be careless, to put your young nose into the poker cards and lose your little bit of money instead of keeping your pennies together for the hardship of the first days in a new country.
I say: The money that a young man brings with him is just as worthless to him as old paper! It only hinders him in life's struggle.
For the faster he is faced with the problem of either starving or earning money, the quicker he gets to know the country and the people and its nature.
That may be bitter medicine, but it is good medicine.
I can't tolerate our millionaires who tell lies in an unctuous memoirs of how diligently they went to church for Sunday school, of how they saved up penny by penny, of how, with their so-acquired initial capital of a hundred dollars, they accumulated an additional hundred dollars, of how they became extremely rich people through hard work and faithful devotion to duty.
This is damned swindling. By being a nice person and penny-pinching no big businessman has ever learned insight into human nature and risk taking. ...
Go out into the country, I would say to a young man. Let life whistle around your ears and get to know the human vermin just as it is and not as it is in pious storybooks.
If one is strong, he can tolerate strong medicine, and if one is weak, then nobody will shed a tear over him." My eyes must have become bright with excitement. How wonderful it had to be, to be in the prime of life and to see and to learn and to be strong.
To me, it was as if strength and confidence leaped over from the old man to me. Then the steamer's warning signal whistle shrieked from the deck.

"I wanted to give you one more piece of advice," said Mr. Johnny Young from San Antonio. "I had almost forgotten it. ... Go to the purser and buy a ticket for an upgrade to a cabin room. The difference in price for the distance between Key West and Galveston will not be too much.
It makes more sense to have comfortable accommodation instead of sleeping on the the hard floor and losing your money with poker. So. The steamer leaves in half an hour. I have to take care of some urgent personal business." And with a farewell nod he vanished into the maze of shacks. ...

But I ran happily to the steamer and jumped on deck. ... At the bureau I showed the purser my remittance order for the ship's cash box.
(Through the offices of Norddeutsche Lloyd, my father had arranged that five hundred Marks were to paid out to me on arrival in Galveston.) At first he defied to do it because the money was only due in Galveston, but when I explained to him that I wished to travel from Key West in the salon, he became very gracious. For the steamer made money with it.

I had my suitcase brought from steerage, had two suits ironed by the stewart, eagerly washed myself in the elegant small cabin, I tried out half a dozen ties, groomed myself like a teenager before his first ball.
While I bound the elaborate knot of the tie, I thought about the dirty bar room and the people in shirtsleeves. How had this only been possible! The stewardess got a tip that made her curtsy.
In the deserted smoking salon, I squirmed and writhed in vain self-satisfaction in front of the mirror - admired the ornate furnishings in white and gold in the dining room and the bountiful silver on the buffet - promenaded on the canvas-covered cabin deck among elegant ladies and gentlemen - had the steward bring me a comfortable deckchair and sipped sherry with ice and soda water from a pointed champagne flute.
Then Jack the giant gravely walked below across the deck. ... He saw me sitting there, looked at me, looked at me again, shook his head and said loudly and clearly: "Now I'll be damned!" At supper Mr. Johnny Young introduced me as his young friend, fresh from the Vaterland. ... I bowed to the right and to the left and talked about German secondary schools and German officers. And served the lady to my right, Miss Daisy Benett from Dallas, Texas galantly.

"How brave of you, that you studied this dreadful steerage!" said Miss Daisy.

"It was very interesting," I murmured.

I felt like the prodigal son who finally made it back from the riff-raff to a life worth living. Every breakfast, every dinner, every supper was a celebration for me, which I tasted with a thousand delights, not for the many courses and the various delicacies, but because I seemed so elegant.
So well dressed. Such a perfect demeanor. ... Such perfect manners. ... For seven days, I was Hans in Luck. Miss Daisy deigned to find my English droll, and stated that I was a good boy. But be well behaved!
I dragged chairs and blankets and books on deck for her, and provided her with chocolate and sweets to last her for half a year.
Up on the promenade deck, we prattled away the sultry summer nights and stared together into the sea. ... And in the very last night we smoked cigarettes and drank iced strawberry bowls, and - "Jetzt heißt es auf Wiedersehen, mein Junge ..." "Und auf Wiedersehen, Miss Daisy -" "How young you are, my boy, and - yes, how curious I am! ... What will probably happen to you?" Then I laughed, funny and light-hearted, as if it were a joke, and blurted out how little money I had, and how I didn't know what to begin.

"Fight your way, my boy," said Daisy. "Struggle through it!" Yellow sandbanks appeared in the morning, protruding ever clearer in long strips; the deep blue of the Gulf Sea became lighter, greener. Around noon we were in the middle of the noise of the harbor. Galveston's huge number of buildings lay there well defined in the bright sunlight.

Dozens of helpers jumped on deck as Sam Houston landed at the pier, recommending hotels and seizing the baggage of the passengers. While the stream of people flooded down the gangway, I had one last look into steerage.
There were the blankets, there the money was rolling, there were the men laughing at a ship's officer, who, crimson in the face, threatened to call the harbor police if they did not stop the damned playing poker immediately and start worrying about the cuckoo.

"Ten dollars more!" I heard a deep bass voice saying - Then I disembarked. Down at the pier, an exceptionally tall fellow snatched the suitcase from my hand.

"City of Galveston, Sir? Finest hotel!" I strolled behind him, over to Mr. Johnny Young, of San Antonio, who just got into a car. I raised my hat in valediction. Johnny Young smilingly nodded at me and pointed with a wide open movement of his arm to the throng.

"This is Texas, my son!"
unit 1
Das Pokerschiff.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 2
Zwischen New York und Texas.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 3
– Vom amerikanischen Nationallaster.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 4
– »Fine game, dieses Poker!« – Die Weisheit des Bluffens.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 5
– Key West und Johnny Young aus San Antonio.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 6
– Eine bissige Bemerkung über Millionäre.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 7
– Im Salon!
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 8
– Good bye, Miss Daisy … – Dies ist Texas, mein Sohn!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 9
»There you are!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 11
Ein Höllenlärm herrschte auf dem Pier trotz der frühen Morgenstunde.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 12
Scharen von Arbeitern rannten vom Pier zum Dampfer und vom Dampfer zum Pier.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 13
Säcke, Kisten, Fässer schienen in der Luft umherzufliegen; Dampfwinden kreischten.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 14
Eine dröhnende Stimme von der Kommandobrücke trieb fluchend zur Eile an.
5 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 15
Rußig und ungewaschen sah der schwarze Dampfer mit den grellroten Schornsteinbändern aus.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 18
Ich stieg hinab.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 19
In einem mäßig großen Zwischendecksraum standen eine Menge Kojen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 20
Aber jede war mit irgend einem Gepäckstück belegt.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 21
Da kam ein Mann in weißer Jacke die Treppe herunter.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 22
»Wo ist mein Platz?« fragte ich ihn.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 23
»Hier!« sagte er und deutete auf die Kojen.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 25
»Aber ich habe doch bezahlt!« »Well, das macht nichts aus,« erklärte der Steward.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 26
»Für Ihr Geld kommen Sie nach Galveston.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 27
Schlafen können Sie, wo's Ihnen beliebt.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 28
In den Kojen oder auf dem Boden oder auf dem Verdeck!« Und pfeifend stieg er die Treppe empor.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 29
Ich sah um mich. Kein Mensch war im Zwischendeck, trotzdem überall Koffer und Bündel lagen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 31
»Da ist noch einer,« sagte der Mann hinter der Bar.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 32
»Was ist Ihre Spezialität, Herr?« Ich sah ihn fragend an.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 33
»Was wollen Sie trinken, mein' ich,« erklärte der Mann.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 34
»Sie sin' wohl 'n Fremder?« »Jawohl,« sagte ich.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 35
»Sehr.« »Well, das macht nichts.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 36
Der Herr hier traktiert.
5 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 37
Was ist das Ihrige?« »Ein Glas Bier.« »Schluck's hinunter, sonny!« sagte einer der Trinkenden.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 38
»Jawohl – ich traktiere.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 40
Soll sich der Mensch vielleicht nicht freuen, wenn er aus New York herauskommt?
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 43
New York ist ungemütlich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 44
Verdamm' New York, sag' ich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 45
Hat einer von den Herren 'was dagegen?« »Ich nicht,« meinte der Mann hinter der Bar.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 46
»New York kann für sich selber aufpassen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 47
Groß genug ist es.« »Das ist wahr.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 48
Ein großer, unappetitlicher, rauchiger Haufen von einer Stadt ist es.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 49
Von Wolkenkratzern und elektrischem Licht kann ich nicht leben, sag' ich.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 53
»Ich rutsche jetzt zum drittenmal auf dieser verdrehten Mallorylinie nach Texas hinunter.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 56
Ich hab' noch nicht die richtige Ruhe, denk' ich mir.« Die Männer lachten schallend auf.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 57
»So geht's uns allen,« rief einer.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 58
»Ich pfeif' auf die richtige Ruhe.
2 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 59
Um die zu haben, müßte ich entweder Millionär sein oder tot und begraben.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 60
Dies ist ein großes Land, und meiner Mutter Sohn will dort sein, wo etwas los ist.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 62
Das Glück läuft einem nicht nach.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 63
Immer hinter drein!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 64
Entfernung spielt bei mir keine Rolle.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 65
unit 66
Und erst vierundzwanzig Stunden im Land?
3 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 67
Dann lassen Sie die Finger davon!« grinste der Riese.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 68
Er war mit mir an Deck gegangen.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 72
»Aber spielen Sie ja nicht mit!« Ich fühlte mich beleidigt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 75
Selbstverständlich würde ich pokern!!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 77
Vor jedem lagen kleine Häuflein Silbergeld und zerknüllte Dollarscheine.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 78
Biergläser und Whiskyflaschen standen umher.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 80
unit 81
Sechs Partien!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 82
Hoh!!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 83
Und ich will meinen Hut noch einmal aufessen, wenn das nicht eine sehr vergnügte Reise wird!
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 85
»Gegen vier Asse anzubluffen ist Pech!« sagte Jack trocken.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 86
»Tun Sie's nicht wieder.« Es war ganz still im Barraum; kein lautes Wort wurde gesprochen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 87
Nur die Silberstücke klirrten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 88
Die Männer hockten regungslos da, mit halb verschleierten Augen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 89
Kalt wie Eis.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 93
Wie sie mir imponierten!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 94
Wie ich sie beneidete um ihre kühle Ruhe und ihren eisernen Willen!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 95
Nichts war natürlicher, als zu versuchen, es ihnen gleichzutun.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 96
Und ich gab mir große Mühe, recht unbefangen auszusehen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 98
Es verflüchtigte sich auch wirklich mit erstaunlicher Schnelligkeit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 100
Um ein Uhr nachmittags kam der Steward und brachte das Essen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 101
Kein Mensch ließ sich dadurch stören.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 103
Man aß so nebenbei und spielte, spielte, spielte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 104
Röcke wurden ausgezogen, Westen geöffnet, Kragen abgebunden.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 106
Der Barraum war eine Spielhölle.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 109
»Gentlemen!« rief er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 112
Runter mit euch, ihr Söhne von Spielkarten!« »Pokerschiff ist gut,« sagte Jack.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 113
»Drolliger Junge, dieser Ingenieur.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 114
Wer gibt?« Ich war am Geben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 115
Und ich wechselte meinen letzten Zehndollarschein.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 116
Laß dich nicht verblüffen, sagte ich mir, nur ja nichts anmerken lassen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 117
Was die anderen können, kannst du auch!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 118
Spät nachts kletterten Jack und ich an Deck, denn im Kojenraum war es viel zu heiß zum Schlafen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 119
Zwischen Fässern und Tauwerk vorne am Bug machten wir uns aus den Pokerdecken ein Lager zurecht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 120
»Good night!« sagte Jack.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 124
unit 125
Holen Sie sich's wieder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 127
Poker war weiter nichts als ein Abklatsch des Lebens.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 128
Bluffen mußte man im Leben wie beim Pokern, nicht verblüffen lassen durfte man sich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 131
Schneid mußte man haben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 133
Nur nicht unterkriegen lassen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 134
Glaub' an dich selbst, und die anderen werden an dich glauben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 135
Sag' den Leuten, du seist stark, und man wird nicht gerne mit dir anbinden.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 136
Hilf dir selber, und alle Welt wird dir helfen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 140
Ich stand im Banne des Pokerschiffs wie jeder andere.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 142
Der Tag verging mir wie im Flug.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 143
Drei Tage.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 144
Am dritten Tage kamen wir in Key West an.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 146
Die anderen aber blieben sitzen und pokerten weiter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 148
), das Pokern die Nationalsünde der Vereinigten Staaten.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 151
Das sei kein Glücksspiel mehr – sondern raffiniertes wohlberechnetes Sündigen!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 153
einen Dollar nach dem andern ab.
5 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 155
Ein moderner Tanz um das Goldene Kalb!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 158
Nur noch viel schlimmer!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 161
Man lachte furchtbar über die Predigt.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 164
»Pardon me,« sagte er.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 165
»I beg your pardon,« antwortete ich.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 166
»My fault!« »Aha – Sie sind ein Deutscher!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 167
unit 168
Also Sie sind Deutscher?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 169
Ferner glaube ich sagen zu können, daß Sie noch nicht lange im Lande sind?« »N–nein!« »Aha!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 170
Wußte doch, daß kein amerikanischer Schneider diesen Anzug gemacht hat.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 172
Well, well.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 173
Sie haben gepokert und verloren?« Ich sah ihn erstaunt an.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 174
»Ja?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 175
Stimmt's?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 176
Nein, ich bin kein Zauberer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 177
Alles pokerte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 178
Und natürlich pokerten Sie mit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 181
Die Luft war feucht und schwül.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 182
Holzhütten tauchten auf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 183
Im Hintergrunde schimmerten weißgetünchte Häuser.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 185
Ich glaube, ich wäre ihm blindlings gefolgt, irgendwohin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 186
Er war als junger Mensch in Key West gewesen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 189
Revolutionäre.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 190
Die gibt's immer da drüben.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 191
Oft genug jagt ein Kriegsschiff solch einem Segler ein halbes Dutzend Granaten in den Leib.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 194
Sie kreuzen still und unauffällig an der Küste.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 196
Der Wrecker betrachtet alles als gute Beute.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 197
Er wird ein reicher Mann, wenn es ihm gelingt, Onkel Sam's Kanonenbooten zu entwischen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 198
Ich hörte in atemloser Spannung zu.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 199
Johnny Young lachte, als er endete, und sah mich vergnügt an.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 200
»Ja, ja – ich hab' was übrig für rapides Leben trotz meiner sechzig Jahre.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 201
Herrgott, wär' ich noch jung!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 202
Könnt' ich noch einmal mittollen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 204
unit 205
Es hindert ihn nur im Lebenskampf.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 207
Das mag bittere Medizin sein, aber es ist gute Medizin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 209
Das ist verdammter Schwindel.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 211
Geh' hinaus ins Land, würde ich zu einem jungen Mann sagen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 214
unit 215
Mir war's, als springe Kraft und Selbstvertrauen von dem alten Mann auf mich über.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 216
Da schrillten vom Deck die mahnenden Pfeifensignale des Dampfers.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 217
»Ich wollte Ihnen ja noch einen Rat geben,« sagte Herr Johnny Young aus San Antonio.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 218
»Beinahe hätte ich's vergessen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 219
Gehen Sie zum Zahlmeister und lösen Sie sich eine Karte für einen Kajütenplatz nach.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 220
Der Unterschied für die Strecke Key West–Galveston wird nicht besonders groß sein.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 222
So.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 223
In einer halben Stunde geht der Dampfer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 225
Ich aber rannte glückselig zum Dampfer und sprang an Deck.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 226
Im Bureau zeigte ich dem Purser meine Anweisung auf die Schiffskasse.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 229
Verdiente doch der Dampfer dabei Geld.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 232
Wie war's denn nur möglich gewesen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 233
Die Stewardeß bekam ein Trinkgeld, das sie einen Knix machen ließ.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 235
Da schritt schwerfällig Jack der Riese unten übers Deck.
4 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 238
Und bediente ritterlich die Dame zu meiner Rechten, Miß Daisy Benett, aus Dallas, Texas.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 239
»Wie tapfer von Ihnen, daß Sie dieses gräßliche Zwischendeck studierten!« sagte Miß Daisy.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 240
»Es war sehr interessant,« murmelte ich.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 243
So gut angezogen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 244
So tadelloses Benehmen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 245
So ganz gute Kinderstube.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 246
Hans im Glück war ich sieben Tage lang.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 247
Miß Daisy geruhte, mein Englisch drollig zu finden und konstatierte, ich sei ein guter Junge.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 248
Aber artig sein!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 253
»Fight your way, my boy,« sagte Daisy.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 255
Gegen Mittag waren wir mitten im Hafenlärm.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 256
Scharf umrissen lagen im grellen Sonnenlicht die Häusermassen Galvestons da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 258
unit 260
»Zehn Dollars mehr!« hörte ich eine tiefe Baßstimme sagen – Dann ging ich von Bord.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 261
Unten am Pier riß mir ein baumlanger Kerl den Koffer aus der Hand.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 262
»City of Galveston, Herr?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 264
Abschiednehmend lüftete ich den Hut.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 265
Johnny Young nickte mir lächelnd zu und deutete mit weitausholender Armbewegung auf das Getriebe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 266
»Dies ist Texas, my son!«
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
anitafunny • 6261  commented on  unit 62  1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4802  translated  unit 222  1 year, 3 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 175  1 year, 3 months ago
Maria-Helene • 2289  translated  unit 174  1 year, 3 months ago
markvanroode • 389  commented on  unit 24  1 year, 3 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 143  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8472  translated  unit 125  1 year, 3 months ago
Maria-Helene • 2289  translated  unit 82  1 year, 3 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 7  1 year, 3 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 18  1 year, 3 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 9  1 year, 3 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 1  1 year, 3 months ago

Das Pokerschiff.

Zwischen New York und Texas. – Vom amerikanischen Nationallaster. – »Fine game, dieses Poker!« – Die Weisheit des Bluffens. – Key West und Johnny Young aus San Antonio. – Eine bissige Bemerkung über Millionäre. – Im Salon! – Good bye, Miss Daisy … – Dies ist Texas, mein Sohn!

»There you are! Good bye!« sagte der zappelige kleine Agent der Mallorylinie, auf die Gangplanken des Texasdampfers deutend, nickte mir zu und verschwand im Gewühl.

Ein Höllenlärm herrschte auf dem Pier trotz der frühen Morgenstunde. Scharen von Arbeitern rannten vom Pier zum Dampfer und vom Dampfer zum Pier.

Säcke, Kisten, Fässer schienen in der Luft umherzufliegen; Dampfwinden kreischten. Eine dröhnende Stimme von der Kommandobrücke trieb fluchend zur Eile an. Rußig und ungewaschen sah der schwarze Dampfer mit den grellroten Schornsteinbändern aus.
Zwischen dahinstürmenden Menschen und daherpolternden Kaufmannsgütern kletterte ich an Deck, ohne daß eine Menschenseele sich um mich kümmerte.

Hier gab's keine väterliche Fürsorge wie beim Norddeutschen Lloyd – keine Polizisten, keine eleganten Schiffsoffiziere, keine uniformierten Stewards, die einem Plätze anwiesen …

Ein Mann in Hemdärmeln (dafür trug er aber elegante Beinkleider, Lackstiefel und eine goldberänderte Offiziersmütze) sah mich verwundert an, als ich ihm meine Zwischendeckskarte zeigte, und deutete einfach mit dem Daumen nach der Vorderdeckstreppe. Ich stieg hinab. In einem mäßig großen Zwischendecksraum standen eine Menge Kojen.
Aber jede war mit irgend einem Gepäckstück belegt. Da kam ein Mann in weißer Jacke die Treppe herunter.

»Wo ist mein Platz?« fragte ich ihn.

»Hier!« sagte er und deutete auf die Kojen.

»Aber da liegen doch überall Sachen!«

»Dann ist kein Platz mehr da!« meinte der Steward seelenruhig.

»Aber ich habe doch bezahlt!«

»Well, das macht nichts aus,« erklärte der Steward. »Für Ihr Geld kommen Sie nach Galveston. Schlafen können Sie, wo's Ihnen beliebt. In den Kojen oder auf dem Boden oder auf dem Verdeck!«

Und pfeifend stieg er die Treppe empor.

Ich sah um mich. Kein Mensch war im Zwischendeck, trotzdem überall Koffer und Bündel lagen.
Am andern Ende der Kojenreihen entdeckte ich aber eine Tür und trat in einen großen, halbdunklen, durch einige Glühbirnen schlecht erleuchteten Raum, in dem ein paar dutzend Leute vor einem hohen Bartisch standen.

»Da ist noch einer,« sagte der Mann hinter der Bar. »Was ist Ihre Spezialität, Herr?«

Ich sah ihn fragend an.

»Was wollen Sie trinken, mein' ich,« erklärte der Mann. »Sie sin' wohl 'n Fremder?«

»Jawohl,« sagte ich. »Sehr.«

»Well, das macht nichts. Der Herr hier traktiert. Was ist das Ihrige?«

»Ein Glas Bier.«

»Schluck's hinunter, sonny!« sagte einer der Trinkenden. »Jawohl – ich traktiere. Und es wird nicht das letztemal sein, daß dieser gute alte Junge hier« (er schlug sich auf die Brust) »auf diesem gesegneten Schiff eine Runde bezahlt.

Soll sich der Mensch vielleicht nicht freuen, wenn er aus New York herauskommt? Im Winter ist es so kalt, daß man Millionär sein muß, um die Kohlenrechnung zu bezahlen; im Sommer ist es so heiß, daß man dreimal im Tag den Sonnenstich bekommt und nachts im Eiskasten schlafen muß.
Mit den Löhnen ist's Essig, weil das italienische Pack von drüben zu billig arbeitet, und ein solides kleines Geschäftchen kann man auch nicht machen, weil alles schon gemacht ist, was es in der Geschäftslinie nur gibt.

New York ist ungemütlich. Verdamm' New York, sag' ich. Hat einer von den Herren 'was dagegen?«

»Ich nicht,« meinte der Mann hinter der Bar. »New York kann für sich selber aufpassen. Groß genug ist es.«

»Das ist wahr. Ein großer, unappetitlicher, rauchiger Haufen von einer Stadt ist es.

Von Wolkenkratzern und elektrischem Licht kann ich nicht leben, sag' ich. Texas für mich, meine Herren, wo ich der Schlauere bin, und nicht New York, wo die anderen alle die Schlaueren sind. Texas für mich, sag' ich.«

Da freute ich mich diebisch, weil ich jedes Wort mühelos verstand, und trank vergnügt das winzig kleine Glas Bier aus.

»New York hin, New York her,« sagte ein Mann neben mir, ein prachtvolles Menschenexemplar, riesengroß, mit breiten Schultern und einem merkwürdig weichen Gesichtsausdruck. »Ich rutsche jetzt zum drittenmal auf dieser verdrehten Mallorylinie nach Texas hinunter. Wenn ich dort bin, kalkulier' ich mir zusammen, daß ich wieder in New York sein möchte, und wenn ich glücklich wieder in New York bin, läßt es mir keine Ruhe, bis ich mein Fahrgeld nach Galveston wieder bezahlt habe.

Wenn ich in Texas auf einem Gaul sitze, möcht' ich in einem New Yorker Varieté sein, und wenn ich in New York sechs Monate lang richtige Mahlzeiten gegessen habe, werd' ich ganz verrückt nach Texasmaisbrot und Texasspeck. Ich hab' noch nicht die richtige Ruhe, denk' ich mir.«

Die Männer lachten schallend auf.

»So geht's uns allen,« rief einer. »Ich pfeif' auf die richtige Ruhe.
Um die zu haben, müßte ich entweder Millionär sein oder tot und begraben.

Dies ist ein großes Land, und meiner Mutter Sohn will dort sein, wo etwas los ist. Gefällt's mir nicht in der einen Stadt, geh' ich in eine andere, und sind im Osten die Zeiten schlecht, so ist damit noch lange nicht gesagt, daß sie auch im Westen schlecht sein müssen.

Das Glück läuft einem nicht nach. Immer hinter drein! Entfernung spielt bei mir keine Rolle. Immer hinter drein, meine Herren, und der Teufel holt den, der zuletzt kommt.«

»Deutscher sind Sie? Und erst vierundzwanzig Stunden im Land? Dann lassen Sie die Finger davon!« grinste der Riese.

Er war mit mir an Deck gegangen. Während der Sam Houston (so hieß der Texasdampfer) sich durch das Hafengewirr schlängelte, nannte er mir die gewaltigen Wolkenkratzer bei Namen und pries in begeisterten Reden die Vortrefflichkeit der New Yorker Varietés und lobte die Appetitbrötchen der New Yorker Bars.

Als aber die Wolkenkratzer untertauchten in einer einzigen gewaltigen Steinmasse, als die hin- und herhuschenden Dampfer seltener wurden und die Millionenstadt langsam am Horizont verschwand, wurde er ungeduldig.

»Gehen wir 'runter!« hatte er gesagt und mir erklärt, daß sich auf dem alten Kasten die Zeit natürlich nur durch Pokerspielen totschlagen lasse.

»Aber spielen Sie ja nicht mit!«

Ich fühlte mich beleidigt. Wenn man die Bänke der Obersekunda neben dem Sohn eines amerikanischen Konsuls gedrückt hat, so ist man in die Anfangsgründe des amerikanischen Nationallasters eingeweiht!

Die Geheimnisse der Paare und der vier Asse und des Flush und des Bluffens waren mir längst keine Geheimnisse mehr. Selbstverständlich würde ich pokern!!

Überall auf dem Boden des Barraumes waren wollene Decken ausgebreitet, und auf den Decken saßen und kauerten die Männer von vorhin, in kleinen Gruppen von vier und fünf, mit Karten in den Händen, mit ernsten Gesichtern.

Vor jedem lagen kleine Häuflein Silbergeld und zerknüllte Dollarscheine. Biergläser und Whiskyflaschen standen umher.

»Na, nun will ich aber meinen Hut aufessen, wenn das nicht unanständige Eile ist!« schmunzelte der Riese.

»Das gesegnete Schiff ist noch gar nicht richtig unterwegs, und da fangen die schon mit dem Pokern an.
Sechs Partien! Hoh!! Und ich will meinen Hut noch einmal aufessen, wenn das nicht eine sehr vergnügte Reise wird! 's ist doch ein wahrer Segen, daß diesmal keine Frauen und Kinder im Zwischendeck sind.«

Fünf Minuten später war ich mit Jack (so hieß der Riese), Tommy (so hieß der Barmann) und zwei anderen schon mitten im eifrigsten Pokerspielen, und in weiteren zehn Minuten hatte ich unter dem schallenden Gelächter der Runde meinen ersten Bluff verloren … Jack hatte nämlich vier Asse!

»Gegen vier Asse anzubluffen ist Pech!« sagte Jack trocken. »Tun Sie's nicht wieder.«

Es war ganz still im Barraum; kein lautes Wort wurde gesprochen. Nur die Silberstücke klirrten.
Die Männer hockten regungslos da, mit halb verschleierten Augen. Kalt wie Eis.

Die Karten glitten über die weiche Decke, die Dollars sammelten sich zu einem Häuflein an, Banknoten wurden in den pot geworfen – bis die Hand des Gewinners das Geldhäuflein an sich raffte; hin und her wanderten das Silber und die grünen Noten.

»Fünf Dollars mehr …«

»Das – und noch fünf!«

»Halte ich – und fünf mehr!«

So wurde geflüstert; in gleichgültigem Ton, gelassen, ruhig. Und doch wußte sogar meine unerfahrene Jugend, daß unter der Maske äußerlicher Ruhe die Spielleidenschaft zittern mußte – aber wie diese Männer sich beherrschten! Wie sie mir imponierten! Wie ich sie beneidete um ihre kühle Ruhe und ihren eisernen Willen!

Nichts war natürlicher, als zu versuchen, es ihnen gleichzutun. Und ich gab mir große Mühe, recht unbefangen auszusehen.
Meine Karten betrachtete ich nur so nebenbei, als interessierten mich ihre Werte eigentlich gar nicht, und mein Geld rollte so leichthin auf die Decke, als könne ich es nicht rasch genug loswerden.
Es verflüchtigte sich auch wirklich mit erstaunlicher Schnelligkeit. Aber das war mir nicht etwa eine Mahnung, vernünftig zu sein und aufzuhören, sondern ich spielte nur um so toller darauf los.

Um ein Uhr nachmittags kam der Steward und brachte das Essen. Kein Mensch ließ sich dadurch stören.
Die Blechteller mit den Beefsteaks und den gebratenen Kartoffeln, die Blechtöpfe mit starkem schwarzem Kaffee wurden auf die Decken gestellt, als sei das selbstverständlich, und mit gleicher Selbstverständlichkeit holte sich der Steward von jeder Decke einen Vierteldollar aus dem Topf für seine Mühe, ohne ein Wort zu sagen.
Man aß so nebenbei und spielte, spielte, spielte. Röcke wurden ausgezogen, Westen geöffnet, Kragen abgebunden.

Berußte Heizer kamen aus dem Maschinenraum gestiegen und pokerten mit, Matrosen mischten sich unter die Spielergruppen.
Der Barraum war eine Spielhölle. Ich verlor und gewann, gewann und verlor, rauchte unzählige Zigaretten, dachte an nichts als Karten und Geld. Um keinen Preis hätte ich meinen Platz auf der Wolldecke aufgegeben –

»Drei Dollars mehr …«

»Wer gibt?«

»Full house, my money –«

Als die schmutzige Heizerhand den Geldhaufen einstrich, in dem mein letztes Silberstück lag, kam der Schiffsingenieur die Zwischendeckstreppe herunter.

»Gentlemen!« rief er. »Dieses gesegnete Pokerschiff verschluckt nebenbei auch Kohlen und braucht Leute, die es mit Kohlen füttern.
Ich möchte also die Herren Heizer der dritten Wache ersuchen, sich gefälligst dahin bemühen zu wollen, wohin sie gehören und zwar verdammt schnell. Runter mit euch, ihr Söhne von Spielkarten!«

»Pokerschiff ist gut,« sagte Jack. »Drolliger Junge, dieser Ingenieur. Wer gibt?«

Ich war am Geben. Und ich wechselte meinen letzten Zehndollarschein. Laß dich nicht verblüffen, sagte ich mir, nur ja nichts anmerken lassen! Was die anderen können, kannst du auch!

Spät nachts kletterten Jack und ich an Deck, denn im Kojenraum war es viel zu heiß zum Schlafen. Zwischen Fässern und Tauwerk vorne am Bug machten wir uns aus den Pokerdecken ein Lager zurecht.

»Good night!« sagte Jack.

Ich lag da und starrte in den Mond, und unklar stieg in mir die Ahnung auf, daß ich ein furchtbarer Esel gewesen sei.

Reingefallen, mein Junge … Die Silberstücke und die Dollarnoten, mit denen am Morgen noch mein Geldtäschchen vollgepfropft gewesen war, trieben sich jetzt in den Taschen anderer Leute herum – mir waren nur ein paar Dollars übriggeblieben. Zu dumm – –

»Fine game, dieses Poker,« meinte der Riese neben mir, »famoses Spiel!«

Da lachte ich hell auf.

»Haben Sie gewonnen?«

»No.«

»Well, morgen ist auch noch ein Tag und übermorgen desgleichen usw. Holen Sie sich's wieder. Bluffen Sie!«

Und im flimmernden Mondenschein, unter Wellengemurmel und Maschinengetöse, wurde mir zum ersten Male amerikanische Weisheit gepredigt, von einem einfachen Arbeiter.

Poker war weiter nichts als ein Abklatsch des Lebens. Bluffen mußte man im Leben wie beim Pokern, nicht verblüffen lassen durfte man sich.

Wenn man fünfzehn Cents in der Tasche hatte und nicht wußte, wo man seine nächste Mahlzeit herkriegen sollte, – mußte man aussehen und auftreten, als hätte man ungezählte Dollarnoten in der Tasche und einen offenen Kredit bei der nächsten Nationalbank.
Dabei stellte man sich besser, als wenn man jedem Menschenkind entgegenschrie: Bemitleide mich, ich Ärmster habe nur noch fünfzehn Cents! Schneid mußte man haben.

Beim Pokern mußte man durch eiserne Ruhe den Anschein erwecken, als hätte man ausgezeichnete Karten – im Leben mußte man sich arbeitskräftiger und klüger und besser stellen als man war.

Nur nicht unterkriegen lassen! Glaub' an dich selbst, und die anderen werden an dich glauben. Sag' den Leuten, du seist stark, und man wird nicht gerne mit dir anbinden.
Hilf dir selber, und alle Welt wird dir helfen. Bete nicht: Lieber Gott, hilf mir, ich bin ja so schwach – sondern bete: Lieber Gott, ich bin ja so stark, laß mich so bleiben!
Und man mußte stets daran denken, daß das nächste Spiel das Glück bringen konnte, beim Pokern wie im Leben … Da schlief ich seelenvergnügt ein.

Wieder wurden die Decken ausgebreitet, und wieder rollten die Dollars, und wieder kamen die Heizer und die Matrosen in jeder dienstfreien Minute. Ich stand im Banne des Pokerschiffs wie jeder andere. Aus meinen wenigen Dollars wurde ein Silberhäuflein – dann schmolz es zusammen – dann wuchs es im ewigen Hin und Her.
Der Tag verging mir wie im Flug. Drei Tage. Am dritten Tage kamen wir in Key West an.
Als ein Schiffsoffizier in den Barraum hinunterrief, wer wolle, könne auf etwa zwei Stunden an Land gehen, sprang ich auf und eilte die Treppe empor.

Die anderen aber blieben sitzen und pokerten weiter.

Der amerikanische Prediger Talmage nannte einst in einer jener Sensationspredigten, die eine halbe Stunde nach Schluß des sonntäglichen Gottesdienstes in seiner berühmten Washingtoner Kirche an alle Zeitungen Amerikas telegraphiert wurden (von ihm selbst – gegen Honorar!), das Pokern die Nationalsünde der Vereinigten Staaten.

Unzweifelhaft spiegle das Teufelsspiel um das goldene Kalb die besonderen Charaktersünden des Amerikaners getreulich wieder!
Alle Glücksspiele zwar seien frevelhaft, doch dem Pokerspiel fehle sogar das versöhnende Moment des Leichtsinns. Das sei kein Glücksspiel mehr – sondern raffiniertes wohlberechnetes Sündigen!

Mit bewußter Gier setze sich der Amerikaner an den Pokertisch und locke mit ehrbarem kaltem Lächeln dem armen Nebenmenschen (den man doch als Christ lieben müsse!) einen Dollar nach dem andern ab.
Die Männer, die vier Asse in der Hand hielten und dabei ein betrübtes Gesicht machten, als hätten sie nicht einmal zwei Könige, um den armen Nächsten durch diese optische Vorspiegelung falscher Tatsachen saftig hineinzulegen – diese Männer seien schlimmere Sünder denn die Zöllner von dereinst!
Ein moderner Tanz um das Goldene Kalb! Es illustriere im Kleinen die großen amerikanischen Sünden – die Goldgier; die Anmaßung, sich klüger zu dünken als der Nachbar; die Sucht, sich durch unehrliche Mittel zu bereichern, und vor allem einen frevelhaften Mangel an christlicher Nächstenliebe.
Der Mann, der mit selbstzufriedenem Lächeln die sündigen Resultate eines niederträchtigen Bluffs einstreiche, sei der alte Pharisäer in moderner amerikanischer Auflage.
Nur noch viel schlimmer! »Pokert nicht mehr, oh Amerikaner, und ihr werdet bessere Menschen werden!« – also predigte Ehrwürden Talmage – und ein vergnügtes Schmunzeln ging über das ganze Land.
Denn jener Kampf im Pokerspiel von Selbstbeherrschung gegen Selbstbeherrschung, von Unverschämtheit gegen Unverschämtheit, von Geldwert gegen Geldwert und von Bluff gegen Bluff ist wahrlich typisch für die Art der Männer des Yankeelands, und Prediger Talmage hätte wissen können, daß seine Mitbürger gerade auf das stolz sind, was er ihre Nationalsünden nannte!

Man lachte furchtbar über die Predigt. Und sie löste in jedem braven Amerikaner den frommen Wunsch aus, doch recht häufig als moderner Pharisäer mit frommem Augenaufschlag saftige Bluffresultate einstreichen zu können … Das ist eben die Nationalsünde!

Auf der Gangplanke des Sam Houston stieß ich mit einem Herrn in weißen Leinenkleidern und riesigem grauem Schlapphut zusammen.

»Pardon me,« sagte er.

»I beg your pardon,« antwortete ich.

»My fault!«

»Aha – Sie sind ein Deutscher! Well, ich bin Johnny Young aus San Antonio und meine Freunde behaupten, ich sei unerträglich neugierig.
Also Sie sind Deutscher? Ferner glaube ich sagen zu können, daß Sie noch nicht lange im Lande sind?«

»N–nein!«

»Aha! Wußte doch, daß kein amerikanischer Schneider diesen Anzug gemacht hat. Es ist so einfach, ein Prophet zu sein, wenn man die Augen ein wenig offen hält und nur ein bißchen nachdenkt. Well, well. Sie haben gepokert und verloren?«

Ich sah ihn erstaunt an.

»Ja? Stimmt's? Nein, ich bin kein Zauberer. Alles pokerte. Und natürlich pokerten Sie mit. Und natürlich verloren Sie!«

Wir schritten in weichem feinem Sand dahin, auf einem breiten Weg, eingesäumt von Palmen in endloser Reihe. Die dunkelgrünen Fächerwipfel stachen scharf ab von dem gelben Sand und dem tiefblauen wolkenlosen Himmel.
Die Luft war feucht und schwül. Holzhütten tauchten auf. Im Hintergrunde schimmerten weißgetünchte Häuser.
Es war wie ein Märchen – die Palmen ringsum, die schwere Luftschwüle, das grelle Tropenlicht; der merkwürdige Mann neben mir mit den weißen Haaren und dem frischen Gesicht, der vom ersten Augenblick an einen unbeschreiblichen Eindruck auf mich machte.

Ich glaube, ich wäre ihm blindlings gefolgt, irgendwohin. Er war als junger Mensch in Key West gewesen. Während wir unter den Palmen dahinschritten erzählte er von den Milliarden und Abermilliarden Zigarren, die alljährlich in dem Hüttengewirr des Inselstädtchens von den geschickten Fingern kleiner Creolinnen verfertigt werden; von den Schmugglern Key Wests, von den Wreckern, von den Flibustiern, von Kämpfen mit Zollkuttern, vom Menschenriffraff der Florida Keys – von den Spielen Key Wests hinter verschlossenen Türen, bei denen Berge von Gold sich auf den Tischen häufen und jeder Spieler den Revolver schußgerecht vor sich auf dem Tisch liegen habe.
Die Flibustier Floridas segeln Waffentransporte nach einsamen Landungsplätzen an der kubanischen Küste, wo Leute warten, die sehr arm sind, aber trotzdem für Waffen sündhaft viel Geld übrig haben. Revolutionäre. Die gibt's immer da drüben.

Oft genug jagt ein Kriegsschiff solch einem Segler ein halbes Dutzend Granaten in den Leib.
Aber die Waffen werden mit Gold aufgewogen – und solange Key West steht, wird es seine Flibustier haben, ebenso wie es stets das Hauptquartier der Wrecker sein wird.
Das sind desperate Schiffskapitäne mit kleinen Segelbooten und einer Mannschaft von Inselbewohnern, die mit Taucheranzügen umgehen können. Sie kreuzen still und unauffällig an der Küste. Wenn ein Schiff an den gefährlichen Bänken strandet, so ist bald ein Wrecker da und schickt seine Taucher hinab, die alles nach oben befördern, was des Nehmens wert ist, ohne sich lang darum zu scheren, wem die Ladung gehört.
Der Wrecker betrachtet alles als gute Beute. Er wird ein reicher Mann, wenn es ihm gelingt, Onkel Sam's Kanonenbooten zu entwischen.

Ich hörte in atemloser Spannung zu. Johnny Young lachte, als er endete, und sah mich vergnügt an.

»Ja, ja – ich hab' was übrig für rapides Leben trotz meiner sechzig Jahre. Herrgott, wär' ich noch jung! Könnt' ich noch einmal mittollen! Sehen Sie, ein anderer würde Ihnen sagen, Sie seien verflucht leichtsinnig gewesen, Ihre junge Nase in Pokerkarten zu stecken und Ihr bißchen Geld zu verlieren, anstatt die Centstücke zusammenzuhalten für die Not der ersten Zeiten in einem neuen Land.
Ich sage: Das Geld, das ein junger Mensch wie Sie mitbringt, ist so wertlos für ihn wie altes Papier! Es hindert ihn nur im Lebenskampf.
Denn je schneller er vor das Problem gestellt wird, entweder zu hungern oder Geld zu verdienen, desto rascher lernt er Land und Leute und Art kennen.
Das mag bittere Medizin sein, aber es ist gute Medizin.
Ich kann unsere Millionäre nicht leiden, die einem in salbungsvollen Memoiren vorlügen, wie fleißig sie in die Kirche zur Sonntagsschule gingen, wie sie Pfennig für Pfennig sich zusammensparten, wie sie mit ihrem so erworbenen Erstlingskapital von hundert Dollars sich weitere hundert Dollars hinzuerarbeiteten, wie sie in harter Plage und getreuer Pflichterfüllung steinreiche Leute wurden.
Das ist verdammter Schwindel. Mit dem Bravsein und dem Pfennigfuchsen hat noch kein großer Kaufmann Menschenkenntnis und Wagemut gelernt.
Geh' hinaus ins Land, würde ich zu einem jungen Mann sagen. Laß dir das Leben um die Ohren pfeifen und lerne das Menschenpack kennen, so wie es ist und nicht wie's in frommen Bilderbüchern steht.
Ist einer stark, dann kann er starke Medizin vertragen, und ist einer schwach, dann ist's nicht schade um ihn.«

Meine Augen müssen vor Begeisterung geleuchtet haben. Wie wunderbar mußte es sein, mitten im Leben zu stehen und zu sehen und zu lernen und stark zu sein.
Mir war's, als springe Kraft und Selbstvertrauen von dem alten Mann auf mich über. Da schrillten vom Deck die mahnenden Pfeifensignale des Dampfers.

»Ich wollte Ihnen ja noch einen Rat geben,« sagte Herr Johnny Young aus San Antonio. »Beinahe hätte ich's vergessen. Gehen Sie zum Zahlmeister und lösen Sie sich eine Karte für einen Kajütenplatz nach. Der Unterschied für die Strecke Key West–Galveston wird nicht besonders groß sein.
Es ist gescheiter, bequem untergebracht zu sein, statt auf hartem Boden zu schlafen und das Geld beim Pokern zu verlieren. So. In einer halben Stunde geht der Dampfer. Ich habe noch dringende Privatgeschäfte.«

Und mit einem verabschiedenden Kopfnicken tauchte er in das Hüttengewirr.

Ich aber rannte glückselig zum Dampfer und sprang an Deck. Im Bureau zeigte ich dem Purser meine Anweisung auf die Schiffskasse.
(Mein Vater hatte, durch Vermittlung des Norddeutschen Lloyd, arrangiert, daß mir bei der Ankunft in Galveston fünfhundert Mark ausbezahlt werden sollten.) Zuerst machte er Schwierigkeiten, weil das Geld erst in Galveston fällig war, als ich ihm aber erklärte, daß ich von Key West ab im Salon zu fahren wünsche, wurde er sehr liebenswürdig. Verdiente doch der Dampfer dabei Geld.

Meine Koffer ließ ich aus dem Schiffsraum holen, zwei Anzüge ließ ich mir aufbügeln von der Stewardeß, ich fiel über die Waschschüssel in der eleganten kleinen Kajüte her, ich probierte ein halbes Dutzend Kravatten, ich machte Toilette wie ein Backfisch vor seinem ersten Ball.
Während ich den kunstvollen Knoten der Halsbinde schlang, dachte ich an den schmutzigen Barraum und die pokernden Menschen in Hemdärmeln. Wie war's denn nur möglich gewesen! Die Stewardeß bekam ein Trinkgeld, das sie einen Knix machen ließ.
Im verlassenen Rauchsalon drehte und wand ich mich in eitler Selbstgefälligkeit vor dem Spiegel – bewunderte im Eßzimmer die überladene Einrichtung in Weiß und Gold, das strotzende Silber auf dem Bufett – promenierte auf dem segeltuchüberspannten Kajütendeck unter eleganten Damen und Herren – ließ mir vom Steward einen bequemen Deckstuhl bringen und schlürfte aus spitzem Champagnerkelch Sherry mit Eis und Sodawasser.
Da schritt schwerfällig Jack der Riese unten übers Deck. Er sah mich sitzen, betrachtete mich, betrachtete mich noch einmal, schüttelte den Kopf und sagte laut und vernehmlich:

»Jetzt will ich aber verdammt sein!«

Beim supper stellte mich Mr. Johnny Young als seinen jungen Freund vor, frisch vom Vaterland. Ich machte Verbeugungen nach rechts und nach links und erzählte von deutschen Gymnasien und deutschen Offizieren. Und bediente ritterlich die Dame zu meiner Rechten, Miß Daisy Benett, aus Dallas, Texas.

»Wie tapfer von Ihnen, daß Sie dieses gräßliche Zwischendeck studierten!« sagte Miß Daisy.

»Es war sehr interessant,« murmelte ich.

Wie der verlorene Sohn kam ich mir vor, der endlich von den Träbern wieder zu menschenwürdigem Leben übergeht. Jedes breakfast, jedes dinner, jedes supper war mir ein Freudenfest, das ich mit tausend Wonnen auskostete, nicht um der vielen Gänge und der mancherlei Delikatessen willen, sondern weil ich mir so vornehm schien.
So gut angezogen. So tadelloses Benehmen. So ganz gute Kinderstube. Hans im Glück war ich sieben Tage lang. Miß Daisy geruhte, mein Englisch drollig zu finden und konstatierte, ich sei ein guter Junge. Aber artig sein!
Ich schleppte ihr Stühle und Decken und Bücher auf Deck und versorgte sie für ein halbes Jahr mit Schokolade und Bonbons.
Droben auf dem Promenadedeck verplauderten wir die sommerschwülen Nächte und starrten zusammen ins Meer. Und in der allerletzten Nacht rauchten wir Zigaretten und tranken eisgekühlte Erdbeerbowle und –

»It's good bye, my boy …«

»Und good bye, Miß Daisy –«

»Wie jung Sie sind, my boy, und – ja, wie neugierig ich doch bin! Wie's Ihnen wohl ergehen wird?«

Da lachte ich, lustig und leichtsinnig, als sei's ein Scherz, und sprudelte hervor, wie wenig Geld ich hätte, und wie ich so gar nicht wüßte, was beginnen.

»Fight your way, my boy,« sagte Daisy. »Schlag' dich durch!«

Gelbe Sandbänke tauchten am Morgen auf, immer klarer hervortretend in langgezogenen Streifen; das tiefe Blau des Golfmeeres wurde heller, grünlicher. Gegen Mittag waren wir mitten im Hafenlärm. Scharf umrissen lagen im grellen Sonnenlicht die Häusermassen Galvestons da.

Dutzende von Helfern sprangen an Deck, als der Sam Houston am Pier anlegte, priesen Hotels an und bemächtigten sich der Gepäckstücke der Passagiere. Während der Menschenstrom die Gangplanken hinabflutete, guckte ich noch einmal in den Zwischendecksraum.
Da waren die Decken, da rollte das Geld, da waren die Männer und lachten einen Schiffsoffizier aus, der, purpurrot im Gesicht, mit der Hafenpolizei drohte, wenn sie nicht sofort mit dem verdammten Pokern aufhören und sich zum Kuckuck scheren würden.

»Zehn Dollars mehr!« hörte ich eine tiefe Baßstimme sagen –

Dann ging ich von Bord. Unten am Pier riß mir ein baumlanger Kerl den Koffer aus der Hand.

»City of Galveston, Herr? Feinstes Hotel!«

Ich schlenderte hinter ihm drein, an Mr. Johnny Young aus San Antonio vorbei, der eben in einen Wagen stieg. Abschiednehmend lüftete ich den Hut. Johnny Young nickte mir lächelnd zu und deutete mit weitausholender Armbewegung auf das Getriebe.

»Dies ist Texas, my son!«