de-en  E. Rosen, Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.3
A day in New York.

How I bought a revolver. - The policeman and the cleaner of boots. - How you are lathered and get a shave. - In the restaurant of speed. - The Bowery. - Girl of Hallelujah. - In the park.

"If possible remain at home", said the little man. "It's smarter and cheaper!" " I wouldn't dream of it," I said.

"Well, I warned you. This is a big city, a nice , but strange city.

If you look in your empty wallet tomorrow and weep, then it's your own funeral. Anyway, the steamship sails tomorrow morning at eight o'clock!" And he pattered out of the office.

I watched him go laughing. Here in the immigrants home on State Street it felt like being in steerage, and I was sick and tired of this feeling.

There were large rooms with nothing but sleeping places stacked three high on top of the other; bunks, real bunks –there was a dining room with enormously long tables and benches.

Emigrants were seated on them, as right now it was mealtime. And bundles lay around, and musty air was in the room, and I had to get out of there.

"Where to?" asked the man with the cap who stood at the door.

"out!" "rather not. Much too hot to walk," "I don't care I want to get out," " well. Are you traveling further?" "Yes. With the Mallory-Steamer tomorrow morning" "Texas? You don't say so! Do you have a revolver?" "Gosh!" the one with the cap said with amazement and sympathy when I shook my head in the negative. "You absolutely have to have a shooting iron down there!" But that I had not even thought about this! I reproached myself severely for my inexcusable thoughtlessness and was imbued with deep gratitude when the man with the cap offered to take me to a store.

He led me to a business on Broadway, whispered to a salesman, got something pressed into his hand, and left again. He said he couldn't stay away from the asylum for too long - the gentleman over there would take care of me.

"I – I desire to buy a revolver!" I stammered.

"Certainly," the salesman answered. "Talk German. Please, speak only German. You want a revolver?" I said yes.

"Of course, you must have the best that there is, especially since you are going to Texas, like the man from the home told me.

There, a man's life can easily enough depend on the quality of his gun!" (Texas must certainly be splendid! I thought to myself, pleasantly surprised).

"I would like to especially recommend to you this Smith and Wesson revolver. Finest nickel steel. Self-acting cartridge ejection.

Self-acting locking device. Accuracy guaranteed for three hundred meters. Immensely comfortable for carrying in your hip pocket!" " I don't know...," I said, eyeing the small machine as expertly as possible. "I am just not familiar with this system." (I understood absolutely nothing of revolver systems.)

"I will explain the mechanism to you precisely. You can also try out the gun in our shooting range. . . . This door there!" I shook with pleasure. It was indeed awesome. I could barely control my impatience as we went into the firing range and he showed me the mechanism, how to load, and the cartridge ejector.

Finally he put the revolver in my hand and I immediately started to shoot at the small target, brightly lit by light bulbs.

"Excellent!" the arms dealer shouted.

"Did I hit the target?" I asked guessing right.

"Whether you hit the target?" he said. ( As if there wasn't any other possibility at all.) "Of course. Right in the center of the target"! I nearly would have shouted hurray. ... I was as happy as a little boy. ...

After the twelfth shot the arms dealer went to the target and brought me the piece of cardboard. ... All shots had landed in the two inner circles.

How proud I was! So proud, that I readily bought the very expensive revolver.

If I had known then that it is an old trick of American gun dealers, to have targets with excellent results ready, which were foisted on the customers as their own results, I would most probably have been less conceited!

They should just come to me in Texas! My Texan future seemed to me assured. ... I owned a revolver.

... I must have tried to cross Broadway.

An electric streetcar, at any rate, tried inconceivably hard to run me over - the horses of a truck were trying to step away from my feet with cynical equanimity - a cyclist first collided with my ribs, then held onto my neck, and twenty-seven coachmen roared at me at the same time.

"Help!" I cried.

A hulk of a policeman with a gray helmet, a blue coat, and a cute little stick in his hand popped up, looking at me disapprovingly, and raised the little finger of his right hand a bit.

Just like magic all the carriages stood still, all the coachmen were silent, all the streetcars stopped their infernal ringing.

And the giant carefully took my arm and steered me to the other side of the street.

"Gosh!" I shouted.

"Oh - aha!" said the policeman in German. "Fresh from over there? Get accident insurance!" he said, and majestically moved on. ... But I looked down sadly at myself and noted that my coat was dusty, my boots were spattered with dirt, and my cuffs were crumpled.

Then at the street corner, I saw an ostentatious armchair embellished with brass plate, in front of which a boy was sitting, and I realized that this was an establishment for polishing boots.

What were "Stiefel" called in English? Right - boots. But how did you express yourself in English if you wanted to have something cleaned? No idea!

At that time, for the first time, I started to wish all kinds of ills especially to the teachers of English at two Bavarian grammar schools. I also did that quite often in the future. Like the beautiful and true sentence that was taught to us in English, "Virtue is the highest good"; the spartan youths, and the various enormities of their upbringing - that had been a very popular subject for translation.

But how one had his boots cleaned - that was something which was probably too ordinary for the humanistic gentlemen. ...

And on New York's Broadway I thanked the gods that as a sixth-former in Burghausen I had read so many trashy English novels and had written so many English love letters. ... For otherwise, I would have been at a complete loss with my English learned at a humanistic school!

No, the word for "reinigen" did not come to my mind. So I climbed onto the armchair without a word. ...

The man got busy with my boots right away, brushed them, oiled them, polished them with seven different cloths and managed a shining splendor which I looked at with awe, while I wracked my brain as to how I could elegantly ask what the whole business would cost. ...

"What does that cost?" I finally said.

"A nickel - five cents", the negro grinned. ... "German, heh? Nix English, heh?" And deeply humiliated I gave him my nickel.

It was so hot that one could hardly breath; it was as if surges of blistering air were flowing from the asphalt of the street.

I envied the gentlemen with their thin jackets without vests and the ladies who carried fans and were constantly cooling themselves; I was amazed that, in spite of the heat, all the people ran around like that; I was astonished when I looked into a bank through a mirrored window and saw long rows of employees sitting in shirt sleeves; in elegant shirt sleeves fastened at the elbow with wide, colourful silk bands. But in shirt-sleeves after all.

Being pushed forward by the hustle and bustle in the streets, I peered into all the stores and stared in astonishment at the skyscrapers sketching up to the sky. A barber shop gave me the idea to ​​further improve my appearance.

For a quarter of an hour I sat in the line of the people waiting until one of the industrious figures in spotless white linen looked at me, and said, "Next!" The next! It was my turn.

The barber was an artist. As soft as a breath, he glided over my face. Suddenly, I felt something at my feet, and realized that a man had insidiously crept up to me and was cleaning my boots! ... For God's sake, they had already been cleaned. I wanted to protest.

However, I couldn't do it because the artist was working around the corners of my mouth. Better for the boots to cleaned twice than to be cut once, I thought to myself.

There! Someone took my right hand. This time I would have almost winced.

Squinting out of the corner of my eye, I noticed that another man was arduously working on my nails with clippers and files and brushes. Well, whatever.

I was lathered three times, shaved three times, Then suddenly a white cloth was laid over my face - I roared! The cloth was scalding hot. ...

"Nice, ain't it?" asked the barber.

Nice - that meant pretty. . . . The New York barbers seemed to me to have a grotesque taste. But really, after the first fright, one felt refreshed, cozy.

From time to time the barber asked me something, and I just nodded my head because I didn't understand his business jargon.

Then he poured hellish fire over my cheeks and anointed me with cooling fragrances – smashed an egg on my poor skull and brushed my hair, and then, with an ice cold glaze, a brilliant contrast - cut my hair - shaved my neck – rubbed me down, chafed, flayed me. But it was very nice!!

"Thank you!" said the artist.

And the young lady at the cash register presented me a bill of five dollars with a charming smile and neat and tidy, packed a hairbrush, a toothbrush and a can of pomade for me. I nearly fainted.

I bought all that stuff by nodding innocently to him! I wanted to protest, I wanted - - then the young lady looked at me with a sweet look, with a look that could have melted a block of ice.

Then suddenly, the bill of five dollars didn't hurt any more. I paid not merely, but I paid with pleasure.

I wandered about aimlessly for hours, taking it all in, flabbergasted. It seemed to me as if one street looked like the other, as if the same confusing racket, the same turmoil, prevailed everywhere. One impression blurred the other.

I began to become tired and above all hungry. Then I saw a sign with dazzling red letters: Restaurant. Immediately, I stepped in.

Men were sitting at small tables, hunched forward in strenuous work. They ate frantically, as if this were an eating contest, with a smart prize for the one who would finish first. There were no menus.

There were posters everywhere on the walls with the names of the dishes and huge signs stating that there was a uniform price. Whatever one ate, everything cost twenty-five cents. ...

"What'll you have?" roared the waiter whizzing past.

"Beef steak!" I yelled after him.

"Medium?" He yelled back.

"Yes!" I shouted for good luck, for I had no idea what "medium" was supposed to mean. (The word is a really a special American expression, restaurant jargon, and is called "mittel" in German, medium well-done.)

"Tea, coffee, milk?" inquired the waiter, screaming across from the other end of the room.

"Beer!" I cried indignantly.

"We don't serve beer! he yelled back. ... "Tea, coffee, milk ..." "Milk!" I screamed. I was outraged. One could not even get a glass of beer!

If I weren't so mistrustful of my English, I would have told the waiter my opinion about his unaccommodating drinks in detail!

After a few seconds he rushed to my table. I stared at him in abrupt amazement.

The man had to be juggler in his second job because as a matter of course, he balanced a pyramid of bowls and small bowls with all sorts of dishes piled up high on his outstretched left arm, as if the law of gravity was abolished for him.

He took the top bowl from the dozen that were suspended on his arm and threw it at me. Yup - flung it down to me.

The plate slid over the tablecloth and slipped neatly into position in front of my place. The pure magic trick.

Slipping in the same way, came a small bowl of fried potatoes and a glass of milk. Then he threw me a piece of pink cardboard with the stamped imprint: 25 cents.

That was the bill. One paid at a small cash box.

I think I ate very quickly. In the first place, I was hungry, and the beef steak was excellent and secondly, the habit of eating quickly was contagious.

One couldn't preserve something like sedate gemütlichkeit in the nervous haste of this fast paced feeding ground.

And again I was outside in the noise of the street. Over the towering iron structure in the middle of the street railway trains were constantly thundering. It was getting dark.

Lights flared up, brightly lightening the sea of promotional signs and posters. Since one store here lined up with the others.

The street front was an uninterrupted sequence of shop windows, junk shops, pubs, clothing stores, bazaars, theaters.

And each of them tried to outdo their neighbors with gaudy advertising; here hundreds of small bulbs glittered in a shop window, there a swinging pinwheel drew attention to cheap jewelry, over there a dancing girl's flapping petticoats and pink stockinged legs in an illuminated splash of colors bordered by lights was supposed to entice people into a Vaudeville theater. Tacky, cheap, was the motto of the street.

Cheap, cheap - it was written everywhere in red and green and yellow - cheap, letters of light bulbs shouted it out in every second window. Cheap, cheap ... Was the street of the Bowery, the quarter of poverty, of vice, of cheap pleasures. Of course, I did not know that then.

I only saw the patheticness of the light-bordered kitsch in the windows - how the businesses of the street hustled to make a penny - how the people crowded and stared and gawked.

Energetic gentlemen tried to drag me into their clothes stores, a young lady bumped into me, a man who being thrown out of a bar whizzed past me and nearly would have swept me away. Sailors were yelling.

Alongside gentlemen who looked oddly ordinary despite their silk hats and despite their brilliant breast pins, figures in half-torn clothes, maids and barefooted children pushed and shoved.

Men and women loitered at the street corners, huge policemen slowly paced back and forth.

You felt like you were hemmed in. For the street curb also formed a single line of light and kiosks, of rolling shops.

A tiki torch was stuck to everyone of the small wagons, and the red glow contrasted especially with the white streams of light from the arc lights. There were fruit sellers and florists and lemonade carts.

A portly-looking man in a white apron had strapped a huge cauldron around his belly, a portable oven.

One saw the glowing coals on the grate.

He marched up and down the curb shouting his head off: Wiener Wurst – Wiener Wurst, gentlemen – hot Wiener Wurst.

Now a wandering restaurant came along, a small house on a cart drawn by a donkey, that touted sandwiches and beefsteaks. Next to it stood the small table of a salesman who sold packs of cards.

The street was an inferno of noise and turmoil and smells - I was pushed and pulled until I felt as helpless as a simple farmer from Feldmoching at the Oktoberfest in Munich ... There was a trumpet flourish resounding and high women's voices singing, the resounding roaring: Hallelujah - Hallelujah, this is the day of the Lord.
Hallelujah – Hallelujah!

Four girls with the ugly hats and blue jackets of the Salvation Army were standing on the street corner, holding an American flag tautly stretched between their hands. ...

The street drifters gathered around them, every now and then somebody threw a piece of money into the flag. There - now the beautiful voices of the girls sang in German: "Flieh doch die Versuchung, Die Leidenschaft brich! (in English: Do run away from temptation, do away with passion")
Glaub' immer an Jesum, Er rettet auch dich" (in English: "Always believe in Jesus, He will save even you.") Unctiously, gimmickly, unpleasantly. And yet - the way that sounded ... In this street. Among all these people!

Grey and sober the emigration house lay there In the oppressive sultry evening, the thought of the many people in the bare rooms and the rows of beds consisting of triple sleepers, was somewhat repulsive. ... Therefore I still wandered around despite my being tired.

Quite nearby I found a small park with broad benches and planted with fragrant jasmine bushes, a green patch nestled between the rows of ships in the harbor and the massive buildings of the skyscrapers.

In a corner there was a little place on a bench, next to a love-couple, laughing, chatting young people.

The park lay in soft semi-darkness. Outside, it flooded with light on all sides, from the thousands of lights in the harbor to the glaring arc lamps of the city streets.

It flashed red and yellow and white - pinwheels, which framed some of the advertising high above on skyscrapers; steamers in the port, with their many windows and hundreds of incandescent lamps, looked like floating masses of light; a sea of ​​light everywhere.

And, as if from a greater distance, a muffled din, the vibrating sound of New York night, the night language of the giant city composed of millions, of billions of individual noises, an indescribable sound, now like a low whisper, now a tumultuous turmoil ... Then from weariness and abandonment homesickness came over me. On the bench in the harbor park under a lantern, I wrote the first letter to my mother. A funny letter. About the barber and the restaurant and the Bowery. ...
unit 1
Ein Tag in New York.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 2
Wie ich mir einen Revolver kaufte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 3
– Der policeman und der Stiefelputzer.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 4
– Wie man eingeseift und barbiert wird.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 5
– Im Geschwindigkeits-Restaurant.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 6
– Die Bowery.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 7
– Hallelujamädchen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 8
– Im Park.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 9
»Bleiben Sie lieber im Heim,« meinte das kleine Männchen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 10
»Es ist gescheiter und billiger!« »Fällt mir nicht im Traum ein,« sagte ich.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 11
»Well, ich habe Sie gewarnt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 12
Dies ist eine große Stadt, eine feine Stadt, aber eine merkwürdige Stadt.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 13
Wenn Sie morgen in Ihr leeres Portemonnaie gucken und weinen, dann ist's Ihr eigenes Begräbnis!
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 14
Also der Dampfer geht morgen früh um acht Uhr ab!« Und er trippelte aus dem Bureau.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 15
Ich sah ihm lachend nach.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 18
An denen saßen Auswanderergestalten, denn es war gerade Essenszeit.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 19
Und Bündel lagen umher, und dumpfe Luft war in dem Raum, und ich machte, daß ich hinauskam.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 20
»Wohin?« fragte der Mann mit der Mütze, der an der Türe stand.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 21
»'raus!« »Lieber nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 22
Viel zu heiß zum Spazierengehen.« »Mir egal.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 23
Ich will 'raus.« »Hm.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 24
Fahren Sie weiter?« »Ja.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 25
Mit dem Mallory-Dampfer morgen früh.« »Texas?
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 26
Was Sie nicht sagen!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 28
unit 31
Er dürfe nicht lange fortbleiben – der gentleman dort würde mich schon fixen.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 32
»I – I desire to buy a revolver!« stotterte ich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 33
»Certainly,« antwortete der Verkäufer.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 34
»Talk German.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 35
Bitte, sprechen Sie nur deutsch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 36
Sie wünschen einen Revolver?« Ich bejahte.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 39
Dachte ich mir, freudig überrascht).
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 40
»Ich möchte Ihnen diesen Smith und Wesson Revolver bestens empfehlen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 41
Feinster Nickelstahl.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 42
Selbsttätiger Patronenauswurf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 43
Selbstwirkende Sperrvorrichtung.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 44
Treffsicherheit auf dreihundert Meter garantiert.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 47
»Ich erkläre Ihnen den Mechanismus genau.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 48
Außerdem können Sie die Waffe auf unserem Schießstand probieren.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 49
Diese Tür dort!« Ich zitterte vor Freude.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 50
Das war ja wunderbar.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 53
»Ausgezeichnet!« rief der Waffenhändler.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 54
»Hab' ich getroffen?« fragte ich erratend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 55
»Ob Sie getroffen haben?« meinte er.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 56
(Als ob das gar nicht anders möglich sei.)
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 57
»Selbstverständlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 58
Ins Zentrum haben Sie getroffen!« Beinahe hätte ich Hurrah geschrien.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 59
Ich freute mich wie ein kleiner Junge.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 60
Nach dem zwölften Schuß ging der Waffenhändler zur Scheibe und brachte mir das Stückchen Pappe.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 61
Sämtliche Schüsse saßen in den beiden inneren Kreisen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 62
Wie stolz ich war!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 63
So stolz, daß ich ohne weiteres den sehr teuren Revolver kaufte.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 65
Die sollten mir nur kommen in Texas!
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 66
Meine texanische Zukunft schien mir gesichert!
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 67
Ich besaß einen Revolver!
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 68
… Ich muß versucht haben, den Fahrweg des Broadway zu überschreiten.
5 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 70
»Hilfe!« schrie ich.
5 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 73
Und der Hüne faßte mich behutsam am Arm und bugsierte mich auf die andere Seite der Straße.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 74
»Donnerwetter!« rief ich.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 75
»Oh – aha!« sagte der policeman in deutscher Sprache.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 76
»Frisch von drüben?
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 77
Lassen Sie sich in eine Unfallversicherung aufnehmen!« Sprach's und schritt majestätisch weiter.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 80
Wie hießen doch Stiefel auf Englisch?
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 81
Richtig – boots.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 82
Aber wie drückte man sich auf Englisch aus, wenn man etwas geputzt haben wollte?
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 83
Keine Ahnung!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 85
In Zukunft tat ich das noch häufig.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 89
Sonst wär' ich dagesessen mit meinem humanistischen Englisch!
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 90
Nein, das Wort für reinigen fiel mir nicht ein.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 91
Ich kletterte daher wortlos auf den Lehnstuhl.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 93
»What does that cost?« meinte ich schließlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 94
»A nickel – fünf Cents,« grinste der Neger.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 95
»Deutsches, heh?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 96
Nix englisch, heh?« Und tief beschämt gab ich ihm meinen Nickel.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 99
Aber immerhin in Hemdärmeln.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 101
Ein Barbierladen brachte mich auf die Idee, mich weiterhin verschönern zu lassen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 103
Ich war an der Reihe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 104
Der Barbier war ein Künstler.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 105
Leise wie ein Hauch glitt er mir über das Gesicht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 107
Herrgott, sie waren doch schon geputzt worden!
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 108
Ich wollte protestieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 109
Es ging aber nicht, weil der Künstler gerade an meinen Mundwinkeln operierte.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 110
Lieber die Stiefel zweimal geputzt als einmal geschnitten, dachte ich mir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 111
Da!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 112
Jemand ergriff meine rechte Hand.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 113
Diesmal wäre ich fast zusammengezuckt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 115
Na, meinetwegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 116
Dreimal wurde ich eingeseift, dreimal rasiert.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 117
Dann legte sich auf einmal ein weißes Tuch über mein Gesicht – Ich brüllte!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 118
Das Tuch war kochend heiß.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 119
»Nice, aint it?« fragte der Barbier.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 120
Nice – das hieß hübsch.
5 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 121
Die New Yorker Barbiere schienen mir einen grotesken Geschmack zu haben.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 122
Aber wirklich, nach dem ersten Schrecken fühlte man sich erfrischt, wohlig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 125
»Thank you!« sagte der Künstler.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 127
Ich fiel beinahe in Ohnmacht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 128
All' das Zeug hatte ich nickenderweise in aller Unschuld gekauft!
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 130
Da tat auf einmal die Fünf-Dollarrechnung gar nicht mehr weh.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 131
Ich bezahlte nicht nur, sondern ich bezahlte mit Vergnügen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 132
Stundenlang wanderte ich ziellos umher, beschauend, staunend.
4 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 134
Ein Eindruck verwischte den andern.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 135
Ich fing an müde und vor allem hungrig zu werden.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 136
Da sah ich ein Schild mit grellen roten Buchstaben: Restaurant.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 137
Schleunigst trat ich ein.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 138
An kleinen Tischen saßen Männer, in angestrengter Arbeit vornüber gebeugt.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 140
Speisekarten gab's nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 142
Was man auch aß, alles kostete fünfundzwanzig Cents.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 143
»Was ist's Ihrige?« brüllte der Kellner im Vorbeijagen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 144
»Beefsteak!« schrie ich ihm nach.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 145
»Medium?« brüllte er zurück.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 146
»Yes!« schrie ich auf gut Glück, denn ich hatte keine Ahnung, was "medium" bedeuten sollte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 148
»Tee, Kaffee, Milch?« erkundigte sich der Ganymed, vom anderen Ende des Lokals herüberschreiend.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 149
»Bier!« rief ich entrüstet.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 150
»Nix Bier!« johlte er zurück.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 151
»Tee, Kaffee, Milch …« »Milch!« schrie ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 152
Ich war empört.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 153
Nicht einmal ein Glas Bier konnte man also bekommen!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 155
Nach wenigen Sekunden schon stürzte er auf meinen Tisch los.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 156
Ich starrte ihn in jähem Erstaunen an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 158
unit 159
Jawohl – warf sie mir hin.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 160
Die Platte glitt über das Tischtuch und rutschte niedlich in Position vor meinen Platz.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 161
Der reine Zaubertrick.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 162
In gleicher Art kam ein Schüsselchen mit gebratenen Kartoffeln gerutscht und ein Glas Milch.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 163
Dann warf er mir ein rosa Pappstück hin mit dem gestempelten Aufdruck: 25 Cents.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 164
Das war die Rechnung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 165
Man bezahlte an einer kleinen Kasse.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 166
Ich glaube, ich habe sehr rasch gegessen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 167
unit 169
Wieder stand ich in dem Straßenlärm.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 170
Über das hohe eiserne Gerüst in der Straßenmitte donnerten alle Augenblicke Eisenbahnzüge.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 171
Es fing an dunkel zu werden.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 172
Lichter flammten auf, das Meer von Reklameschildern und Plakaten hell beleuchtend.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 173
Denn ein Laden reihte sich hier an den andern.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 176
Cheap, billig, war das Motto der Straße.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 179
Das wußte ich freilich damals nicht.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 182
Matrosen johlten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 184
An den Ecken lungerten Männer und Frauen, riesige Polizisten schritten langsam auf und ab.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 185
Man war wie eingekeilt.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 186
unit 188
Da waren Obstverkäufer und Blumenhändler und Limonadekarren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 190
Man sah die glühenden Kohlen auf dem Rost.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 193
Daneben stand das Tischchen eines Händlers, der Spielkarten verkaufte.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 195
Hallelujah – Hallelujah!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 197
unit 199
Glaub' immer an Jesum, Er rettet auch dich.« Salbungsvoll, marktschreierisch, unangenehm.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 200
Und doch – wie das klang … In dieser Straße.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 201
Unter diesen Menschen!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 202
Das Auswandererhaus lag grau und nüchtern da.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 204
So wanderte ich noch umher trotz aller Müdigkeit.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 207
Der Park lag in weichem Halbdunkel.
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 211
Einen lustigen Brief.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 212
Über den Barbier und das Restaurant und die Bowery.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 149  1 year, 3 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 77  1 year, 3 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 210  1 year, 3 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 111  1 year, 3 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 83  1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 57  1 year, 3 months ago

Ein Tag in New York.

Wie ich mir einen Revolver kaufte. – Der policeman und der Stiefelputzer. – Wie man eingeseift und barbiert wird. – Im Geschwindigkeits-Restaurant. – Die Bowery. – Hallelujamädchen. – Im Park.

»Bleiben Sie lieber im Heim,« meinte das kleine Männchen. »Es ist gescheiter und billiger!«

»Fällt mir nicht im Traum ein,« sagte ich.

»Well, ich habe Sie gewarnt. Dies ist eine große Stadt, eine feine Stadt, aber eine merkwürdige Stadt.

Wenn Sie morgen in Ihr leeres Portemonnaie gucken und weinen, dann ist's Ihr eigenes Begräbnis! Also der Dampfer geht morgen früh um acht Uhr ab!«

Und er trippelte aus dem Bureau.

Ich sah ihm lachend nach. Hier im Auswandererheim in der State Street wehte Zwischendeckluft, und Zwischendeckluft hatte ich gründlich satt.

Da waren große Räume mit lauter Schlafplätzen dreifach übereinander; Kojen, richtige Kojen – da war ein Eßraum mit riesig langen Tischen und Bänken.

An denen saßen Auswanderergestalten, denn es war gerade Essenszeit. Und Bündel lagen umher, und dumpfe Luft war in dem Raum, und ich machte, daß ich hinauskam.

»Wohin?« fragte der Mann mit der Mütze, der an der Türe stand.

»'raus!«

»Lieber nicht. Viel zu heiß zum Spazierengehen.«

»Mir egal. Ich will 'raus.«

»Hm. Fahren Sie weiter?«

»Ja. Mit dem Mallory-Dampfer morgen früh.«

»Texas? Was Sie nicht sagen! Haben Sie schon 'n Revolver?«

»Mann!« sagte der mit der Mütze erstaunt und mitleidig, als ich den Kopf verneinend schüttelte. »Da unten muß man unbedingt 'n Schießeisen haben!«

Daß ich aber auch daran nicht gedacht hatte! Ich machte mir schwere Vorwürfe über meinen unverzeihlichen Leichtsinn und war von tiefer Dankbarkeit erfüllt, als der Mann mit der Mütze sich erbot, mir einen Laden zu zeigen.

Er führte mich in ein Geschäft am Broadway, flüsterte mit dem Verkäufer, bekam irgend etwas in die Hand gedrückt, und ging wieder. Er dürfe nicht lange fortbleiben – der gentleman dort würde mich schon fixen.

»I – I desire to buy a revolver!« stotterte ich.

»Certainly,« antwortete der Verkäufer. »Talk German. Bitte, sprechen Sie nur deutsch. Sie wünschen einen Revolver?«

Ich bejahte.

»Sie müssen natürlich das Beste haben, was es nur gibt, besonders da Sie nach Texas reisen, wie mir der Mann vom Heim sagte.

Dort kann das Leben eines Mannes leicht genug von der Güte seiner Waffe abhängen!«

(Texas muß ja fa–mos sein! Dachte ich mir, freudig überrascht).

»Ich möchte Ihnen diesen Smith und Wesson Revolver bestens empfehlen. Feinster Nickelstahl. Selbsttätiger Patronenauswurf.

Selbstwirkende Sperrvorrichtung. Treffsicherheit auf dreihundert Meter garantiert. Kolossal bequem in der Hüftentasche zu tragen!«

»Ich weiß doch nicht …« sagte ich, die kleine Maschine möglichst sachverständig betrachtend. »Gerade mit diesem System bin ich nicht vertraut.« (Ich verstand überhaupt nichts von Revolversystemen.)

»Ich erkläre Ihnen den Mechanismus genau. Außerdem können Sie die Waffe auf unserem Schießstand probieren. Diese Tür dort!«

Ich zitterte vor Freude. Das war ja wunderbar. Kaum konnte ich meine Ungeduld meistern, als wir in die Schießbahn kamen, und er mir zuerst den Mechanismus, das Laden, das Patronenauswerfen zeigte.

Endlich gab er mir den Revolver in die Hand, und schleunigst knallte ich auf die von Glühlampen hellbeleuchtete kleine Scheibe los.

»Ausgezeichnet!« rief der Waffenhändler.

»Hab' ich getroffen?« fragte ich erratend.

»Ob Sie getroffen haben?« meinte er. (Als ob das gar nicht anders möglich sei.) »Selbstverständlich. Ins Zentrum haben Sie getroffen!«

Beinahe hätte ich Hurrah geschrien. Ich freute mich wie ein kleiner Junge.

Nach dem zwölften Schuß ging der Waffenhändler zur Scheibe und brachte mir das Stückchen Pappe. Sämtliche Schüsse saßen in den beiden inneren Kreisen.

Wie stolz ich war! So stolz, daß ich ohne weiteres den sehr teuren Revolver kaufte.

Hätte ich damals schon gewußt, daß es ein alter Trick amerikanischer Waffenhändler ist, auf den Schießständen sauber zurechtgeschossene Scheiben in Bereitschaft zu haben, die den Kunden für ihre eigenen unterschoben werden, so würde ich wohl bedeutend weniger eingebildet gewesen sein!

Die sollten mir nur kommen in Texas! Meine texanische Zukunft schien mir gesichert! Ich besaß einen Revolver!

… Ich muß versucht haben, den Fahrweg des Broadway zu überschreiten.

Eine elektrische Straßenbahn wenigstens gab sich die erdenklichste Mühe, mich zu rädern – die Pferde eines Lastwagens versuchten mit zynischem Gleichmut, mir die Füße wegzutreten – ein Radfahrer kollidierte zuerst mit meinen Rippen und hielt sich dann vertrauensvoll an meinem Halse fest – und siebenundzwanzig Kutscher brüllten zu gleicher Zeit auf mich ein.

»Hilfe!« schrie ich.

Da tauchte ein Hüne von Polizist mit grauem Helm, blauem Rock und einem niedlichen kleinen Knüppel in der Hand neben mir auf, sah mich mißbilligend an und hob den kleinen Finger der rechten Hand ein bißchen in die Höhe.

Wie durch Zauberschlag standen all' die Wagen still, schwiegen all' die Kutscher, hörten all' die Elektrischen mit ihrer dröhnenden Klingelei auf.

Und der Hüne faßte mich behutsam am Arm und bugsierte mich auf die andere Seite der Straße.

»Donnerwetter!« rief ich.

»Oh – aha!« sagte der policeman in deutscher Sprache. »Frisch von drüben? Lassen Sie sich in eine Unfallversicherung aufnehmen!«

Sprach's und schritt majestätisch weiter. Ich aber guckte betrübt an mir hinab und konstatierte, daß mein Rock bestaubt, meine Stiefel mit Schmutz bespritzt und meine Manschetten zerknüllt waren.

Da sah ich an der Straßenecke einen pompösen, mit Messingblech verzierten Lehnstuhl stehen, vor dem ein Junge hockte, und ich begriff, daß das ein Etablissement zum Stiefelputzen war.

Wie hießen doch Stiefel auf Englisch? Richtig – boots. Aber wie drückte man sich auf Englisch aus, wenn man etwas geputzt haben wollte? Keine Ahnung!

Damals begann ich zum erstenmal, speziell den Lehrern der englischen Sprache zweier bayrischer Gymnasien allerlei Übles an den Hals zu wünschen. In Zukunft tat ich das noch häufig. Wie der schöne und wahre Satz:

»Die Tugend ist das höchste Gut« auf Englisch hieß, das hatte man uns gelehrt; die spartanischen Jünglinge und die verschiedenen Enormitäten ihrer Erziehung – das war ein sehr beliebtes Übersetzungsthema gewesen.

Aber wie man sich auf Englisch die Stiefel putzen ließ – das war den Herren Humanisten wahrscheinlich zu gewöhnlich gewesen.

Und auf dem Broadway von New York dankte ich den Göttern, daß ich als Primaner in Burghausen so viele englische Schundromane gelesen und so viele englische Liebesbriefe geschrieben hatte. Sonst wär' ich dagesessen mit meinem humanistischen Englisch!

Nein, das Wort für reinigen fiel mir nicht ein. Ich kletterte daher wortlos auf den Lehnstuhl.

Der Mann fiel auch sofort über meine Stiefel her, bürstete, ölte, frottierte mit sieben verschiedenen Tüchern und erzielte eine glänzende Herrlichkeit, die ich mit Staunen betrachtete, während ich meinen Schädel damit quälte, wie ich elegant fragen könnte, was die Geschichte kostete.

»What does that cost?« meinte ich schließlich.

»A nickel – fünf Cents,« grinste der Neger. »Deutsches, heh? Nix englisch, heh?«

Und tief beschämt gab ich ihm meinen Nickel.

Es war so heiß, daß man kaum atmen konnte; es war, als strömten Fluten glühender Luft aus dem Asphalt der Straße.

Ich beneidete die westenlosen Herren mit ihren dünnen Jäckchen und die Damen, die Fächer trugen und sich unablässig Kühlung zufächelten; ich wunderte mich, daß trotz der Hitze alle Leute so rannten; war erstaunt, als ich durch eine Spiegelscheibe in ein Bankgeschäft hineinguckte und lange Reihen von Angestellten in Hemdärmeln sitzen sah; in eleganten Hemdärmeln, an den Ellenbogen von breiten bunten Seidenbändern zusammengehalten. Aber immerhin in Hemdärmeln.

Ich guckte in alle Läden hinein, starrte verblüfft an himmelragenden Wolkenkratzern empor, ließ mich vorwärts schieben im Straßengewühl. Ein Barbierladen brachte mich auf die Idee, mich weiterhin verschönern zu lassen.

Eine Viertelstunde lang saß ich in der Reihe der Wartenden, bis eine der emsig arbeitenden Gestalten in fleckenlosem weißen Linnen mich ansah und rief:

»Next!«

Der Nächste! Ich war an der Reihe.

Der Barbier war ein Künstler. Leise wie ein Hauch glitt er mir über das Gesicht. Auf einmal spürte ich etwas an meinen Füßen, merkte, daß ein Mann sich heimtückischerweise herbeigeschlichen hatte und mir die Stiefel putzte! Herrgott, sie waren doch schon geputzt worden! Ich wollte protestieren.

Es ging aber nicht, weil der Künstler gerade an meinen Mundwinkeln operierte. Lieber die Stiefel zweimal geputzt als einmal geschnitten, dachte ich mir.

Da! Jemand ergriff meine rechte Hand. Diesmal wäre ich fast zusammengezuckt.

Mühsam aus den Augenwinkeln schielend, stellte ich fest, daß ein anderer Mann mit Scheerchen und Feilen und Bürstchen meine Nägel bearbeitete! Na, meinetwegen.

Dreimal wurde ich eingeseift, dreimal rasiert. Dann legte sich auf einmal ein weißes Tuch über mein Gesicht –

Ich brüllte! Das Tuch war kochend heiß.

»Nice, aint it?« fragte der Barbier.

Nice – das hieß hübsch. Die New Yorker Barbiere schienen mir einen grotesken Geschmack zu haben. Aber wirklich, nach dem ersten Schrecken fühlte man sich erfrischt, wohlig.

Von Zeit zu Zeit fragte mich der Barbier irgend etwas, und ich nickte nur mit dem Kopf, weil ich seinen Geschäftsjargon nicht verstand.

So übergoß er meine Wangen mit höllischem Feuer und salbte mich mit kühlenden Wohlgerüchen – zerschlug ein Ei auf meinem armen Schädel und brühte mir die Haare, um gleich darauf durch einen eiskalten Guß einen brillanten Kontrast zu erzielen – schnitt mir die Haare – rasierte mir den Nacken – frottierte, rieb, schund mich. Aber es war sehr schön!!

»Thank you!« sagte der Künstler.

Und die junge Dame an der Kasse präsentierte mir mit bezauberndem Lächeln eine Rechnung von fünf Dollars und packte mir eine Haarbürste, eine Zahnbürste und eine Dose mit Pomade fein säuberlich ein. Ich fiel beinahe in Ohnmacht.

All' das Zeug hatte ich nickenderweise in aller Unschuld gekauft! Ich wollte protestieren, ich wollte – – da sah mich die junge Dame mit einem süßen Blick an, mit einem Blick, der einen Eisblock hätte schmelzen können.

Da tat auf einmal die Fünf-Dollarrechnung gar nicht mehr weh. Ich bezahlte nicht nur, sondern ich bezahlte mit Vergnügen.

Stundenlang wanderte ich ziellos umher, beschauend, staunend. Mir kam's vor, als sehe eine Straße wie die andere aus, als herrsche überall das gleiche verwirrende Getöse, das gleiche Getümmel. Ein Eindruck verwischte den andern.

Ich fing an müde und vor allem hungrig zu werden. Da sah ich ein Schild mit grellen roten Buchstaben: Restaurant. Schleunigst trat ich ein.

An kleinen Tischen saßen Männer, in angestrengter Arbeit vornüber gebeugt. Sie aßen krampfhaft darauf los, als sei dies ein Preisessen, mit einem tüchtigen Preis für den, der zuerst fertig würde. Speisekarten gab's nicht.

Dafür hingen überall an den Wänden Plakate mit Namen von Gerichten, und riesengroße Schilder besagten, daß hier ein Einheitspreis herrsche. Was man auch aß, alles kostete fünfundzwanzig Cents.

»Was ist's Ihrige?« brüllte der Kellner im Vorbeijagen.

»Beefsteak!« schrie ich ihm nach.

»Medium?« brüllte er zurück.

»Yes!« schrie ich auf gut Glück, denn ich hatte keine Ahnung, was "medium" bedeuten sollte. (Das Wort ist ein echt amerikanischer Spezialausdruck, Restaurantjargon, und heißt "mittel", halb durchgebraten.)

»Tee, Kaffee, Milch?« erkundigte sich der Ganymed, vom anderen Ende des Lokals herüberschreiend.

»Bier!« rief ich entrüstet.

»Nix Bier!« johlte er zurück. »Tee, Kaffee, Milch …«

»Milch!« schrie ich. Ich war empört. Nicht einmal ein Glas Bier konnte man also bekommen!

Wäre ich meinem Englisch nicht so mißtrauisch gegenübergestanden, so hätte ich dem Kellner gründlich meine Meinung über seine unkommentmäßigen Getränke gesagt!

Nach wenigen Sekunden schon stürzte er auf meinen Tisch los. Ich starrte ihn in jähem Erstaunen an.

Der Mensch mußte im Nebenberuf Jongleur sein, denn er balanzierte auf ausgestrecktem linkem Arm eine Pyramide von hochaufgetürmten Schüsseln und Schüsselchen mit allerlei Gerichten, mit einer Selbstverständlichkeit, als sei für ihn das Gesetz der Schwerkraft aufgehoben.

Von den dutzend Schüsseln, die da auf seinem Arm schwebten, nahm er die oberste und warf sie mir hin. Jawohl – warf sie mir hin.

Die Platte glitt über das Tischtuch und rutschte niedlich in Position vor meinen Platz. Der reine Zaubertrick.

In gleicher Art kam ein Schüsselchen mit gebratenen Kartoffeln gerutscht und ein Glas Milch. Dann warf er mir ein rosa Pappstück hin mit dem gestempelten Aufdruck: 25 Cents.

Das war die Rechnung. Man bezahlte an einer kleinen Kasse.

Ich glaube, ich habe sehr rasch gegessen. Erstens war ich hungrig und das Beefsteak ausgezeichnet, und zweitens steckte die Schnellesserei an.

Man konnte in der nervösen Hast dieser Futterstelle mit Dampfbetrieb so etwas wie beschauliche Gemütlichkeit nicht bewahren.

Wieder stand ich in dem Straßenlärm. Über das hohe eiserne Gerüst in der Straßenmitte donnerten alle Augenblicke Eisenbahnzüge. Es fing an dunkel zu werden.

Lichter flammten auf, das Meer von Reklameschildern und Plakaten hell beleuchtend. Denn ein Laden reihte sich hier an den andern.

Die Straßenfront war eine ununterbrochene Folge von Schaufenstern, von Trödelläden, Kneipen, Kleidergeschäften, Bazaren, Theatern.

Und ein jeder versuchte seinen Nachbarn durch grelle Anpreisung zu übertrumpfen; hier glitzerten hunderte von Glühlämpchen in einem Schaufenster, dort lenkte ein schwingendes Feuerrad die Aufmerksamkeit auf billigen Schmuck, da sollte ein lichtumrahmter Farbenklecks einer Tänzerin mit flatternden Jupons und rosabestrumpften Beinen in ein Varieté locken. Cheap, billig, war das Motto der Straße.

Billig, billig – stand überall in Rot und Grün und Gelb angeschrieben – billig, schrien an jedem zweiten Fenster Buchstaben aus Glühlampen geformt. Billig, billig …

Die Straße war die Bowery, das Viertel der Armut, des Lasters, des billigen Vergnügens. Das wußte ich freilich damals nicht.

Ich sah nur, wie erbärmlich der lichtumflutete Tand in den Fenstern war – wie das Geschäft der Straße hinter dem Pfennig herhetzte – wie die Menschen sich drängten und starrten und gafften.

Energische Herren versuchten, mich in ihre Kleidergeschäfte hineinzuziehen, eine junge Dame rempelte mich an, ein Mann, der aus einer Bar hinausgeworfen wurde, sauste an mir vorbei und hätte mich beinahe mitgerissen. Matrosen johlten.

Neben Herren, die trotz ihrer Seidenhüte und trotz der Brillantbusennadeln merkwürdig gewöhnlich aussahen, drängten sich Gestalten in halbzerrissenen Kleidern, Dirnen, barfüßige Kinder.

An den Ecken lungerten Männer und Frauen, riesige Polizisten schritten langsam auf und ab.

Man war wie eingekeilt. Denn auch der Straßenrand bildete eine einzige Linie von Licht und Verkaufsbuden, von rollenden Läden.

An jedem der kleinen Wagen steckte eine Petroleumfackel, und der rote Schein stach sonderbar von den weißen Lichtfluten der Bogenlampen ab. Da waren Obstverkäufer und Blumenhändler und Limonadekarren.

Ein behäbig aussehender Mann in weißer Schürze hatte einen riesigen Kessel um sein Bäuchlein geschnallt, einen tragbaren Ofen.

Man sah die glühenden Kohlen auf dem Rost.

Er wanderte hin und her am Straßenrand, aus Leibeskräften schreiend: Wiener Wurst – Wiener Wurst, gentlemen – hot Wiener Wurst.

Da kam ein wanderndes Restaurant, ein kleines Häuschen auf Rädern von einem Esel gezogen, das sandwiches und beefsteaks anpries. Daneben stand das Tischchen eines Händlers, der Spielkarten verkaufte.

Die Straße war eine Hölle von Lärm und Getümmel und Gerüchen – ich wurde gestoßen und gedrängt, bis ich mir so hilflos vorkam wie ein biederer Bauer aus Feldmoching auf dem Münchener Oktoberfest …

Da ertönte ein Trompetenstoß und helle Frauenstimmen sangen, das Gedröhne übertönend:

Hallelujah –
Hallelujah, this is the day of the Lord.
Hallelujah – Hallelujah!

Vier Mädchen in den häßlichen Hüten und den blauen Jacken der Heilsarmee standen an der Straßenecke, eine amerikanische Flagge ausgespannt in den Händen.

Die Straßenbummler scharten sich um sie, und dann und wann warf jemand ein Geldstück in die Flagge. Da – jetzt sangen die schönen Mädchenstimmen in deutscher Sprache:

»Flieh' doch die Versuchung,
Die Leidenschaft brich!
Glaub' immer an Jesum,
Er rettet auch dich.«

Salbungsvoll, marktschreierisch, unangenehm. Und doch – wie das klang … In dieser Straße. Unter diesen Menschen!

Das Auswandererhaus lag grau und nüchtern da. In der drückenden Abendschwüle hatte der Gedanke an die vielen Menschen in den kahlen Räumen, an die Bettreihen der Brettergestelle, etwas Abstoßendes. So wanderte ich noch umher trotz aller Müdigkeit.

Ganz in der Nähe fand ich einen kleinen Park, Anlagen mit duftendem Jasmingebüsch und breiten Bänken, ein grünes Fleckchen, eingekapselt zwischen den Schiffsreihen des Hafens und den Häusermassen der Wolkenkratzer.

In einem Winkel war noch ein Plätzchen auf einer Bank, neben einem Liebespärchen, lachenden, schwatzenden jungen Menschen.

Der Park lag in weichem Halbdunkel. Draußen auf allen Seiten flutete es von Licht, von den Tausenden von Lichtpünktchen im Hafen bis zu dem grellen Bogenlampenschein der Citystraßen.

Rot und gelb und weiß blitzte es auf – Feuerräder, die irgend eine Reklame umrahmten hoch droben in der Luft auf Wolkenkratzern; Dampfer im Hafen, die mit ihren vielen Fenstern und Hunderten von Glühlampen aussahen wie schwimmende Lichtmassen; ein Meer von Licht überall.

Und, wie aus weiter Ferne kommend, ein dumpfes Getöse, der vibrierende Ton des nächtlichen New York, die Nachtsprache der Riesenstadt, die sich aus Millionen, aus Milliarden von Einzelgeräuschen zusammensetzt, ein unbeschreiblicher Ton, bald wie leises Flüstern, bald anschwellend zu dröhnendem Tumult …

Da kam aus Müdigkeit und Verlassensein das Heimweh über mich. Auf der Bank im Hafenpark unter einer Laterne schrieb ich den ersten Brief an meine Mutter. Einen lustigen Brief. Über den Barbier und das Restaurant und die Bowery.