de-en  E. Rosen, Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika, Kap.2
In steerage of the Lahn.
In the Bremen Ratskeller. "So, forge your own fortune by yourself!" - On board. - The steward, the purser and the small business on the side. - About Itzig Siberberg from Wodcziliska. - Atra cura … - the girl with the hungry eyes. - The two Danish women. - In New York Habour.

All day long we were running around in Bremen. When we had to join a long line of emigrants for medical examination and had to wait for hours, my father suddenly said, "You actually ought to make the crossing in the cabin, not in steerage!" But immediately he had second thoughts. "No! The fact remains. It's better that on board you get used to new conditions." And then came the last evening on German soil.

Until around midnight, my father and I were sitting in the Bremen Ratskeller, in a quiet corner, hidden between bellied apostle barrels. Noble wine glistened in the glasses. A confusion of voices sounded from the the big parlor, the cheerful laughter of happy people. I felt pathetic; I stared into the golden yellow wine and fought back tears again and again and thought of leaving my mother and didn't dare that my father would see my discontented face.

Only years later, I understood what my father told me that evening. ... He spoke as one man to another, as a friend talks to a friend; he explained to me, that it would become very difficult to him to send out his only son into the world. But he did not know what else he could do. ... Life itself, with all its hardships, would have to cure me. "Perish if you aren't strong enough for life!" And I smiled tearfully, because I had my kind of pride in spite of all my dejection and in spite of all my remorse. He liked that.

I think you won't perish. Even as dangerous as the experiment is, I consider it the right thing to do. ... You must be put on your own feet. You have to let off steam! At the university, you wouldn't do anything other than new pranks, perhaps plunge yourself into misfortune; I cannot let you be a soldier as you want to be, for no one is suited as badly as you to the life of the poor officer – you do not really fit into business life. So, forge your own fortune by yourself! ..." My father talked to me for hours. My ticket was for Galveston in Texas. My stop-over in New York would only last for a few hours; the next day, after the arrival of the Lahn in New York, I was to continue my journey to Texas on a steamer of the Mallory-line. Out there in the young country it would be much easier for me to get by than in a huge city with its thousands of unemployed.

"Find a job! Hold your head high, my boy; accept nothing for free, answer a blow with a blow, respect women. You always wanted to become a soldier - now you are a soldier of fortune." And the glasses clicked.
Sobbing I asked him for forgiveness --- Never in my life will I forget this evening; for when I returned seven years later, they had already buried my father.

The next morning we drove to Bremerhaven to Lloydd's dock. The fast steamer Lahn was anchored there like a huge black monster. The German flag fluttered on the little house at the dock, which might contain some bureau. People thronged at the wharf, and at the ship's railing cabin passengers stood in dense rows, shouting farewell greetings down to their friends and waving handkerchiefs. We climbed up the gangplank. A purser of the North German Lloyd asked for my steerage ticket, and a policeman checked my passport. There was an indescribable confusion at the bow of the ship. Men and women and children were standing and sitting around in between suitcases and sacks and bundles. Someone was playing a concertina, and a girl was singing: "Et hat ja immer, immer jut jejange' – jut jejange' ..." The unhelpful people, who stood in the way of on another, chattered and cursed; The concertina chanted one popular song after the other, until the waltzes of the ship's band on the promenade deck drowned them out. My father and I were standing at the railing between a Russian Jew in a fat-glistening caftan and a peasant woman with a colorful headscarf. I sobbed to myself. People and things swam before my eyes; I felt as if I had to scream in bitter remorse. My father said over and over: "My dear boy, my dear boy!" "Visitors disembark!" cried the stewards. The bell started to ring.
Slowly the colossus of a ship was set in motion. And I stood and stared with burning eyes at the warf. Standing up, my father stood at the far end of the landing bridge, his head thrown back at his neck as was his style, and waved to me. Once. Twice. Then he turned with a sharp jerk, and in a few seconds he had disappeared into the crowd. A steward tapped me on the shoulder. "Have you got a bunk?" "No." "Well, listen, then it's high time. Make sure that you come down. The stairs there." I took my suitcase and descended into a huge room with long rows of wooden racks: bunks side by side and stacked over each other. Several hundred sleeping places were there. Each bed contained a straw mattress, two light brown woolen blankets, and a pillow. A tin cup, a tin plate, a knife, a fork and a spoon were laid down on every pillow. Everywhere men climbed on the wooden racks, and here and there they were struggling for places. I must have stood there quite helpless. A steward scrutinized me, and then he walked up to me, "You won't like it down here with the Poles, the Jews and the whole company - that's nothing for young gentlemen, I say. Come with me." Of course, I went with him. To me everything was frightfully indifferent. Through endless corridors and over countless stairs he led me into the office of the fourth purser.

"Can we not fix a bunk for this young gentleman?" My companion asked the purser.
Aye, sir, it was possible. The Herr purser wanted a compensation of twenty Reichsmark to have a berth set up for me in the storage room. Indeed, strangely enough, there it was, already ready, in a corner, coyly covered by a stretched out American flag.

"That is shamefully cheap," the steward whispered to me. "You were lucky. But let's have a drink. Such a small bottle of caraway schnapps from Hamburg costs only one mark fifty. ... Do you have any by chance, Herr purser?" Aye Sir, there was one there.

"Cheers!" (Twenty-one marks and fifty pfennigs changed their owners). Then at once, the steward stared at me in horror. "a straw hat? No, it's not possible - a straw hat! Gosh, don't you have a cap?" No, I didn't have a cap.
"Man! Such a fine straw hat - it's going overboard, I tell you. With the wind! By chance, I have a cap. Costs a Taler! "A fine cap!" Of course, I bought the cap.
Then the purser ushered me out politely but forcefully. Now indeed, I knew my place to sleep. But I couldn't find anything in his office from 7 in the morning until 9 o'clock in the evening.

That was also no big deal to me – as was everything and anything on board the Lahn on that first day. I ate almost nothing, was interested in nothing, walked dully back and forth on deck, stood for hours at the railing in an isolated spot, snuck into the purser's office early in the evening, went to bed and cried under the blankets like a little boy...Cheerful sunshine was flooding through the small, rounded cabin windows when I woke up the next morning and sleepily blinked around me. What was that sound and whirring? Throughout my body, I felt the vibration of the forward-whipping giant vessel - I felt as if I were in a swing, swinging up and down; as if I were thrown to the ceiling, would hang there for a moment, and then sink into infinite depths. A little bit of me seemed to lag behind; above on the ceiling and below in the depths. At one point I had this horrible feeling, as if my stomach had separated from me and was floating somewhere in the cabin. I jumped out of bed, and the rumbling inside me stopped immediately. I dressed in no time, hurried on deck and, with a genuine ravenous appetite, pitched into coffee and rolls that were dispensed by two stewards from a large cauldron and a monster of a basket. Only few people were on deck. ... I stepped to the railing. Out there was a majestic calm. They looked like infinity itself, the incessantly forward-rolling mountains of water, profoundly black in their arched middle and nevertheless shining like a mirror, ascending green-blue, frothy white on the edges. Then one mountain of water overtook the next, collapsing, and a new wave was born out of them, lasting only a short while. ... Never-ceasing motion and yet peace personified. I drank the salty air in, which made my eyes gleam and the blood course faster through my veins. And looked up to the sunny sky. I felt fresh and happy and light. "So forge your own fortune." The past was the past, and it would be cowardly to mope. If you have guts enough for silly foolishness, you must also have guts enough not to snivel in useless remorse.

I became adventurous and descended into steerage. It was terrible down there. Poor hordes of human misery lay on the bunks, with greenish-yellow faces, wailing in the agony of seasickness, too weak to go into the fresh air on deck. An underworld of moaning and smells. And the consequences of seasickness were very noticeable, so I thanked all the gods for my sleeping-place in the storage room.

"Your're not feeling seasick?" asked an old Jew, who was smelling of garlic and sitting on a bundle next to his bunk. ...
"No." "Well, I'm glad. What did you take for your stomach?" "Nothing. I only stayed in the fresh air." "Pooh, fresh air. Will I go up to sit in the fresh air? I will not! I went up and sat down on ropes. Came a goy along, who pulled at the robes and I fell on my back.
"The rigging is not there for sitting on," he said.
"Excuse me most kindly," I said. Now I went to sit on a bench at the ship's bow. ...
"Take care. It's damp there!" said the goy.

Well, I remained seated. I think, the bench is there for everybody, and he has no say in that matter. Well, I sit there - and while I'm sitting there, a wave hits and makes me soaking wet. ... Waih geschrien, sag ich, was is das for e Gemeinheit?« »Siehste,« sagte der Goj.
"Now you will certainly understand that I do not want to get wet, and don't want to have anything to do with the goy ship crew. Puh! What would you do if I asked you?" "I don't know yet." "Well? What's your name? Are you a millionaire?" "No! Unfortunately not. What do you want to do in America?" "Well, Silberberg went to New York after going bankrupt in Wodcziliska in Galicia, and now has become a self-made man. ... In the case of the business, it is so, one makes a profit, he writes to the relatives. Well- so I'll go into business - like Itzig Silberberg from Wodcziliska." When I was on deck again and gratefully breathed the fresh air, I laughed out loud and long about the clever son of Israel. Then I became thoughtful.

"What are you going to do over there?" "Hell, what would I actually do? What will we eat? What will we drink? I think, I dedicated ten minutes to this important question of life. Until now, worrying about the future hadn't been my specialty: In dreary recollections of all the Indian books I thought of galloping horses and shooting cowboys, and... with that, the treasure of my knowledge was exhausted. Hmm, to wait. It was so infinitely indifferent to me. Over there, somewhere in the converging mass of sky and water, new land would appear in thus and so many days, new people, new things. That would undoubtedly be very interesting and very amusing. ... I was already looking forward to this new country, as if I had, God knows, what important plans. ... In addition, then one certainly had to earn his bread and butter. One had to work or such. Some such thing. Well, that would turn out alright in the end.

"Behind the rider on the horse sits constant apprehension..." That had already seemed comical to me in the fourth grade of grammar school. But let it sit! And I whistled to myself and decided that the matter had been settled for the time being. It sounded splendid to be a soldier of fortune. ... The nature of a soldier of fortune was indeed very mysterious to me, but I suspected that the chief thing was to care for nothing that I found wonderful, and for that I had undoubtedly great talent.
Everything was wonderful after all. ... Magnificent feeling to be one's own master like this. Admittedly - a dozen times a day I looked down at myself, noting that my bright summer suit was excellent and wanting most ardently to go over to the elegant ladies and gentlemen on the promenade deck. But there I was supposed to be! By rights!

Little by little, all the miserable ones had come to the deck after recovering from sea sickness, and they consumed enormous amounts of the crude ship food with great regularity, as if they were trying to catch up for what they had missed. There were Oldenburg peasants, worthless giants, who sat all day long in anxious vigil over their belongings, never talking to anyone. There were Galician Jews, Hungarian workers, German craftsmen.
Usually they were sitting together in groups. They didn't give a damn about the beauties of the sea and the strangeness of the colossus of a ship, ate and drank and smoked, washed clothes, and mended their stuff, making a village out of the steerage with old practices and old customs. The women suckled their children, fetched food for their husbands and danced happy as a lark when the amusing Bavarian beer-brewer fetched his concertina, and the men quarreled and made up again, and talked a little, and lied a bit, and the Stewards soon played the mighty police - because they were Germans and that was in their blood; soon they remembered that they were waiters, and snatched tips.

The Oldenburg peasants had money in their sack and were going to Kansas to buy land in a German settlement. The craftsmen reported wonderful things about American miracle wages - the Hungarian workers chatted all day in their excited way - the Jews crouched together on boxes and suitcases and wheeled and dealed.
I had little understanding for them and their manner; the steerage of the Lahn is a blurred memory from which only a few people emerge.

There was a slender girl with hungry eyes. She was traveling alone and told anyone who wanted to listen that she was tired of playing maid and of condescending women and – yes, over there was money, a lot of money and beautiful clothes and she was most certainly not stupid. The women in steerage looked at her with the deepest disgust and the men rolled their eyes whenever she showed her face. She sat for hours up front at the bow of the ship and stared out at the ocean. ... Once I sat down beside her.
"A penny for your thoughts!" "Hah!," the girl said and her eyes laughed, "My thoughts are worth a lot more." "How much then?" "It's not for telling. I have thought about it, that I want to have everything that is beautiful, just whatever there is – everything, everything!" She turned around and looked at me. I was too young at the time to read those hungry eyes, and she laughed and went away.

And there were my two Danish women. Sisters, very young things in blue sailor suits and small, black little hats. They always sat together and giggled, and when the sun was shining, their golden-blond hair shone. I once said something to them, they then laughingly shook their heads because they spoke only Danish and didn't understand another language. However, on the last evening of the voyage, I was together with them. It was already late, and I was sitting alone on the deck and starring into the stars. Then the sisters came, giggling and laughing, and one sat down on my right and the other sat down on my left. So we stayed the entire night in the darkness and looked out at the ocean and looked at one another, and contemplated the glittering stars and were delighted when the waves flared up, foaming with silver. Hour after hour passed, and we moved closer and closer together.
Without being able to speak a single word.
I saw the two poor things again years later in abject misery. But that is another story.

As a fine misty veil lay over the sea. Gray structures appeared on the horizon, barely visible in blurred contours, but of oppressive mass, heavy, immense. They grew, rose upwards, took shape and form, dissected themselves into shady housing masses, divided, interspersed with striking, gigantic shadows, which looked coarse and angular as cubes, and immense, as if a superhuman hand had set them down. The sea became alive. Ships came into sight - steamers, large and small, sailing vessels, ocean tugs. And slowly colors extracted themselves from the shadows, the sea oppressive, as if the gigantic city wants to say: Here I rule!

Deafening noise everywhere. A woman emerges from the water, swinging a torch, a radiant crown about her head, the Statue of Liberty. Now we are traveling in the middle of the hustle and bustle of the houses, which in all colors, in all sizes, on all sides, surround the impenetrable rows of ships.

Two diminutive steamer tugs urge our colossus of a ship pretty slowly and cautiously to the pier, from which, out of the black throng of people, white towels flapped in greeting. The gang planks are laid, the cabin passengers go ashore, the steam winches hastily extracting their suitcase loads from the belly of the ship. We steerage passengers must wait a long time until we too are allowed leave the ship and can stand in the landing hall for the customs check.

That passed quickly enough; with the poor people from steerage there wasn't much for Uncle Sam to get. Then we were marched onto a small steamer, which took us to the emigrants' halls.
It was a vast room, divided into long, narrow aisles by woodwork, with small wooden houses for the doctors and the emigrant commissaries, along which we had to proceed in a single file. After an hour or so, it was then my turn. The doctor looked at me briefly, and just waved his hand that I was permitted to go on; the Commissioner asked me my name and looked at a list he held in his hand.

"Are you German?" "Yes." "What was your work in Germany?" "Nothing!" I blurted out, and the official laughed.
"What do you want to do here in America?" I probably must have had a rather stupid look on my face at this question, for the official did not wait for the answer, and asked, smiling, "show me the thirty dollars required." He glanced at the gold pieces in my money purse.
"Good enough. You can pass. And good luck!" There I was now in the smaller side hall with its mountain of suitcases, and it occurred to me that on the ticket of the steamer line which was to take me to Texas, it was explained in a cumbersome fashion that you had to put the ticket on your hat upon arrival in New York. I did that. Immediately, a nimble young fellow hurtled towards me, "Hello, mister. You are traveling with the Mallory line. I'm the agent. Everything is in order. Give me your baggage check. So! Remain standing here. Don't budge from this spot. You don't have to do anything at all. Everything is taken care of. Everything is paid for." And he went away. Soon I saw him here, now there, in the crowd, and he always had new "charges" by the collar which he quickly took to my corner. Finally we were all there.

"One, two, three - seven!" he counted. ... "All right. Everything is all right. Baggage is brought. Let's go. Just keep on following me!" That's how I set foot on the streets of New York.
unit 1
Im Zwischendeck der Lahn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 2
Im Bremer Ratskeller.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 3
– »So schmiede dir denn selbst dein Glück!« – An Bord.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 4
– Der Steward, der Zahlmeister und das Nebengeschäftchen.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 5
– Vom Itzig Silberberg aus Wodcziliska.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 6
– Atra cura … – Das Mädel mit den hungrigen Augen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 7
– Die beiden Däninnen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 8
– Im New Yorker Hafen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 9
Den ganzen Tag waren wir in Bremen umhergerannt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 11
»Nein!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 12
Es bleibt dabei.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 15
Edler Wein funkelte in den Gläsern.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 16
Von der großen Stube her klang Stimmengewirr, lustiges Lachen fröhlicher Menschen.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 18
Erst Jahre später habe ich das verstanden, was mir mein Vater an jenem Abend sagte.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 20
Er wisse aber keinen andern Rat.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 22
Das gefiel ihm.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 23
»Du wirst nicht zugrunde gehen, glaube ich.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 24
So gefährlich auch das Experiment ist, für so richtig halte ich es.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 25
Du mußt auf deine eigenen Füße gestellt werden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 26
Du mußt dich austoben!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 28
So schmiede dir denn selber dein Glück …« Stundenlang sprach mein Vater mit mir.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 29
Meine Fahrkarte lautete nach Galveston in Texas.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 32
»Such' dir dein Brot!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 36
Am nächsten Morgen fuhren wir nach Bremerhaven zum Lloyddock.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 37
Dort lag wie ein riesiges schwarzes Ungetüm der Schnelldampfer Lahn.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 40
Wir stiegen die Gangplanke hinan.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 42
Auf dem Vorderschiff war ein unbeschreiblicher Wirrwarr.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 43
unit 46
Ich schluchzte vor mich hin.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 49
Die Glocke begann zu läuten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 50
Langsam setzte sich der Schiffskoloß in Bewegung.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 51
Und ich stand und starrte mit brennenden Augen nach dem Kai.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 53
Einmal.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 54
Zweimal.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 56
»Haben Sie schon 'ne Koje?« »Nein.« »Na, hören Sie 'mal – dann ist's aber höchste Zeit.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 57
Machen Sie, daß Sie 'runterkommen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 59
Viele Hunderte von Schlafplätzen waren es.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 60
Jedes Bett enthielt eine Strohmatraze, zwei hellbraune Wolldecken und ein Kopfkissen.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 61
unit 63
Ich muß recht hilflos dagestanden haben.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 65
Kommen Sie mit.« Natürlich ging ich mit.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 66
Mir war alles furchtbar gleichgültig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 67
unit 68
unit 69
Jawohl, es ging.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 72
»Das is schandbar billig,« flüsterte mir der Steward zu.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 73
»Da haben Sie Glück gehabt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 74
Nu wollen wir aber einen trinken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 75
So 'ne kleine Flasche Hamburger Kümmel kost' nur 'ne Mark fufzig.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 76
Haben Sie zufällig eine da, Herr Zahlmeister?« Jawohl; es war eine da.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 77
»Prost!« (Einundzwanzig Mark und fünfzig Pfennige wechselten ihre Besitzer).
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 78
Da starrte mich der Steward auf einmal entsetzt an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 79
»'n Strohhut?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 80
Nee, is' nich' möglich – 'n Strohhut!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 81
Mensch, haben Sie keine Mütze?« Nein, ich hatte keine Mütze.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 82
»Mensch!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 83
So 'n feiner Strohhut – der geht über Bord, sag' ich Ihnen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 84
Bei dem Wind!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 85
Ich hab' zufällig 'ne Mütze.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 86
Kost 'n Taler!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 87
'ne feine Mütze!« Natürlich kaufte ich die Mütze.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 88
Dann komplimentierte mich der Zahlmeister höflich aber energisch hinaus.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 89
Ich kennte ja jetzt meinen Schlafplatz.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 90
Von 7 Uhr morgens aber bis 9 Uhr abends hätte ich in seinem Bureau nichts zu suchen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 91
Auch das war mir sehr gleichgültig – wie alles und jedes an Bord der Lahn an jenem ersten Tag.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 93
Was war das für ein Tönen und Surren?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 97
Ich sprang aus dem Bett, und sofort hörte das Rumoren in meinem Innern auf.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 99
Wenig Menschen waren an Deck.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 100
Ich trat an die Reeling.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 101
Da draußen war majestätische Ruhe.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 104
Nimmer aufhörende Bewegung und doch verkörperte Ruhe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 106
Und schaute in den Sonnenhimmel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 109
Ich wurde unternehmungslustig und stieg ins Zwischendeck hinab.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 110
Es war fürchterlich da unten.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 112
Eine Unterwelt des Stöhnens und der Gerüche.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 115
»Nein.« »Nu, das frait mich. Was ham Se genommen ein for de Magen?« »Nichts.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 116
Ich blieb nur in der frischen Luft.« »Püh, frische Luft.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 117
Wer' ich raufgehen ssu sitzen in der frischen Luft?
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 118
Wer' ich nich'!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 119
Bin ich gegangen rauf und hab mer gesetzt auf Stricke.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 120
Is 'n Goj gekommen, wo hat ge–soogen an die Stricke un' bin ich gefallen auf 'n Rücken.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 121
»'s Tauwerk is nich' zum Sitzen da,« sagt er.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 122
»Se ver–sseihen gütigst,« sag ich.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 123
Nu bin ich gegangen ssu sitzen auf 'e Bank ganz vorne.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 124
»Paß man auf.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 125
Da is feucht!« sagt der Goj.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 126
Nu, ich bin geblieben sitzen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 127
De Bank is for alle da und er hat mer nix nich' ssu sagen, denk' ich.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 128
Nu, ich sitz – un' wie ich so sitz, kommt e Welle un' macht mer himmelschreiend naß.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 131
Püh!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 132
Was wern Se machen drieben, wenn ich fragen derf?« »Weiß ich noch nicht.« »Nu?
5 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 133
wie haißt?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 134
Sind Se e Millionär?« »Nee!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 135
Leider nicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 137
Bei de Geschäfte is' ssu machen e Rebbach, schreibt er an de Verwandtschaft.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 139
Dann wurde ich nachdenklich.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 140
»Was wern Se machen drieben?…« Zum Teufel auch, was würde ich eigentlich anfangen?
5 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 141
Was werden wir essen?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 142
Was werden wir trinken?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 143
Ich glaube, ich habe dieser wichtigen Lebensfrage etwa zehn Minuten gewidmet.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 145
Hm, abwarten.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 146
Es war mir ja auch so unendlich gleichgültig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 148
Das würde zweifellos sehr interessant und sehr lustig sein.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 149
Ich freute mich schon so auf dieses neue Land, als hätte ich weiß Gott welche wichtigen Pläne.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 150
Nebenbei mußte man dann allerdings Brot verdienen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 151
Man mußte arbeiten oder dergleichen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 152
Irgend etwas.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 153
Nun, das würde sich schon finden.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 155
Laß sie doch sitzen!
4 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 156
Und ich pfiff mir eins und entschied, die Sache sei vorläufig erledigt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 157
Es klang famos, ein Glückssoldat zu sein.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 159
Alles war überhaupt wunderschön.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 160
Prachtvolles Gefühl, so sein eigener Herr zu sein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 162
Da gehörte ich doch hin!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 163
Von Rechts wegen!
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 166
Da waren galizische Juden, ungarische Arbeiter, deutsche Handwerker.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 167
Sie hockten gewöhnlich in Gruppen zusammen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 173
Da war ein schlankes Mädel mit hungrigen Augen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 176
Sie saß stundenlang ganz vorne an der Spitze des Schiffes und starrte aufs Meer hinaus.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 177
Einmal setzte ich mich neben sie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 180
Ich war zu jung damals, um in den hungrigen Augen zu lesen, und sie lachte und ging weg.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 181
Und da waren meine beiden Däninnen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 182
Schwestern, blutjunge Dinger in blauen Matrosenanzügelchen und kleinen schwarzen Hütchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 183
unit 185
Am letzten Abend der Reise aber war ich mit ihnen zusammen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 186
unit 187
Da kamen die Schwestern, kichernd und lachend, und eine setzte sich rechts von mir und eine links.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 189
Stunde auf Stunde verrann, und wir rückten immer enger zusammen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 190
Ohne auch nur ein einziges Wort sprechen zu können.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 191
Ich hab' die beiden armen Dinger nach Jahren wieder gesehen in jämmerlichem Elend.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 192
Aber das ist eine andere Geschichte.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 193
Wie ein feiner Dunstschleier lag's über dem Meer.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 196
Das Meer wurde lebendig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 197
Schiffe kamen in Sicht – Dampfer, groß und klein, Segler, Ozeanschlepper.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 199
Getöse überall.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 206
unit 208
Nach einer Stunde etwa kam auch ich an die Reihe.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 212
»Schön.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 213
Sie können passieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 215
Das tat ich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 216
Sofort schoß ein bewegliches kleines Kerlchen auf mich zu: »Hello, mister.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 217
Sie fahren mit der Mallory-Linie.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 218
Ich bin der Agent.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 219
Alles in Ordnung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 220
Geben Sie mir Ihren Gepäckschein her.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 221
So!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 222
Bleiben Sie hier stehen.Rühren Sie sich ja nicht vom Platz.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 223
Sie haben gar nichts zu tun.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 224
Wird alles besorgt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 225
Ist alles bezahlt.« Und weg war er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 227
Endlich waren wir vollzählig.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 228
»Eins, zwei, drei – sieben!« zählte er.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 229
»Allright.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 230
Alles in Ordnung.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 231
Gepäck wird gebracht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 232
Gehen wir.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 233
Immer hinter mir drein!« So betrat ich die Straßen New Yorks.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 229  1 year, 4 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 221  1 year, 4 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 169  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 215  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 163  1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 163  1 year, 4 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 131  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 124  1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 118  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 82  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 79  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 54  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 53  1 year, 4 months ago
bf2010 • 4798  translated  unit 32  1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 11  1 year, 4 months ago

Im Zwischendeck der Lahn.
Im Bremer Ratskeller. – »So schmiede dir denn selbst dein Glück!« – An Bord. – Der Steward, der Zahlmeister und das Nebengeschäftchen. – Vom Itzig Silberberg aus Wodcziliska. – Atra cura … – Das Mädel mit den hungrigen Augen. – Die beiden Däninnen. – Im New Yorker Hafen.

Den ganzen Tag waren wir in Bremen umhergerannt. Als wir bei der ärztlichen Untersuchung uns einer langen Reihe von Auswanderern anschließen und stundenlang warten mußten, sagte mein Vater auf einmal:
»Du solltest eigentlich doch die Überfahrt in der Kajüte machen und nicht im Zwischendeck!«
Aber sofort besann er sich. »Nein! Es bleibt dabei. Es ist besser, wenn du dich schon auf dem Schiff an neue Verhältnisse gewöhnst.«
Und dann kam der letzte Abend im deutschen Land.

Bis gegen Mitternacht saßen mein Vater und ich im Bremer Ratskeller, in einem stillen Winkel, verborgen zwischen bauchigen Apostelfässern. Edler Wein funkelte in den Gläsern. Von der großen Stube her klang Stimmengewirr, lustiges Lachen fröhlicher Menschen. Mir war erbärmlich zumute; ich starrte in den goldgelben Wein und kämpfte immer wieder mit Tränen und dachte an den Abschied von meiner Mutter und wagte es nicht, meinem Vater in das vergrämte Gesicht zu sehen.

Erst Jahre später habe ich das verstanden, was mir mein Vater an jenem Abend sagte. Er sprach wie ein Mann zum andern, wie ein Freund zum Freund; erklärte mir, daß es ihm bitter schwer würde, den einzigen Sohn in die Welt hinauszuschicken. Er wisse aber keinen andern Rat. Das Leben selbst mit all' seinen Härten müsse mich in die Kur nehmen …

»Geh' zugrunde, wenn du zu schwach fürs Leben bist!«

Und ich lächelte unter Tränen, denn meine Art von Stolz hatte ich trotz allen Gedrücktseins und trotz aller Reue. Das gefiel ihm.

»Du wirst nicht zugrunde gehen, glaube ich. So gefährlich auch das Experiment ist, für so richtig halte ich es. Du mußt auf deine eigenen Füße gestellt werden. Du mußt dich austoben! Auf der Universität würdest du nichts als neue Streiche machen, dich vielleicht ins Unglück stürzen; Soldat, wie du es werden möchtest, kann ich dich nicht werden lassen, denn zum armen Offizier eignet sich kein Mensch so schlecht wie du – ins kaufmännische Leben paßt du erst recht nicht. So schmiede dir denn selber dein Glück …«

Stundenlang sprach mein Vater mit mir. Meine Fahrkarte lautete nach Galveston in Texas. Mein Aufenthalt in New York würde nur wenige Stunden dauern; am nächsten Tag nach Ankunft der Lahn in New York sollte ich mit einem Dampfer der Mallorylinie nach Texas weiterfahren. Da draußen im jungen Land würde es mir weit leichter werden, mich durchzuschlagen, als in einer Riesenstadt mit ihren Tausenden von Arbeitslosen.

»Such' dir dein Brot! Halte den Kopf hoch, mein Junge; laß dir nichts schenken; gib Schlag um Schlag; hab' Respekt vor Frauen. Du wolltest ja immer Soldat werden – bist jetzt ein Glückssoldat.«

Und die Gläser klirrten zusammen.
Da bat ich schluchzend um Verzeihung – – – Nie in meinem Leben werde ich jenen Abend vergessen; denn als ich sieben Jahre später wiederkam, da hatten sie meinen Vater begraben.

Am nächsten Morgen fuhren wir nach Bremerhaven zum Lloyddock. Dort lag wie ein riesiges schwarzes Ungetüm der Schnelldampfer Lahn. Auf dem kleinen Häuschen am Dock, das irgend ein Bureau enthalten mochte, flatterte die deutsche Flagge. Am Kai drängten sich die Menschen, und an der Schiffsreeling standen in dichten Reihen Kajütenpassagiere, die Abschiedsgrüße zu ihren Freunden hinunterriefen und Taschentücher flattern ließen. Wir stiegen die Gangplanke hinan. Ein Zahlmeister des Norddeutschen Lloyd verlangte meine Zwischendeckkarte, und ein Polizist prüfte meinen Paß. Auf dem Vorderschiff war ein unbeschreiblicher Wirrwarr. Männer und Frauen und Kinder standen und saßen herum, zwischen Köfferchen und Säcken und Bündeln. Irgend jemand spielte auf einer Ziehharmonika, und ein Mädel sang dazu: »Et hat ja immer, immer jut jejange' – jut jejange' …« Die unbehilflichen Menschen, die sich gegenseitig im Wege standen, schnatterten und schimpften; die Ziehharmonika johlte einen Gassenhauer nach dem andern, bis die Walzerklänge der Schiffskapelle auf dem Promenadedeck sie übertönten. Mein Vater und ich standen an der Reeling zwischen einem russischen Juden in fettglänzendem Kaftan und einer Bauernfrau mit buntem Kopftuch. Ich schluchzte vor mich hin. Die Menschen und die Dinge schwammen mir vor den Augen; mir war, als müßte ich schreien in bitterer Reue. Mein Vater sagte ein über das andere Mal:
»Mein lieber Junge – mein lieber Junge!«
»Besucher von Bord!« riefen die Stewards. Die Glocke begann zu läuten.
Langsam setzte sich der Schiffskoloß in Bewegung. Und ich stand und starrte mit brennenden Augen nach dem Kai. Hochaufgerichtet stand mein Vater am äußersten Ende der Landungsbrücke, den Kopf in den Nacken geworfen, wie das seine Art war, und winkte mir zu. Einmal. Zweimal. Dann wandte er sich mit einem scharfen Ruck, und in wenigen Sekunden war er im Menschengewühl verschwunden – – –

Ein Steward klopfte mir auf die Schulter. »Haben Sie schon 'ne Koje?«
»Nein.«
»Na, hören Sie 'mal – dann ist's aber höchste Zeit. Machen Sie, daß Sie 'runterkommen. Die Treppe dort.«
Ich nahm meinen Handkoffer und stieg hinunter, in einen Riesenraum mit langen Reihen von Holzgestellen: nebeneinander und übereinander geschichteten Kojen. Viele Hunderte von Schlafplätzen waren es. Jedes Bett enthielt eine Strohmatraze, zwei hellbraune Wolldecken und ein Kopfkissen. Auf jedem Kopfkissen waren ein Blechbecher, ein zinnerner Teller, Messer, Gabel und Löffel hingelegt. Überall auf den Holzgestellen kletterten Männer herum, und da und dort stritt man sich um die Plätze. Ich muß recht hilflos dagestanden haben. Ein Steward sah mich prüfend an, dann ging er auf mich zu:

»Das wird Ihnen man nich' gefallen hier unten mit die Polacken un' die Jüden un' die ganze Gesellschaft – das is nix nich' für junge Herren, sag' ich. Kommen Sie mit.«

Natürlich ging ich mit. Mir war alles furchtbar gleichgültig. Durch endlose Gänge und über unzählige Treppen führte er mich ins Bureau des vierten Zahlmeisters.

»Können wir nich' 'ne Koje fixen für diesen jungen Herrn?« fragte mein Begleiter den Zahlmeister.
Jawohl, es ging. Gegen eine Entschädigung von zwanzig Reichsmark wollte der Herr Zahlmeister eine Koje für mich im Vorratsraum aufstellen lassen. Ja, sie stand merkwürdigerweise schon fix und fertig da, in einem Winkel, durch eine aufgespannte amerikanische Flagge schamhaft verhüllt.

»Das is schandbar billig,« flüsterte mir der Steward zu. »Da haben Sie Glück gehabt. Nu wollen wir aber einen trinken. So 'ne kleine Flasche Hamburger Kümmel kost' nur 'ne Mark fufzig. Haben Sie zufällig eine da, Herr Zahlmeister?«
Jawohl; es war eine da.

»Prost!« (Einundzwanzig Mark und fünfzig Pfennige wechselten ihre Besitzer). Da starrte mich der Steward auf einmal entsetzt an. »'n Strohhut? Nee, is' nich' möglich – 'n Strohhut! Mensch, haben Sie keine Mütze?«
Nein, ich hatte keine Mütze.
»Mensch! So 'n feiner Strohhut – der geht über Bord, sag' ich Ihnen. Bei dem Wind! Ich hab' zufällig 'ne Mütze. Kost 'n Taler! 'ne feine Mütze!«
Natürlich kaufte ich die Mütze.
Dann komplimentierte mich der Zahlmeister höflich aber energisch hinaus. Ich kennte ja jetzt meinen Schlafplatz. Von 7 Uhr morgens aber bis 9 Uhr abends hätte ich in seinem Bureau nichts zu suchen.

Auch das war mir sehr gleichgültig – wie alles und jedes an Bord der Lahn an jenem ersten Tag. Ich aß fast nichts, interessierte mich für nichts, lief stumpfsinnig an Deck auf und ab, stand stundenlang in einem einsamen Winkel an der Reeling, schlich mich früh am Abend in des Zahlmeisters Bureau, ging ins Bett und weinte unter der Decke wie ein kleiner Junge …

Fröhlicher Sonnenschein flutete durch die kleinen rundlichen Kajütenfenster, als ich am nächsten Morgen erwachte und schläfrig um mich blinzelte. Was war das für ein Tönen und Surren? Im ganzen Körper fühlte ich das Vibrieren des vorwärtspeitschenden Riesenschiffes – mir war, als läge ich in einer Schaukel, auf und ab schwingend; als würde ich der Decke zugeschleudert, bliebe dort einen Augenblick hängen und versänke dann in unendliche Tiefen. Ein Stückchen von mir selbst schien jedesmal zurückzubleiben; droben an der Decke und unten in der Tiefe. Einmal hatte ich das entsetzliche Gefühl, als hätte sich mein Magen von mir getrennt und schwebe irgendwo in der Kajüte. Ich sprang aus dem Bett, und sofort hörte das Rumoren in meinem Innern auf. Im Handumdrehen war ich angezogen, eilte an Deck und machte mich mit wahrem Heißhunger über Kaffee und Brötchen her, die aus einem großen Kessel und einem Ungetüm von Korb durch zwei Stewards verteilt wurden. Wenig Menschen waren an Deck. Ich trat an die Reeling. Da draußen war majestätische Ruhe. Wie die Unendlichkeit selbst sahen sie aus, die immerzu vorwärtsrollenden Wasserberge, in ihrer gewölbten Mitte tief schwarz und doch glänzend wie ein Spiegel grünblau aufsteigend, schaumig weiß an den Rändern. Dann überholte der eine Wasserberg den andern, zusammenstürzend, und eine neue Welle wurde aus ihnen geboren, zu kurzem Spiel. Nimmer aufhörende Bewegung und doch verkörperte Ruhe. Ich trank die salzige Luft ein, die einem die Augen aufleuchten ließ und das Blut schneller durch die Adern jagte. Und schaute in den Sonnenhimmel. Frisch und froh und leicht fühlte ich mich. »So schmiede dir denn selber dein Glück –« Vergangen war vergangen und feige wäre es, die Ohren hängen zu lassen. Hast du Schneid genug zu dummem Leichtsinn gehabt, so mußt du auch Schneid genug haben, nicht in nutzloser Reue zu flennen.

Ich wurde unternehmungslustig und stieg ins Zwischendeck hinab. Es war fürchterlich da unten. Armselige Häuflein menschlichen Elends lagen auf den Kojen herum, mit grüngelben Gesichtern, jammernd in den Qualen der Seekrankheit, zu energielos, um in frische Luft an Deck zu gehen. Eine Unterwelt des Stöhnens und der Gerüche. Und die Konsequenzen der Seekrankheit machten sich sehr bemerkbar, so daß ich allen Göttern für mein Schlafplätzchen im Vorratsraum dankte.

»Se belieben nix ssu sein seekrank?« fragte mich ein alter Jude, der knoblauchduftend auf einem Bündel neben seiner Koje saß.
»Nein.«
»Nu, das frait mich. Was ham Se genommen ein for de Magen?«
»Nichts. Ich blieb nur in der frischen Luft.«
»Püh, frische Luft. Wer' ich raufgehen ssu sitzen in der frischen Luft? Wer' ich nich'! Bin ich gegangen rauf und hab mer gesetzt auf Stricke. Is 'n Goj gekommen, wo hat ge–soogen an die Stricke un' bin ich gefallen auf 'n Rücken.
»'s Tauwerk is nich' zum Sitzen da,« sagt er.
»Se ver–sseihen gütigst,« sag ich. Nu bin ich gegangen ssu sitzen auf 'e Bank ganz vorne.
»Paß man auf. Da is feucht!« sagt der Goj.

Nu, ich bin geblieben sitzen. De Bank is for alle da und er hat mer nix nich' ssu sagen, denk' ich. Nu, ich sitz – un' wie ich so sitz, kommt e Welle un' macht mer himmelschreiend naß. Waih geschrien, sag ich, was is das for e Gemeinheit?«
»Siehste,« sagte der Goj.
»Nu belieben Se gütigst ssu verstehen, daß ich nix will wern naß un' nix will haben tun mit die Gojim vons Schiff. Püh! Was wern Se machen drieben, wenn ich fragen derf?«
»Weiß ich noch nicht.«
»Nu? wie haißt? Sind Se e Millionär?«
»Nee! Leider nicht. Was wollen denn Sie in Amerika anfangen?«
»Nu, der Silberberg is gegangen nach e böse Pleite in Wodcziliska in Galizien nach New York, un' is geworden e gemachter Mann. Bei de Geschäfte is' ssu machen e Rebbach, schreibt er an de Verwandtschaft. Nu – wer ich handeln – wie der Itzig Silberberg aus Wodcziliska.«

Als ich wieder oben war und dankbar die frische Luft einatmete, lachte ich laut und lange über den handelstüchtigen Sohn Israels. Dann wurde ich nachdenklich.

»Was wern Se machen drieben?…«
Zum Teufel auch, was würde ich eigentlich anfangen? Was werden wir essen? Was werden wir trinken? Ich glaube, ich habe dieser wichtigen Lebensfrage etwa zehn Minuten gewidmet. Zukunftssorgen waren bis jetzt nicht meine Spezialität gewesen: In schleierhaften Erinnerungen an allerlei Indianerbücher dachte ich an galoppierende Pferde und schießende Cowboys, und … damit war der Schatz meines Wissens erschöpft. Hm, abwarten. Es war mir ja auch so unendlich gleichgültig. Da drüben, irgendwo in der zusammenfließenden Masse von Himmel und Wasser würde in so und so viel Tagen neues Land auftauchen, neue Menschen, neue Dinge. Das würde zweifellos sehr interessant und sehr lustig sein. Ich freute mich schon so auf dieses neue Land, als hätte ich weiß Gott welche wichtigen Pläne. Nebenbei mußte man dann allerdings Brot verdienen. Man mußte arbeiten oder dergleichen. Irgend etwas. Nun, das würde sich schon finden.

»Hinter dem Reiter auf dem Pferde sitzt die schwarze Sorge …«
Das war mir schon in Tertia komisch vorgekommen. Laß sie doch sitzen! Und ich pfiff mir eins und entschied, die Sache sei vorläufig erledigt. Es klang famos, ein Glückssoldat zu sein. Das Wesen eines Glückssoldaten war mir zwar sehr schleierhaft, aber ich vermutete, die Hauptsache sei, sich um nichts zu kümmern, was ich wunderschön fand, und wozu ich unbestritten großes Talent hatte.
Alles war überhaupt wunderschön. Prachtvolles Gefühl, so sein eigener Herr zu sein. Freilich – ein dutzendmal jeden Tag sah ich an mir hinunter, konstatierte, daß mein heller Sommeranzug ausgezeichnet saß und wünschte mich sehnlichst zu den eleganten Herren und Damen auf das Promenadedeck hinüber. Da gehörte ich doch hin! Von Rechts wegen!

Nach und nach waren all die Jammergestalten nach überstandener Seekrankheit an Deck gekommen und verzehrten mit großer Regelmäßigkeit unglaubliche Mengen der derben Schiffskost, als wollten sie Versäumtes wieder einholen. Da waren oldenburgische Bauern, wortkarge Hünen, die den ganzen Tag lang in besorgter Wacht auf ihren Habseligkeiten saßen und niemals mit irgend jemand sprachen. Da waren galizische Juden, ungarische Arbeiter, deutsche Handwerker.
Sie hockten gewöhnlich in Gruppen zusammen. Sie scherten sich den Teufel um die Schönheiten des Meeres und die Fremdartigkeit des Schiffskolosses, aßen und tranken und rauchten und wuschen Wäsche und flickten Zeug und machten aus dem Zwischendeck ein Dorf mit alten Gebräuchen und alten Sitten. Die Weiber säugten ihre Kinder und holten ihren Männern das Essen und tanzten kreuzfidel, wenn der lustige bayrische Bierbrauer seine Ziehharmonika herbeiholte, und die Männer stritten sich und vertrugen sich wieder und erzählten ein wenig und logen ein bißchen, und die Stewards spielten bald die Polizeigewaltigen, weil sie Deutsche waren und ihnen das im Blut steckte; bald erinnerten sie sich daran, daß sie Kellner waren, und ergatterten Nickel.

Die oldenburgischen Bauern hatten Geld im Sack und gingen nach Kansas, um sich in einer deutschen Ansiedlung Land zu kaufen. Die Handwerker berichteten Wunderdinge von amerikanischen Wunderlöhnen – die ungarischen Arbeiter schnatterten den ganzen Tag in ihrer aufgeregten Art – die Juden hockten auf Kisten und Koffern zusammen und mauschelten.
Ich hatte wenig Verständnis für sie und ihre Art; das Zwischendeck der Lahn ist mir eine verschwommene Erinnerung, aus der nur ein paar Menschen auftauchen.

Da war ein schlankes Mädel mit hungrigen Augen. Sie reiste allein und erzählte jedem, der es hören wollte, daß sie des Dienstmädchenspielens und der gnädigen Frauen überdrüssig sei und – ja, da drüben gab's Geld, viel Geld und schöne Kleider, und sie sei ganz gewiß nicht dumm. Die Frauen im Zwischendeck betrachteten sie mit tiefster Abneigung, und die Männer verdrehten die Augen, wenn sie sich blicken ließ. Sie saß stundenlang ganz vorne an der Spitze des Schiffes und starrte aufs Meer hinaus. Einmal setzte ich mich neben sie.
»Einen Pfennig für Ihre Gedanken!«
»Hoh!« sagte das Mädel, und ihre Augen lachten, »meine Gedanken sind viel mehr wert.«
»Wieviel denn?«
»Nicht zum sagen. Ich hab' daran gedacht, daß ich alles Schöne haben will, was es nur gibt – alles, alles!«
Sie drehte sich um und sah mich an. Ich war zu jung damals, um in den hungrigen Augen zu lesen, und sie lachte und ging weg.

Und da waren meine beiden Däninnen. Schwestern, blutjunge Dinger in blauen Matrosenanzügelchen und kleinen schwarzen Hütchen. Sie saßen immer zusammen und kicherten, und wenn die Sonne schien, leuchteten die goldblonden Haare. Ich sagte einmal irgend etwas zu ihnen, da schüttelten sie lachend die Köpfe, denn sie sprachen nur dänisch und verstanden keine andere Sprache. Am letzten Abend der Reise aber war ich mit ihnen zusammen. Spät war's schon, und ich saß allein auf dem dunklen Verdeck und starrte in die Sternenwelt hinaus. Da kamen die Schwestern, kichernd und lachend, und eine setzte sich rechts von mir und eine links. So blieben wir die ganze Nacht im Dunkeln und schauten aufs Meer hinaus und schauten einander an, und betrachteten das Sternengeglitzer und freuten uns, wenn die Wellen silberschäumend aufblitzten. Stunde auf Stunde verrann, und wir rückten immer enger zusammen.
Ohne auch nur ein einziges Wort sprechen zu können.
Ich hab' die beiden armen Dinger nach Jahren wieder gesehen in jämmerlichem Elend. Aber das ist eine andere Geschichte.

Wie ein feiner Dunstschleier lag's über dem Meer. Graue Gebilde tauchten auf am Horizont, kaum sichtbar in verschwommenen Umrissen, aber von erdrückender Masse, schwer, ungeheuer. Sie wuchsen, stiegen empor, nahmen Form und Gestalt an, zergliederten sich in schattenhafte Häusermassen, zerteilt, interpunktiert von himmelstrebenden, riesengroßen Schatten, die grob und eckig wie Würfel aussahen und gewaltig, als habe eine übermenschliche Hand sie hingestellt. Das Meer wurde lebendig. Schiffe kamen in Sicht – Dampfer, groß und klein, Segler, Ozeanschlepper. Und langsam lösten sich aus den Schatten Farben heraus, das Meer erdrückend, als wolle die Riesenstadt sagen: Hier herrsche ich!

Getöse überall. Aus dem Wasser taucht ein Weib auf, fackelschwingend, eine Strahlenkrone um das Haupt, die Statue der Freiheit. Nun fahren wir mitten im Häusergewirr, das auf allen Seiten unabsehbare Linien von Schiffen bunt umsäumen, in allen Farben, in allen Größen.

Zwei zierliche Schleppdampfer drängen unseren Schiffskoloß hübsch langsam und vorsichtig an den Pier, von dem aus schwarzer Menschenmenge weiße Tücher grüßend flattern. Die Gangplanken werden gelegt, die Kajütspassagiere gehen an Land, die Dampfwinden fördern eilend ihre Kofferlasten aus dem Schiffsbauch. Wir Zwischendeckler müssen lange warten, bis auch wir das Schiff verlassen dürfen und uns in der Landungshalle zur Zollrevision aufstellen können.

Die ging schnell genug vorüber; bei den armen Leuten vom Zwischendeck war nicht viel zu holen für Onkel Sam. Dann marschierte man uns auf einen kleinen Dampfer, der uns nach den Auswandererhallen hinübertrug.
Es war ein riesengroßer Raum, durch Holzwerk in lange, schmale Gänge eingeteilt, mit kleinen Holzhäuschen für die Ärzte und die Auswanderer-Kommissare.An denen mußten wir im Gänsemarsch vorbeischreiten. Nach einer Stunde etwa kam auch ich an die Reihe. Der Arzt sah mich flüchtig an und winkte nur mit der Hand, ich dürfe weitergehen; der Kommissar fragte mich nach meinem Namen und sah auf einer Liste nach, die er in der Hand hielt.

»Sie sind Deutscher?«
»Ja.«
»Was haben Sie in Deutschland gearbeitet?«
»Nichts!« platzte ich heraus, und der Beamte lachte.
»Was wollen Sie hier in Amerika?«
Ich muß wahrscheinlich auf diese Frage ein recht dummes Gesicht gemacht haben, denn der Beamte wartete die Antwort gar nicht ab und fragte lächelnd:
»Zeigen Sie mir die erforderlichen dreißig Dollars.«

Er warf einen flüchtigen Blick auf die Goldstücke in meinem Geldtäschchen.
»Schön. Sie können passieren. Und viel Glück!«
Da stand ich nun in der kleineren Seitenhalle mit ihren Kofferbergen und mir fiel ein, daß auf dem Fahrschein der Dampferlinie, die mich nach Texas bringen sollte, umständlich auseinandergesetzt war, man müsse bei der Ankunft in New York die Fahrkarte auf den Hut stecken. Das tat ich. Sofort schoß ein bewegliches kleines Kerlchen auf mich zu:

»Hello, mister. Sie fahren mit der Mallory-Linie. Ich bin der Agent. Alles in Ordnung. Geben Sie mir Ihren Gepäckschein her. So! Bleiben Sie hier stehen.Rühren Sie sich ja nicht vom Platz. Sie haben gar nichts zu tun. Wird alles besorgt. Ist alles bezahlt.«
Und weg war er. Bald sah ich ihn hier, bald dort im Menschengedränge auftauchen, und immer hatte er neue Schutzbefohlene am Wickel, die er schleunigst zu mir in die Ecke führte. Endlich waren wir vollzählig.

»Eins, zwei, drei – sieben!« zählte er. »Allright. Alles in Ordnung. Gepäck wird gebracht. Gehen wir. Immer hinter mir drein!«
So betrat ich die Straßen New Yorks.