de-en  Generation What?
https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/mol/20994041.html Copyright Goethe-Institut, Klaus Lüber; CC BY SA; Juni 2017 Klaus Lüber (KL) talks to the head of the survey, Maximilian von Schwartz (MvS); Survey "Generation What?“; "Loss of confidence does not mean resignation"; A current survey shows: Young Europeans have little confidence in politics and the media.

But this does not mean they commit themselves less, says project manager Maximilian von Schwartz from the opinion research center Sinus.

KL: Mr. von Schwartz, "Generation What?" is so far the largest European-wide study on the generation of 18 to 34 year-olds.

It reached about one million young people from 35 countries, and among other things, asked about their relationship to politics and the media.

For a scientific study this is a remarkable number, no?

MvS: Absolutely! However, it must be mentioned that Generation What? was not purely a scientific study.

The goal and the methodology were different because we wanted to reach as large a number of young people as possible with an unusually wide range of questions.

Basically one could say: Generation What? is not only a study, but also a muli-media project.

KL: What does that mean for the interpretation of the results?

MvS: At least not, that you have to take them less seriously.

Perhaps the results in some segments are less selective than in other studies. ...

But we are absolutely convinced that it definitely shows a representative picture of a certain basic mood.

KL: So, what can be determined about the confidence of 18-34 year-old Europeans in political institutions?

MvS: The confidence is alarmingly low.

We see, that 82 percent of the young Europeans have no confidence.

Again of this group, even 45 percent state that they have "no confidence at all" in political institutions.

KL: Why is that?

MvS: The study found that young grown-ups are partly very dissatisfied with the political system.

Eighty-seven percent are of the opinion that social inequality is increasing.

A further 90 percent say that money plays too big of a role in our society.

Furthermore, a majority is of the opinion that politics does not come to grips with important problems. ...

KL: For example?

MvS: For example, climate issues or corruption.

What is interesting is the ranking of countries that emerged from our question about confidence in politics. It is almost congruent with the corruption perception index of Transparency International.

We see, for example, that in Switzerland, Germany and the Netherlands, thus countries with the lowest corruption perception index, the confidence in political institutions is the highest.

Conversely, confidence in politics is the lowest in countries with high unemployment of young people.

KL: How can it be explained then that, in Germany, despite a favorable environment, at least 23 percent state that they have no confidence in politics?

MvS: One reason could be the social division that nonetheless prevails in Germany and is due to a very low social mobility.

Young Germans from lower social classes see comparatively fewer opportunities for advancement and in general look less optimistically into the future than other young Germans with a higher level of education.

Furthermore, in the eyes of many young people, political processes appear to be staged and take place far away from the realities of their own lives.

The resulting distance to their own lives makes it hard of course to trust someone in politics.

KL: You also asked about political engagement and in doing so found something interesting.

MvS: Right. One could easily come to the conclusion that loss of confidence in politics automatically leads to lower commitment.

But that cannot be corroborated as such.

Despite the great distrust, at least 15 percent stated that they had once already been committed in a political organization. ...

A further 30 percent could at least imagine doing it.

Apparently, a general frustration does not lead to resignation.

KL: What can be said about the relationship of young Europeans to the media?

MvS: On the question of whether they completely trust the media, only two percent actually answered "yes," and 39 percent generally have no confidence.

However, one has to admit that at this point the concept of media has not been further differentiated.

It can be assumed that the media offered by the public services would have been declared as more trustworthy, if we had specifically asked about them.

In Germany the figures, similar to those of the political institutions, are not quite as low. ...

Here, "only" 22 % says, they have no confidence in the media at all.

KL: Are these figures already enough, to speak of a crisis of confidence?

MvS: I think you should take them seriously, but not dramatize them.

An obvisious explanation for relatively high scepticism of young people towards media topics can be simple the fact that they use a much greater variety of informations from most different sources, whose reliability is first of all principally in question.

In this sense a certain skepticism seems to be appropriate.

We see not only here, that the young generation is generally very cautious when it comes to place trust in someone.

KL: Which effect does the lack of trust you describe have in your opinion on the mechanisms of democracy?

MvS: On the one hand there is of course the danger of instrumentalising this lack of trust for populist purposes.

At the same time, we see that young people are less susceptibe for populist demands.

For example, study participants were asked if german citizens should be prefers on the german employment market in periods of crisis.

More than 75 percent answer in the negative. ... In addition, more than 90 percent say they favor solidarity. ...

A lack of trust in political institutions does obviously not automatically lead to nationalistic tendencies.
unit 5
Für eine wissenschaftliche Studie ist das eine beeindruckende Zahl, oder?
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 6
MvS: Absolut!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 7
Allerdings muss man dazu sagen, dass Generation What?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 8
keine rein wissenschaftliche Studie war.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 10
Im Grunde könnte man sagen: Generation What?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 11
ist nicht nur eine Studie, sondern auch ein multimediales Projekt.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 12
KL: Was bedeutet das für die Interpretation der Ergebnisse?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 13
MvS: Jedenfalls nicht, dass man sie deshalb weniger ernst nehmen müsste.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 14
Die Ergebnisse sind vielleicht in einzelnen Bereichen weniger trennscharf als in anderen Studien.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 15
unit 17
MvS: Das Vertrauen ist erschreckend gering.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 18
Wir sehen, dass 82 Prozent der jungen Europäer kein Vertrauen haben.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 20
KL: Warum ist das so?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 22
87 Prozent sind der Meinung, die soziale Ungleichheit nähme zu.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 23
Weitere 90 Prozent sagen, Geld spielt in unserer Gesellschaft eine zu große Rolle.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 25
KL: Zum Beispiel?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 26
MvS: Zum Beispiel die Klimaproblematik oder Korruption.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 34
unit 35
unit 36
MvS: Richtig.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 38
Das lässt sich so aber nicht bestätigen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 40
Weitere 30 Prozent könnten sich das zumindest vorstellen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 41
Offenbar scheint eine generelle Frustration nicht zu Resignation zu führen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 42
KL: Was lässt sich über das Verhältnis junger Europäer zu den Medien sagen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 44
unit 46
In Deutschland sind die Werte, ähnlich wie bei politischen Institutionen, nicht ganz so niedrig.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 47
Hier sagen „nur“ 22 Prozent, sie hätten überhaupt kein Vertrauen in die Medien.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 48
KL: Reichen diese Zahlen schon aus, um von einer Vertrauenskrise zu sprechen?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 49
MvS: Ich denke, man sollte sie ernst nehmen, aber auch nicht dramatisieren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 51
So gesehen scheint eine gewisse Grundskepsis geradezu angebracht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 55
unit 57
Über 75 Prozent verneinen das.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 58
Darüber hinaus sprechen sich über 90 Prozent generell für Solidarität aus.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
bf2010 • 4788  translated  unit 36  1 year, 4 months ago

https://www.goethe.de/de/kul/mol/20994041.html

Copyright Goethe-Institut, Klaus Lüber; CC BY SA; Juni 2017

Klaus Lüber (KL) im Gespräch mit dem Leiter der Studie, Maximilian von Schwartz (MvS)

Studie „Generation What?“ „Vertrauensverlust heißt nicht Resignation“

Eine aktuelle Studie belegt: Junge Europäer haben wenig Vertrauen in Politik und Medien.

Doch das bedeutet nicht weniger Engagement, sagt Projektleiter Maximilian von Schwartz vom Meinungsforschungsinstitut Sinus.

KL: Herr von Schwartz, „Generation What?“ ist die bislang größte europaweite Studie zur Generation der 18-34-Jährigen.

Sie hat rund eine Million junge Menschen aus 35 Ländern erreicht und unter anderem nach ihrem Verhältnis zu Politik und Medien gefragt.

Für eine wissenschaftliche Studie ist das eine beeindruckende Zahl, oder?

MvS: Absolut! Allerdings muss man dazu sagen, dass Generation What? keine rein wissenschaftliche Studie war.

Die Zielsetzung und die Methodik war eine andere, denn es ging uns auch darum, eine möglichst große Anzahl junger Menschen mit einer ungewöhnlich großen Auswahl von Fragen zu erreichen.

Im Grunde könnte man sagen: Generation What? ist nicht nur eine Studie, sondern auch ein multimediales Projekt.

KL: Was bedeutet das für die Interpretation der Ergebnisse?

MvS: Jedenfalls nicht, dass man sie deshalb weniger ernst nehmen müsste.

Die Ergebnisse sind vielleicht in einzelnen Bereichen weniger trennscharf als in anderen Studien.

Wir sind aber davon überzeugt, dass sie bestimmte Grundstimmungen durchaus repräsentativ abbildet.

KL: Was also lässt sich zum Vertrauen der 18-34-jährigen Europäer in politische Institutionen feststellen?

MvS: Das Vertrauen ist erschreckend gering.

Wir sehen, dass 82 Prozent der jungen Europäer kein Vertrauen haben.

Von dieser Gruppe wiederum gaben 45 Prozent sogar an, „überhaupt kein“ Vertrauen in politische Institutionen zu haben.

KL: Warum ist das so?

MvS: Die Studie hat festgestellt, dass junge Erwachsene teilweise sehr unzufrieden mit dem politischen System sind.

87 Prozent sind der Meinung, die soziale Ungleichheit nähme zu.

Weitere 90 Prozent sagen, Geld spielt in unserer Gesellschaft eine zu große Rolle.

Außerdem ist eine Mehrheit der Meinung, die Politik würde wichtige Probleme nicht in den Griff bekommen.

KL: Zum Beispiel?

MvS: Zum Beispiel die Klimaproblematik oder Korruption.

Interessanterweise ist die Rangliste der Länder, die sich bei unserer Frage nach dem Vertrauen in die Politik ergeben hat, fast deckungsgleich mit dem Korruptionswahrnehmungsindex von Transparency International.

Wir sehen etwa, dass in der Schweiz, in Deutschland und den Niederlanden, also Ländern mit dem niedrigsten Korruptionswahrnehmungsindex, das Vertrauen in politische Institutionen am höchsten ist.

Umgekehrt ist in Ländern mit hoher Arbeitslosigkeit junger Menschen das Vertrauen in die Politik am geringsten.

KL: Wie ist es dann zu erklären, dass in Deutschland trotz günstiger Rahmenbedingungen immerhin 23 Prozent angeben, sie hätten kein Vertrauen in die Politik?

MvS: Ein Grund könnte die soziale Spaltung sein, die in Deutschland dennoch herrscht und bedingt ist durch eine sehr geringe soziale Mobilität.

Junge Deutsche aus unteren Schichten sehen vergleichsweise wenig Aufstiegschancen, blicken ganz allgemein viel weniger optimistisch in die Zukunft, als Angehörige höherer Bildungsschichten.

Hinzu kommt, dass in den Augen vieler junger Menschen politische Vorgänge inszeniert wirken und fernab der eigenen Lebensrealität stattfinden.

Die daraus resultierende Distanz zum eigenen Alltag macht es natürlich schwer, Vertrauen zu fassen.

KL: Sie haben auch nach dem politischen Engagement gefragt und dabei etwas Interessantes festgestellt.

MvS: Richtig. Man könnte leicht den Schluss ziehen, dass ein Vertrauensverlust in die Politik automatisch zu einem geringen Engagement führt.

Das lässt sich so aber nicht bestätigen.

Trotz des großen Misstrauens gaben immerhin 15 Prozent an, sich schon einmal in einer politischen Organisation engagiert zu haben.

Weitere 30 Prozent könnten sich das zumindest vorstellen.

Offenbar scheint eine generelle Frustration nicht zu Resignation zu führen.

KL: Was lässt sich über das Verhältnis junger Europäer zu den Medien sagen?

MvS: Auf die Frage, ob sie den Medien voll und ganz vertrauen, antworten tatsächlich nur zwei Prozent mit ja, 39 Prozent haben überhaupt kein Vertrauen.

Allerdings muss man zugeben, dass an dieser Stelle der Begriff Medien nicht weiter differenziert wurde.

Es ist davon auszugehen, dass den öffentlich-rechtlichen Angeboten größeres Vertrauen ausgesprochen wäre, hätten wir spezifisch danach gefragt.

In Deutschland sind die Werte, ähnlich wie bei politischen Institutionen, nicht ganz so niedrig.

Hier sagen „nur“ 22 Prozent, sie hätten überhaupt kein Vertrauen in die Medien.

KL: Reichen diese Zahlen schon aus, um von einer Vertrauenskrise zu sprechen?

MvS: Ich denke, man sollte sie ernst nehmen, aber auch nicht dramatisieren.

Eine naheliegende Erklärung für die vergleichsweise hohe Skepsis junger Menschen gegenüber Medieninhalten könnte schlicht die Tatsache sein, dass sie eine viel größere Vielfalt an Informationen aus den unterschiedlichsten Quellen nutzen, deren Zuverlässigkeit grundsätzlich erst einmal in Frage steht.

So gesehen scheint eine gewisse Grundskepsis geradezu angebracht.

Wir sehen nicht nur an dieser Stelle, dass die junge Generation generell sehr vorsichtig ist, wenn es darum geht, Vertrauen zu schenken.

KL: Welchen Effekt hat der beschriebene Vertrauensmangel Ihrer Meinung nach auf die Mechanismen der Demokratie?

MvS: Einerseits gibt es sicherlich die Gefahr der Instrumentalisierung des Vertrauensmangels für populistische Zwecke.

Gleichzeitig sehen wir bei jungen Menschen eine geringe Anfälligkeit für populistische Forderungen.

Beispielsweise wurden die Studienteilnehmer gefragt, ob in Krisenzeiten deutsche Staatsbürger auf dem deutschen Arbeitsmarkt bevorzugt werden sollten?

Über 75 Prozent verneinen das. Darüber hinaus sprechen sich über 90 Prozent generell für Solidarität aus.

Der Vertrauensmangel in die Politik scheint offenbar nicht automatisch zu nationalistische Tendenzen zu führen.