de-en  E. Rosen, Der Deutsche Lausbub in Amerika
1911.
Chapter 1. From the start of the beginning.

The scallawag and the cakes. At the Ox Tavern in Freising. - Schooldays at a high school. - The first mishap. - The attack on the Glass Palace in the seminary. - At the bell master's foundry. - First love and second mishap. The Family´s patience is wearing thin.
The consensus of the social circles concerned was remarkable.
"A scallywag!" said the professors in Munich.
"Such a scallywag ..." expressed the caretaker.
"That slovenly fellow!" groaned the Ordinarius three times a day.
"Yes - the scallywag!" the aunts and relatives nodded their heads.
"A terrible rascal you've been!" my mother would say. "Hideous stories you made!" Then she laughed and asked regularly if I also remembered Mrs. Schrettle and the cakes ... I was twelve years old. Third year grammar student. Third grade grammar school pupil in the "Königlich Bayrisches Maxgymnasium" in Munich. My dignity as a grammar school boy didn't protect me at all from being sent to Mrs. Schrettle's corner grocery store to fetch something for the household.
On your mama's recommendation!" the plump Mrs. Schrettle said each time while I also regularly politely nodded, not taking my eyes off of the cakes on the counter. Of Frau Schrettle's famous cakes. They were made of puff pastry, garnished with raspberries; they were marvels - and they tempted the student for so long, until one afternoon, before the beginning of class, he rushed headlong into the shop.

"I've been told to get a raspberry cake!" "Here you are! Best regards!" Mrs. Schrettle said, bowing repeatedly, and charged a raspberry cake to Mom.
The deception was successful, and the scallywag repeated the operation nearly every day for one whole month! The cake was eaten on the way to school, fairly shared with his buddies and friends from the third grade. Until on a Sunday in November, the disaster happened - Mrs. Schrettle came with the bill. My heart sank to my boots when my mother said inquiringly: "Raspberry cakes?" "Aren't they delicious?", opined Mrs. Schrettle proudly.
"But we didn't have any raspberry cake!", my mother shouted out enraged.
Now it was Mrs. Schrettle's turn to be shocked.
"The master son has fetched it!", she stammered. "Every day!" Unholy mess. Frau Schrettle received her money and I, for the time being, got a slap on the ear, with a promise of more, when father would come home. My mother wept and I wept and my mother said, this was awful, and I thought it even more awful! Ten minutes later, I slipped crying out of the house, and in a dense flurry of snow I ran through the streets through the English Garden towards the Isar river. At the Bogenhausen bridge the lonely countryroad began. It was bitter cold. The snowflakes scourged my face, and I, a little guy, really had to brace myself against the sharp wind. "I am not going home!" I murmured again and again to myself. "I am most certainly not going home..." Late in the evening a half starved and half frozen Latin student stumbled into the public room of the "Rote Ochsen" in the small city of Freising. ...
"There look here", he called the cowherd. Yes, what would it be! What are you wanting in the tavern afterwards?" "I want something to eat." "Where are you coming from?" "From Munich. "I made a trip", I lied, almost crying.
"What"?, cried the innkeeper. "The lousy way from Minken, in the lousy weather, did you walk"? You lie like the devil. ... That would be a clean trip. What's your name and where do you live?" I stood there trembling like a picture of misery, gave answer to the giant in front of me, and noticed shivering and trembling, as he went to the large guest table, hissing with the guests, as he whispered with Madam landlady, and the house servant was called and sent off with a piece of paper. ...

"Squat down at the table," the host grumbled. "My wife will bring you something to eat." I remember darkly, that I eagerly swallowed everything I've been served, that Madam landlady leaded me to the living room and bedded me on a sofa. And that suddenly my father was there and I was terribly ashamed and was awfully scared of him. But I do quite know what the Ochsenwirt from Freising said to my father when we left.

"No need to thank me, Sir", he said. "You will be able to just catch the 12 o'clock train to Minken. Yes, the boys! Rascals are just rascals. There is nothing to it. But I would give him a good spanking!" Which I thoroughly got the next day!

The scallywag grew older, managed to be promoted from grade to grade by the skin of his teeth, and stayed a scallywag ... "An imprudent pupil", it said in his grade reports. "His achievements are woefully out of proportion to his abilities; his behavior is nothing less than satisfactory." I must have had an awfully bad reputation with my teachers. The dislike, however, was mutual. Even today, the memory of my grammar school time is to me the memory of an institution of harsh discipline, of mindless assimilation of textbooks, of rote memorization, of a lack of love and a lack of understanding, of vacillating didacticism according to Bakel, of a coarse non-commissioned officer's tone, of almost comical incomprehension. I remember a persistently sniffling monster of a professor with a red handkerchief and a greasy coat collar, who used to maintain the indicative in quarter-hour frenzies; I remember thundering Philippics, how immoral it is that a lazy fellow like myself, without work, can only advance to the next class through his little bit of talent; I recall a professor of the lower school, who had denied me the use of the tasteful and good German expression 'Frechjö', because, after he had refused me the permission to leave the school room, I asked him a second time for the extremely natural and urgent reason. But I can't remember that a teacher ever took me aside and talked kindly to me to find out what was going through my head; why the silly boy did such silly pranks - and was a scallywag.

"This chap!", the headmaster said fuming with rage, when I was delivered to him. "Such an incorrigible boor!" Enough is enough. The pitcher goes often to the well and gets broken at last!" The headmaster was right. I was an infamous rascal. ... A long list of school detentions because of smoking in the street, failing to turn in homework, being involved in the back room of a tavern, bore witness to my incorrigibility. In addition, the faculty had long suspected me of belonging to the infamous student affiliation of the Max school which mimicked student customs in hidden suburban pubs. Despite all efforts of the janitor he never managed to catch the culprits in the act. For we always ordered the youngest "pledge" to keep watch in the street, and when the janitor or a professor showed up, we were warned right away, climbing through backroom windows, escaping through yards, climbing over walls. But one knew in the Max high school more or less which pupils were the culbrits and looked keenly over the fingers of the suspicious subjects. In any case, I was extremely suspicious.
Now the little pitcher of my sins was overflowing: I was cutting school for three days! ... Prince Bismarck had come to Munich and had stopped at the Lenbach villa. ... I ran there as quickly as possible after lunch, let afternoon classes just be afternoon classes and stayed on the street until late evening, screaming hurrah with all my might. Because the freedom was so very nice and the early summer so very sunny, the next day I did not go to the high school either and certainly not even on the third day but instead hung around in the Isar meadows and indulged myself in countless cigarettes and wrote terribly bad poems.
A sixth grade student Cut class! That has never ever happened before!" the headmaster roared. "What do you have to say for yourself?" Stammering, I tried to explain that I had not meant it in a mean and nasty way, that - "A wicked lie! You were drinking!" "That's not true. I won't stand for that", I flared back at him.
"Shut your big mouth! You are a lost cause. ... You are a threat to all virtuous pupils. The teachers' council will decide what will happen to you next." Within twenty-four hours, I was thrown out of the temple of humanism, dismissed, and thus excluded not only from the Max school but also from every other higher educational institution in Munich. My remorse was deep and honest.
The Royal Seminary in Burghausen, a small Bavarian grammar school town on the Austrian border admitted the wayward boy. The seminary was a boarding school, a kind of reform school. The pupils were taken to the school in the morning and picked up again at noon; taken there again in the afternoon and picked up again in the evening. Ad interim one ate at long tables in the dining room, worked in the study halls, slept at night in common dormitories - every minute under supervision, under strict discipline. For six months, everything went well, and my certificates rose quickly to an amazing quality. ... Then it started again.

The supervision in our study hall was led by a prefect, whom we all hated from the bottom of our hearts. The little man in the priest's tunic buttoned up to his neck, crept behind our benches and peered over our shoulders. We seventh year students perceived his spying, as we called it, as an egregious insult. He was a stern master, who wasted more than a few words about nothing, but, in breaches of the house rules, simply imposed punishments in short, exuberant sentences. Detentions of the first order. His repertoire of punishments began with the memorization of a hundred verses of the Odyssey. ... On walks, he forbade us from speaking loudly; at night he walked up and down for hours in the dormitory. Naturally, we had no idea that this nightly vigil had a very specific purpose, and not the slightest understanding that he was only doing his duty! We saw him as only the incarnation of ruthless authority, who was always on our backs. And hated him.

Well, it was custom in the seminary that once a month the higher classes, under the guidance of their prefects, made an excursion to some village inn in which we were allowed to drink beer and smoke; a privilege which was supposed to act as a safety valve. This time, the head of the seminary informed us that, on the suggestion of our prefect, the excursion would be suspended this month. We were said not to be worthy of such a privilege. ... We were kindly to be more dilligent and not get so many house punishments!

Our anger knew no bounds.
"The sneak!" "The spy!" "'Such vulgarity!" A conspiracy was promptly organized. During the afternoon walk, we crammed our pockets with small pebbles. ... And in the evening, when everything had become quiet in the dormitory and we all lay in our beds, a pebble rattled with sharp sound against the prefect's glass house. Glass house? That's right! The object of our hatred slept in a tiny, uncovered room, the walls of which consisted of a framework with glass windows; in a small glass house, all right. The walls were covered with curtains through which he could still watch us. Which of course was the function of the glass cubicle. We natives of Munich called it the glass palace. ...
A second pebble hit the glass palace; a third, a fourth. ... The prefect rushed out fully clothed.
"Silence!" Then he vanished again. And in the next moment, it chattered against his walls like gunfire. This time he came at once and shouted in indignation, his voice shuddering: "Scallywags" "shameless!" cried a voice from a corner of the dormitory. (That was me!)
"Stop these childish pranks!" the prefect ordered, calming down. ... "I'll punish you tomorrow". But we were much too excited to accept reason. Without interruption, a hailstorm of pebbles clattered against the glass walls. The prefect raced up and down between the rows of beds and stormed and raged. In addition, the rows of beds, to which he had turned his back, ensured that the bombardment was maintained. It was an orgy. Finally he ran off and fetched the headmaster. For the head of the seminary was the headmaster of the grammar school - a ruffian we all loved.
"If there is not absolute quiet in the dormitory for the rest of the night", declared the headmaster drily, "then I will come and personally mete out corporal punishment to all of you. I will begin at one end of the row of beds. And so on. Ad infinitum. When sixth year students behave like elementary school pupils, they must be caned like elementary school pupils. This is logical. Good evening!" I, an incorrigible sinner, however, laughed half the night long as I imagined how fantastic this fight scene would have been! ...
The next morning, everything came out into the open... "Were you throwing?" "Yes, Headmaster." "So? Like that? Like this? Why did you do that?" " Because of the excursion." "yeah-oh! I am acting in loco parentis and have a strong desire to box your ears". In the next moment: a slap to the left, then a slap to the right. ...
" You are really incorrigible. I can't tolerate you in the seminary any longer after this performance. I will not expel you from the gymnasium because you at least did not lie. But I am warning you! Just the slightest little thing – and you fly!" Still on the same afternoon, I and another pupil were declared unworthy of the seminary and were led by the janitor into the little town. He took me to a Frau Glockengießermeister, who gave me board and lodging.

However, I blessed the prefect and the glass palace and the pebbles because I was now a free fellow, a town pupil! At the little room at Glockengießermeister's, one could smoke long pipes as much as they liked, and in the evening Glockengießermeister's little daughter gladly brought a mug of beer. This was beautiful - golden freedom. For almost a year everything went well till the fairytale happened; a real fairytale: Once upon a time there was a queen, who bowed to a pageboy and a big gossip arose in the king's castle... In admiring emotion I remember those times of first love. ... The queen was a young lady, highly wooed in the little town, older than the 8th class grammar schoolboy, who believed he was a man, but wasn't at all. ... I remember how I had been angry when a letter from my father forced me to "go" visit the family; then with that reluctance a chance encounter at the ice rink, in front of the mother and daughter I performed my school bow and for better or worse had to invite the young lady to go skating. Family simpletons, I then called the like at that time. But it did not take long, and the eighth grade student often waited for hours in trembling anxiety on the ice rink to see if she would come - and was blissful when she came. In silent happiness at first. And then, it broke like a storm over us little people. From the everyday conversation came the stammered words of a deep sense, a whisper, timid gesture: "Je vous aime!" "I love you so..." The great words which seemed to contain such a miraculous secret, and yet almost physically ached in speaking, would never have crossed our lips in German. That was happiness; unforgettable times of excitement, of the godhood of two young people who saw in each other the perfection of the other, the secretly dreamed dream of youth. We reveled in Goethe, and Scheffel, and Heine, and wrote to each other lavender-colored notes, and rejoiced loudly in the passages of the old Dukesburg on the Schlossberg. Like blissful children.
Then the small town began to speak. The wig braids of the good citizens shook terribly with horrified head shaking. ... What the honorable dignitaries and indignant teachers of high school may have said and thought of everything! When I returned to the town ten years later, Frau Glockengießermeister clasped her hands over her head and for three hours told me about the strange things that the town had been talking about, not with the tongues of angels. The queen at that time however lived far away in Swabia by Lake Constance and became a handsome young regimental commander who had bestowed the colonel a horde of children – the eighth grader was promptly kicked out of the gymnasium on the flimsy pretense of smoking a long pipe at the open window and not greeting a passing professor. I had not seen him. But the teachers' council took it as mockery.

The rest is an ugly memory. As a result of the second expulsion, every gymnasium in Bavaria was closed to the disturbed student, and only a Munich press was left. But now the hops and malt were lost; I had the feeling that I had been severely wronged and became more indifferent than before. I was boozing. I ran into debt. Grotesque debts.
Until one day, a long-drawn-out family patience wore thin, and it was soon decided to let the incorrigible take care of himself across the big pond; a decision which may have been overly forceful. Since after all, the rascal had neither stolen nor robbed. ... But when I picture the jerk of that time, how he listened everyday to the most eloquent exhortations with a bored expression on his face, to then shake like a dog that had gotten wet and immediately concoct a new stupidity (which usually cost his family ill-gotten money) - now, I understand everything! Believe me, oh reader: The rascal was an infamous rascal!
unit 1
1911.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 2
Kapitel 1.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 3
Vom Beginn des Beginnens.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 4
Der Lausbub und die Kuchen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 5
– Beim Ochsenwirt in Freising.
4 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 6
– Gymnasialzeiten.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 7
– Das erste Malheur.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 8
– Die Attacke auf den Glaspalast im Seminar.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 9
– Bei Glockengießermeisters.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 10
– Erste Liebe und zweites Malheur.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 11
– Die Familiengeduld reißt.
3 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 12
Das Übereinstimmen der beteiligten Kreise war erstaunlich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 13
»Ein Lausbub!« sagten die Professoren in München.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 14
»A solchener Lausbub …« erklärte der Pedell.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 15
»Dieser lie–ii–derliche Bursche!« stöhnte der Ordinarius dreimal täglich.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 16
»Ja – der Lausbub!« nickten die Tanten und die Verwandten.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 17
»Ein furchtbarer Strick bist du gewesen!« pflegt meine Mutter zu sagen.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 19
Quartaner.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 20
Lateinschüler der Klasse 3a des Königlich Bayrischen Maxgymnasiums in München.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 23
Von Frau Schrettles berühmten Kuchen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 25
»Einen Himbeerkuchen soll ich holen!« »Bitt' sehr!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 26
A schöne Empfehlung!« dienerte Frau Schrettle und schrieb der Mama einen Himbeerkuchen an.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 29
Bis an einem Novembersonntag die Katastrophe kam – Frau Schrettle mit ihrer Rechnung.
5 Translations, 8 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 31
»Aber wir haben ja gar keine Himbeerkuchen gehabt!« rief meine Mutter entrüstet.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 32
Nun war die Reihe zum Erschrecken an Frau Schrettle.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 33
»Der Herr Sohn hat's g'holt!« stotterte sie.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 34
»Jeden Tag!« Kladderadatsch.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 38
Bei der Bogenhausener Brücke begann die einsame Landstraße.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 39
Es war bitter kalt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 41
»Ich geh' nicht nach Hause!« murmelte ich immer wieder vor mich hin.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 43
»Da schaugt's her,« rief der Ochsenwirt.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 44
»Ja was wär' denn dös!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 46
A – an Ausflug hab' ich g'macht,« log ich, beinahe weinend.
2 Translations, 7 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 47
»Woas?« schrie der Wirt.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 48
»Den Sauweg von Minken bist herg'loffen in dem Sauwetter?
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 49
Lüag du und der Teifi.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 50
Dös wär' a sauberer Ausflug.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 52
»Hock di' hin an Tisch,« brummte der Wirt.
3 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 56
»Is nix zu danken, Herr,« sagte er.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 57
»Den 12 Uhr Zug nach Minken werd'n S' grad no' derwischen.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 58
Ja, dö Buam!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 59
Früchteln san' halt Früchteln.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 60
Is eh nix dabei.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 61
Aber an Hintern tät i' eahm halt do' vollhau'n!« Was am nächsten Tag ausgiebigst geschah!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 64
Ich muß bei meinen Lehrern in einem erbärmlich schlechten Ruf gestanden haben.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 65
Die Abneigung beruhte jedoch auf Gegenseitigkeit.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 69
»Düsser Bursche!« sagte der Herr Rektor wutschnaubend, als ich ihm vorgeführt wurde.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 70
»Düsser unverbösserliche Lümmel!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 71
Das Maß üst voll.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 72
Der Krug geht so lange zum Brunnen, bis er brücht!« Der Schulgewaltige hatte recht.
4 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 73
Ich war ein infamer Bengel.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 76
Trotz aller Anstrengungen des Pedells gelang es nie, die Sünder in flagranti zu erwischen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 79
Ich jedenfalls galt als besonders verdächtig!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 80
Nun war das Krüglein meiner Sünden übergelaufen: Ich schwänzte drei Tage die Schule!
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 81
Fürst Bismarck war nach München gekommen und in Lenbachs Villa abgestiegen.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 84
»Ein Schüler der 6.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 85
Klasse schwänzt!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 86
Das üst noch nücht vorgekommen!« donnerte der Rektor.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 88
Gekneipt haben Sü!« »Das ist nicht wahr.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 89
Das verbitt' ich mir,« brauste ich auf.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 90
»Halten Sü das lose Maul!
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 91
Sü sind ein Verlorener.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 92
Sü sind eine Gefahr für die tugendhaften Schüler.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 94
Meine Reue war tief und ehrlich.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 96
Das Seminar war ein Internat, eine Art Besserungsanstalt.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 99
Sechs Monate lang ging alles gut, und meine Zeugnisse schnellten zu verblüffender Güte empor.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 100
Dann fing's wieder an.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 101
unit 103
unit 105
Strafarbeiten erster Güte.
4 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 106
Mit dem Auswendiglernen von hundert Versen der Odyssee begann erst sein Repertoire.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 110
Und haßten ihn.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 113
Wir seien einer solchen Vergünstigung nicht würdig.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 114
Wir sollten gefälligst fleißiger sein und uns nicht so viele Hausstrafen zuziehen!
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 115
Unsere Wut kannte keine Grenzen.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 117
Auf dem nachmittäglichen Spaziergang stopften wir unsere Taschen voll kleiner Steinchen.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 119
Glashaus?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 120
Jawohl!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 122
Die Wände verhüllten Vorhänge, durch die er uns aber beobachten konnte.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 123
Was ja auch der Zweck des Glasgemachs war.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 124
Wir Münchener nannten es den Glaspalast.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 125
Ein zweites Steinchen prallte gegen den Glaspalast; ein drittes, ein viertes.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 126
Der Präfekt, völlig angekleidet, kam hervorgeschossen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 127
»Ruhe!« Dann verschwand er wieder.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 128
Und im nächsten Augenblick knatterte es wie Gewehrfeuer gegen seine Wände.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 130
(Das war ich!)
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 131
»Lassen Sie die Kinderei!« befahl der Präfekt ruhiger werdend.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 132
»Bestrafen werde ich Sie morgen.« Aber wir waren viel zu aufgeregt, um Vernunft anzunehmen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 133
Ohn' Unterlaß klatschte der Hagelsturm von Kieselsteinen gegen die Glaswände.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 134
Der Präfekt rannte zwischen den Bettreihen auf und ab und stürmte und wütete.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 136
Es war eine Orgie.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 137
Schließlich lief er davon und holte den Rektor.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 138
unit 140
Ich werde an dem einen Ende der Bettreihe anfangen.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 141
Und so weiter.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 142
Ad infinitum.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 143
Wenn Sekundaner sich wie Volksschüler betragen, so muß man sie prügeln wie Volksschüler.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 144
Dies ist Logik.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 147
Soo?
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 148
Soo–o?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 149
Weshalb haben Sie das getan?« »Wegen des Ausflugs.« »So–oh!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 151
»Sie sind wirklich unverbesserlich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 152
Im Seminar kann ich Sie nach dieser Leistung nicht länger belassen.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 153
Aus dem Gymnasium werde ich Sie nicht entfernen, weil Sie wenigstens nicht gelogen haben.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 154
Aber ich warne Sie!
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 156
Mich brachte er zu einer Frau Glockengießermeister die mich in Kost und Verpflegung nahm.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 159
Das war wunderschön – goldene Freiheit.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 163
Familiensimpelei nannte ich dergleichen damals.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 165
In schweigendem Glück zuerst.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 166
Und dann brach es wie ein Sturm über uns Menschlein herein.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 170
Wie glückselige Kinder.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 171
Da fing das Städtchen zu reden an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 172
Die Perückenzöpfe braver Bürger wackelten erschrecklich vor lauter entsetztem Kopfschütteln.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 173
unit 176
Ich hatte ihn nicht gesehen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 177
Aber der Lehrerrat faßte es als Verhöhnung auf.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 178
Der Rest ist eine häßliche Erinnerung.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 181
Ich kneipte.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 182
Machte Schulden.
5 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 183
Groteske Schulden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 185
Denn schließlich hatte der Lausbub weder gestohlen noch geraubt.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 187
Glaube mir, oh Leser: Der Lausbub war ein infamer Lausbub!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 148  1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 147  1 year, 4 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 148  1 year, 4 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  translated  unit 147  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 119  1 year, 4 months ago
DrWho • 8447  translated  unit 85  1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 2  1 year, 4 months ago
Siri • 1143  translated  unit 1  1 year, 4 months ago

1911.
Kapitel 1. Vom Beginn des Beginnens.

Der Lausbub und die Kuchen. – Beim Ochsenwirt in Freising. – Gymnasialzeiten. – Das erste Malheur. – Die Attacke auf den Glaspalast im Seminar. – Bei Glockengießermeisters. – Erste Liebe und zweites Malheur. – Die Familiengeduld reißt.
Das Übereinstimmen der beteiligten Kreise war erstaunlich.
»Ein Lausbub!« sagten die Professoren in München.
»A solchener Lausbub …« erklärte der Pedell.
»Dieser lie–ii–derliche Bursche!« stöhnte der Ordinarius dreimal täglich.
»Ja – der Lausbub!« nickten die Tanten und die Verwandten.
»Ein furchtbarer Strick bist du gewesen!« pflegt meine Mutter zu sagen. »Grässliche Geschichten hast du gemacht!« Dann lacht sie und fragt regelmäßig, ob ich mich denn auch an Frau Schrettle erinnere und an die Kuchen …
Ich war zwölf Jahre alt. Quartaner. Lateinschüler der Klasse 3a des Königlich Bayrischen Maxgymnasiums in München. Meine Würde als Lateinschüler schützte mich aber keineswegs davor, gelegentlich zu der Frau Kolonialwarenhändlerin Schrettle an der Ecke geschickt zu werden, um irgend etwas für den Haushalt zu holen.
»An Empfehlung an d' Frau Mama!« sagte jedesmal die dicke Frau Schrettle, während ich ebenso regelmäßig vornehm nickte und dabei kein Auge von den Kuchen auf dem Ladentisch verwandte. Von Frau Schrettles berühmten Kuchen. Sie waren aus Blätterteig; sie waren mit Himbeeren belegt; sie waren Wunderwerke – und sie führten den Lateinschüler so lange in Versuchung, bis er eines Nachmittags vor Klassenanfang Hals über Kopf in den Laden stürzte.

»Einen Himbeerkuchen soll ich holen!«
»Bitt' sehr! A schöne Empfehlung!« dienerte Frau Schrettle und schrieb der Mama einen Himbeerkuchen an.
Der Raub war gelungen, und der Lausbub wiederholte die Operation einen ganzen Monat lang fast jeden Tag! Verzehrt wurden die Kuchen auf dem Schulweg, in ehrlicher Teilung mit den Spezerln und Freunderln aus der Quarta. Bis an einem Novembersonntag die Katastrophe kam – Frau Schrettle mit ihrer Rechnung. Mir fiel das Herz in die Hosen, als meine Mutter fragend sagte:
»Himbeerkuchen?«
»Guat sans, nöt?« meinte Frau Schrettle stolz.
»Aber wir haben ja gar keine Himbeerkuchen gehabt!« rief meine Mutter entrüstet.
Nun war die Reihe zum Erschrecken an Frau Schrettle.
»Der Herr Sohn hat's g'holt!« stotterte sie. »Jeden Tag!«

Kladderadatsch. Frau Schrettle erhielt ihr Geld und ich vorläufig eine Ohrfeige mit der Aussicht auf mehr, wenn der Vater nach Hause kam. Meine Mutter weinte und ich weinte und meine Mutter sagte, es sei ja fürchterlich, und ich fand, es sei noch viel fürchterlicher! Zehn Minuten später schlich ich mich heulend aus dem Haus und rannte in dichtem Schneegestöber durch die Straßen, durch den englischen Garten, der Isar zu. Bei der Bogenhausener Brücke begann die einsame Landstraße. Es war bitter kalt. Die Schneeflocken peitschten mir ins Gesicht, und ich kleiner Kerl mußte mich tüchtig gegen den scharfen Wind anstemmen. »Ich geh' nicht nach Hause!« murmelte ich immer wieder vor mich hin. »Nach Hause geh' ich ganz gewiß nicht …«

Spät abends stolperte ein halb verhungerter und halb erfrorener Lateinschüler in die Gaststube des Roten Ochsen im Städtchen Freising.
»Da schaugt's her,« rief der Ochsenwirt. »Ja was wär' denn dös! Was willst denn du nacha im Wirtshaus?«
»Was zum essen möcht' i'.«
»Wo kimmst denn her?«
»Von München. A – an Ausflug hab' ich g'macht,« log ich, beinahe weinend.
»Woas?« schrie der Wirt. »Den Sauweg von Minken bist herg'loffen in dem Sauwetter? Lüag du und der Teifi. Dös wär' a sauberer Ausflug. Wia heißt' denn und wo wohnst'?«

Wie ein Häuflein Elend stand ich schlotternd da, gab dem Riesen vor mir Auskunft und sah mit Zittern und Bangen, wie er zu dem großen Gasttisch in der Ecke schritt, wie er mit den Gästen zischelte, wie er mit Frau Wirtin tuschelte, wie der Hausknecht gerufen und mit einem Zettel fortgeschickt wurde.

»Hock di' hin an Tisch,« brummte der Wirt. »D' Frau bringt dir was zum essen.«
Ich entsinne mich noch dunkel, daß ich gierig alles verschlang, was mir vorgesetzt wurde, daß Frau Wirtin mich in die Wohnstube führte und auf ein Sofa bettete. Und daß eben auf einmal mein Vater da war und ich mich furchtbar vor ihm schämte und eine fürchterliche Angst vor ihm hatte. Aber was der Ochsenwirt von Freising zu meinem Vater beim Abschied sagte, das weiß ich noch ganz genau.

»Is nix zu danken, Herr,« sagte er. »Den 12 Uhr Zug nach Minken werd'n S' grad no' derwischen. Ja, dö Buam! Früchteln san' halt Früchteln. Is eh nix dabei. Aber an Hintern tät i' eahm halt do' vollhau'n!«
Was am nächsten Tag ausgiebigst geschah!

Der Lausbub wurde älter, stieg mit Ach und Krach von Klasse zu Klasse, und blieb ein Lausbub … »Ein leichtsinniger Schüler,« hieß es in den Zeugnissen. »Seine Leistungen stehen in bedauerlichem Mißverhältnis zu seinen Fähigkeiten; sein Betragen ist nichts weniger als zufriedenstellend«. Ich muß bei meinen Lehrern in einem erbärmlich schlechten Ruf gestanden haben. Die Abneigung beruhte jedoch auf Gegenseitigkeit. Heute noch ist mir das Gedenken an meine Gymnasialzeit das Gedenken an eine harte Zuchtanstalt, an gedankenloses Eintrichtern von Lehrbüchern, an schablonenmäßiges Auswendiglernen, an mangelnde Liebe und mangelndes Verständnis, an bakelschwingende Schulmeisterei, an groben Unteroffizierston, an fast komisches Nichtverstehen. Ich erinnere mich an ein beständig schnupfendes Ungeheuer von einem Professor mit rotem Taschentuch und fettigem Rockkragen, der über ein ut mit dem Indikativ in viertelstündige Raserei zu verfallen pflegte; ich erinnere mich an donnernde Philippiken, wie unsittlich es sei, daß ein so fauler Bursche wie ich sich ohne Arbeit nur durch sein bißchen Talent das Aufsteigen in die nächsthöhere Klasse erschwindele; ich erinnere mich an einen Ordinarius der Untersekunda, der mich mit dem geschmackvollen und gut deutschen Ausdruck "Frechjö" belegte, weil ich, nachdem er mir die Erlaubnis, das Schulzimmer zu verlassen, verweigert hatte, ihn aus einem höchst natürlichen und dringenden Grund ein zweitesmal darum bat. Aber ich kann mich nicht entsinnen, daß jemals mich ein Lehrer beiseite nahm und in Güte mit mir sprach, um herauszubekommen, was in meinem Hirn vorging; weshalb der dumme Junge so dumme Streiche machte – und ein Lausbub war.

»Düsser Bursche!« sagte der Herr Rektor wutschnaubend, als ich ihm vorgeführt wurde. »Düsser unverbösserliche Lümmel! Das Maß üst voll. Der Krug geht so lange zum Brunnen, bis er brücht!«
Der Schulgewaltige hatte recht. Ich war ein infamer Bengel. Von meiner Unverbesserlichkeit zeugte eine lange Reihe von Karzerstrafen, wegen Rauchens auf der Straße, wegen Nichtablieferung von Schularbeiten, wegen Betroffenwerden in dem Hinterzimmer einer Gastwirtschaft. Außerdem hatte mich das Lehrerkollegium schon längst im Verdacht, der berüchtigten Schülerverbindung des Maxgymnasiums anzugehören, die in versteckten Vorstadtkneipen studentische Gebräuche nachäffte. Trotz aller Anstrengungen des Pedells gelang es nie, die Sünder in flagranti zu erwischen. Stellten wir doch stets den jüngsten "Fuchs" als Wache auf die Straße, und wenn der Pedell oder ein Professor sich blicken ließen, wurden wir prompt gewarnt, kletterten aus Hinterfenstern, flüchteten über Höfe, stiegen über Mauern. Aber man wußte im Maxgymnasium doch so von ungefähr, welche Schüler die Schuldigen waren, und sah den verdächtigen Subjekten scharf auf die Finger. Ich jedenfalls galt als besonders verdächtig!
Nun war das Krüglein meiner Sünden übergelaufen:
Ich schwänzte drei Tage die Schule! Fürst Bismarck war nach München gekommen und in Lenbachs Villa abgestiegen. Dorthin lief ich schleunigst nach dem Mittagessen, ließ Nachmittagsunterricht eben Nachmittagsunterricht sein und stand bis zum späten Abend auf der Straße, aus Leibeskräften hurraschreiend. Weil die Freiheit gar so schön war und der junge Sommer gar so sonnig, ging ich am nächsten Tag auch nicht ins Gymnasium, und am dritten Tag erst recht nicht, sondern trieb mich in den Isarauen herum und schwelgte in unzähligen Zigaretten und machte erschrecklich schlechte Gedichte.
»Ein Schüler der 6. Klasse schwänzt! Das üst noch nücht vorgekommen!« donnerte der Rektor. »Was haben Sü zu sagen?«

Stotternd versuchte ich zu erklären, daß ich es gar nicht so böse gemeint hätte, daß –
»Oine gemeine Lüge! Gekneipt haben Sü!«
»Das ist nicht wahr. Das verbitt' ich mir,« brauste ich auf.
»Halten Sü das lose Maul! Sü sind ein Verlorener. Sü sind eine Gefahr für die tugendhaften Schüler. Der Lehrerrat wird das weitere über Sü beschließen.«

Binnen vierundzwanzig Stunden wurde ich aus dem Tempel des Humanismus hinausgeworfen, dimittiert, und damit nicht nur vom Maxgymnasium, sondern auch von jeder anderen höheren Lehranstalt in München ausgeschlossen. Meine Reue war tief und ehrlich.
Das Königliche Seminar in Burghausen, einem kleinen bayrischen Gymnasialstädtchen an der österreichischen Grenze, nahm den Entgleisten auf. Das Seminar war ein Internat, eine Art Besserungsanstalt. Die Zöglinge wurden morgens ins Gymnasium geführt und mittags wieder abgeholt; nachmittags wieder hingeführt und abends wieder abgeholt. In der Zwischenzeit aß man an langen Tischen im Speisesaal, arbeitete in den Studiersälen, schlief des Nachts in gemeinsamen Schlafsälen – jede Minute unter Aufsicht, unter strengster Zucht. Sechs Monate lang ging alles gut, und meine Zeugnisse schnellten zu verblüffender Güte empor. Dann fing's wieder an.

Die Aufsicht in unserem Studiersaal führte ein Präfekt, den wir alle aus tiefstem Herzensgrund haßten. Das kleine Männchen im bis an den Hals zugeknöpften Priesterrock pflegte auf leisen Sohlen hinter unsere Bänke zu schleichen und uns über die Schultern zu gucken. Wir Obersekundaner empfanden sein Spionieren, wie wir es nannten, als eine ungeheuerliche Beleidigung. Er war ein gestrenger Herr, der über nichts viele Worte verlor, sondern bei Verstößen gegen das Hausregiment einfach in knappen, kurz hervorgesprudelten Sätzen Strafarbeiten auferlegte. Strafarbeiten erster Güte. Mit dem Auswendiglernen von hundert Versen der Odyssee begann erst sein Repertoire. Auf den Spaziergängen verbot er uns das laute Sprechen; nachts wandelte er stundenlang im Schlafsaal auf und ab. Wir hatten natürlich keine Ahnung, daß diese nächtliche Vigil einen ganz bestimmten Zweck hatte, und nicht das geringste Verständnis dafür, daß er nur seine Pflicht tat! Wir sahen in ihm nur die Verkörperung einer erbarmungslosen Autorität, die uns stets auf dem Nacken saß. Und haßten ihn.

Nun war es Sitte im Seminar, daß einmal im Monat die höheren Klassen unter Führung ihrer Präfekten einen Ausflug machten, bei dem in irgend einem Dorfwirtshaus Bier getrunken und geraucht werden durfte; eine Vergünstigung, die als Sicherheitsventil wirken sollte. Diesmal teilte uns der Leiter des Seminars mit, daß auf Vorschlag unseres Präfekten der Ausflug in diesem Monat unterbliebe. Wir seien einer solchen Vergünstigung nicht würdig. Wir sollten gefälligst fleißiger sein und uns nicht so viele Hausstrafen zuziehen!

Unsere Wut kannte keine Grenzen.
»Der Schleicher!«
»Der Spion!«
»A solchene Gemeinheit!«
Prompt wurde eine Verschwörung organisiert. Auf dem nachmittäglichen Spaziergang stopften wir unsere Taschen voll kleiner Steinchen. Und abends, als alles ruhig geworden war im Schlafsaal und wir alle in den Betten lagen, klirrte mit scharfem Klang ein Steinchen gegen das Glashaus des Präfekten. Glashaus? Jawohl! Der Gegenstand unseres Hasses schlief in einem winzigen deckenlosen Gemach, dessen Wände aus Rahmenwerk mit Glasfenstern bestanden; in einem richtigen Glashäuschen. Die Wände verhüllten Vorhänge, durch die er uns aber beobachten konnte. Was ja auch der Zweck des Glasgemachs war. Wir Münchener nannten es den Glaspalast.
Ein zweites Steinchen prallte gegen den Glaspalast; ein drittes, ein viertes. Der Präfekt, völlig angekleidet, kam hervorgeschossen.
»Ruhe!«

Dann verschwand er wieder. Und im nächsten Augenblick knatterte es wie Gewehrfeuer gegen seine Wände. Diesmal kam er sofort und rief mit vor Entrüstung bebender Stimme:
»Lausbuben!«
»Unverschämt!« schrie eine Stimme aus einem Winkel des Schlafsaals. (Das war ich!)
»Lassen Sie die Kinderei!« befahl der Präfekt ruhiger werdend. »Bestrafen werde ich Sie morgen.«
Aber wir waren viel zu aufgeregt, um Vernunft anzunehmen. Ohn' Unterlaß klatschte der Hagelsturm von Kieselsteinen gegen die Glaswände. Der Präfekt rannte zwischen den Bettreihen auf und ab und stürmte und wütete. Unterdessen sorgten die Bettreihen, denen er jeweilig den Rücken zukehrte, für Aufrechthaltung des Bombardements. Es war eine Orgie. Schließlich lief er davon und holte den Rektor. Denn der Leiter des Seminars war gleichzeitig Rektor des Gymnasiums – ein Grobian, den wir liebten.
»Wenn während des Restes der Nacht nicht völlige Ruhe in diesem Schlafsaal herrscht,« erklärte der Rektor trocken, »so werde ich höchstpersönlich erscheinen und Sie alle körperlich züchtigen. Ich werde an dem einen Ende der Bettreihe anfangen. Und so weiter. Ad infinitum. Wenn Sekundaner sich wie Volksschüler betragen, so muß man sie prügeln wie Volksschüler. Dies ist Logik. Guten Abend!«

Ich unverbesserlicher Sünder aber lachte die halbe Nacht hindurch, indem ich mir vorstellte, wie grandios doch diese Prügelszene gewesen wäre!
Am nächsten Morgen kam alles ans Licht der Sonnen …
»Haben Sie geworfen?«
»Jawohl, Herr Rektor.«
»So? Soo? Soo–o? Weshalb haben Sie das getan?«
»Wegen des Ausflugs.«
»So–oh! Ich stehe in loco parentis und habe gute Lust, Sie zu ohrfeigen.«
Im nächsten Augenblick: Klatsch links, klatsch rechts.
»Sie sind wirklich unverbesserlich. Im Seminar kann ich Sie nach dieser Leistung nicht länger belassen. Aus dem Gymnasium werde ich Sie nicht entfernen, weil Sie wenigstens nicht gelogen haben. Aber ich warne Sie! Nur die geringste Kleinigkeit – und Sie fliegen!«

Am gleichen Nachmittag noch wurden in feierlicher Zeremonie ich und ein anderer Schüler für unwürdig des Seminars erklärt und vom Pedell ins Städtchen geführt. Mich brachte er zu einer Frau Glockengießermeister die mich in Kost und Verpflegung nahm.

Ich aber segnete den Präfekten und den Glaspalast und die Steinchen, denn nun war ich ein freier Bursch, ein Stadtschüler! Auf dem Stübchen bei Glockengießermeisters konnte man lange Pfeifen rauchen, soviel man nur wollte, und am Abend holte Glockengießermeisters Töchterlein gern eine Maß Bier. Das war wunderschön – goldene Freiheit. Fast ein Jahr lang ging alles gut, bis das Märchen kam; ein richtiges Märchen: Es war einmal eine Königin, die neigte sich zu einem Pagen, und ein groß' Gerede entstand im Königsschloß …

In wundernder Rührung gedenke ich jener Zeiten erster Liebe. Die Königin war eine junge Dame, vielumworben im Städtchen, älter als der Unterprimaner, der ein Mann zu sein glaubte, es aber durchaus nicht war. Ich weiß noch genau, wie ich mich geärgert hatte, als ein Brief meines Vaters mich zwang, zum Besuch in jener Familie "anzutreten"; mit welchem Widerstreben ich dann bei einer zufälligen Begegnung auf dem Eisplatz meine Schulverbeugung vor Mutter und Tochter machte und wohl oder übel die junge Dame zum Schlittschuhlaufen einladen mußte. Familiensimpelei nannte ich dergleichen damals. Doch es dauerte nicht lange, und der Unterprimaner wartete oft stundenlang in zitterndem Bangen auf dem Eisplatz, ob sie kommen würde – – und war glückselig, wenn sie kam. In schweigendem Glück zuerst. Und dann brach es wie ein Sturm über uns Menschlein herein. Aus dem Alltagssprechen wurden gestammelte Worte von tiefem Sinn, leises Geflüster, zaghaftes Gestehen, ein:
»Je vous aime!«
»I love you so …«

Die großen Worte, die ein so wunderbares Geheimnis zu bergen schienen und doch fast körperlich schmerzten im Gesprochenwerden, wären in deutscher Sprache nie über unsere Lippen gekommen. Das war das Glück; unvergeßliche Zeiten der Begeisterung, des Göttertums zweier junger Menschen, die ein jeder im andern die Vollkommenheit sahen, den heimlich geträumten Jugendtraum. Wir schwelgten in Goethe und Scheffel und Heine und schrieben einander lavendelfarbene Briefchen und jubelten laut in den Gängen der alten Herzogsburg droben auf dem Schloßberg. Wie glückselige Kinder.
Da fing das Städtchen zu reden an. Die Perückenzöpfe braver Bürger wackelten erschrecklich vor lauter entsetztem Kopfschütteln. Was mögen ehrsame Honoratioren und entrüstete Gymnasiallehrer alles gesagt und alles gedacht haben! Als ich zehn Jahre später wieder in das Städtchen kam, schlug Frau Glockengießermeisterin die Hände über dem Kopf zusammen und erzählte drei Stunden lang von den merkwürdigen Dingen, die damals das Städtchen geredet hatte, nicht mit Engelszungen. Die Königin aber von damals wohne weit drüben im Schwäbischen am Bodensee und sei eine stattliche junge Regimentskommandeuse geworden, die dem Herrn Oberst schon eine Schar von Kindern beschert habe –
Der Unterprimaner wurde schleunigst aus dem Gymnasium fortgejagt, unter dem ein wenig fadenscheinigen Vorwand, am offenen Fenster eine lange Pfeife geraucht und einen vorübergehenden Professor nicht gegrüßt zu haben. Ich hatte ihn nicht gesehen. Aber der Lehrerrat faßte es als Verhöhnung auf.

Der Rest ist eine häßliche Erinnerung. Durch die zweite Dimission war dem Entgleisten jedes Gymnasium in Bayern verschlossen, und übrig blieb nur eine Münchner Presse. Aber nun war Hopfen und Malz verloren; ich hatte die Empfindung, man hätte mir schweres Unrecht getan und wurde gleichgültiger denn je. Ich kneipte. Machte Schulden. Groteske Schulden.
Bis eines Tages langgeprüfte Familiengeduld riß und kurzerhand beschlossen wurde, den Unverbesserlichen drüben über dem großen Wasser für sich selbst sorgen zu lassen; ein Beschluß, der allzu energisch gewesen sein mag. Denn schließlich hatte der Lausbub weder gestohlen noch geraubt. Wenn ich mir aber den Lümmel von damals vorstelle, wie er alltäglich die schönsten Ermahnungen mit gelangweiltem Gesicht anhörte, um sich dann zu schütteln wie ein naßgewordener Hund und schleunigst eine neue Dummheit auszuhecken (die der Familie gewöhnlich ein Sündengeld kostete) – so verstehe ich alles! Glaube mir, oh Leser: Der Lausbub war ein infamer Lausbub!