de-en  Aschenputtel der Brüder Grimm (1812)
Cinderella of the Brothers Grimm (1812)

Once there was a rich man who lived happily with his wife for a long time; they had just one daughter. Then the woman became ill and when she was dying, she called her daughter to her and said: "Dear child, I must leave you, but when I am up in Heaven, I want to look down upon you. Plant a little tree on my grave and when you wish for something, shake it and you shall receive it. If you should be in need, I will send help to you. Just remain devout and good". Having thus spoken, she closed her eyes and passed from this world; the child wept and planted a small tree on her grave. She did not need to carry water to the grave to water the tree as her tears provided enough. Snow covered the mother's grave like a small, white cloth, then when the sun had taken it away again and the little tree had become green for the second time, the man took another wife.

However the step-mother already had two daughters from her first husband; they were beautiful to look at, but proud, haughty and evil. When the wedding was over, and all three drove home, a bad time began for the poor child. "What is the horrible idler doing in the parlor," said the mother-in-law, "take her away to the kitchen If she wants to eat bread, she has to earn it first. She can be our maid." The step-sisters took away her fine clothes and dressed her in an old grey dress: "That is good enough for you!" they said, laughing at her and leading her into the kitchen.

There the poor child had to work hard: get up before the sun rose, carry water, light the fire, do the cooking and washing, and the step-sisters inflicted bitter heartache on her, made fun of her, poured peas and the lentils into the ashes, then she had to sit there all day and sort them out again. ... In the evening, when she was tired, she was not allowed to sleep in a bed, but had to lie down in the ashes next to the hearth. And because she was always working in ashes and dust and looked dirty, she was given the name of Cinderella.

At a certain time, the King was to hold a ball, which, in all its lavishness would last for three days and his son, the prince, would seek a wife; the two proud sisters were also invited.

"Cinderella", they called, "come up here and comb our hair, brush our shoes and tie them firmly. We are going to the ball, to the prince".

Cinderella worked very hard and cleaned them as well as she could; they however only scolded her and when they were finished, asked her mockingly "Cinderella, would you like to go with us to the ball?"

"Yes, I would, but how can I go there, I have no fine clothes."

"No," said the eldest, "that is only right; we should be ashamed if you were to be seen there and people heard you were our sister; you belong in the kitchen, there you have a bowl full of lentils. When we come back they must be sorted out, and be careful that there are no bad ones among them, otherwise do not expect a good outcome."

With that they went away and Cinderella stood there and watched them go, and when she couldn´t see them any more, she sadly went into the kitchen and poured the lentils on the hearth, and it made a big, big heap. "Oh my, she said and sighed, I will have to sort them out till midnight and cannot close my eyes, even if it really hurts to keep them open, if my mother knew that.

Then she knelt in the ashes before the hearth and as she wanted to begin to pick up the lentils, two white doves flew in through the window and alighted beside the lentils on the hearth; they nodded their little heads and said: "Cinderella, should we help you to pick up the lentils?" "Yes, Cinderella answered: the good ones go into the pot, the bad ones go into your crop." And peck they did! peck, peck! they began and put the bad ones into the crop and left the good ones for the pot. And not a quarter hour passed till the lentils were sorted, that not even one bad one was among them, and Cinderella could put them into the pot.

But then the doves said: "Cinderella, if you want to see your sisters dancing with the Prince, then just climb up to the dovecote." Cinderella followed them and climbed up to the last rung of the ladder, there she could look into the hall and saw her sisters dancing with the Prince, and it glittered and sparkled before her eyes like thousands of lights. And when her eyes had had their fill, she climbed down and with a heavy heart she lay down in the ashes and fell asleep.

Next morning the two sisters came into the kitchen, and as they saw that Cinderella had sorted the lentils neatly, they were angry, for they wanted to scold her and since they found no reason to do so, they started to talk about the ball and said: "Cinderella, it was wonderful; the prince, the most handsome in the world, lead us in the dance, and one of us will become his wife." - "Yes", Cinderella said, "I saw the flickering of the lights and that would certainly have been splendid." -"Ey! how did you manage to do that," the oldest one asked. -" I stood up there on the dovecote." On hearing that, she was driven by jealousy and ordered the dovecote to be torn down right away. ...

And again Cinderella had to comb and wash their hair; then the youngest, who still had a soft spot left in her heart said: "Cinderella, when it gets dark, you can go there and watch through the windows from the outside". - "No," said the eldest, "that will only make her lazy. You have a sack full of vetches, Cinderella. Sort them out, the good ones from the bad ones, and be diligent. If they are not sorted properly, in the morning I will empty them into the ashes and you will go hungry until you have picked them all out again."

Cinderella sat down sadly on the hearth and poured out the vetches. ... Then the doves came flying in again said heartily: "Cinderella, shall we sort the vetches for you?" "Yes, - the bad ones into the crop, the good ones into the pot." Pick, pick! pick, pick! it went so fast as if twelve hands were at it. And when they were finished, the doves said: "Cinderella, do you want to go to dance at the ball?" - "Oh my God, she said, how can I go there in my dirty clothes?" ... - "Go to the little tree on your mother's grave, shake it and wish for beautiful clothes, but come back before midnight." - then Cinderella went out, shook the little tree and said: "Shake and quiver little tree, throw beautiful dresses over me!" ... Scarcely had she spoken, than lay before her a magnificent silver dress, together with pearls, silk stockings with silver gussets and silver slippers and other things that belonged to this. Cinderella carried everything home, and after having washed and dressed herself, she was as pretty as a rose, bathed by dew. And as she came to the front door, there stood a coach with six black horses, decorated with feathers, and coachmen dressed in blue and silver, who lifted her inside; and so they went in gallop to the King's castle.

But the Prince saw the carriage stop before the gate, and he thought a foreign princess had arrived. ... So he went down the stairs himself, lifted Cinderella out and led her into the ballroom. And as the brilliance of the thousands of lights fell upon her, she radiated such beauty, that everyone was astonished, and the two sisters stood there, angry that someone was lovelier than they; but they never thought that it could be Cinderella, who was at home lying among the ashes. However the prince danced with Cinderella, and he was enamoured by her. He also thought to himself: I am to seek a bride, then I know no other that I would have than this one. For so long amongst the ashes and in sadness, Cinderella now lived in splendour and joy; however when Midnight came, before it had struck twelve, she rose, curtsied, and although the prince begged her, she would not remain. She led the prince down to where the coach waited, and so she drove forth in splendour as she had come.

When Cinderella had returned home, she went again to the little tree on her mother's grave: "Shake and quiver little tree! take the clothes again to thee!" Then the tree took back the clothes and Cinderella put on her old ashen dress, thus she went back, made her face dusty and lay down to sleep in the ashes.

On the following morning, the sisters looked sullen and were silent. Cinderella said: "You must have had great pleasure yesterday evening" - "No, there was a princess there and the prince danced with her nearly the whole time; but nobody knew who she was or where she came from". "Was she the one who drove in the magnificent coach with six black horses?" said Cinderella. - "How do you know that?" - "I was standing at the front door, there I saw her drive past", - "In future remain at your work", said the eldest and looked angrily at Cinderella, "you have no need to stand at the front door".

For the third time, Cinderella had to dress the sisters in all their finery, and for a reward they gave her a bowl of peas, which she was to sort, "and don't you dare leave your work", the eldest still shouted as she went. Cinderella thought: if only my doves do not fail to appear, and her heart beat a little faster. But the doves came as on the previous evening, and said, "Cinderella, shall we sort the peas for you?" ... "Yes, the bad ones go into the crop, the good ones go into the pot." The doves again pecked out the bad ones and were soon finished, then they said, "Cinderella, shake the little tree that it will throw down even more beautiful clothes for you, go to the ball, but beware that you come back before midnight." Cinderella walked over, "Shake and quiver, little tree, cast down beautiful clothes for me." Then a dress fell down, even more magnificent and gorgeous than the previous one, entirely of gold and precious stones, together with gold-gusseted stockings and golden slippers; and when Cinderella was dressed in it, she shone like the noonday sun. A coach and six white horses with tall bunches of white feathers upon their heads, stopped before the door. The coachmen were dressed in red and gold. When Cinderella arrived, the prince was already standing on the steps and led her into the hall. And if they were astonished at her beauty yesterday, they were even more amazed today, and the sisters were standing in the corner, and they were green with envy, and if they had known that it was Cinderella who lay in the ashes at home, they would have died of envy.

The prince however, wanted to know who the unknown Princess was, where she came from and to where she was travelling; he had placed people on the street who should take notice thereof, and so that she could not run away so quickly, he had let the staircase be coated with tar. Cinderella danced and danced with the prince, was in great joy and did not think of midnight. Suddenly, in the midst of dancing, she heard the clock strike, and she remembered how the doves had warned her, was horrified and hurried out of the door and flew down the stairs. But because of bad luck, one of her gold slippers got stuck, and out of fear, she didn't think to take it with her. And just as she reached the last step of the stairs, it struck twelve and the carriage and horses disappeared; Cinderella stood there in her ashen clothes on the dark street. The prince had hurried after her. On the stairs he found the golden slipper, tore it loose and took it with him. However when he reached the bottom of the staircase, everything had disappeared, even those who were put there to keep guard came and said that they had seen nothing.

Cinderella was relieved that it had not turned out worse and went home. There she lit her dim oil-lamp, hung it in the chimney and lay down in the ashes. It did not take long until the two sisters came back also and called out: "Cinderella get up and make light for us". Cinderella yawned and acted as if she had just awoken from sleep. When it was light, she heard one of them say, "God knows who the wicked princess is, if only she would lay buried in the earth! The prince danced only with her, and when she was gone, he did not want to stay any longer, and the whole festival came to an end." "It was as if all the lights had suddenly been blown out," said the other. Cinderella certainly knew who the strange princess was, but she uttered not a word.

The prince thought to himself, however, failing everything else, the slipper will help you find the bride, and let it be known that whomever the golden slipper fits, she shall be his wife. But it was much too small for all of them, and some of them couldn't put their foot in, and two slippers would have been as one. Finally, it was the two sisters turn to make the test; they were happy, for they had pretty, little feet, and thought that we could not fail if the Prince had come to us immediately. "Listen, the mother said secretly, you have a knife there, and if the slipper is too tight for you, cut a little from your foot; it hurts a little, but what harm is that, it will soon pass, and one of you will be queen." Then the eldest entered the chamber and tried on the slipper; her toes fitted into it, but her heel was too big, so she took the knife and cut a piece from her heel until she squeezed her foot into the slipper. Then she went out to the prince, and when he saw that she was wearing the slipper, he said that she was the bride, led her to the carriage and wanted to go away with her. But as he came to the gate, the doves were sitting above, calling, "Turn and look, turn and look! Blood is in the shoe: The shoe is too small, The right bride is still sitting at home!" The prince bent down and looked at the slipper, the blood gushed out, and then he realized that he had been betrayed and led the false bride back. But the mother said to the second daughter, "Take the slipper, and if it is too short for you, then it is better to cut off your toes at the front." Then she took the slipper into her chamber, and when the foot was too big, she clenched her teeth and cut off a large part of her toes and squeezed the slipper on quickly. The way she walked out with it, he thought she would be the right one and wanted to ride off with her. But when he came to the gate, the doves called again, "Turn and look, turn and look! Blood is in the shoe: The shoe is too small, The right bride is still sitting at home!" The prince looked down; the bride's white stockings were red, the blood having penetrated high up. Then the prince brought her back to her mother, and said, "This is not the right bride, but isn't there another daughter in the house." "No," said the mother, "only a horrid Cinderella is still there who sits down in the ashes, the slipper cannot fit her." She didn't want to call her until the prince absolutely demanded it. Then Cinderella was called, and since she heard that the prince was there, she washed her face and her hands, fresh and clean; and as she entered the room, she bowed, but the prince handed her the golden slipper, and said, "Try it on! And if it fits you, you shall be my wife. Then she took the heavy shoe from her left foot, placed her foot onto the golden slipper, squeezed just a little and then the foot was in, the slipper fitting like a glove. And when she stood up and the prince looked into her face, he recognized the beautiful princess, and cried, "This is the right bride." The stepmother and the two proud sisters were terrified and became pale, but the prince led Cinderella away and lifted her into the carriage, and when they were passing through the gate, the doves called, "Turn and look, turn and look! No blood in the shoe: the shoe is not too small, the true bride he now leads home.
unit 1
Aschenputtel der Brüder Grimm (1812).
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 8
sagte sie, lachten es aus und führten es in die Küche.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 10
unit 15
"Ach ja, wie kann ich aber hingehen, ich habe keine Kleider."
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 20
"Ja, antwortete Aschenputtel: die schlechten ins Kröpfchen, die guten ins Töpfchen."
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 21
Und pick, pick!
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 22
pick, pick!
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 23
fingen sie an und fraßen die schlechten weg und ließen die guten liegen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 30
– "Ei!
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 31
wie hast du das angefangen," fragte die älteste.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 32
– "Ich hab’ oben auf den Taubenstall gestanden."
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 36
Aschenputtel setzte sich betrübt auf den Heerd und schüttete die Wicken aus.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 38
"Ja, – die schlechten ins Kröpfchen, die guten ins Töpfchen."
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 39
Pick, pick!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 40
pick, pick!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 41
gings so geschwind, als wären zwölf Hände da.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 43
– "O du mein Gott, sagte es, wie kann ich in meinen schmutzigen Kleidern hingehen?"
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 49
unit 50
Da ging er selbst die Treppe hinab, hob Aschenputtel hinaus und führte es in den Saal.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 52
Der Prinz aber tanzte mit Aschenputtel und ward ihm königliche Ehre angethan.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 53
Er gedachte auch bei sich: ich soll mir eine Braut aussuchen, da weiß ich mir keine als diese.
1 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 57
nimm die Kleider wieder für dich!"
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 59
Am Morgen darauf kamen die Schwestern, sahen verdrießlich aus und schwiegen still.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 61
unit 62
sagte Aschenputtel.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 63
– "Woher weißt du das?"
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 66
Aschenputtel gedachte: wenn nur meine Tauben nicht ausbleiben, und das Herz schlug ihm ein wenig.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 68
– "Ja,die schlechten ins Kröpfchen, die guten ins Töpfchen."
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 72
Als Aschenputtel ankam, stand schon der Prinz auf der Treppe und führte sie in den Saal.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 75
Aschenputtel tanzte und tanzte mit dem Prinzen, war in Freuden und gedachte nicht an Mitternacht.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 82
Aschenputtel gähnte und that als wacht es aus dem Schlaf.
3 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 85
– "Es war recht, als wären alle Lichter auf einmal ausgeblasen worden," sagte die andere.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 86
Aschenputtel wußte wohl wer die fremde Prinzessin war, aber es sagte kein Wörtchen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 93
Wie er aber ans Thor kam, saßen oben die Tauben und riefen: "Rucke di guck, rucke di guck!
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 94
Blut ist im Schuck: (Schuh) Der Schuck ist zu klein, Die rechte Braut sitzt noch daheim!"
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 98
Wie sie damit hervortrat, meinte er, das wäre die rechte und wollte mit ihr fortfahren.
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 99
Als er aber in das Thor kam, riefen die Tauben wieder: "Rucke di guck, rucke di guck!
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 100
Blut ist im Schuck: Der Schuck ist zu klein, Die rechte Braut sitzt noch daheim!"
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 104
Sie wollte es auch nicht rufen lassen, bis es der Prinz durchaus verlangte.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
unit 106
und wenn er dir paßt, wirst du meine Gemahlin."
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 2 months ago
unit 110
Kein Blut im Schuck: Der Schuck ist nicht zu klein, Die rechte Braut, die führt er heim!"
2 Translations, 0 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 3 months ago
anitafunny • 6239  commented on  unit 77  1 year, 3 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 40  1 year, 4 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 39  1 year, 4 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 22  1 year, 4 months ago
bf2010 • 4794  translated  unit 30  1 year, 4 months ago

Aschenputtel der Brüder Grimm (1812).

Es war einmal ein reicher Mann, der lebte lange Zeit vergnügt mit seiner Frau, und sie hatten ein einziges Töchterlein zusammen. Da ward die Frau krank, und als sie todtkrank ward, rief sie ihre Tochter und sagte: „liebes Kind, ich muß dich verlassen, aber wenn ich oben im Himmel bin, will ich auf dich herab sehen, pflanz ein Bäumlein auf mein Grab, und wenn du etwas wünschest, schüttele daran, so sollst du es haben, und wenn du sonst in Noth bist, so will ich dir Hülfe schicken, nur bleib fromm und gut.“

Nachdem sie das gesagt, that sie die Augen zu und starb; das Kind aber weinte und pflanzte ein Bäumlein auf das Grab und brauchte kein Wasser hin zu tragen, und es zu begießen, denn es war genug mit seinen Thränen.Der Schnee deckte ein weiß Tüchlein auf der Mutter Grab, und als die Sonne es wieder weggezogen hatte, und das Bäumlein zum zweitenmal grün geworden war, da nahm sich der Mann eine andere Frau.

Die Stiefmutter aber hatte schon zwei Töchter, von ihrem ersten Mann, die waren von Angesicht schön, von Herzen aber stolz und hoffährtig und bös. Wie nun die Hochzeit gewesen, und alle drei in das Haus gefahren kamen, da ging schlimme Zeit für das arme Kind an. "Was macht der garstige Unnütz in den Stuben, sagte die Stiefmutter, fort mit ihr in die Küche, wenn sie Brod essen will, muß sies erst verdient haben, sie kann unsere Magd seyn." Da nahmen ihm die Stiefschwestern die Kleider weg, und zogen ihm einen alten grauen Rock an: "der ist gut für dich!" sagte sie, lachten es aus und führten es in die Küche.

Da mußte das arme Kind so schwere Arbeit thun: früh vor Tag aufstehen, Wasser tragen, Feuer anmachen, kochen und waschen und die Stiefschwestern thaten ihm noch alles gebrannte Herzeleid an, spotteten es, schütteten ihm Erbsen und Linsen in die Asche, da mußte es den ganzen Tag sitzen und sie wieder auslesen. Wenn es müd war Abends kam es in kein Bett, sondern mußte sich neben dem Heerd in die Asche legen. Und weil es da immer in Asche und Staub herumwühlte und schmutzig aussah, gaben sie ihm den Namen Aschenputtel.

Auf eine Zeit stellte der König einen Ball an, der sollte in aller Pracht drei Tage dauern, und sein Sohn, der Prinz, sollte sich eine Gemahlin aussuchen; dazu wurden die zwei stolzen Schwestern auch eingeladen.

"Aschenputtel riefen sie, komm herauf, kämme uns die Haare, bürst uns die Schuhe und schnalle sie fest, wir gehen auf den Ball zu dem Prinzen."

Aschenputtel gab sich alle Mühe und putzte sie so gut es konnte, sie gaben ihm aber nur Scheltworte dazwischen, und als sie fertig waren, fragten sie spöttisch: "Aschenputtel, du gingst wohl gern mit auf den Ball?"

"Ach ja, wie kann ich aber hingehen, ich habe keine Kleider."

"Nein, sagte die älteste, das wär mir recht, daß du dich dort sehen ließest, wir müßten uns schämen, wenn die Leute hörten, daß du unsere Schwester wärest; du gehörst in die Küche, da hast du eine Schüssel voll Linsen, wann wir wieder kommen muß sie gelesen seyn, und hüt dich, daß keine böse darunter ist, sonst hast du nichts Gutes zu erwarten."

Damit gingen sie fort, und Aschenputtel stand und sah ihnen nach, und als es nichts mehr sehen konnte, ging es traurig in die Küche, und schüttete die Linsen auf den Heerd, da war es ein großer, großer Haufen. "Ach, sagte es und seufzte dabei, da muß ich dran lesen bis Mitternacht und darf die Augen nicht zufallen lassen, und wenn sie mir noch so weh thun, wenn das meine Mutter wüßte!"

Da kniete es sich vor den Heerd in die Asche und wollte anfangen zu lesen, indem flogen zwei weiße Tauben durchs Fenster und setzten sich neben die Linsen auf den Heerd; sie nickten mit den Köpfchen und sagten: "Aschenputtel, sollen wir dir helfen Linsen lesen?" "Ja, antwortete Aschenputtel: die schlechten ins Kröpfchen, die guten ins Töpfchen." Und pick, pick! pick, pick! fingen sie an und fraßen die schlechten weg und ließen die guten liegen. Und in einer Viertelstunde waren die Linsen so rein, daß auch nicht eine falsche darunter war, und Aschenputtel konnte sie alle ins Töpfchen streichen.

Darauf aber sagten die Tauben: "Aschenputtel, willst du deine Schwestern mit dem Prinzen tanzen sehen, so steig auf den Taubenschlag." Aschenputtel ging ihnen nach und stieg bis auf den letzten Leitersproß, da konnte es in den Saal sehen, und sah seine Schwestern mit dem Prinzen tanzen, und es flimmerte und glänzte von viel tausend Lichtern vor seinen Augen. Und als es sich satt gesehen, stieg es wieder herab, und es war ihm schwer ums Herz, und legte sich in die Asche und schlief ein.

Am andern Morgen kamen die zwei Schwestern in die Küche, und als sie sahen, daß Aschenputtel die Linsen rein gelesen, waren sie böse, denn sie wollten es gern schelten, und da sie das nicht konnten, huben sie an von dem Ball zu erzählen und sagten: "Aschenputtel, das ist eine Lust gewesen, bei dem Tanz, der Prinz, der allerschönste auf der Welt hat uns dazu geführt, und eine von uns wird seine Gemahlin werden." – "Ja, sagte Aschenputtel, ich habe die Lichter flimmern sehen, das mag recht prächtig gewesen seyn." – "Ei! wie hast du das angefangen," fragte die älteste. – "Ich hab’ oben auf den Taubenstall gestanden." – Wie sie das hörte, trieb sie der Neid und sie befahl, daß der Taubenstall gleich sollte niedergerissen werden.

Aschenputtel aber mußte sie wieder kämmen und putzen; da sagte die jüngste, die noch ein wenig Mitleid im Herzen hatte: "Aschenputtel, wenns dunkel ist, kannst du hinzugehen und von außen durch die Fenster gucken!" – "Nein, sagte die älteste, das macht sie nur faul, da hast du einen Sack voll Wicken, Aschenputtel, da lese die guten und bösen auseinander und sey fleißig, und wenn du sie morgen nicht rein hast, so schütte ich dir sie in die Asche und du mußt hungern, bis du sie alle herausgesucht hast."

Aschenputtel setzte sich betrübt auf den Heerd und schüttete die Wicken aus. Da flogen die Tauben wieder herein und thaten freundlich: "Aschenputtel, sollen wir dir die Wicken lesen?" "Ja, – die schlechten ins Kröpfchen, die guten ins Töpfchen." Pick, pick! pick, pick! gings so geschwind, als wären zwölf Hände da. Und als sie fertig waren, sagten die Tauben: "Aschenputtel, willst du auch auf den Ball gehen und tanzen?" – "O du mein Gott, sagte es, wie kann ich in meinen schmutzigen Kleidern hingehen?" – "Geh zu dem Bäumlein auf deiner Mutter Grab, schüttele daran und wünsche dir schöne Kleider, komm aber vor Mitternacht wieder." – da ging Aschenputtel hinaus, schüttelte das Bäumlein und sprach:

"Bäumlein rüttel und schüttel dich, wirf schöne Kleider herab für mich!" Kaum hatte es das ausgesagt, da lag ein prächtig silbern Kleid vor ihm, Perlen, seidene Strümpfe mit silbernen Zwickeln und silberne Pantoffel und was sonst dazu gehörte. Aschenputtel trug alles nach Haus, und als es sich gewaschen und angezogen hatte, da war es so schön wie eine Rose, die der Thau gewaschen hat. Und wie es vor die Hausthüre kam, so stand da ein Wagen mit sechs federgeschmückten Rappen und Bediente dabei in Blau und Silber, die hoben es hinein, und so gings im Gallop zu dem Schloß des Königs.

Der Prinz aber sah den Wagen vor dem Thor halten, und meinte eine fremde Prinzessin käme angefahren. Da ging er selbst die Treppe hinab, hob Aschenputtel hinaus und führte es in den Saal. Und als da der Glanz der viel tausend Lichter auf es fiel, da war es so schön, daß jedermann sich darüber verwunderte, und die Schwestern standen auch da und ärgerten sich, daß jemand schöner war wie sie, aber sie dachten nimmermehr, daß das Aschenputtel wäre, das zu Haus in der Asche lag. Der Prinz aber tanzte mit Aschenputtel und ward ihm königliche Ehre angethan. Er gedachte auch bei sich: ich soll mir eine Braut aussuchen, da weiß ich mir keine als diese. Für so lange Zeit in Asche und Traurigkeit lebte Aschenputtel nun in Pracht und Freude; als aber Mitternacht kam, eh’ es zwölf geschlagen, stand es auf, neigte sich und wie der Prinz bat und bat, so wollte es nicht länger bleiben. Da führte es der Prinz hinab, unten stand der Wagen und wartete, und so fuhr es fort in Pracht wie es gekommen war.

Als Aschenputtel zu Haus war, ging es wieder zu dem Bäumlein auf der Mutter Grab: "Bäumlein rüttel dich und schüttel dich! nimm die Kleider wieder für dich!" Da nahm der Baum die Kleider wieder, und Aschenputtel hatte sein altes Aschenkleid an, damit ging es zurück, machte sich das Gesicht staubig und legte sich in die Asche schlafen.

Am Morgen darauf kamen die Schwestern, sahen verdrießlich aus und schwiegen still. Aschenputtel sagte: "ihr habt wohl gestern Abend viel Freude gehabt" – "Nein, es war eine Prinzessin da, mit der hat der Prinz fast immer getanzt, es hat sie aber niemand gekannt und niemand gewußt, woher sie gekommen ist." – "Ist es vielleicht die gewesen, die in den prächtigen Wagen mit den sechs Rappen gefahren ist?" sagte Aschenputtel. – "Woher weißt du das?" – "Ich stand in der Hausthüre, da sah ich sie vorbeifahren," – "In Zukunft bleib bei deiner Arbeit, sagte die älteste und sah Aschenputtel böse an, was brauchst du in der Hausthüre zu stehen."

Aschenputtel mußte zum drittenmal die zwei Schwestern putzen, und zum Lohn gaben sie ihm eine Schüssel mit Erbsen, die sollte sie rein lesen; "und daß du dich nicht unterstehst von der Arbeit wegzugehen," rief die älteste noch nach. Aschenputtel gedachte: wenn nur meine Tauben nicht ausbleiben, und das Herz schlug ihm ein wenig. Die Tauben aber kamen wie an dem vorigen Abend und sagten: "Aschenputtel, sollen wir dir die Erbsen lesen?" – "Ja,die schlechten ins Kröpfchen, die guten ins Töpfchen." Die Tauben pickten wieder die bösen heraus, und waren bald damit fertig, dann sagten sie: "Aschenputtel, schüttele das Bäumlein, das wird dir noch schönere Kleider herunter werfen, geh auf den Ball, aber hüte dich, daß du vor Mitternacht wieder kommst." Aschenputtel ging hin:

"Bäumlein rüttel dich und schüttel dich, wirf schöne Kleider herab für mich." Da fiel ein Kleid herab noch viel herrlicher und prächtiger als das vorige, ganz von Gold und Edelgesteinen, dabei goldgezwickelte Strümpfe und goldene Pantoffel; und als Aschenputtel damit angekleidet war, da glänzte es recht, wie die Sonne am Mittag. Vor der Thüre hielt ein Wagen mit sechs Schimmeln, die hatten hohe weiße Federbüsche auf dem Kopf, und die Bedienten waren in Roth und Gold gekleidet. Als Aschenputtel ankam, stand schon der Prinz auf der Treppe und führte sie in den Saal. Und waren gestern alle über ihre Schönheit erstaunt, so erstaunten sie heute noch mehr und die Schwestern standen in der Ecke und waren blaß vor Neid, und hätten sie gewußt, daß das Aschenputtel war, das zu Haus in der Asche lag, sie wären gestorben vor Neid.

Der Prinz aber wollte wissen, wer die fremde Prinzessin sey, woher sie gekommen und wohin sie fahre, und hatte Leute auf die Straße gestellt, die sollten Acht darauf haben, und damit sie nicht so schnell fortlaufen könne, hatte er die Treppe ganz mit Pech bestreichen lassen. Aschenputtel tanzte und tanzte mit dem Prinzen, war in Freuden und gedachte nicht an Mitternacht. Auf einmal, wie es mitten im Tanzen war, hörte es den Glockenschlag, da fiel ihm ein, wie die Tauben es gewarnt, erschrak und eilte zur Thüre hinaus und flog recht die Treppe hinunter. Weil die aber mit Pech bestrichen war, blieb einer von den goldenen Pantoffeln festhängen, und in der Angst dacht es nicht daran, ihn mitzunehmen. Und wie es den letzten Schritt von der Treppe that, da hatt’ es zwölf ausgeschlagen, da war Wagen und Pferde verschwunden und Aschenputtel stand in seinen Aschenkleidern auf der dunkeln Straße. Der Prinz war ihm nachgeeilt, auf der Treppe fand er den goldenen Pantoffel, riß ihn los und hob ihn auf, wie er aber unten hinkam, war alles verschwunden; die Leute auch, die zur Wache ausgestellt waren, kamen und sagten, daß sie nichts gesehen hätten.

Aschenputtel war froh, daß es nicht schlimmer gekommen war, und ging nach Haus, da steckte es sein trübes Oel-Lämpchen an, hängte es in den Schornstein und legte sich in die Asche. Es währte nicht lange, so kamen die beiden Schwestern auch und riefen: "Aschenputtel, steh auf und leucht uns." Aschenputtel gähnte und that als wacht es aus dem Schlaf. Bei dem Leuchten aber hörte es, wie die eine sagte: "Gott weiß, wer die verwünschte Prinzessin ist, daß sie in der Erde begraben läg! der Prinz hat nur mit ihr getanzt und als sie weg war, hat er gar nicht mehr bleiben wollen und das ganze Fest hat ein Ende gehabt." – "Es war recht, als wären alle Lichter auf einmal ausgeblasen worden," sagte die andere. Aschenputtel wußte wohl wer die fremde Prinzessin war, aber es sagte kein Wörtchen.

Der Prinz aber gedachte, ist dir alles andere fehlgeschlagen, so wird dir der Pantoffel die Braut finden helfen, und ließ bekannt machen, welcher der goldene Pantoffel passe, die solle seine Gemahlin werden. Aber allen war er viel zu klein, ja manche hätten ihren Fuß nicht hineingebracht, und wären die zwei Pantoffel ein einziger gewesen. Endlich kam die Reihe auch an die beiden Schwestern, die Probe zu machen; sie waren froh, denn sie hatten kleine schöne Füße und glaubten, uns kann es nicht fehlschlagen, wär der Prinz nur gleich zu uns gekommen. "Hört, sagte die Mutter heimlich, da habt ihr ein Messer, und wenn euch der Pantoffel doch noch zu eng ist, so schneidet euch ein Stück vom Fuß ab, es thut ein bischen weh, was schadet das aber, es vergeht bald und eine von euch wird Königin." Da ging die älteste in ihre Kammer und probirte den Pantoffel an, die Fußspitze kam hinein, aber die Ferse war zu groß, da nahm sie das Messer und schnitt sich ein Stück von der Ferse, bis sie den Fuß in den Pantoffel hineinzwängte. So ging sie heraus zu dem Prinzen, und wie der sah, daß sie den Pantoffel anhatte, sagte er, das sey die Braut, führte sie zum Wagen und wollte mit ihr fortfahren. Wie er aber ans Thor kam, saßen oben die Tauben und riefen:

"Rucke di guck, rucke di guck! Blut ist im Schuck: (Schuh) Der Schuck ist zu klein, Die rechte Braut sitzt noch daheim!" Der Prinz bückte sich und sah auf den Pantoffel, da quoll das Blut heraus, und da merkte er, daß er betrogen war, und führte die falsche Braut zurück. Die Mutter aber sagte zur zweiten Tochter: "nimm du den Pantoffel, und wenn er dir zu kurz ist, so schneide lieber vorne an den Zehen ab." Da nahm sie den Pantoffel in ihre Kammer, und als der Fuß zu groß war, da biß sie die Zähne zusammen und schnitt ein groß Stück von den Zehen ab, und drückte den Pantoffel geschwind an. Wie sie damit hervortrat, meinte er, das wäre die rechte und wollte mit ihr fortfahren. Als er aber in das Thor kam, riefen die Tauben wieder:

"Rucke di guck, rucke di guck! Blut ist im Schuck: Der Schuck ist zu klein, Die rechte Braut sitzt noch daheim!" Der Prinz sah nieder, da waren die weißen Strümpfe der Braut roth gefärbt und das Blut war hoch herauf gedrungen. Da brachte sie der Prinz der Mutter wieder und sagte: "das ist auch nicht die rechte Braut; aber ist nicht noch eine Tochter im Haus." "Nein, sagte die Mutter, nur ein garstiges Aschenputtel ist noch da, das sitzt unten in der Asche, dem kann der Pantoffel nicht passen." Sie wollte es auch nicht rufen lassen, bis es der Prinz durchaus verlangte. Da ward Aschenputtel gerufen und wie es hörte, daß der Prinz da sey, wusch es sich geschwind Gesicht und Hände frisch und rein; und wie es in die Stube trat, neigte es sich, der Prinz aber reichte ihr den goldenen Pantoffel und sagte: "probier ihn an! und wenn er dir paßt, wirst du meine Gemahlin." Da streift es den schweren Schuh von dem linken Fuß ab, setzt ihn auf den goldenen Pantoffel und drückte ein klein wenig, da stand es darin, als wär er ihm angegossen. Und als es sich aufbückte, sah ihm der Prinz ins Gesicht, da erkannte er die schöne Prinzessin wieder und rief: "das ist die rechte Braut." Die Stiefmutter und die zwei stolzen Schwestern erschracken und wurden bleich, aber der Prinz führte Aschenputtel fort und hob es in den Wagen, und als sie durchs Thor fuhren, da riefen die Tauben:

"Rucke di guck, rucke di guck! Kein Blut im Schuck: Der Schuck ist nicht zu klein, Die rechte Braut, die führt er heim!"