de-en  Die Romanze eines geschäftigen Maklers
The romance of a busy broker.

(In “The Four Million,” 1906).

By O. Henry (William Sydney Porter, 1862-1910).

Pitcher, Procurator at the office of Harvey Maxwell, broker, allowed himself a look of mild interest and surprise in his usually expressionless attitude when his employer, at half past nine, entered in the company of his young lady stenographer. With a brisk "Good morning, Pitcher," Maxwell rushed to his desk as if he wanted to jump over it, then delved into the great heap of letters and telegrams waiting for him there.

The young woman had been Maxwell's Stenographer for a year. She was definitely not of stenographic beauty. She renounced the splendor of the seductive pompadour. She wore no necklaces, bracelets or lockets. She did not give the appearance of being someone who would accept an invitation to lunch. Her dress was gray and plain, but it suited her figure with integrity and discretion. In her well-groomed black turban was a gold-green feather of a macaw. This morning she was gently and shyly radiant. Her eyes were dreamily bright, her cheeks truly peach-coloured, her expression a happy one, tinted with memories.

Pitcher, still somewhat curious, noticed a difference in her manner this morning. Instead of going into the next room where her desk stood, she remained somewhat undecided in the outer office. Once she move in the direction of Maxwell's desk, close enough for him to be aware of her presence.

The machine, sitting at the desk, was no longer a man, it was a busy New York broker, driven by buzzing wheels and uncoiling springs.

"Now, what is the matter? "What´s up?" Maxwell asked tartly. His opened mail lay like a heap of snow on his overfilled desk. His eager grey eyes, impersonal and gruff, scanned her impatiently.

"Nothing at all", the stenographer replied, turning away with the touch of a smile.

"Mr. Pitcher," she said to the procurator, "did Mr. Maxwell say something about hiring another stenographer yesterday?" "He did," Pitcher replied, "he asked me to look for a new one. I instructed the agency yesterday to send some sample folders. It's 9:45 am and not a single cap or piece of pineapple gum has shown up so far." "Then I'll do the work as usual,"said the young lady," until someone takes the place." And she went straight to her desk and hung the black turban with the gold-green macaw feather in its usual place.

Whom the play of a busy Manhattan broker during the business onslaught remained denied, is for the profession of anthropology to decide. The poet sings of the "overcrowded hour of a glorious life". The hour of a broker is not just overflowing; rather, the minutes and seconds are bursting at the seams and are filled from the first to the last car.

And that day was Harvey Maxwells busy day. The stock ticker machine began to lurch with a jerk over the restless reels of tape, the telephone on the desk had a chronic bout of ringing. Men began to crowd into the office, calling to him over the railing, friendly, harsh, malicious, agitated. Newsboys run in and out with news and telegrams. The clerks in the office jumped around like sailors during a storm. Even Pitchers' face relaxed in something like the liveliness.

There were hurricanes and landslides and snowstorms and glaciers and volcanoes at the stock exchange, and, in miniature, the disturbances of the elements were reproduced in the broker's office. Maxwell pushed his chair to the wall and was engaged in business dealings like a top dancer. With the trained agility of a Harlekin, he jumped from the news ticker to the phone, from the desk to the door.

In the midst of the growing and major stress, the broker suddenly noticed an upswept ponytail of golden hair under a bonnet of velvet and flowers, an imitation sealskin, and a necklace of beads as large as hickory nuts that ended near the bottom with a silver heart. A self-assured young lady was associated with the accessories; and Pitcher was there, to lead usher her in.

"Lady from the stenographer's agency, regarding the position," said Pitcher.

Maxwell turned half away, with hands full of papers and punched tape

"Which position?", he asked with a frown.

"The position of a stenographer", said Pitcher. "You instructed me yesterday to call them and have someone sent this morning." "You are losing your marbles, Pitcher" said Maxwell. Why should I have given you such instructions? Miss Leslie has worked to my fullest satisfaction during the year she is here. The job is hers as long as she is willing to keep it. There are no vacancies here, madam.
Cancel the order with the agency, Pitcher, and don't bring anymore of them here." The silver heart left the office and swung and bumped itself against the office furniture as it indignantly disappeared. Pitcher took a moment to inform the accountant that the "old man" seemed to become more absent-minded and forgetful every day on this earth.

The boom and the pace of business is growing stronger and faster. On the floor lay half a dozen stocks, in which Maxwells' customers were large investors. Orders for purchase and sale came and went as fast as swallows fly. Some of his own stocks were at risk, and the man worked like a high-spirited, delicate, strong machine - fully stretched, running at high speed, accurate, never hesitating, with the right word and decision and ready to act and punctual as clockwork. Bonds, loans and mortgages, margins and securities - this was a world of finance, and there was no place in it for the world of humans or the world of nature.

As the noon hour approached, a little calm came into the turmoil. Maxwell was standing in front of his desk, his hands full of telegrams and memos, a fountain pen behind his right ear, and strands of hair strewn across his forehead. His windows was open so that the beloved spring brought a little warmth through the awakening registers of the earth.

And through the window came a wandering - perhaps a lost - scent - a delicate, sweet scent of lilac, which had fixed the broker motionless for a moment. This smell belonged to Miss Leslie; it was her own and hers alone.

The smell brought her animated, almost tangible, before him. The financial world suddently shrank to a spot. And she was in the adjoining room - twenty steps away

"By George, I'll do it now" said Maxwell in an undertone. "I will ask her now. I am surprised that I didn't do it a long time ago." He rushed into the interior of his office, with the haste of an equity trader for Shorts having to hedge a portfolio of securities. He rushed to the stenograper's desk.

She looked up at him with a smile. A light blush crept over her cheek and her eyes were kind and frank. Maxwell leaned an elbow on her desk. He still clasped futtering papers with both hands and the pen was still behind his ear.

"Miss Leslie," he began hastily: "I have only one moment to spare" I would like to use this moment to say something. Do you want to marry me? I had no time to inquire the love with you in the ordinary way, but I really love you. Speak quickly please, these peoples beat the last thing from Union Pacific". "Oh, what are you talking about"? replied the young lady. She rose and stared at him with wide eyes.

"Don't you understand?" said Maxwell anxiously. "I would like you to marry me. I love you, Miss Leslie. I wanted to tell you and I took a minute since thing have slowed down a tad. They are calling me to the phone now. Pitcher, tell them to wait a minute. Don't you want to Miss Leslie?

The stenographer reacted very strangely. Firstly she seemed to be overcome by astonishment, then tears poured from her amazed eyes; and then she smiled with her whole being and one of her arms glided gently over the Broker's neck.

"I know now" she said softly. It is this old business that is pushing everything else out of your head. Ad first I was afraid. Don't you remember, Harvey? We were married last night at 8.00 in the small church around the corner. "Translation: vokabel.org
unit 1
Die Romanze eines geschäftigen Maklers.
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 2
(In “The Four Million,” 1906).
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 5 months ago
unit 3
Von O. Henry (William Sydney Porter,1862-1910).
1 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 5 months ago
unit 6
Die junge Dame war seit einem Jahr Maxwells Stenographin.
1 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 7
Sie war definitiv von nicht stenographischer Schönheit.
4 Translations, 6 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 8
Sie verzichtete auf den Prunk des verführerischen Pompadour.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 9
Sie trug keine Kettchen, Armbänder oder Medaillons.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 10
Sie hatte nicht den Anschein, etwa eine Einladung zum Mittagessen, zu akzeptieren.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 5 months ago
unit 11
Ihr Kleid war grau und schlicht, aber es passte zu ihrer Figur mit Redlichkeit und Diskretion.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 5 months ago
unit 12
In ihrem gepflegten schwarzen Turban war eine goldgrüne Feder einer Ara.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 5 months ago
unit 13
An diesem Morgen war sie sanft und schüchtern strahlend.
3 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 15
Pitcher, noch leicht neugierig, bemerkte einen Unterschied in ihrer Art und Weise an diesem Morgen.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 19
„Nun, was ist denn?
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 20
Gibt´s etwas?“ fragte Maxwell scharf.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 21
Seine geöffnete Post lag wie eine Schneebank auf seinem überfüllten Schreibtisch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 5 months ago
unit 22
Seine eifrigen grauen Augen, unpersönlich und schroff, streiften sie ungeduldig.
4 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 23
„Nichts“, antwortete die Stenographin, sich mit einem kleinen Lächeln abwendend.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 25
Ich habe die Agentur gestern beauftragt einige Mustermappen zu schicken.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 28
Der Dichter singt von der „überfüllten Stunde eines glorreichen Lebens“.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 30
Und dieser Tag war Harvey Maxwells betriebsamer Tag.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 33
Nachrichtenjungen liefen ein und aus mit Nachrichten und Telegrammen.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 34
Die Sachbearbeiter im Büro sprangen umher wie Matrosen während eines Sturms.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 35
Selbst Pitchers Gesicht entspannte sich in etwas der Lebhaftigkeit ähnliches.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 37
Maxwell schob seinen Stuhl an die Wand und tätigte Geschäfte nach Art eines Spitzentänzers.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 41
„Lady aus der Stenographengentur, bezüglich der Stelle“, sagte Pitcher.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 42
Maxwell wandte sich halb um, mit den Händen voller Papiere und Lochstreifen.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 43
„Welche Position?“ fragte er mit einem Stirnrunzeln.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 44
„Der Stelle eines Stenographen“ sagte itcher.
2 Translations, 5 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 46
„Warum sollte ich Ihnen solche Anweisungen gegeben haben?
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 47
Fräulein Leslie hat während des Jahres, das sie hier ist, zur vollsten Zufriedenheit gewirkt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 5 months, 3 weeks ago
unit 48
Die Stelle ist ihre, solange sie gewillt ist sie zu behalten.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 49
Es gibt hier keine offene Stelle zu besetzen, gnädige Frau.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 52
Der Andrang und das Tempo des Geschäfts wuchs stärker und schneller.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 53
Auf dem Boden lagen ein halbes Dutzend Aktien, in denen Maxwells Kunden Großinvestoren waren.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 54
Aufträge zum Kauf und Verkauf kamen und gingen so flink, wie Schwalben fliegen.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 57
Als die Mittagsstunde nahte, kam ein wenig Ruhe in die Aufruhr.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 61
Dieser Geruch gehörte Fräulein Leslie; es war ihr eigener und nur ihrer.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 62
Der Geruch brachte sie lebhaft, fast greifbar, vor ihn.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 63
Die Finanzwelt schwand plötzlich zu einem Fleckchen dahin.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 64
Und sie war im Nebenzimmer – zwanzig Schritte entfernt.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 65
„Beim George, ich werde es jetzt tun“ sagte Maxwell halblaut.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 66
„Ich werde sie jetzt fragen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 68
Er stürmte zum Schreibtisch der Stenographin.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 69
Sie schaute mit einem Lächeln zu ihm auf.
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 70
Eine leichte Röte schlich über ihre Wange und ihre Augen waren gütig und freimütig.
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 71
Maxwell lehnte einen Ellbogen auf ihren Schreibtisch.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 72
unit 73
„Fräulein Leslie“ begann er hastig: „Ich habe nur einen Augenblick zu entbehren.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 74
Ich möchte etwas in diesem Augenblick sagen.
2 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 75
Willst Du meine Frau werden?
3 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 78
Sie stand auf und starrte ihn mit großen Augen an.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 79
„Verstehen Sie nicht?“ sagte Maxwell unruhig.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 80
„Ich möchte, dass Sie mich heiraten.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 81
Ich liebe Sie, Fräulein Leslie.
2 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 83
Sie rufen mich jetzt ans Telefon.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 84
Pitcher, sag ihnen sie sollen eine Minute warten.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 85
Wollen Sie nicht, Fräulein Leslie?
2 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 86
Die Stenographin reagierte sehr seltsam.
1 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 88
„Ich weiß jetzt“ sagte sie leise.
1 Translations, 4 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 89
„Es ist dieses alte Geschäft, das Dir zur Zeit alles andere aus dem Kopf drängt.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 90
Anfangs hatte ich Angst.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago
unit 91
Erinnerst Du Dich nicht, Harvey?
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 year, 4 months ago

Die Romanze eines geschäftigen Maklers.

(In “The Four Million,” 1906).

Von O. Henry (William Sydney Porter,1862-1910).

Pitcher, Prokurist im Büro von Harvey Maxwell, Broker, erlaubte sich einen Blick von mildem Interesse und Überraschung zu seiner normalerweise ausdruckslosen
Haltung, als sein Arbeitgeber, zügig um halb zehn, in der Gesellschaft mit seiner jungen Dame Stenographin eintrat. Mit einem flotten „Guten Morgen, Pitcher,“ stürzte Maxwell an seinen Schreibtisch, als ob er drüberspringen wollte und tauchte
dann in den großen Berg aus Briefen und Telegramme, die dort auf ihn warteten.

Die junge Dame war seit einem Jahr Maxwells Stenographin. Sie war definitiv von nicht stenographischer Schönheit. Sie verzichtete auf den Prunk des verführerischen Pompadour. Sie trug keine Kettchen, Armbänder oder Medaillons. Sie hatte nicht den Anschein, etwa eine Einladung zum Mittagessen, zu
akzeptieren. Ihr Kleid war grau und schlicht, aber es passte zu ihrer Figur mit Redlichkeit und Diskretion. In ihrem gepflegten schwarzen Turban war eine goldgrüne Feder einer Ara. An diesem Morgen war sie sanft und schüchtern strahlend. Ihre Augen waren verträumt hell, ihre Wangen wahrlich pfirsichfarben, ihr Ausdruck ein Glücklicher, gefärbt in Erinnerungen.

Pitcher, noch leicht neugierig, bemerkte einen Unterschied in ihrer Art und Weise an diesem Morgen. Anstatt direkt in den Nebenraum zu gehen, wo ihr Schreibtisch war, blieb sie, etwas unentschlossen, im Vorzimmer. Ein Mal bewegte sie sich in
Richtung Maxwells Schreibtisch, nah genug, dass er ihre Anwesenheit wahrnahm.

Die Maschine, die da am Schreibtisch saß, war kein Mann mehr, es war ein
geschäftiger New York Broker, angetrieben von summenden Rädern und abwickelnden Federn.

„Nun, was ist denn? Gibt´s etwas?“ fragte Maxwell scharf. Seine geöffnete Post lag wie eine Schneebank auf seinem überfüllten Schreibtisch. Seine eifrigen grauen Augen, unpersönlich und schroff, streiften sie ungeduldig.

„Nichts“, antwortete die Stenographin, sich mit einem kleinen Lächeln abwendend.

„Herr Pitcher,“ sagte sie zum Prokuristen „hat Herr Maxwell gestern etwas über das Einstellen einer weiteren Stenographin gesagt?“

„Das tat er“, antwortete Pitcher.“ Er beauftragte mich eine Neue zu suchen. Ich habe die Agentur gestern beauftragt einige Mustermappen zu schicken. Es ist 9.45 Uhr und nicht eine einzige Mütze oder Stück Ananas-Kaugummi hat sich bisher blicken lassen.“

„Dann werde ich die Arbeit wie gewöhnlich machen“ sagte die junge Dame „bis jemand den Platz einnimmt.“ Und sie ging sofort zu ihrem Schreibtisch und hängte
den schwarzen Turban mit der gold-grünen Arafeder an seinen gewöhnlichen Platz.

Wem das Schauspiel eines geschäftigen Manhattan Brokers beim
Geschäftsansturm verweigert blieb, ist für den Berufsstand der Anthropologie
vorbelastet. Der Dichter singt von der „überfüllten Stunde eines glorreichen Lebens“. Die Stunde eines Brokers ist nicht nur überfüllt, vielmehr platzen die Minuten und Sekunden aus allen Nähten und sind vom ersten bis zum letzen Wagon gefüllt.

Und dieser Tag war Harvey Maxwells betriebsamer Tag. Der Fernschreiber began ruckartig über die unruhigen Spulen des Bandes zu taumeln, das Telefon auf dem Schreibtisch hatte einen chronischen Klingelanfall. Männer begannen in das Büro
zu drängen und über das Geländer nach ihm zu rufen, freundlich, scharf, bösartig, aufgeregt. Nachrichtenjungen liefen ein und aus mit Nachrichten und
Telegrammen. Die Sachbearbeiter im Büro sprangen umher wie Matrosen während eines Sturms. Selbst Pitchers Gesicht entspannte sich in etwas der Lebhaftigkeit ähnliches.

An der Börse gab es Hurrikane und Erdrutsche und Schneestürme und Gletscher und Vulkane und die elementaren Störungen wurden, in Miniatur, im Büro des Brokers wiedergegeben. Maxwell schob seinen Stuhl an die Wand und tätigte
Geschäfte nach Art eines Spitzentänzers. Er sprang vom Nachrichtenticker zum Telefon, vom Schreibtisch zur Tür, mit der geschulten Agilität eines Harlekins.

Inmitten des wachsenden und wichtigen Stresses bemerkte der Makler plötzlich einen hochgekämmten Pony goldenen Haares unter einer Haube aus Samt und Strauß, eine Robbenhautimitation und eine Kette aus Perlen, so groß wie Hickory-
Nüsse, die in der nähe des Bodens mit einem silbernen Herzen endete. Eine
selbstbeherrschte junge Dame war mit den Assecoires verbunden; und Pitcher war da, um sie hereinzuführen.

„Lady aus der Stenographengentur, bezüglich der Stelle“, sagte Pitcher.

Maxwell wandte sich halb um, mit den Händen voller Papiere und Lochstreifen.

„Welche Position?“ fragte er mit einem Stirnrunzeln.

„Der Stelle eines Stenographen“ sagte itcher. „Sie beauftragten mich gestern sie anzurufen und heute morgen jemanden schicken zu lassen.“

„Sie verlieren Ihren Verstand, Pitcher“ sagte Maxwell. „Warum sollte ich Ihnen
solche Anweisungen gegeben haben? Fräulein Leslie hat während des Jahres, das sie hier ist, zur vollsten Zufriedenheit gewirkt. Die Stelle ist ihre, solange sie gewillt ist sie zu behalten. Es gibt hier keine offene Stelle zu besetzen, gnädige Frau.
Widerrufen Sie den Auftrag bei der Agentur, Pitcher, und bringen Sie keine von ihnen mehr hierher.“

Das silberne Herz verließ das Büro und schwang und stieß sich selbständig gegen die Büromöbel, als es empört verschwand. Pitcher ergriff einen Moment, um dem Buchhalter mitzuteilen, dass der „alte Mann“ jeden Tag auf dieser Welt zerstreuter und vergesslicher zu werden schien.

Der Andrang und das Tempo des Geschäfts wuchs stärker und schneller. Auf dem Boden lagen ein halbes Dutzend Aktien, in denen Maxwells Kunden Großinvestoren waren. Aufträge zum Kauf und Verkauf kamen und gingen so flink, wie Schwalben fliegen. Einige seiner eigenen Bestände wurden gefährdet und der Mann arbeitete wie eine hochgedrehte, delikate, starke Maschine – aufs vollste gespannt, auf Hochtouren laufend, akkurat, nie zögernd, mit dem richtigen Wort
und Entscheidung und zum Handeln bereit und pünktlich wie ein Uhrwerk. Aktien und Anleihen, Darlehen und Hypotheken, Margen und Wertpapiere – das hier war eine Welt der Finanzen, und es gab keinen Platz in ihr für die Welt der Menschen oder der Welt der Natur.

Als die Mittagsstunde nahte, kam ein wenig Ruhe in die Aufruhr. Maxwell stand vor seinem Schreibtisch, die Händen voller Telegramme und Denkschriften, mit einem
Füllfederhalter hinter seinem rechten Ohr und durcheinander geworfenen
Haarsträhnen über der Stirn. Sein Fenster war offen, damit der geliebte Frühling ein wenig Wärme durch die erwachenden Register der Erde bringt.

Und durch das Fenster kam ein wandernder – vielleicht ein verlorener – Duft – eine zarter, süßer Duft von Flieder, der den Broker für einen Moment lang regungslos fixiert hatte. Dieser Geruch gehörte Fräulein Leslie; es war ihr eigener und nur ihrer.

Der Geruch brachte sie lebhaft, fast greifbar, vor ihn. Die Finanzwelt schwand plötzlich zu einem Fleckchen dahin. Und sie war im Nebenzimmer – zwanzig Schritte entfernt.

„Beim George, ich werde es jetzt tun“ sagte Maxwell halblaut. „Ich werde sie jetzt fragen. Es wundert mich, dass ich es nicht schon vor Langem tat.“

Er raste in das Büroinnere mit der Hast eines Shorts, der den Kauf decken soll. Er stürmte zum Schreibtisch der Stenographin.

Sie schaute mit einem Lächeln zu ihm auf. Eine leichte Röte schlich über ihre
Wange und ihre Augen waren gütig und freimütig. Maxwell lehnte einen Ellbogen auf ihren Schreibtisch. Er umklammerte immer noch flatternde Papiere mit beiden Händen und der Stift war hinter seinem Ohr.

„Fräulein Leslie“ begann er hastig: „Ich habe nur einen Augenblick zu entbehren. Ich möchte etwas in diesem Augenblick sagen. Willst Du meine Frau werden? Ich hatte keine Zeit, um Liebe mit Dir auf dem gewöhnlichen Weg zu erfahren, aber ich liebe Dich wirklich. Sprech bitte schnell, diese Leute prügeln das Letzte aus Union Pacific.“

„Oh, wovon sprichst Du?“ erwiederte die junge Dame. Sie stand auf und starrte ihn mit großen Augen an.

„Verstehen Sie nicht?“ sagte Maxwell unruhig. „Ich möchte, dass Sie mich heiraten. Ich liebe Sie, Fräulein Leslie. Ich wollte es Ihnen sagen und schnappte mir eine Minute, da die Angelegenheiten ein wenig nachgelassen haben. Sie rufen mich
jetzt ans Telefon. Pitcher, sag ihnen sie sollen eine Minute warten. Wollen Sie nicht, Fräulein Leslie?

Die Stenographin reagierte sehr seltsam. Anfangs wirkte sie vom Erstaunen überwältigt, dann ergossen sich Tränen aus ihren staunenden Augen; und dann lächelte sie sonnig durch sie hindurch und einer ihrer Arme glitt sanft über den Hals
des Brokers.

„Ich weiß jetzt“ sagte sie leise. „Es ist dieses alte Geschäft, das Dir zur Zeit alles andere aus dem Kopf drängt. Anfangs hatte ich Angst. Erinnerst Du Dich nicht, Harvey? Wir wurden gestern Abend um 8 Uhr in der kleinen Kirche um die Ecke verheiratet.“

Übersetzung: vokabel.org