de-en  Die Zeitmaschine von H.G. Wells Medium
The machine. What the time traveler held in his hand was a glittering metal structure, hardly bigger than a small clock, and very finely crafted. There was ivory on it and a transparent crystalline substance. And now I have to go into detail, because what follows - if you don't accept this explanation - is something absolutely inexplicable. He took one of the small octagonal tables that were standing around the room and placed it in front of the fire with two of its feet on the fireplace carpet. He placed the mechanism on this table. Then he pulled up a chair and sat down. The only other object on the table was a small lamp with a lampshade, whose bright light fell fully on the model. There were also perhaps a dozen candles around, two in brass candlesticks on the mantelpiece and several in sconces, so that the room was brightly lit. I sat in a low armchair, closest to the fire, and pulled it forward so that I almost came to sit between the time traveler and the fireplace. Filby sat behind him and looked over his shoulder. The doctor and the mayor from the province watched him in profile from the right, the psychologist from the left. The very young man stood behind the psychologist. We were all eyes. It seems incredible to me that a trick could be played on us under these conditions, no matter how finely conceived and skillfully executed it was.

The time traveler looked first at us and then at the mechanism. "Well?" said the psychologist.

"This little thing," said the time traveler, resting his elbows on the table and squeezing his hands over the apparatus, "is only a model. It's my plan for building a machine to travel through time. You'll notice that it looks peculiarly odd and this shaft sparkles strangely there as if it were somehow unreal." He pointed to the part with his finger. "There's also a little white lever here and another one there." The doctor stood up from his chair and looked at the thing. "It's beautifully worked," he said.

"Work on it took two years," replied the time traveler. Then, when we were all following the doctor's example, he said: "Now I want you to understand me clearly: if I push this lever over, the machine slips away into the future, and that lever reverses the movement. This saddle is the seat of a time traveler. I will press the lever immediately, and the machine will start, I'll disappear, going into the future, and be gone. Have a good look at this thing. Also look at the table to make sure that no deception takes place. I don't want to lose this model and be told afterwards that I'm a charlatan." There was a pause of perhaps one minute. The psychologist seemed to want to address me, but he withdrew his intention. Then the time traveler stretched his finger out towards the lever. "No," he said suddenly, "give me your hand." And he turned to the psychologist and took his hand and told him to stretch out his index finger. Thus the psychologist himself sent the model of the time machine on its endless journey. All of us saw the lever turning. I'm absolutely certain that there wasn't a deceit. A breath of wind arose, and the lamp flared up. One of the candles on the mantelpiece was blown out, and the little machine suddenly turned, became blurred, was visible like a ghost for perhaps a second, like a vortex of faintly glittering brass and ivory; and it was gone - disappeared. Apart from the lamp the table was empty.

All remained silent for a minute. Then Filby said he'd be hanged.

The psychologist recovered from his petrified state and suddenly looked under the table. The time traveler laughed jovially. "Well?" he said with an allusion to the psychologist. Then he got up, went to the tobacco jar on the mantel and began to stuff his pipe, turning his back on us.

We stared at each other. "Listen to me," said the doctor, "are you serious? Do you seriously mean that this machine has traveled in time?" "Certainly," said the time traveler, bending down to light a spill by the fire. Then he turned around while lighting the pipe and looked at the psychologist in the face. (The psychologist wanted to show that he was not off his rocker, so he took a cigar and tried to light it untrimmed). "Even more - I have back there" - he pointed to the laboratory - "a big machine almost ready, and when it's assembled, I think I'll make a trip myself." "You mean to say that the machine traveled into the future?" asked Filby.

"Into the future or the past - where to, I am not really sure." After a break, the psychologist had an inspiration. "It must have wandered into the past if it had wandered somewhere," he said.

"Why?" said the time traveler.

"Because I assume it didn't move in space, and if it had traveled into the future, it would still be here because it should have traveled through this time." "But," I said, 'if it had traveled into the past, it should have been there when we came into this room, and last Thursday when we were here, and the Thursday before and so on." "Serious objections," the provincial mayor remarked with a look of impartiality, turning to the time traveler.

"Not a bit," said the time traveler; and to the psychologist: "You think you can explain this. It's a perception just below the threshold, you know, vanished perception." "Of course," said the psychologist comforting us. "That's run-of-the-mill in psychology. I should have thought of that. That is simple enough and it wonderfully helps the paradox. We can see and notice this machine as little as we can see the spoke of a twirling wheel or a bullet flying through the air. If it travels through time fifty or a hundred times as fast as we do, if it travels a minute while we traverse a second, the impression it makes will of course be only a fiftieth or a hundredth of what it would be if it did not travel through time. That's very clear." He ran his hand through the space where the machine had stood. "You see?" he said with a laugh.

We sat for a minute or so and stared at the empty table. Then the time traveler asked us how did all this strike us.

"Tonight everything sounds plausible enough," said the doctor; "but wait until tomorrow. Wait for the common sense of the morning." "Would you like to see the time machine for yourself?" asked the time traveler. And at the same time he took the lamp and led us down the long corridor to his laboratory. I vividly remember the flickering light, his strange, broad head in silhouette, his shadow dancing as we all followed him, confused but unbelieving, and how we saw there in the laboratory a larger version of the small mechanism that we had seen disappear before our eyes. Parts were made of nickel, parts of ivory and others were undoubtedly cut from rock crystal. The machine was almost finished, only the wound crystal waves were still unfinished on the bench next to some drawings, and I took one in my hand to observe it better. It seemed to be quartz.

"Listen," the doctor said, "are you really serious? Or is it a trick - like the ghost you showed us last Christmas?" "On the machine," said the time traveler, holding up the lamp, "I want to explore time. Is that clear? I've never been more serious about anything in my whole life." None of us really knew how to take it.

I met Filby's eye over the doctor's shoulder and he winked at me solemnly.
unit 2
Es war Elfenbein daran und eine durchsichtige, kristallinische Substanz.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 5
Auf diesen Tisch stellte er den Mechanismus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 6
Dann zog er einen Stuhl heran und setzte sich.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 10
Filby saß hinter ihm und sah ihm über die Schulter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 12
Der sehr junge Mann stand hinter dem Psychologen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 13
Wir waren alle auf dem Quivive.
2 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 2 days ago
unit 15
Der Zeitreisende sah erst uns an und dann den Mechanismus.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 16
»Nun?« sagte der Psychologe.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 18
Es ist mein Entwurf zu einer Maschine, um durch die Zeit zu reisen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 21
»Es ist wundervoll gearbeitet«, sagte er.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 22
»Die Arbeit daran hat zwei Jahre gedauert«, erwiderte der Zeitreisende.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 2 weeks, 4 days ago
unit 24
Dieser Sattel ist der Sitz eines Zeitreisenden.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 26
Sehen Sie das Ding gut an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 27
Sehen Sie auch den Tisch an und überzeugen sich, daß kein Betrug geschieht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 29
Der Psychologe schien mich anreden zu wollen, aber er gab seine Absicht auf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 30
Dann streckte der Zeitreisende den Finger gegen den Hebel aus.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 32
So schickte der Psychologe selber das Modell der Zeitmaschine auf seine endlose Reise.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 33
Wir alle sahen den Hebel sich drehen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 34
Ich bin absolut sicher, daß kein Betrug vorlag.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 35
Es entstand ein Windhauch, und die Lampe flackerte auf.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 37
Abgesehen von der Lampe, war der Tisch leer.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 38
Alle schwiegen eine Minute lang.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 39
Dann sagte Filby, er ließe sich hängen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 40
Der Psychologe erholte sich aus seiner Erstarrung und blickte plötzlich unter den Tisch.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 41
Da lachte der Zeitreisende heiter.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 42
»Nun?« sagte er mit einer Reminiszenz an den Psychologen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 44
Wir starrten einander an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 45
»Hören Sie«, sagte der Arzt, »ist das Ihr Ernst?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 47
Dann wandte er sich um, während er die Pfeife anzündete, und sah dem Psychologen ins Gesicht.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 51
»Sie muß in die Vergangenheit gewandert sein, wenn sie irgendwohin gewandert ist,« sagte er.
3 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 52
»Warum?« sagte der Zeitreisende.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 54
»Keine Spur«, sagte der Zeitreisende; und zum Psychologen: »Sie denken.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 55
Sie können das erklären.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 57
»Das ist etwas ganz Gewöhnliches in der Psychologie.
3 Translations, 3 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 58
Daran hätte ich denken sollen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 59
Das ist einfach genug und hilft dem Paradoxen wundervoll.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 62
Das ist ganz klar.« Er fuhr mit der Hand durch den Raum, wo die Maschine gestanden hatte.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 63
»Sie sehen?« sagte er lachend.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 64
Wir saßen eine Minute oder so und starrten den leeren Tisch an.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 65
Dann fragte uns der Zeitreisende, was wir von dem allen hielten.
3 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 66
»Heut abend klingt alles plausibel genug«, sagte der Arzt; »aber warten Sie bis morgen.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 3 days ago
unit 68
Und zugleich nahm er die Lampe und führte uns den langen Gang zu seinem Laboratorium hinunter.
1 Translations, 1 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 72
Es schien Quarz zu sein.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 73
»Hören Sie«, sagte der Arzt, »ist es Ihnen wirklich Ernst?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 75
Ist das klar?
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
unit 77
Ich begegnete über der Schulter des Arztes Filbys Auge, und er blinzelte mir feierlich zu.
1 Translations, 2 Upvotes, Last Activity 1 week, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 8  1 week, 2 days ago
DrWho 9088  commented on  unit 14  1 week, 2 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 66  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 13  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 8  1 week, 3 days ago
DrWho 9088  commented on  unit 50  1 week, 3 days ago
DrWho 9088  commented on  unit 49  1 week, 3 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 46  1 week, 3 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 76  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 48  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 33  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 30  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 26  1 week, 3 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 14  1 week, 3 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 60  1 week, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 65  1 week, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 51  1 week, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented  1 week, 4 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 75  1 week, 4 days ago
DrWho 9088  commented on  unit 66  1 week, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 39  1 week, 4 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 9  1 week, 4 days ago
DrWho 9088  commented on  unit 7  1 week, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 11  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 15  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 21  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 6  2 weeks, 4 days ago
DrWho 9088  translated  unit 13  2 weeks, 4 days ago
DrWho 9088  commented on  unit 5  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 2  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented  2 weeks, 4 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented  2 weeks, 4 days ago
lollo1a 3930  commented on  unit 2  2 weeks, 4 days ago
anitafunny 6683  commented on  unit 1  2 weeks, 4 days ago

type fiction
author Herbert George Wells
title Die Zeitmaschine
publisher rororo
year 1951
translator Felix Paul Grewe
corrector Josef Muehlgassner
sender www.gaga.net
created 20150313
projectid 88fe3eac.......Sorry, now I've opened the context, too.

by anitafunny 1 week, 4 days ago

Entschuldigung...besser, erst die Einführung übersetzen, danke..mein Fehler, Entschuldigung vielmals !

by anitafunny 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Sehr gerne Lollo...freue mich..bleib bei uns! Liebe und schnell verzeihende Menschen, gibt es doch sehr, sehr viele! Die anderen brauchen wir nicht... lach!!!!

by anitafunny 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Wieder was zum Übersetzen... danke Anita! :-)

by lollo1a 2 weeks, 4 days ago

Die Maschine
Was der Zeitreisende in der Hand hielt, war ein glitzerndes Rahmenwerk aus Metall, kaum größer als eine kleine Uhr, und sehr fein gearbeitet. Es war Elfenbein daran und eine durchsichtige, kristallinische Substanz. Und jetzt muß ich ausführlich werden, denn was folgt, ist – wenn man nicht seine Erklärung annimmt, etwas absolut Unerklärliches. Er nahm einen der kleinen achteckigen Tische, die im Zimmer umherstanden, und stellte ihn vors Feuer, mit zwei Füßen auf den Kaminteppich. Auf diesen Tisch stellte er den Mechanismus. Dann zog er einen Stuhl heran und setzte sich. Der einzige andere Gegenstand auf dem Tische war eine kleine Lampe mit Lampenschirm, deren helles Licht voll auf das Modell fiel. Außerdem standen vielleicht ein Dutzend Kerzen umher, zwei davon in Messingleuchtern auf dem Kaminsims, und mehrere in Wandleuchtern, so daß das Zimmer glänzend erleuchtet war. Ich saß in einem niedrigen Sessel, dem Feuer am nächsten, und zog ihn soweit vor, daß ich fast zwischen dem Zeitreisenden und dem Kamin zu sitzen kam. Filby saß hinter ihm und sah ihm über die Schulter. Der Arzt und der Bürgermeister aus der Provinz beobachteten ihn im Profil von rechts, der Psychologe von links. Der sehr junge Mann stand hinter dem Psychologen. Wir waren alle auf dem Quivive. Es scheint mir unglaublich, daß uns unter diesen Bedingungen ein noch so fein ersonnener und noch so geschickt ausgeführter Streich gespielt werden konnte.

Der Zeitreisende sah erst uns an und dann den Mechanismus. »Nun?« sagte der Psychologe.

»Dieses kleine Ding«, sagte der Zeitreisende, indem er die Ellenbogen auf den Tisch stützte und über dem Apparat die Hände zusammendrückte, »ist nur ein Modell. Es ist mein Entwurf zu einer Maschine, um durch die Zeit zu reisen. Sie werden bemerken, daß es seltsam verquer aussieht und diese Welle dort sonderbar funkelt, gleichsam als wäre sie irgendwie unreal.« Er zeigte den Teil mit dem Finger. »Auch ist hier ein kleiner weißer Hebel und dort noch einer.«

Der Arzt stand aus seinem Stuhle auf und sah sich das Ding an. »Es ist wundervoll gearbeitet«, sagte er.

»Die Arbeit daran hat zwei Jahre gedauert«, erwiderte der Zeitreisende. Dann, als wir alle dem Beispiel des Arztes gefolgt waren, sagte er: »Jetzt möchte ich, daß Sie mich klar dahin verstehen: wenn ich diesen Hebel hinüberdrücke, so gleitet die Maschine in die Zukunft fort, und dieser Hebel kehrt die Bewegung um. Dieser Sattel ist der Sitz eines Zeitreisenden. Ich werde den Hebel gleich drücken, und die Maschine wird losgehen, Ich werde verschwinden, in die Zukunft gehen und fort sein. Sehen Sie das Ding gut an. Sehen Sie auch den Tisch an und überzeugen sich, daß kein Betrug geschieht. Ich will nicht dieses Modell verlieren und mir nachher nachsagen lassen, ich sei ein Quacksalber.«

Es trat eine Pause von vielleicht einer Minute ein. Der Psychologe schien mich anreden zu wollen, aber er gab seine Absicht auf. Dann streckte der Zeitreisende den Finger gegen den Hebel aus. »Nein«, sagte er plötzlich, »lassen Sie mir Ihre Hand.« Und er wandte sich dem Psychologen zu und nahm dessen Hand in seine und sagte ihm, er solle den Zeigefinger ausstrecken. So schickte der Psychologe selber das Modell der Zeitmaschine auf seine endlose Reise. Wir alle sahen den Hebel sich drehen. Ich bin absolut sicher, daß kein Betrug vorlag. Es entstand ein Windhauch, und die Lampe flackerte auf. Eine der Kerzen auf dem Kaminsims wurde ausgeblasen, und die kleine Maschine drehte sich plötzlich, wurde undeutlich, war vielleicht eine Sekunde lang wie ein Geist zu sehen, wie ein Wirbel schwach glitzernden Messings und Elfenbeins; und sie war fort – verschwunden. Abgesehen von der Lampe, war der Tisch leer.

Alle schwiegen eine Minute lang. Dann sagte Filby, er ließe sich hängen.

Der Psychologe erholte sich aus seiner Erstarrung und blickte plötzlich unter den Tisch. Da lachte der Zeitreisende heiter. »Nun?« sagte er mit einer Reminiszenz an den Psychologen. Dann stand er auf, ging zum Tabakkrug auf dem Kaminsims und begann sich, uns den Rücken zugekehrt, seine Pfeife zu stopfen.

Wir starrten einander an. »Hören Sie«, sagte der Arzt, »ist das Ihr Ernst? Meinen Sie im Ernst, daß diese Maschine in die Zeit gereist ist?«

»Sicherlich«, sagte der Zeitreisende und bückte Sich, um einen Fidibus am Feuer anzuzünden. Dann wandte er sich um, während er die Pfeife anzündete, und sah dem Psychologen ins Gesicht. (Der Psychologe wollte zeigen, daß er nicht aus den Angeln gehoben war, nahm sich eine Zigarre und versuchte, sie unbeschnitten anzuzünden.) »Noch mehr – ich habe da hinten« – er zeigte nach dem Laboratorium – »eine große Maschine fast fertig, und wenn sie zusammengesetzt ist, denke ich selber eine Reise zu machen.«

»Sie wollen sagen, die Maschine sei in die Zukunft gewandert?« sagte Filby.

»In die Zukunft oder die Vergangenheit – wohin, weiß ich nicht sicher.«

Nach einer Pause hatte der Psychologe eine Inspiration. »Sie muß in die Vergangenheit gewandert sein, wenn sie irgendwohin gewandert ist,« sagte er.

»Warum?« sagte der Zeitreisende.

»Weil ich annehme, daß sie sich im Raum nicht bewegt hat, und wenn sie in die Zukunft gewandert wäre, würde sie noch immer hier sein, weil sie diese Zeit hätte durchwandern müssen.«

»Aber«, sagte ich, »wenn sie in die Vergangenheit gewandert wäre, hätte sie zu sehen sein müssen, als wir in dieses Zimmer kamen, und letzten Donnerstag, als wir hier waren, und den Donnerstag davor und so fort.«

»Ernste Einwände«, bemerkte der Bürgermeister aus der Provinz mit einer Miene der Unparteilichkeit, indem er sich zum Zeitreisenden wandte.

»Keine Spur«, sagte der Zeitreisende; und zum Psychologen: »Sie denken. Sie können das erklären. Es ist eine Wahrnehmung unter der Schwelle, wissen Sie, verflüchtigte Wahrnehmung.«

»Natürlich«, sagte der Psychologe und beruhigte uns. »Das ist etwas ganz Gewöhnliches in der Psychologie. Daran hätte ich denken sollen. Das ist einfach genug und hilft dem Paradoxen wundervoll. Wir können diese Maschine so wenig sehen und wahrnehmen, wie wir die Speiche eines wirbelnden Rades oder einer Kugel, die durch die Luft fliegt, sehen können. Wenn sie fünfzig oder hundertmal so schnell durch die Zeit wandert wie wir, wenn sie eine Minute durchläuft, während wir eine Sekunde durchlaufen, so wird der Eindruck, den sie macht, natürlich auch nur ein Fünfzigstel oder ein Hundertstel von dem sein, den sie machen würde, wenn sie nicht durch die Zeit wanderte. Das ist ganz klar.« Er fuhr mit der Hand durch den Raum, wo die Maschine gestanden hatte. »Sie sehen?« sagte er lachend.

Wir saßen eine Minute oder so und starrten den leeren Tisch an. Dann fragte uns der Zeitreisende, was wir von dem allen hielten.

»Heut abend klingt alles plausibel genug«, sagte der Arzt; »aber warten Sie bis morgen. Warten Sie auf den gesunden Menschenverstand des Morgens.«

»Möchten Sie die Zeitmaschine selber sehen?« fragte der Zeitreisende. Und zugleich nahm er die Lampe und führte uns den langen Gang zu seinem Laboratorium hinunter. Ich erinnere mich lebhaft des flackernden Lichts, seines wunderlichen, breiten Kopfes in der Silhouette, des Schattentanzes, als wir ihm alle folgten, verwirrt, aber ungläubig, und wie wir dort im Laboratorium eine größere Ausgabe des kleinen Mechanismus erblickten, den wir vor unseren Augen hatten verschwinden sehen. Teile waren aus Nickel, Teile aus Elfenbein und andere waren ohne Frage aus Felskristall geschliffen und geschnitten. Die Maschine war ziemlich fertig, nur die gewundenen Kristallwellen lagen noch unvollendet auf der Bank neben einigen Zeichnungen, und ich nahm eine in die Hand, um sie besser zu betrachten. Es schien Quarz zu sein.

»Hören Sie«, sagte der Arzt, »ist es Ihnen wirklich Ernst? Oder ist es ein Trick – wie der Geist, den Sie uns vergangene Weihnachten zeigten?«

»Auf der Maschine«, sagte der Zeitreisende und hielt die Lampe hoch, »will ich die Zeit erforschen. Ist das klar? Es ist mir in meinem ganzen Leben nie mehr Ernst gewesen.«

Keiner von uns wußte recht, wie er es nehmen sollte.

Ich begegnete über der Schulter des Arztes Filbys Auge, und er blinzelte mir feierlich zu.